US3204741A - Consumable key vending system - Google Patents

Consumable key vending system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3204741A
US3204741A US29765263A US3204741A US 3204741 A US3204741 A US 3204741A US 29765263 A US29765263 A US 29765263A US 3204741 A US3204741 A US 3204741A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
key
means
vending
portion
switch
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
James A Maxwell
James M Heath
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
MAXWELL AG
Original Assignee
MAXWELL AG
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F7/00Mechanisms actuated by objects other than coins to free or to actuate vending, hiring, coin or paper currency dispensing or refunding apparatus
    • G07F7/02Mechanisms actuated by objects other than coins to free or to actuate vending, hiring, coin or paper currency dispensing or refunding apparatus by keys or other credit registering devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/30Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices
    • G06Q20/34Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices using cards, e.g. integrated circuit [IC] cards or magnetic cards
    • G06Q20/343Cards including a counter
    • G06Q20/3433Cards including a counter the counter having monetary units

Description

P 1965 J. A. MAXWELL ETAL 3,204,741

CONSUMABLE KEY VENDING SYSTEM 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 25, 1963 INVENTORS JAM ES M. HEATH BY JAMES A. MAXWELL ATTORNEY Sept. 7, 1965 J. A. MAXWELL ETAL 3,204,741

CONSUMABLE KEY VENDING SYSTEM Filed July 25, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS JAMES M. HEATH BY JAMES A. MAXWELL ATTORNEY p 7, 1965 J. A. MAXWELL ETAL 3,204,741

CONSUMABLE KEY VENDING SYSTEM Filed July 25, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 MS-ll MS-9 MS-7 MS-5 MS-3 MS-l MS-IO MS-8 /o o o INVENTORS JAMES M. HEATH Y JAMES A. MAXWELL g. LNLML ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,204,741 CONSUMABLE KEY VENDING SYSTEM James A. Maxwell, Fremont, and James M. Heath, Sunnyvale, Califi; said Heath assignor to said Maxwell Filed July 25, 1963, Ser. No. 297,652 9 Claims. (Cl. 1944) This invention relates to improved vending devices and, more particularly, to a vending system utilizing a key card to operate a vending device instead of the usual coins or tokens, which key card is partially consumed in payment for the merchandise delivered by the vending device.

With the continued drive towards automation and the resulting decrease in cost of labor, vending machines and self-service stores are in common use today in which articles of merchandise are stocked in a vending machine. The variety of articles of merchandise which may be so d spensed is limitless and ranges from the conventional clgarette package and soft drink bottle machines to electronic tubes and other highly specialized components. Additionally, vending machines are also utilized to dispense services such as the washing or drying of clothes in corn operated washing machines or dry cleaning machmes, to mention just a few. Other types of machines falling in the class of self service systems which we included herein in the broad category of vending devices are parking meters, airplane ticket dispensers and the like. Qne common feature possessed by all prior art self service or vending devices is that coins of certain designatrons or special tokens are required to operate them and which constitute payment for the merchandise delivered or services rendered.

Because of the necessity for either inserting coins or purchasing special tokens, all prior art devices have certam common characteristics which limit their usefulness, acceptability and convenience of operation in a number of ways. The first limiting characteristic is that the article of merchandise dispensed or the services rendered by such machines is usually priced so that payment by change COlIlS is feasible. Few dispensing machines in use today offer articles or services which are over fifty cents. The reason therefore is, of course, that the average purchaser generally carries only a small amount of ready change in his pocket. Coin machines dispensing articles worth several dollars are virtually unknown since the requirement for that large an amount of change is impractical. Even though the number of coins used in most of the machines is few, many sales are lost because a prospective purchaser does not have the required change in his pocket and no means of conveniently and readily obtaining the same.

Another limiting characteristic of the conventional coin vending machine is the amount charged for the articles of merchandise purchased or services rendered which must usually be increased to the nearest five cent step so that the number of different coins used is kept at a minimum. For example, a package of cigarettes may be locally available at twenty-six cents but if placed in a conventional vending machine, the same package will usually be dis pensed for thirty cents. Such overcharge leads to general dissatisfaction with conventional vending devices which has been sought to be overcome, in the case of a package of cigarettes, by inserting pennies into its cellophane wrapper. However, the preparing of specially packaged goods With coins therein has become a rare occurrence because of the added expense involved and the 3,ZM,741 Patented Sept. 7, 1965 need for adopting the number of coins inserted to local and fluctuating requirements.

No vending device known heretofore was able to charge a proper price for the merchandise or services dispensed if the cost thereof involved fractional parts of cents or even integral number of cents. For example, in stamp vending machines it was quite common to purchase either four one-cent stamps for five cents, involving a surcharge of 25%, or three three-cent stamps for ten cents, involving only a surcharge of 11%. Potentially, such a difference in the surcharges is dictated by coin and not by profit considerations and is unfair, but there is no practical way of equalizing the surcharge on such purchases It is therefore a primary object of this invention to provide a vending system which does not require coins or tokens which charges a proper price including fractions of a cent, and which is capable of dispensing valuable merchandise worth many dollars.

It is another object of this invention to provide a vending system which dispenses articles of merchandise or renders services in response to being operated by a key card which is being consumed in proportion to the merchandise received or services rendered.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a vending system in which the price of the commodity or service may be computed without reference to the integral denomination of coins.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a dispenser which will operate in response to a selected card-shaped key which may be carried on ones person.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a vending device ideally suitable for the dispensing of commodities or the rendering of services without regard to amount of cost and therefore may be used where merchandise or services cost very large or small, or even fractional sums of money.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a vending system which obviates the necessity for the requirement of coins or tokens and which is simple, economical, and substantially tamper-proof.

It is still further an object of this invention to provide a vending device in which a large number of different commodities having different prices, may be stored for dispensing according to ones selection and in which payment is made in accordance with the selected commodity.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide a vending system, and method therefor, which is operated in response to a card-type key which is consumed in proportion to the cost of the commodity selected or service rendered and in which substantially no regard need to be paid to the cost of the individual item dispensed, or the cost diiferential between the various items or services offered.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a vending system which may be restricted to a selected group of users so that special discount prices may be restrictively available.

It is also an object of this invention to provide improved vending systems which obsolete the need for coins or tokens, which permit the vending of high priced commodities and which also permit the charging of a cost entirely dependent on economic considerations and independent of the fact that the item is machine vended.

