US3199828A - Supporting and clamping device - Google Patents

Supporting and clamping device Download PDF

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US3199828A
US3199828A US336601A US33660164A US3199828A US 3199828 A US3199828 A US 3199828A US 336601 A US336601 A US 336601A US 33660164 A US33660164 A US 33660164A US 3199828 A US3199828 A US 3199828A
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forms
whaler
hairpin
members
snaptie
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US336601A
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Willie E Newton
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Willie E Newton
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G17/00Connecting or other auxiliary members for forms, falsework structures, or shutterings
    • E04G17/06Tying means; Spacers ; Devices for extracting or inserting wall ties
    • E04G17/07Tying means, the tensional elements of which are fastened or tensioned by means of wedge-shaped members
    • E04G17/0707One-piece elements
    • E04G17/0721One-piece elements remaining completely or partially embedded in the cast material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S425/00Plastic article or earthenware shaping or treating: apparatus
    • Y10S425/129Wedge

Description

1955 w. E. NEWTON 3, 8
7 SUPPORTING AND CLAMPING DEVICE Filed Jan. 8, 1964 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR Fi 1 BY V AGENT Aug. 10, 1965 w. E. NEWTON SUPPORTING AND CLAMPING DEVICE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 8, 1964 llllllllll II Fig 2 P United States Patent C) irnl 33%,328 SUPEGRTENG AND (ILAMTING DEVKQE Willie E. Newton, 134 Pleasant Drive N? Albuquerque, N. Mex. Filed Jan. 8, 19:54, Ser. No. 336,6tl1 1 Qlairn. (Cl. 249-45) The present invention relates to a device for supporting and maintaining the relative positions and spacing of parallel members, such as concrete forms. More particularly, the present invention relates to an improved evice for maintaining the relative spacing of parallel spaced members, such as concrete forms, while at the same time providing support for such members.
Many devices, and combinations thereof, have been used in the past, particularly in the concrete construction industry, for maintaining the relative spacing of parallel spaced members, such as forms, and for supporting such members while in use. Such devices have been used with varying degrees of success as the art has evolved, but they have generally been found to be cumbersome and time consuming to use, and have not been readily adaptable to the uses for which they are intended.
Various problems, such as lengths of supports, means for attaching the supports to the forms, number of supports required, weight of supports, facility of use of such supports, and adaptability or" supports to varying conditions of use presently confront the art. Such problems have persisted in the industry, and there has arisen a great need for a support which is easy to handle under conditions of use, and which is adaptable to varying requirements found where the supports are used.
It is an object of the present invention to provide a device for supporting and retaining parallel spaced members used in industries, such as the concrete construction industry, which is easy to use, and adaptable to varying conditions.
It is another object of the present invention to provide a device for supporting and maintaining parallel spaced members, such as concrete forms, which device is du'rable under extreme conditions, but which is not unduly cumbersome to use.
A further object of the present invention is to provide a device which may be used to support forms while at the same time retaining such forms in their positions relative to one another.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a device which is adaptable to supporting as well as retaining parallel spaced members, such as concrete forms, in place, and which is durable, relatively light in weight, readily attachable to such forms, and easily removed when its function is served.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a device for retaining the relative spacing of parallel spaced members, such as concrete forms, which can be re-used an indefinite number of times, is sturdy, but relatively light in weight, adaptable to use under varying conditions, easy to attach, and detach from such forms, and generally adaptable to use with any configuration of forms.
Other objects and advanta es of the present invention will appear as the same is better understood from the following description.
The present invention includes the combination of a Whaler with one or a plurality of hairpins, which Whaler and hairpins are used in combination with a snaptie for retaining the relative positioning of spaced members, such as concrete forms, and if the need arises for providing support for such terms.
