US3192539A - Ventilators for water closets, kitchens and the like - Google Patents

Ventilators for water closets, kitchens and the like Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3192539A
US3192539A US300414A US30041463A US3192539A US 3192539 A US3192539 A US 3192539A US 300414 A US300414 A US 300414A US 30041463 A US30041463 A US 30041463A US 3192539 A US3192539 A US 3192539A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
pipe
tank
bowl
water
bathroom
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US300414A
Inventor
William L Martz
Original Assignee
William L Martz
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by William L Martz filed Critical William L Martz
Priority to US300414A priority Critical patent/US3192539A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3192539A publication Critical patent/US3192539A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D9/00Sanitary or other accessories for lavatories ; Devices for cleaning or disinfecting the toilet room or the toilet bowl; Devices for eliminating smells
    • E03D9/04Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices
    • E03D9/05Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices ventilating the bowl
    • E03D9/052Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices ventilating the bowl using incorporated fans

Description

July 6, 1965 w. L. MAR-fz M9239 VENTILATORS FOR WATER CLOSE'IS, KITCHENS AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. 1, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet l F/G 6b F/6-5 F/G 6 A T TOPNVS w. L. MARTZ Euy 6, 1%65 VENTILATOP-,S FOR WATER CLOSETS, KITGHENS AND THE LIKE 3 Shets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 1:. 1963 INVENTOR. W/LL/AM L. MA/PTZ PNE ATTO

United States Patent O 3,352,539 VEIITFATRS FR 'WATER CLQSETS,

Klll'CHl-LNS AND Tim LIKE William L Marta', 243939 Canyon View Brive, Saratoga, Calif. Filed Aug. l, 1963, Ser. No. Solhll 4 Claims. (Si. 4 23) The present invention relates to ventilators for water closets and is adapted for use in combination with the water closet system including a conventional tank.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 279,689, tiled March 22, 1963, now abandoned.

An object of this invention is to provide an improved ventilating arrangement which may be used in conjunction with an existing Ventilating blower for exhausting undesired kitchen odors such as are given o in the preparation of food such as onions.

Another object of this invention is to provide an irnproved arrangement for e'iciently eliminating the obnoxious odors that appear in a closet bowl during use, and it is particularly adapted for use in connection with conventional water closet equipment.

Brietiy, this invention provides facilities for exhausting the odors from the water closet bowl by an air exhauster or blower positioned in the attic or on the building roof. The exhauster or blower is connected to the space above the water level in the water closet tank or to the top of the overow pipe in said tank by a plastic pipe which preferably extends down from the attic between wall members so that it vmay be led to the water closet tank through a suitable hole cut in the wall behind the tank, and the lower end of this plastic pipe is positioned above the normal water level in the tank. When a motor driven blower is used a suitable switch for controlling the exhaust blower is provided in the bathroom wall, and this switch may be adjacent to the normal bathroom light switch or it may be made to be operated simultaneously with 'the light switch if desired.

In accordance with this invention, the existing exhaust blowers that are provided in the ceiling of the bathroom and in the ceiling of the kitchen are each equipped with a suitable suction nozzle. A plastic pipe is provided in each case with the upper end thereof connected to the nozzle. In the bathroom fixture the lower end of the plastic pipe is positioned in the tank of the water closet. In the kitchen fixture the lower end of the plastic pipe opens under a small hood provided over or adjacent to the kitchen sink. Thus in each case the undesired odors are sucked up through the plastic pipe by the negative pressure generated under the exhaust blower. This apparatus may be installed as an attachment to the kitchen and bathroom exhaust blowers if desired.