It is also an object of this invention to relieve employees who make the rounds to fill and/or service vending 3 machines from having to bundle coins or from the temptation of pilferage by providing a vending system which requires no coins.

It is also an object of this invention to have customers prepay for the goods they intend to purchase and thereby increase the cash flow of the vending machine operators.

It is also an object of this invention to do away with the necessity for customers to have coins on hand at all times in view of the already serious shortage of coins.

Briefly, the vending device of this invention utilizes a card which includes indicia for identification which coact with a recognition system in the vending machine. The card is inserted into the vending machine and if the identification is proper the vending machine will cut off a portion of the length of the card, the length cut off being directly proportional to the price of the commodity dispensed or services rendered.

The consuming mechanism which may be in the form of a knife is actuated after selection is made for a particular commodity, which selection determines the position of the knife so that the proper amount of card is consumed. As soon as the commodity is dispensed the card may be withdrawn and reinserted for additional purchases.

Other objects and a better understanding of this invention may be had by reference to the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the operative portion of the vending system of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a top View of an embodiment of a consumable key card utilized in practicing this invention;

FIG. 3 is an end view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a side view of the key card of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a front view of the vending device shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the vending device shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged front view of the scan-tumbler assembly shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a View taken along line 88 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic electrical diagram for the scanning tumbler assembly of FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 is a diagrammatic wiring and switching diagram showing the control mechanism of the device of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 11 is a programmer which operates a portion of the control system shown in FIG. 10.

Referring now to the drawing, in which like reference characters indicate like parts, there is shown by way of example an embodiment of the consumable key vending system and generally designated by reference character 20. Vending system operates in response to a spe cially constructed vending key 22, also referred to as a vending card, which is inserted into the vending device through a slot 24 located in a front panel 25 which forms a portion of an outer enclosure or cabinet of vending device 20.

The internal operating mechanism of vending device 20 includes a vending key indexing and locking means 32 which locks vending card 22 securely in its proper operating position and prevents its premature withdrawal, a scanning vending key tumbler means 50 for checking the authenticity of vending card 22 and for determining the active or remaining consumable length, and a vending key consuming means 52 for cutting a selected length of the end portion of vending card 22 to thereby consume key 22 in accordance with the monetary value of goods or services selected.

There is also provided a programming and switching means 54, diagrammatically shown in FIG. 10, for properly sequencing the various operations such as the selection of goods or services, locking card 22 in place, scanning card 22 by tumbler means 50, cutting card 22 by consuming means 52, releasing the goods or services selected, and releasing card 22. Programming and switching means 54 is readied to commence its sequencing operation in response to the closing of a switch SA forming a part of operation commencing means 26 and the depressing of a selection button such as 105.

Operation commencing means 26 may be constructed in the form of a single-pole single-throw switch enclosed in a housing 27 mounted to the back of front panel 25 and below insertion slot 24, by conventional means such as fastening screws 30. The movable contact of switch SA of commencing means 26 is connected to springloaded pivoted arm 28 positioned in such a manner that insertion of vending card 22 through slot 24 rotates arm 28 against spring pressure to close switch SA.

Indexing and locking means 32 includes a solenoid operated index plate 36 which may be springlocked and which controls the switching state of a switch SB. Means 32 may be mounted to the inner surface of front panel 25 above slot 24 by means of fastening screws 40 to hold the same securely in position. Indexing and locking means 32 also includes a solenoid SL-l, indicated as 34, mounted thereto by means of screws 42. The movable solenoid element is coupled to springloaded index plate 36 which is pivotally mounted for rotation about a pivot pin 35 and which is normally in the up position shown by dotted outline as 37. Indexing and locking means 32 also includes a triple-pole single-throw switch SB operated by index plate 36. Switch SB is normally open when the index plate is in the position shown at 37 and closed when the index plate is in the position shown at 36. As will become better understood hereinafter, index plate 36, upon actuation of solenoid SL-l, moves downward to lock vending card 22 securely into its proper operating position to prevent its withdrawal.

Vending key 22, as best seen in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, defines three separate portions 43, 44 and 45 along its length each of which performs an important function. The lefthand portion 43 performs the function of a handle or grip for the hand holding of vending key 22 for insertion into slot 24 and is conventionally plain. The center portion 44 is also conventionally plain and has a length which is carefully selected for cooperation with the position of index plate 36 of indexing and locking means 32 so that key 22 may be properly indexed and positioned for the subsequent cutting of the consumable portion of key 22. The right-hand portion 45 is provided with key ridges and represents the consumable portion of key 22 so that its remaining length represents the remaining monetary value of key 22. Key 22 is generally of one .piece construction and is preferably made of a plastic material such as one ordinarily employed for conventional credit cards or the like.

Center portion 44 is separated from handle portion 43 by a square shoulder 46 which, upon insertion of key 22 into slot 24, seats against the outer surface of front panel 25 to thereby provide an indexing means which determines the proper degree of insertion of key 22 into device 20. Unless card 22 is fully inserted into device 20, so that shoulder 46 bears upon the front surface of panel 25, vending device 20 will not operate because index plate 36 cannot move downwards to close switch SB. Center portion 44 is separated from consumable portion 45 by the end faces 48 of a plurality of lengthwise key ridges 47 which extend all along its consumable length. As index plate 36 moves downwards, it seats itself behind end faces 48 to thereby lock card 22 against withdrawal and at the same time closes switch SB.

Key ridges 48 are selected in number and in position to define a unique combination of longitudinal ridges and valleys along key 22. Even though key ridges 47 are. shown only on one side of vending key 22, it is within thecontemplation of this invention to utilize such ridges on both sides if a larger number of unique combinations, than obtainable with ridges on one side only, if desired Also, instead of, or in addition to outwardly depending key ridges, inwardly extending key grooves may be utilized for the same purpose as the ridges. Generally speaking, a transverse section of consumable portion 45 is in the nature of a key having a unique contour to actuate tumblers as will presently be described.

By way of example, if the width of key 22 is selected of sufiicient width to accommodate twelve key ridges 47, then the different combinations possible, by selecting different placement and number of key ridges, is 4,096.

The length of center portion 44 is selected such that when key 22 is fully inserted into slot 24 and index plate 36 is moved downwards to seat upon the upper surface of key 22, edge 38 of index plate 36 engages the flat terminating end portions 48 of key ridges 47 as best seen in FIG. 6. If center portion 44 is to long, key 22 can move back and forth and cannot properly be cut, and if too short, index plate 36 cannot move to its required low position to close switch SB. Accordingly, in the position shown in FIG. 6, card 22 is held securely against withdrawal and is properly indexed for scanning and for cutting.