As the skilled artisan knows, the terms Whaler, hairpin, and snaptie are terms used in the construc- "ice tion industry, particularly where concrete construction is concerned, to designate various members adapted to retain, and sometimes to support, spaced members, such as concrete forms. A snaptie, as used in the present invention, is an elongated pin having enlarged heads on either end. These pins are extended between forms, such as plywood slabs, and protrude through apertures provided in the forms at spaced intervals. The Whaler serves the purpose of a support member and usually comprises one section of two-by-four lumber placed on the outside of each of the forms, along the longitudinal axis thereof, directly under the protruding ends of the snapties, and another, usually smaller, piece of lumber placed directly over the protruding ends of the snapties. These two pieces of lumber comprise the usual Whaler. The hairpin is usually a wedge shaped, elongated piece of material, such as cast iron, having a channel cut through it along its longitudinal axis, which channel opens into an enlarged aperture to receive the head the snaptie. The hairpin is in position on the snaptie when it is placed across the gap between the two members of the Whaler, and the enlarged head of the snaptie is inserted into the enlarged aperture in the hairpin channel. The hairpin is then driven so that the outer shoulders of the channel come into contact with the head of the snaptie and since the channel is wedge shaped in cross section, the snaptie is urged outwardly from both sides or" the forms, and is thus tightened as the wedge is driven between it and the Whaler.
As may be seen from the above description, the normal operation of securing forms in place is time consuming and cumbersome, requiring several men merely to attach the hairpins and Whalers. As will presently be seen from the ensuing description, much of the inetliciency of the operation is eliminated by the present invention.
A better understanding of the present invention can be obtained by reference to the drawings, wherein like numbers designate like parts, and accompanying detailed description contained herein.
Referring now to the drawings:
FIG. 1 shows the present invention in use on a set of forms;
FIG. 2 is similar to FIG. 1 except that the present invention is shown being used as a strongback as well as a snaptie clamp and form support;
FIG. 3 is a detailed showing of one of the hairpinwhaler combinations which form an important part of the present invention;
1G. 4 is a cross-sectional View of the hairpin-Whaler combination shown in FIG. 3;
FIG. 5 is an end view of the hairpin-Whaler combination shown in FIG. 3;
FIG. 6 is a detailed showing of the present invention clamping a snaptie in an inside corner of a set of forms, and demonstrates a special use of the present invention;
FIG. 7 is a perspective showing of the double wedge hairpin used in the present invention;
FIG. 8 is a modification of the hairpin-Whaler combination which forms a part of the present invention, showing a Whaler of rectangular cross section.
Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown therein hairpin-Whaler combinations 2%? comprising Whalers 21, double wedge hairpins 22 and single wedge hairpins 23. Although FIG. 1 shows a combination of three hairpins per Whaler, it is to be noted that any number of hairpins can be connected to each Whaler, limited only to length of the Whaler, and the size of the hairpins. The Whaler-s 21 are shown generally in the drawings to be right angle members, such as angle iron, but
may consist of any members of suitable strength having a variety of cross sections, such as rectangular as shown in FIG. 8.
Hairpin-Whaler combinations 2%) are attached to forms 24, which are to be maintained in spaced relationship While retaining material such as concrete, by means of their co-action with snapties 25. Forms 24 are provided at spaced intervals with apertures 26, as shown in FIG. 6, through which snapties 25 project. Snapties 25 are of standard construction, and consist of a rod 27, an abutment cone 28 and a head 29. Snapties 25 are more specifically shown in FIGS. 4 and 6. The specific details of the hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 and their co-action with snapties 25 and forms 24 will be described hereinafter.
Referring again to FIG. 1, it can be readily seen that the hairpin-Whaler combinations 2d are adapted to be secured to the forms 24 in a manner to be hereinafter described, and may be so secured either in a vertical, horizont-al or any other desired position limited only by the spacing of the snapties. Further, it is obvious that snapties 25 extend between two spaced forms, and the co-action of the snaptics with the forms and the hairpin-Whaler combinations 2% provides support for forms 24 as well as maintaining their relative spacing.
Hairpin-Whaler combinations 2!) provide a connection between adjacent sections of forms 24, as shown in FIG. 1, and may be used to retain corners or other angles in forms both on the inside, as shown in FIG. 6, as well as the outside, as shown in FIG. 1. Referring now to FIG. 1, in order to facilitate retaining forms at an angular relationship with one another, whalers 21 are provided with apertures 39, and pins 31 are adapted to be inserted into two matched apertures at the junction of two forms 24 in the manner shown in FIG. 1. The insertion of pins 31 into matched apertures 39 in two Whalers 21 forms a pivot so that any angle desired can be formed.
Referring now to FIG. 6, two forms forming the inside of an angle are retained in position by the abutment of their respective adjoining edges, and by single-wedge hairpins 23 co-acting with their respective snapties 25.