Other features and objects of this invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which it relates from the following specification, claims and drawing in which, briey:

FlG. l is a vertical sectional View taken through a bathroom equipped with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a View of the water closet tank partially broken away to show the inside mechanism thereof;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3 3 of FiG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4 4 of FIG. 3;

FiG. 5 is a detail view of a modified form of this invention adapted to be used with the iiush type valves;

FIG. 6 is a view taken along the line 6 6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken through a bathroom equipped with another form of this invention;

lee

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken along the line 8 8 of FlG. 7 showing how the plastic pipe passes through the gasket provided under the cover of the water closet tank;

FIG. 9` is a vertical sectional View taken through a kitchen equipped with an exhaust hood positioned above the kitchen sink whereby undesired odors given oft by food such as onions may be exhausted during the preparation of such food; v

FlG. l0 is a vertical sectional view taken through a bathroom equipped with still another form of this invention;

FIG. ll is a sectional view taken along the line lll-l1 of FIG. l0; and

FlG. l2 is a fragmentary view of a ventilator unit made in accordance with this invention equipped with a heat exchanging unit.

Referring to the drawing in detail, there is illustrated a water closet Ventilator which is adapted to be used with the conventional water closet equipment employing a bowl lil connected by means of the pipe ll to the water tank 12. The tank 12 is of generally conventional construction and is provided with a bulb valve 14 that is seated on the member 13 to which the pipe 1l leading to the bowl 1li is connected and to which the overow pipe l5 is also connected.

The top end part of the overflow pipe l5 is coupled to the lower end of the plastic tubing lo which is stretched over the pipe 15 so as to make a snug connection therewith. The pipe or tubing lo may ofcourse be made o copper or other material beside plastic if desired. The pipe 16 passes ont of the tank and through a suitable hole 29a formed in the wall'tl so that it passes between the wall members 2% and 2l up into the attic of the building where it is connected to the fan housing of the electric motor driven exhaust fan 17. The top portion of the fan housing is provided with a pipe 1S. leading out of the building through a suitable hole formed in the roof. Electric current to the electric fan 17 is controlled by means of the switch 19 which may be positioned adjacent to the door of the bathroom. Also the bathroom light may be controlled by this same switch, if desired so that both the motor of the fan l? and the lights may be energized simultaneously.

The part of the pipe or tubing lo passing over the topedge of the tank l2 may be flattened to assume the configuration shown in the parties in FIGS. 3 and 4 so that this part of the tube fits under the cover of the tank more readily. Where desired the top of the tank 1 2 may be cut away slightly by using a conventional diamond impregnated saw so as to provide a suitable notch or recess for receiving the tube i6. In case such a notch or recess is provided to the upper edge of the tank, then the tube 16 need not be flattened.

The tank .12 is also provided with conventional equipment such .as the inlet supply pipe 22 which furnishes water supply t-o ill the tank to the predetermined level. This inlet pipe 22 is connected to the valve 23 which is also of conventional construction and which is controlled by means yof the bulb 2li Ithat is mounted on one `of the rods 25, the other end of this rod being connected to the valve control linkage 26. An external lever Z7 is provided on the Vtank l2 and this lever which is connected by means `of the members 2S to the bulb valve la is used for lifting this bulb valve when it is desired lto ush the toilet. A bowl refilling pipe 2h is also connected between the valve 23 and the top part of the -overow pipe l5.

The upper end of the l`overiiow pipe 15 is provided with a small hollow elbow `3@ onerend of which is attached thereto and the other end or upper part of which provides a seat'for `the ball shaped float Valve 32. The upper part of the elbow 30 forms an inlet to the overtiow pipe 15 which is controlled by the float valve 32. The float valve 32 is hollow and is adapted to iloat on the water if the water level in the tank reaches above the seating surface of the elbow Sil. Thus this valve opens and allows the excess water .to flow into the overllow pipe l5. A suitable screen 31 is provided for enclosing the ball 32 to prevent this ball from `escaping the immediate vicinity of the seat on the elbow 30. rllhus the screen 31 is large enough to permit the bulb 32 to leave its seat but it functions to guide the ball Ito said seat when the water level is lowere-d.