Scanning vending key tumbler means 50 comprises a frame 60 lengthwise movable along consumable portion 45 of key 22 between an initial position indicated at 60 and an end-of-scan position indicated at 61 in. dotted outline, means for horizontally moving frame 60, a tumbler carriage 62 vertically movable in frame 60 between the position indicated at 62 and the scanning position indicated at 63 by dotted outline, and means for vertically moving carriage 62 between positions 62 and 63.

Movable frame 60 comprises a lower horizontal member 64, an upper horizontal member 65, and a pair of vertically disposed cylindrical bearing shafts 66 and 67 rigidly connecting members 64 and 65 and providing bearing guides for vertically movable tumbler carriage 62. Lower member 64 engages a lead screw 68 on the right hand side, as viewed in FIG. 5, and a corresponding guide bar 69 on the left hand side which movably support frame 60 for motion along the length of card 22. Of course, in practicing this invention, additional guides may be provided to prevent frame 60 from skewing or binding as it moves back and forth.

Lead screw 68 and guide bar 69 are end supported by brackets 71 and 72 mounted upon a support base 73 to which front panel 25 may also be connected. Guide bar 69 may be rigidly supported whereas lead screw 68 is rotatably mounted. The rear end of lead screw 68 is coupled through a suitable coupling means (not shown), which may include a gear reduction box, to a reversible scanning motor 70 also referred to as motor M-2. As motor 70 is energized, lead screw 68 rotates to thereby move frame 60 either forward or backward in accordance with the motors direction of rotation.

Mounted to upper horizontal member 65 is a solenoid SL-2, shown at 74, by means of a mounting bracket 75. The moving element 74a of solenoid 74 is connected, through a suitable opening in member 65, to carriage 62 to actuate its vertical motion in accordance with the state of solenoid 74. Carriage 62 is constructed in the form of a horizontal member having guide sleeves 76 and 77 at opposite ends which respectively engage vertical guide shafts 66 and 67.

Solenoid 74 may be of the type which, in its normal position, has its movable element 74a in the up-position and which when actuated drives its movable element downwards to lower tumbler carriage 62 upon card 22. This is normally accomplished by springloading movable element 74a to overcome the gravitational forces acting on tumbler carriage 62. In the alternative, sole- FIGS. 7 and 8. Each microswitch 78 has a contact finger 79 which, when tumbler carriage 62 is in its scanning position, bears against key 22 and senses the presence or absence of a key ridge 47 on card 22. More particularly, when contact finger 79 encounters a key ridge 47, it assumes one state and in the absence of a key ridge 47 it assumes or remains in the other state.

The lower surface of carriage 62 may also be provided with a pair of inclined outer wings 80 and 81 for centering vending key 22 by engaging edges 82 and 83 of consumable portion 45 respectively. Their wings may be inclined or canted to prevent binding when carriage 62 scans. There may also be provided one or more guides 84 for engaging corresponding guide grooves 85 in card 22. Guides 84 assure the proper lateral positioning of carriage 62 with respect to card 22 at all times as frame 60 travels and allows the tumblers (microswitches 78) to scan key 22. Additionally, guides 84 apply pressure to.

the card to urge the same firmly against the upper surface of lower horizontal member 64 of movable frame 60. The actual number of microswitches 78 carried by carriage 62 depends on the maximum number of key ridges to be utilized for forming the desired number of combinations, there being provided normally one tumbler (microswitch) for each possible ridge.

Referring now to FIG. 9 there is shown, by way of example, an embodiment of a suitable tumbler circuit for sensing the authenticity of a twelve key ridgecard 22. The twelve microswitches carried by carriage 62 have been designated by a sequence of reference characters MSl through MS12. A source of switching power, indicated at 86, is connected to one pole of the first microswitch MS-l through lead 87. One pole of the last microswitch MS12 in the sequence is connected, through lead 88, to one side of a relay 89, the other side of which is connected to ground. Relay 89 controls the switching state of a switch SC indicated at 90 which is normally open.

All microswitches MS-l through MS-12 are connected in series in such a manner that when encountering a preselected combination of key ridges, switching power is applied from source 86 to relay 89 to close switch SC. For example, if the preselected combination is the absence of key ridges from the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 7th, 9th, 10th, and 12th space on key 22, and the presence of key ridges on the 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 11th space, microswitches MS-l to MS12 are interconnected as shown, i.e., the series connection is made by connecting diflerent poles of a switch encountering a ridge and the same pole of a switch not encountering a ridge to adjacent switches in the sequence.

Motor M-2 shown at 70 turns lead screw 68 in a forward direction to move tumbler carriage 62 forward towards the end of key 22 upon closure of a switch S-2 for scanning until the end of key 22 is reached. As will be explained in connection with programming and switching means 54, the end of key 22 is being sensed by those microswitches which encounter the key ridges. When the end of key 22 is reached during scan, switch SC opens just as if a defective key were encountered. Upon closure of a switch S-5 motor M-2 turns lead screw 68 in the reverse direction to return frame 60 to its initial or starting position.

Vending card cutting or consuming means 52 comprises a guillotine 92, also referred to as knife support, having a downwardly movable blade or knife 97 whose motion is controlled by a solenoid SL-3 shown at 96. Guillotine 92 is lengthwise movably supported upon support plate 73 by engaging a lead screw 93 and a bearing shaft 95 both of which are mounted upon support plate 73 by brackets 71 and 72 or the like in the manner explained in connection with movable frame 60. As indicated before, the illustrated mode of support of guillotine 92 is merely schematic and superior mechanical supports, if desired, are readily available.

Lead screw 93 is rotat-ably mounted in brackets 71 and has one of its ends coupled, either directly or through a suitable gear box, to a reversible motor M3 shown at 94. Guillotine 92 is moved by rotation of lead screw 93 in such a manner that when motor 94 is actuated in a forward direction, knife support 92 moves towards the card and when motor 94 is reversed, it moves away from the card. As Will be explained hereinafter, motor 94 is actuated for motion in a forward direction by the closure of a switch S-3 and is reversed by the closure of a switch S-4.