As shown in FIG. 1, either single-wedge hairpins 23 or double-wedge hairpins 22 may be attached to Whalers 21. Whether the hairpins are single or double wedge will be determined by the use to which they are to be put. For example, double-Wedge hairpins 21 have an advantage in that they may be driven from either of two directions, whereas single-wedge hairpins are advantageous in positions where space is limited, or it is possible to drive them in only one direction, such as an inside I corner as shown in FIG. 6.
As is demonstrated in FIG. 1, the hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 which are a part of the present invention have a great versatility in that they may be used to retain the spaced relation of forms 24, sides being useful as vertical or horizontal supports and to form corners or other angles in forms. Further, these hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 are of a unitary construction, with the hairpins 22 and 23 being slideably attached to Whalers 21 in a manner to be hereinafter more particularly described, so that each unit can be attached to a set of forms quickly, by a single individual, and detached with a minimum of elfort.
The versatility of the present invention can be seen by reference to FIG. 2 wherein the hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 are attached to forms 24 in such a manner as to provide a strongback support for such forms. When hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 are to be used as strongback supports, support members are placed against forms 24, with snapties 25 extending through apertures therein, and Whalers 21 are attached to snapties 25 and then clamped into place by hairpins 22 or 23 to hold both supports 32 and forms 24 in place. Such use of strongback supports is often necessary in cases where the forms 24 are raised to great heights, and where a single support, placed either vertically or horizontally will not provide sufficient support to keep the forms from breaking apart or buckling when pressure is applied to them. Such an arrangement as that shown in FIG. 2 provides both vertical and horizontal support for forms, and is particularly desirable where several panels of forms are attached adjacent one another to obtain the desired height, for instance, of a concrete wall. As is shown in FIG. 2, support members 32 are usually of the same construction as hairpin-Whaler combinations 2%, so that these members can be used to secure snapties, if desired, and eliminate the need for extending snapties 25 through the outside hairpin-Whaler combinations at every point on the forms 24.
The specific details of each hairpinwhaler combina tions 20 may be seen by reference to FIGS. 3-5. Whalers 21 consist of lengths of material, such as angle iron. Material of different cross section, such as rectangular, as shown in FIG. 8, circular or any other desired cross sec tion, could be used for Whalers 21. Hairpins 22 are attached to Whalers 21 by pins 40, which pins extend through channels 41 in each hairpin 22. Heads 42 of pins 40 engage the shoulders 44 of channels 41 to secure each hairpin 22 to Whaler 21. A double-wedge 22 is shown in FIGS. 3-5 for simplicity in describing the attachment of each hairpin 22 to its respective Whaler 21. It may be seen by reference to FIG. 6 that a singlewedge is attached to its Whaler 21 in the same manner. As may be seen by reference to FIG. 3, channel 41 has an enlargement 43 at its longitudinal center, or in the case of single-wedge hairpins 23 at their lower end, and Whaler 21 is provided with an aperture or slot over which enlargement 43 may be positioned to receive one end of a snaptie 25. Channels 41 are slightly smaller in width than the diameter of snaptie heads 29. Cone 28 on snaptie 25 abuts the inside surface of a form 24, being retained on snaptie 25 by projection 45, and head 29 of snaptie 25 extends through the enlargement 43 of channel 41 and the aperture or slot in Whaler 21. Head 29 then engages the shoulder 44 of channels 41 when hairpin 22 is moved in either direction. The attachment of one double-wedge hairpin 22 to Whaler has been described for simplicity, but it is obvious that a multplicity of hairpins, either double or single wedge, could be attached to a Whaler 21 if desired, limited only by the length of the Whaler and size of the hairpins. The specific construction of a double-wedge hairpin 22 can be better seen by reference to FIG. 7.