Mounted upon knife support 92 is solenoid SL3 indicated at 96 which has its movable element coupled to cutting knife 97 and which is norm-ally in its up position. When solenoid 96 is actuated its movable element moves downwards and pushes cutting knife 97 against key 22 to partially consume the same by cutting off a piece of the card. Solenoid 96 is selected to exert sufiicient down ward force upon cutting blade 97 to cut card 22 when energized. Solenoid 96 may have its moving element spring loaded in the upward direction to compensate for its own weight and that of blade 97.

To properly position guillotine 92 for cutting off a portion of card 22, as will hereinafter be explained in detail, .three switches SE, SF, and SG, indicated at 99, 98, and 205, respectively, are rigidly mounted thereto. Bach switch 98, 99 and 205 is provided with a whisker or feeler arm 100, 101, and 206, respectively, which controls its switching state. When the whisker makes contact with an object against which it is urged, itchanges the switching state of the switch. In the embodiment here illustrated, switches 98, 99, and 205 close when whiskers 100, 101, and 206 are urged against the rear surface of horizontal members 64, the fiat end portion of key 22, and the rear surface of a member 107 mounted on the bracket holding solenoid 34. Whiskers 100 and 101 are so spaced that switch 98 closes before switch 99 when scanning means 50 has found key 22 authentic and undamaged. If scanning means 50 does not scan the whole card, it comes to rest before reaching the end of the card and consequently whisker 101 closes switch 99 before whisker 100 reaches frame 64. Switches 98 and 99 are so interconnected that when switch 99 closes first it deact-ivates the cutting and dispensing means so as to release the card without vending goods or services. Whisker 206 and element 107 are so spaced that switch 205 closes when there is an insuflicient length of the consumable portion of card 22 left to pay for the purchase before either switches 98 or 99 close.

If switch 98 properly closes first, motor 94 continues to drive guillotine 97 forward until switch 99 closes. Accordingly, the distance between actuation of switches 98 and 99 is selected to be as short as possible to assure maximum accuracy. As will be explained hereinafter, switch 98 trips a relay RY5 which may incorporate a variable time delay to reflect the price of a selected piece of merchandise so that it cuts off motor M-3 at a time when knife edge 97 is in the proper position for consuming a portion of key 22 commensurate with the monetary value of the item selected for purchase by means of selector buttons.

The operation of vending device 20 will now be explained in connection with programming and sequencing means 54 shown in FIGS. and 11. Key 22 is inserted into slot 24 to rotate arm 28 of operation commencing means 26 to close switch SA and to thereby initiate the first step of the sequencing cycles which is the application of operating power from a source 110 .to an input lead 111. The card is inserted all the way into slot 24 until its shoulder 46 rests firmly against the front surface of front panel 25. For indicating that power is applied to lead 111, an indicator light 112 may be connected into the circuit (between lead 111 and ground) to advise a customer that it is time for making a manual selection of goods desired. This selection is made by depressing a suitable select-ion switch such as 105 or 106 which also initiate all remaining steps of the automating sequence to be described.

Selection switches and 106 are representative of a plurality of switches for making a desired selection of goods or services. Each selection switch is mechanically or electrically interlocked With all other selection switches and may take the form of a double pole, single-throw, spring-loaded push button as indicated at S'P1 and SP-Z in FIG. 10 having two sections (a) and (b). Section (a) is wired to one side of a latching relay such as RY1 and RY2 and section (b) is connected .to lead 114 to apply power from source to lead 116 through a normally closed switch 115.

Lead 116 is connected to solenoid SL1 (of indexing and locking means 32) and actuates the same to lower index plate 36 to lock card 22 and to close triple-pole single-throw switch SB having sections (a), (b) and (c). Closure of switch SB accomplishes the following results: section (11) connects lead 114 directly to lead 111 so that when the selected push button switch is released (and its (b) section opens) power continues to be applied to solenoid SL-l; section (b) completes the circuit of the relay associa-ted'with the depressed selection switch, say SP-l to ground thereby closing and latching its associated double-pole, single-throw switch SD-l; section (0) starts operation of a timing or sequencing motor M-l.

Subsequent release of the chosen selection switch SP- 1) has no further effect on means 54 since closure of the (a) section of switch SB now applies power directly to solenoid SL1 and since the selected relay RY-1 is now latched only to open when reset by the application of a resetting signal.- A resetting signal is applied to relays RY-l and RY-2 by source 110 through a switch S6 forming part of a motor driven commutator 122 but for the sake of simplicity is not shown since it is well known that latching relays may be set by the application of a resetting signal.

Timing motor M1 forms a part of a motorized commutator means 122 also referred to as programmer. Commutator means 122 comprises, as best seen in FIG. 11, a commutator plate 119 and a contact carrier 120 which are sup-ported for relative rotation with respect to one another about an axis 121 to motor M-1. Carrier 120 is provided with seven contacts C-1 through C-7 which are spaced to cooperate with contacts mounted upon plate 119 and respectively designated S-1 through 5-7. In effect, if contact C-1 rides over contact S1, a circuit closes and the combination of G l and 8-1 is simply referred to as switch S1 and is so illustrated in FIG. 10. Each of the seven switches of programmer 122 close at a predetermined time during a cycle and remain closed for a time determined by the length of arc of the contacts on plate 119.

The first switch of commutator means 122 to close is S1 which applies power, from lead 116, to solenoid SL-2 to lower tumbler carriage 62 upon active portion 45 of key 22.- If the combination of ridges 47 of key 22 is correct for the particular tumbler circuit, power is applied to relay 89 to close a switch SC there'by readying the circuit containing switch S2 for applying power to scan motor M-2. A very short time interval after the closure of switch S-l, switch S-2 is closed and, providing the proper card was inserted which closed switch SC, power is applied to motor M2 to move frame 60 towards the end of key 22 to scan the same along its length. This scanning action continues until switch SC opens due to encounter with a damaged portion of key 22 or, of course, when reaching the end of key 22. The arc length of contact 8-2 is selected sufiiciently long so that frame 60 can scan the longest possible card 22.

After frame 60 has come to a stop, switches S1 and S2 open simultaneously and the opening of switch S1 returns tumbler carriage 62 to its normal up position. As programmer 1'22 continues its advance, switch S3 closes to actuate motor M-3 to move cutting means 52 towards the end of key 22. The forward motion of cutting means 52 stops only (as long as switch S-3 remains closed) when either relay RY-4 or RY-5 is activated, both of which are of the latching type. Relay RY-4 controls a double-pole single-throw switch SID-4 which has both sections (a) and (b) normally closed. Relay RY-S controls a triple-pole single-throw switch SD-S having two normally open sections (b) and (c) and one normally closed section (a).