The operation of the present invention is as follows: Forms 24 are erected with both ends of the desired number of snapties 25 projecting through apertures in a set of forms 24, as is the normal course of business. Snapties 25 extend between two opposite spaced forms 24. Each end of a snaptie 25 projects through an aperture in one of the pair of forms. Whalers 21 and their attached hairpins 22 and 23 are then positioned with their respective snaptie receiving apertures or slots over the projecting heads 29 of snapties 25, and heads 29 of snapties 25 project into enlargement 43 of their respective hairpins 22 to therein engage shoulders 44 of channels 41. Pressure, for instance by hammering, is applied to drive shoulders 44 of channels 41 into closer engagement With the heads 29 of snaptie 25 forcing hairpin- Whaler combinations 20 into close engagement with one side of forms 24, and cone 28 of snaptie 25 into close engagement with the other side of form 24, thus tightly attaching each hairpin-Whaler combination 20 to form 24. It is obvious that snapties 25 have a first and a second end. When the second end of the snaptie 25 is attached to a form 24 opposite and spaced from that to which the first end of snaptie 25 is attached, the two members are retained in their relative positions and are supported. As is shown in FIG. 1, hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 may be attached either in a vertical position, or a horizontal position, on forms 24 depending on the need of the user. The unified Whaler members 21 to which are attached a plurality of hairpins 22 and 23 provide support for forms 24 and co-act with snaptie and hairpins 22 and 23 to maintain the relative spacing between a pair of spaced forms 2 5-. As is also shown in FIG. 1, hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 may be used to support corners in forms 24 by aligning apertures of intersecting Whalers, and placing pin 31 through the two aligmed apertures 30 to form a pivot.
As is shown in FIG. 2, the chief difference in the operation of the present invention when used as a strongback is that some of snapties 25 must project through apertures in support members 32 prior to being attached to hairpin-Whaler combinations 2%). The attachment of the hairpin-Whaler combination 20 to snapties 2 5' is then accomplished as Was described previously with reference to FIG. 1.
It should be noted that in normal uses, snapties 25 are spaced along forms equal distance from each other, such as sixteen inches apart, so that hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 can be designed to match this standard spacing. Whalers 21 are placed over snapties 25, and hairpins 22 or 23 are positioned over snaptie heads 2? and driven into tight engagement to complete the operation. When removal of the hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 is desired, hairpins 22 and 23 are loosened, and hairpin-Whaler combinations 20 are simply lifted away from forms 24.
In uses where a hairpin 22 can be moved in only one direction, such as in an inside corner as shown in FIG. 6, a single-wedge hairpin 22 can be used. In normal uses, a corner or other angle is formed on the outside as has been previously described with reference to FIG. 1. The inside of the corner or other angle is formed in the following manner, with reference to FIG. 6. Two forms 24 are placed in abutment at the proper angle, such as a right angle, the ends of snapties 25 project through apertures in forms 24, and single-wedge hairpins 23 are positioned over heads 29 of snapties 25 in the same manner as was previously described with reference to the double-wedge hairpins 22. Hairpins 23 are then driven into engagement with heads 29 of snapties 25. Forms 24 are thereby held in their desired position by the snapties 25 and their co-action with hairpin-Whaler combinations 20.
As may be seen from the above description, the present invention provides a supporting and clamping device for parallel spaced members, such as concrete forms which is sturdy, durable, relatively light in weight and easily attached and detached from the members it supports.
Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is, therefore, to be understood that within the scope of the appended claim the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.
What is claimed is:
In a clamping device for spaced form members having apertures therethrough, the form members being spaced so as to have facing surfaces and so as to have the apertures in one form member substantially in alignment with a corresponding aperture in the opposite form member, the combination comprising snaptie means extending between said spaced form members; Whaler means; and hairpin means; said snaptie means comprising a plurality of elongated rod-like members having first and second ends, which ends are enlarged relative to the diameters of the rod-like members, and two abutment members firredly attached to each of said rod-like members and spaced from said first and second ends respectively, said enlarged ends of each rod-like member extending through aligned apertures in the spaced form members, and said abutment members abutting against the inner faces of the forms to space said forms apart; said Whaler means comprising an elongated metal member having a plurality of slots spaced therealong and extending from an edge of the elongated member inwardly toward the longitudinal axis of the elongated member, said elongated member being positioned so as to have each slot receive one of the ends of said snaptie means which ends extend through the apertures in said spaced form members; said hairpin means comprising a plurality of wedge-shaped elongated members each having a channel therein along the longitudinal aXis thereof, which channel is generally of less width than the diameter of the enlarged ends of said snaptie means and is enlarged in one portion for receiving an enlarged end of said snaptie means; attachment means fixedly attached to said Whaler means and engaging said hairpin means whereby said hairpin means are slidably attached to said Whaler means and form a unit therewith, and the channels in said hairpin means intersect the slots in said Whaler means and each receive an enlarged end of one of said snaptie means so that said Whaler means and said hairpin means engage said snaptie means as a unit, and said snaptie means, said Whaler means and said hairpin means coast to retain the forms in position; said attachment means comprising at least two pins each having one end attached to said Whaler means and another end enlarged, whereby the enlarged ends engage the outer portion or" the channel in said hairpin means to slidably attach said hairpin means to said Whaler means and position the channels to pass over and intersect the slots in said Whaler means.
References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,042,648 10/12 Crary 25-131 1,221,567 4/ 17 Moncure 25-131 1,293,391 2/19 Ewing 25-13 1 1,467,903 9/23 McCallum 25-131 1,658,681 2/28 Jordan et al. 25-131 1,919,751 7/33 Schenk 25-131 2,887,757 5/59 Miles 25-131 3,060,541 10/62 Hillberg 25-131 J. SPENCER OVERHOLSER, Primary Examiner.
MICHAEL V. BRINDISI, WILLIAM J. STEPHENSON,
Examiners.
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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3436053A (en) * 1966-08-15 1969-04-01 James E Person Apparatus for use in forms for concrete
US4300747A (en) * 1980-11-10 1981-11-17 Brow Arthur J Flat shoe form tie bracket for use with concrete forms
US4320888A (en) * 1979-06-20 1982-03-23 Oury Ralph M Concrete form systems and components thereof
US20100037538A1 (en) * 2008-08-18 2010-02-18 George Richard Sorich Temporary adjustable support brace
US20130074432A1 (en) * 2011-09-28 2013-03-28 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete form and method of using same
US8877329B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2014-11-04 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca High performance, highly energy efficient precast composite insulated concrete panels
US9114549B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2015-08-25 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Concrete runways, roads, highways and slabs on grade and methods of making same
US9145695B2 (en) 2010-04-02 2015-09-29 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Composite insulated concrete form and method of using same
US9181699B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2015-11-10 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Precast concrete structures, precast tilt-up concrete structures and methods of making same
US9366023B2 (en) 2014-03-28 2016-06-14 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated reinforced foam sheathing, reinforced vapor permeable air barrier foam panel and method of making and using same
US9410321B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-08-09 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca High performance, reinforced insulated precast concrete and tilt-up concrete structures and methods of making same
US9458637B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2016-10-04 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Composite insulated plywood, insulated plywood concrete form and method of curing concrete using same
US9505657B2 (en) 2011-11-11 2016-11-29 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Method of accelerating curing and improving the physical properties of pozzolanic and cementitious-based material
US9574341B2 (en) 2014-09-09 2017-02-21 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated reinforced foam sheathing, reinforced elastomeric vapor permeable air barrier foam panel and method of making and using same
US9776920B2 (en) 2013-09-09 2017-10-03 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete slip form and method of accelerating concrete curing using same
US9862118B2 (en) 2013-09-09 2018-01-09 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated flying table concrete form, electrically heated flying table concrete form and method of accelerating concrete curing using same
US9955528B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2018-04-24 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Apparatus for electronic temperature controlled curing of concrete
US10065339B2 (en) 2013-05-13 2018-09-04 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Removable composite insulated concrete form, insulated precast concrete table and method of accelerating concrete curing using same
US10220542B2 (en) 2013-05-13 2019-03-05 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete battery mold, insulated passive concrete curing system, accelerated concrete curing apparatus and method of using same
US10280622B2 (en) 2016-01-31 2019-05-07 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Self-annealing concrete forms and method of making and using same
US10640425B2 (en) 1996-01-19 2020-05-05 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Method for predetermined temperature profile controlled concrete curing container and apparatus for same

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US1467903A (en) * 1922-12-09 1923-09-11 Albert E Mccallum Wall form
US1658681A (en) * 1926-11-08 1928-02-07 Ralph A Jordan Form for plastic materials
US1919751A (en) * 1931-05-01 1933-07-25 Richmond Screw Anchor Co Inc Wedge for form ties
US2887757A (en) * 1956-05-10 1959-05-26 Miles Walter Leslie Tie-rod for concrete forms
US3060541A (en) * 1960-03-07 1962-10-30 Superior Concrete Accessories Waler clamp assembly

Patent Citations (8)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1042648A (en) * 1909-10-09 1912-10-29 Alexander P Crary Mold-form for concrete-wall construction.
US1221567A (en) * 1916-08-02 1917-04-03 William A P Moncure Mold for concrete structures.
US1293391A (en) * 1917-12-06 1919-02-04 Maurice M Ewing Tie and spacing member for concrete-forms.