Relay RY4 is actuated when switch SE closes before switch SF, an event which occurs when scanning means 50 come to rest before reaching the end of card 22 either because the tumbler means did not accept key 22 as valid and never started to scan or because the card was defective at some point terminating the scan prematurely. Relay RY-4 is also actuated when switch S6 closes before switch SE or SF closes, an event which occurs when cutting means 52 gets too close to the end of card 22 indicating there is not enough of the consumable portion left to pay for the purchase.

As switch SE or SG close first, power is applied through lead 111 to lead 124 connected to relay RY-4 opening both sections of switch SD-4. Section (a) of switch SD-4 opens the circuit to motor M-3 thereby stopping cutting means 52 from advancing any further, and section (b) disables lead 125, which controls the dispensing circuit (not shown), by disconnecting relay RY-5 from the power circuit. In this case, programmer 122 proceeds as will be explained hereinafter.

If switch SF closes before switch SE or SG, indicating a properly scanned and accepted key 22 of sufiicient length to pay for the purchase, the subsequent closure of switch SE (switch SG remains open) applies power through section (a) of selected switch SD-l to lead 126. Application of power to lead 126 actuates relay RY-5 through section (b) of switch SD-4 thereby opening sec tion (a) of switch SD-S to bring motor M-3 to rest, closing section (0) to actuate solenoid SL-S to cut key 22 and closing section (b) to dispense the goods or render the services selected. As soon as key 22 is cut, switch SE opens because whisker 101 is released. This removes power from solenoid SL-3 and knife 97 is retracted to its normal position.

Lead 125, which initiates the dispense operation, performs in conjunction with the initial selection made which is reflected by the closed section (b) of switch SD-l. Accordingly, the selection made depends on the particular selection switch SD initially depressed and the signal for dispensing the selected item is provided on lead 125.

In operation, card 22 is inserted into slot 24 and firmly pushed in as far as it will go until shoulder 46 bears against panel 25. Insertion of the vending card closes switch SA causing indicator light 112 to light up. Thereafter the customer makes his selection by depressing one of the selector buttons, say SP1.

Pushing in of selector button SP4 disables all other selector buttons through a conventional interlocking circuit, and energizes solenoid SL 1 which brings down index plate 36 to lock the card securely against withdrawal. As index plate 36 assumes the locking position, it closes switch SB which latches relay RY-l to close switch SD- l and also starts operation of motorized programmer 122 of programming and switching means 54 by applying power to motor M-l.

As soon as motorized programmer advances to close switch S-1, solenoid SL-2 is energized which lowers tumbler carriage 62 upon the consumable portion of key 22 to check its authenticity. If key 22 is found authentic, the tumbler assembly closes switch SC which closes the circuit between switch S2 and motor M-2 for rotating head screw 68 to move frame 60 towards the rear of card 22. A very short instant later, motorized programmer 122 advances to close switch S2 to apply power to motor M2 through switch SC to scan the length of key 22. If the card had not been found authentic,

10 switch SC would have remained open and motor M2 would have remained without power so that frame 60 would have remained stationary.

As soon as the end of card 22 is reached, or if card 22 is found defective during scan, switch SC opens to open the circuit to motor M2 and stops further scanning motion of frame 60. At the end of the time interval alloted to scanning, motorized programmer 122 opens switches S-1 to de-energizesolenoid SL-2 so that tumbler carriage 62 is returned to its up position. Switch 8-2 is also opened to disconnect power to switch SC which of course is by that time in its open position.

Motorized programmer 122 in its advance then closes switch 8-3 which applies power to the circuit of motor M4: to move vending card cutting means 52 towards frame 60. The motion of means 52 is stopped upon closure of switch SE which happens when whisker 1M encounters the end of card 22. There are three different situations which may be encountered by the moving vending card cutting means 52 which are as follows: Situation I is where the card is of a sufficient length to pay for the purchase made and is authentic so that scanning means 50 comes to rest at the end of the card; situation 11 is where the card is not authentic and therefore scanning means 50 either never moved or came to rest before reaching the end of card 22; and situation III is where there is insufficient length remaining in card 22 to pay for the purchase.

In situation I, since the spacing bet-ween whiskers 100 and 101 is carefully selected so that their distance is v slightly smaller than the distance between the end of card 22 and the end face of scanning member 64, switch SF closes first. Thereafter switch SE closes to actuate relay RY-S which stops the motion of cutting means 52 and actuates the cutting and dispensing signal as explained heretofore.

' In situation-II, switch SE closes to apply power to relay RY4 which stops further motion of cutting means 52 and disables both the dispensing signal and the cutting signal. Also it disables relay RY-S from being set. It is therefore of no moment whether there be a subsequent closure of switches SF or SG since relay RY-S is disabled. In situation IH, switch SG closes first so that when switch SE closes, relay RY-4 is energized to isolate relay RY-S from the circuit. To prevent both relays RY-4 and RY-5 being energized simultaneously, a situation which may occur where switch SG and SF both close before switch SE, it has been found convenient to utilize a slow relay for RY-5 and a fast relay for RY-4 so that the fast closing of relay RY4 disables relay RY-5 before the latter is latched.

After the above-explained operation, programmer 122 opens switch S-3 and closes switches S-4 and 8-5 simultaneously to respectively return cutting means 52 and scanning means 50 to their initial positions. Thereafter programmer 122 opens switches 84 and 8-5 and closes switch 8-6 which applies a resetting signal to relays RY-l, RY-4 (or RY-S) which also causes blade 97 to be raised to its initial position. Finally, programmer 122 closes switch S7 which releases relay RY-3 to remove power from solenoid SL-Il and to open switch SB. This in turn will cause motor M-1 to come to a stop and the system is returned to its initial position. The inertia of programmer 122 carries it just past the position to open switch 5-7 to thereby deactivate the entire system.

There has been described a consumable key vending system and method in which a consumable key is utilized for making purchases. The monetary value of a given length of vending card may be selected to fit the commodity vended or the services obtained independent of the value of coins or notes. The card itself carries with it some unique method of identification which may be in the nature of key ridges as described or some other means such as diffraction grating-type grooves which cooperate with a monochromatic light source and a cell angularly positioned to receive the diffracted pattern peaks. Likewise other types of recognition means may be employed such as wavy geometrical contours, resistive coatings of selected conductance, reflective pattern coatings, magnetic coating or magnets selectively positioned within the key. Additionally, instead of cutting card 22, the same may be punched or burned or consumed in some other manner.

What is claimed is:

1. A card-type consumable key for use with a vending device adapted to progressively consume the key in proportion to the monetary value of the commodity vended, said consumable key comprising: an elongated substantially flat member having a handle portion and a consumable portion at opposite ends thereof, said consumable portion being dimensioned for insertion into a vending device reception means and said handle portion including shoulder means for cooperation with the reception means to position the edge of said consumable portion opposite said handle portion in a predetermined position within said reception means, said consumable portion including a plurality of continuous key-type ridges parallel to the direction of elongation of said member and forming a unique recognition code for cooperation with a vending device sensing means adapted to check the authenticity of said member and to determine the remaining length of the consumable portion, said member also including a retaining shoulder for cooperation with a vending device locking means adapted to securely lock said member in said predetermined position.

2. A card-type consumable key for use with a vending device adapted to progressively consume said key in proportion to the monetary value of the commodity vended, said consumable key comprising: an elongated substantially flat member having a handle portion, a spacer portion and a consumable portion in that order, said spacer portion and said consumable portion being dimensioned for insertion into a vending device reception means, said consumable portion including a plurality of key-type ridges on at least one fiat side thereof and extending parallel to the direction of elongation of said member, said ridges being arranged to form a preselected recognition code for cooperation with a lengthwise scannable vending device code recognition means by which the authenticity of said member is checked and the remaining length of said consumable portion is determined, said handle portion including an indexing shoulder facing said consumable portion for cooperation with a vending device reception means to position the edge of the consumable portion adjacent said spacer portion at a predetermined position within said vending device reception means, and the inner end faces of said ridges forming a locking shoulder facing said handle portion for cooperation with a vending device locking means to securely lock said member in said predetermined position.

3. A vending device key which is progressively consumed as payment for commodities vended by a vending device which, in the order stated, receives the key, locks the key in a predetermined position, scans the key for its authenticity and for finding its leading edge, consumes a predetermined amount of the key, and dispenses a selected commodity, said vending device key comprising: a card-shaped elongated member including an end portion having a code in the form of a plurality of key-type ridges which are continuous and uniform along the direc tion of elongation for cooperation with a vending device code recognition means, said end portion defining a consumable portion terminating in a leading edge, said member also including a handle portion and a spacer portion for connecting said handle portion and said consumable portion, the edges of said consumable portion immediately adjacent said spacer portion defining an inner edge, said spacer portion and consumable portion being dimensioned for insertion into a vending device slot-type reception means, said handle including a forwardly facing shoulder cooperating with the vending device reception means to position said inner edge at a predetermined position within said vending device reception means and said ridges having a forwardly facing shoulder at said inner edge for cooperating with a vending device locking means to lock said member securely in said preselected position against withdrawal from said vending device reception means.

4. A. card-type consumable key for a vending device comprising: an elongated member having a handle portion, a spacer portion and a consumable portion in that order, said consumable portion being defined by recognition means extending between an inner edge and the end of said member and which is uniform and continuous along the direction of elongation of said member, said recognition means cooperating with a vending device sensing and scanning means by which the authenticity and the end of said member is determinable, said handle portion including a forward-facing shoulder means for engaging a vending device reception means, said spacer portion being of predetermined length so that when said card is inserted into the vending device reception means and said forwardfacing shoulder means engages the vending device reception means, said inner edge occupies a predetermined position within the vending device reception means, said spacer portion also including a rearward-facing shoulder means for engaging a vending device locking means to securely lock said card in said predetermined position.

5. A card-type consumable key for a vending device comprising: an elongated member having a handle por tion, a spacer portion and a consumable portion in that order, said consumable portion including a lengthwise scannable recognition means uniform and continuous along the direction of elongation by which the authenticity and the remaining length of said consumable portion is determinable, said handle means including a 'ilirwardfacing shoulder means for engaging a vending device reception means, said spacer portion being of predetermined length so that when said card is inserted into the vending device reception means and said forward-facing shoulder means engages the vending device reception means the adjoining edge of said consumable portion occupies a predetermined position defining the start-of-scan position of a vending device scanning means, said spacer portion including a rearward-facing shoulder means for engaging a vending device locking means to securely lock said card in place so that said adjoining edge is locked in said preselected position.

6. A vending device in which a selected commodity is vended in response to a key which is consumed in proportion to the monetary value of the selected commodity, said vending device comprising, in combination:

(a) a card-type key normally disposed outside said vending device, said key having a consumable end portion which is provided with a scannable code means extending between an inner and an outer edge for identification;

(b) reception means disposed on said vending device for receiving said key and for indexing said key so that the inner edge is in registry with a start-of-scan position;

(0) commodity selection means on said vending device for providing a selection signal and a locking signal in response to being actuated;

(d) locking means responsive to said locking signal for locking said key in said indexed position, said locking means including programming means for generating a sequence of timing signals;

(e) sensing and scanning means responsive to a first timing signal for checking the identification of said key, said sensing and scanning means moving across said consumable end portion only in the presence of an authentic key from the start-of-scan position to an end-of-scan position so that for a properly authenticated card the end-of-scan position coincides with the outer edge;

(f) consuming means responsive to a second timing signal and operative to consume a portion of said key and providing a vending signal when the endof-scan position coincides with the outer edge position; and

(g) vending means responsive to said selection signal and said vending signal for releasing said selected commodity.

7. A vending device in which a selected commodity is vended in response to a key which is consumed in proportion to the monetary value of the selected commodity, said vending device comprising, in combination:

(a) a card-type key normally disposed outside said vending device, said key having a consumable end portion which is provided with lengthwise key-type ridges extending between an inner and an outer edge for identification;

(b) reception means disposed on said vending device for receiving said key and for indexing said key so that the inner edge is in registry with a start-of-scan position;

(c) sensing means in said reception means for providing a ready signal upon reception of said key; ((1) commodity selection means on said vending device for providing a selection signal and a locking signal in response to being actuated during the occurrence of said ready signal;

(e) locking means responsive to said locking signal for locking said key in said indexed position, said locking means generating a programming signal when engaging said key;

(f) programming means responsive to said programming signal and operative to provide a sequence of timing signals; 7

(g) sensing and scanning means responsive to a first timing signal for checking the identification of said key, said sensing and scanning means moving across said consumable end portion only in the presence of an authentic key from the start-of-scan position to an end-of-scan position so that for a properly authenticated card the end-of-scan position coincides with the outer edge;

(h) consuming means responsive to a second timing signal, the outer edge position and the end-of-scan position and operative to sense coincidence of the end-of-scan position with the outer edge position for assurance that said key is authentic, said consuming means consuming a predetermined portion of said key and providing a vending signal when finding an authentic key; and

(i) vending means responsive to said selection signal and said vending signal for releasing said selected commodity.