US1467903A (en) * 1922-12-09 1923-09-11 Albert E Mccallum Wall form
US1658681A (en) * 1926-11-08 1928-02-07 Ralph A Jordan Form for plastic materials
US1919751A (en) * 1931-05-01 1933-07-25 Richmond Screw Anchor Co Inc Wedge for form ties
US2887757A (en) * 1956-05-10 1959-05-26 Miles Walter Leslie Tie-rod for concrete forms
US3060541A (en) * 1960-03-07 1962-10-30 Superior Concrete Accessories Waler clamp assembly

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3436053A (en) * 1966-08-15 1969-04-01 James E Person Apparatus for use in forms for concrete
US4320888A (en) * 1979-06-20 1982-03-23 Oury Ralph M Concrete form systems and components thereof
US4300747A (en) * 1980-11-10 1981-11-17 Brow Arthur J Flat shoe form tie bracket for use with concrete forms
US10640425B2 (en) 1996-01-19 2020-05-05 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Method for predetermined temperature profile controlled concrete curing container and apparatus for same
US20100037538A1 (en) * 2008-08-18 2010-02-18 George Richard Sorich Temporary adjustable support brace
US9145695B2 (en) 2010-04-02 2015-09-29 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Composite insulated concrete form and method of using same
US20130074432A1 (en) * 2011-09-28 2013-03-28 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete form and method of using same
US8756890B2 (en) * 2011-09-28 2014-06-24 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete form and method of using same
US9115503B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2015-08-25 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete form and method of using same
US9982445B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2018-05-29 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete form and method of using same
US9181699B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2015-11-10 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Precast concrete structures, precast tilt-up concrete structures and methods of making same
US9624679B2 (en) 2011-09-28 2017-04-18 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Anchor member for insulated concrete form
US9505657B2 (en) 2011-11-11 2016-11-29 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Method of accelerating curing and improving the physical properties of pozzolanic and cementitious-based material
US9809981B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2017-11-07 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca High performance, lightweight precast composite insulated concrete panels and high energy-efficient structures and methods of making same
US9458637B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2016-10-04 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Composite insulated plywood, insulated plywood concrete form and method of curing concrete using same
US8877329B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2014-11-04 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca High performance, highly energy efficient precast composite insulated concrete panels
US10385576B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2019-08-20 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Composite insulated plywood, insulated plywood concrete form and method of curing concrete using same
US10071503B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2018-09-11 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Concrete runways, roads, highways and slabs on grade and methods of making same
US9955528B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2018-04-24 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Apparatus for electronic temperature controlled curing of concrete
US9114549B2 (en) 2012-09-25 2015-08-25 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Concrete runways, roads, highways and slabs on grade and methods of making same
US10443238B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2019-10-15 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca High performance, reinforced insulated precast concrete and tilt-up concrete structures and methods of making same
US9982433B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-05-29 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca High performance, reinforced insulated precast concrete and tilt-up concrete structures and methods of making same
US9410321B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-08-09 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca High performance, reinforced insulated precast concrete and tilt-up concrete structures and methods of making same
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US10744674B2 (en) 2013-05-13 2020-08-18 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Removable composite insulated concrete form, insulated precast concrete table and method of accelerating concrete curing using same
US10639814B2 (en) 2013-05-13 2020-05-05 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete battery mold, insulated passive concrete curing system, accelerated concrete curing apparatus and method of using same
US9862118B2 (en) 2013-09-09 2018-01-09 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated flying table concrete form, electrically heated flying table concrete form and method of accelerating concrete curing using same
US9776920B2 (en) 2013-09-09 2017-10-03 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete slip form and method of accelerating concrete curing using same
US10487520B2 (en) * 2013-09-09 2019-11-26 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated concrete slip form and method of accelerating concrete curing using same
US9366023B2 (en) 2014-03-28 2016-06-14 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated reinforced foam sheathing, reinforced vapor permeable air barrier foam panel and method of making and using same
US9574341B2 (en) 2014-09-09 2017-02-21 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Insulated reinforced foam sheathing, reinforced elastomeric vapor permeable air barrier foam panel and method of making and using same
US10280622B2 (en) 2016-01-31 2019-05-07 Romeo Ilarian Ciuperca Self-annealing concrete forms and method of making and using same

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