8. A vending device in which a selected commodity is vended in response to a key which is consumed in proportion to the monetary value of the selected commodity, said vending device comprising, in combination:

(a) a card-type key normally disposed outside said vending device, said key having a consumable end portion which is provided with lengthwise key-type ridges extending between an inner and an outer edge for identification;

(b) reception means disposed on said vending device for receiving said key and for indexing said key so that the inner edge is in registry with a start-of-scan position;

(c) sensing means in said reception means for providing a ready signal upon reception of said key;

(d) commodity selection means on said vending device for providing a selection signal and a locking signal in response to being actuated during the occurrence of said ready signal;

(e) locking means responsive to said locking signal for locking said key in said indexed position, said locking means generating a programming signal when engaging said key;

(f) programming means responsive to said programming signal and operative to provide a sequence of timing signals;

(g) sensing and scanning means responsive to a first timing signal for checking the identification of said key, said sensing and scanning means moving across said consumable end portion only in the presence of an authentic key from the start-of-scan position to an end-of-scan position so that for a properly authenticated card the end-of-scan position coincides with the outer edge;

(h) consuming means responsive to a second timing signal, the inner edge position, the outer edge position, and the end-of-scan position, said consuming means first sensing the distance between the inner edge position and the outer edge position for assurance that there is a sutficient portion of said consumable end portion remaining for purchasing the selected commodity and thereafter sensing the endof-scan position and the outer edge position for assurance that said key is authentic, said consuming means cutting ofi a predetermined portion of said key and providing a vending signal when finding a sufficient portion and an authentic key; and

(i) vending means responsive to said selection signal and said vending signal for releasing said selected commodity.

9. A vending device in which a selected commodity is vended in response to a key which is consumed in proportion to the monetary value of the selected commodity, said vending device comprising, in combination:

(a) a card-type key normally disposed outside said vending device, said key having a consumable end portion which is provided with lengthwise key-type ridges for identification and extending between an inner and an outer edge;

(b) reception means disposed on said vending device for receiving said key and for indexing the inner edge for registry with a start-of-scan position;

(c) sensing means in said reception means for providing a ready signal upon reception of said key;

(d) commodity selection means on said vending device for providing a selection signal and a locking signal in response to actuation during the occurrence of said ready signal;

(e) locking means responsive to said locking signal for locking said key in the indexed position in which the inner edge coincides with the start-of-scan position, said locking means generating a programming signal when engaging said key;

(f) programming means responsive to said programming signal and operative to provide a sequence of timing signals;

(g) tumbler scanning means responsive to a first timing signal for checking the key-type ridges of said key, said tumbler scanning means moving across said consumable end portion only in the presence of an authentic key from the start-of-scan position to an end-of-scan position, so that for a properly authenticated key the end-of-scan position coincides with the outer edge;

(h) consuming means responsive to a second timing signal, the inner edge position, the outer edge position, and the end-of-scan position, said consuming means first sensing the difierence between the inner edge position and the outer edge position for assurance that there is a sufficient portion of said consumable end portion remaining for purchasing the selected commodity, and thereafter sensing for the coincidence of the end-of-scan position and the outer edge position for assurance that said key is authentic,

15 said consuming means consuming a section of said consumable portion and providing a vending signal when finding a sufiicient portion and an authentic y;

(i) vending means responsive to said selection signal and said vending signal for releasing said selected commodity; and

(j) reset means responsive to a third timing signal for releasing said locking means and returning said vending device to its initial position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,611,673 9/52 Riise 1944 5 2,794,869 6/57 Noregaard 194-4 3,097,347 7/63 Simjian 1944 FOREIGN PATENTS 281,399 12/27 Great Britain.

SAMUEL F. COLEMAN, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A CARD-TYPE CONSUMABLE KEY FOR USE WITH A VENDING DEVICE ADAPTED TO PROGRESSIVELY CONSUME THE KEY IN PROPORTION TO THE MONETARY VALUE OF THE COMMODITY VENDED, SAID CONSUMABLE KEY COMPRISING; AN ELONGATED SUBSTANTIALLY FLAT MEMBER HAVING A HANDLE PORTION CONSUMABLE PORTION AT OPPOSITE ENDS THEREOF, SAID CONSUMABLE PORTION BEING DIMENSIONED FOR INSERTION INTO A VENDING DEVICE RECEPTION MEANS AND SAID HANDLE PORTION INCLUDING SHOULDER MEANS FOR COOPERATION WITH THE RECEPTION MEANS TO POSITION THE EDGES OF SAID CONSUMABLE PORTION OPPOSITE SAID HANDLE PORTION IN A PREDETERMINED POSITION WITHIN SAID HANDLE PORTION IN A PREDETERMINED PORTION INCLUDING A PLURALITY OF CONTINUOUS KEY-TYPE RIDGES PARALLEL TO THE DIRECTION OF ELONGATION OF SAID MEMBER AND FORMING A UNIQUE RECOGNITION CODE FOR COOPERATION WITH A VENDING DEVICE SENSING MEANS ADAPTED TO CHECK THE AUTHENTICITY OF SAID MEMBER AND TO DETERMINE THE REMAINING LENGTH OF THE CONSUMABLE PORTION, SAID MEMBER ALSO INCLUDING A RETAINING SHOULDER FOR COOPERATION WITH A VENDING DEVICE LOCKING MEANS ADAPTED TO SECURELY LOCK SAID MEMBER IN SAID PREDETERMINED POSITION.
US3204741A 1963-07-25 1963-07-25 Consumable key vending system Expired - Lifetime US3204741A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3204741A US3204741A (en) 1963-07-25 1963-07-25 Consumable key vending system

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3204741A US3204741A (en) 1963-07-25 1963-07-25 Consumable key vending system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3204741A true US3204741A (en) 1965-09-07

Family

ID=23147201

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3204741A Expired - Lifetime US3204741A (en) 1963-07-25 1963-07-25 Consumable key vending system

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3204741A (en)

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3302828A (en) * 1964-05-15 1967-02-07 Frenchtown Porcelain Co System for automatically dispensing predetermined quantities of selected articles
US3307743A (en) * 1965-01-14 1967-03-07 Marathon Oil Co System and method for dispensing materials
US3338364A (en) * 1966-06-24 1967-08-29 Ii Charles C Hoffberger Vending machine
US3338365A (en) * 1966-10-24 1967-08-29 Ii Charles C Hoffberger Key operated turnstile
US3344897A (en) * 1965-12-06 1967-10-03 Wesley P Kliewer Actuation device for actuating article dispensers
US3432017A (en) * 1967-07-13 1969-03-11 Wesley P Kliewer Actuation device controlled by deformable key having end-to-end conformity
US3486600A (en) * 1967-01-10 1969-12-30 Toshio Tanaka Method of automatically examining railway tickets
US3595358A (en) * 1969-03-07 1971-07-27 David W Chase Ticket collection method and apparatus
US3897862A (en) * 1973-05-16 1975-08-05 Nat Res Dev Ticket systems
US3900715A (en) * 1969-01-11 1975-08-19 Nat Res Dev Ticket issuing and collection systems
US3944039A (en) * 1974-06-21 1976-03-16 Houghtaling John J Consumable card activated apparatus
US4300041A (en) * 1979-10-25 1981-11-10 Donald Nama Magnetic coded card acceptor
US4871053A (en) * 1985-11-05 1989-10-03 Dara Cosgrave Fracturable-key activated control system
US5392890A (en) * 1993-03-29 1995-02-28 O.T.R. S.R.L. Obliterator and relative card
US6044953A (en) * 1994-03-16 2000-04-04 Telecommunicaçoes Brasileiras S/A-Telebras Independent device for verifying, validating and codifying inductive cards
US20080005924A1 (en) * 2006-05-26 2008-01-10 Hea-Kyung Yoo Method of managing operation of laundry room machine and dryer therefor

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB281399A (en) * 1926-09-03 1927-12-05 Edward Alaric Falconer An improved lock and indicator for holding and locating keys, tools and other portable articles
US2611673A (en) * 1946-11-22 1952-09-23 Charles W Riise Dispensing mechanism for cylindrical articles
US2794869A (en) * 1954-09-17 1957-06-04 Maurice J Noregaard Combination electric switch and shearing apparatus
US3097347A (en) * 1959-09-09 1963-07-09 Universal Match Corp Subscriber controlled apparatus

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB281399A (en) * 1926-09-03 1927-12-05 Edward Alaric Falconer An improved lock and indicator for holding and locating keys, tools and other portable articles
US2611673A (en) * 1946-11-22 1952-09-23 Charles W Riise Dispensing mechanism for cylindrical articles
US2794869A (en) * 1954-09-17 1957-06-04 Maurice J Noregaard Combination electric switch and shearing apparatus
US3097347A (en) * 1959-09-09 1963-07-09 Universal Match Corp Subscriber controlled apparatus

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3302828A (en) * 1964-05-15 1967-02-07 Frenchtown Porcelain Co System for automatically dispensing predetermined quantities of selected articles
US3307743A (en) * 1965-01-14 1967-03-07 Marathon Oil Co System and method for dispensing materials
US3344897A (en) * 1965-12-06 1967-10-03 Wesley P Kliewer Actuation device for actuating article dispensers
US3338364A (en) * 1966-06-24 1967-08-29 Ii Charles C Hoffberger Vending machine
US3338365A (en) * 1966-10-24 1967-08-29 Ii Charles C Hoffberger Key operated turnstile
US3486600A (en) * 1967-01-10 1969-12-30 Toshio Tanaka Method of automatically examining railway tickets
US3432017A (en) * 1967-07-13 1969-03-11 Wesley P Kliewer Actuation device controlled by deformable key having end-to-end conformity
US3900715A (en) * 1969-01-11 1975-08-19 Nat Res Dev Ticket issuing and collection systems
US3595358A (en) * 1969-03-07 1971-07-27 David W Chase Ticket collection method and apparatus
US3897862A (en) * 1973-05-16 1975-08-05 Nat Res Dev Ticket systems
US3944039A (en) * 1974-06-21 1976-03-16 Houghtaling John J Consumable card activated apparatus
US4300041A (en) * 1979-10-25 1981-11-10 Donald Nama Magnetic coded card acceptor
US4871053A (en) * 1985-11-05 1989-10-03 Dara Cosgrave Fracturable-key activated control system
US5392890A (en) * 1993-03-29 1995-02-28 O.T.R. S.R.L. Obliterator and relative card
US6044953A (en) * 1994-03-16 2000-04-04 Telecommunicaçoes Brasileiras S/A-Telebras Independent device for verifying, validating and codifying inductive cards
US20080005924A1 (en) * 2006-05-26 2008-01-10 Hea-Kyung Yoo Method of managing operation of laundry room machine and dryer therefor
US8250776B2 (en) * 2006-05-26 2012-08-28 Lg Electronics Inc. Method of managing operation of laundry room machine and dryer therefor

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3379295A (en) Self-service apparatus
US3184714A (en) Apparatus for use with a credit card
US3397763A (en) Multiple transaction vending machine
US6202006B1 (en) Cassette for a rotary rolled coin dispenser
US5133441A (en) Video cassette vending machine
US5637859A (en) Method and apparatus for exchanging information with subscriber cards used in article vending machines
US6435329B1 (en) Money handling apparatus
US5233532A (en) System for mailing and collecting items
US5302811A (en) Point of sale apparatus including a depositing/withdrawing apparatus
US5468942A (en) Dispensing device for hand scanners accessible from two sides
US4650977A (en) Automatic self service machine system and method
US6260757B1 (en) Automatic cashier machine
US4789054A (en) Vending machine for returnable cartridges
US6957746B2 (en) Apparatuses and methods for dispensing magnetic cards, integrated circuit cards, and other similar items
US6055521A (en) Unattended automated system for selling and dispensing fluids, with change-dispensing capability
US4412607A (en) Vending machine with improved means for dispensing products at a predetermined price
US5303844A (en) Automated apparatus, system and method for reliably vending articles of increased value
US4379334A (en) Electronic parking meter
US5458333A (en) Game parlor system which allows a player to play a game before paying a charge
US4298116A (en) String detector for a coin-selecting device
US4512453A (en) Vendor accountability system
US5752699A (en) Coin operated amusement machine
US4884212A (en) Apparatus and method for using unique charge cards dispensed from a vending machine
US3761682A (en) Credit card automatic currency dispenser
US3778595A (en) Automatic teller system