This invention provides an electrically actuated exhaust system for removing odors from the closet bowl and directing -them to the vent stack 1S opening to the outer atmosphere on the roof of lthe building. Thus the person using the bathroom turns on'the fan i7 by manipulating the wall Swich 19 which, as previously described, may also be used for turning on the light on the bathroom. The exhaust fan 17 draws the air from the closet bowl 10 through the pipe Il, the overilow pipe 15, pipe i6 and forces it out through the stack 1S. This exhausting oper- Iation continues as long as the fan 17 is turned on.

In FIG. there is illustrated a modied form of this invention that is adapted to be used with toilet bowls equipped with a flush type valve, also sometimes referred to as a Sloan valve. The toilet `howl 1G which is of conventional construction is provided with a pipe 33 which connects to the Hush valve 33. This ilush valve is connected to a water supply pipe and it is also provided with a trip -lever 40 which is manually tripped when it is desired to flush the toilet. The pipe 33 is provided with a connection 34 which extends through the bathroom wall 29 and connects to the pipe or tubing 16h that corresponds to the pipe 16 shown in FIG. l. This pipe leads to the attic exhaust fan 17 and to the vent pipe 18 so that when the fan isturned on air is drawn out of the bowl 1t) through pipe 33, pipe 34 and pipe 16h.

.The pipe 33 is also provided with a butterfly ltype tap valve which includes the ap 35 that is normally held in horizontal position with respect to its pivot 36. A weight 37 that is connected to the flap 35 is provided for this purpose. However, when the Hush valve 39 is .tripped "by manual operation of the handle 40, so that water runs therethrough into the pipe 33 the water engages the iap 35 and forces it against the seat 38 thereby closing the passage into the pipe 34 during the tlushing of the toilet bowl li?. The pivot 36 may be made of two opposing Allen type set screws having pointed pivot surfaces en-y gaging the shaft 36a of the tlap valve. A-lso the seat 33 extends substantially around the mouth of the pipe 34 and may consist of a neoprene member cemented around said mouth.

Thus the pipes 33 and 34 form ya T connection between the valve 39, the bowl il@ and the pipe 1Gb which may be of plastic. The portion 34 thereof extends into the wall structure where it is .connected to the pipe 16h which may be stretched thereover to make a snug it. 'The valve 39 is connected to a water supply pipe in a conventional manner. The form of this invention shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, -used with flush type valves which are also sometimes referred to as Sloan valves, also functions to prevent a back flow since the flap valve 35 when in the position shownin FIG. 5 will prevent back flow into the valve 39 from the pipe 33. This valve will then serve a dual purpose, that is, vent valve plus back flow prev-enter.

Another form of this invention is shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. A conventional exhaust blower including the fan member 41 and motor 42 for driving same is positioned in the housing 43 which has an inlet 44 opening into the bathroom so that the air from the bathroom may be exhausted outward through the stack 45 which is positioned lon the roof of the building. This blower 'arrangement is provided with a nozzle 47 which has an elongated opening that is positioned directly under lone side of the fan so that when the fan is driven a negative pressure is created in this nozzle and gases are sucked up through t-he plastic pipe 4S from the toilet bowl 51.

The lower opening Si) of the plastic pipe is positioned inside of the water closet tank 49 'and this opening is positioned above the normal water level in this tank. A suitable gasket 53 of resilient material such as foam rubber, plastic `or the like, is provided under the cover 52. and this gasket seals -the cover Ito .the top of the tank. Thus the suction through .the plastic pipe 48 functions to exhaust the air from the space above the water level in Ithe top of the .tank and at the same time the gases from the toilet bowl 51 are sucked up through the overow pipe that is positioned in the tank 49. This overow pipe is similar to ythe pipe l shown in FIGS. l, 2 and 3. However, the inlet S0 of the plastic pipe is not connected directly to the top of this Ioverow pipe since this is not necessary inasmuch as the gasket 53 provided between the cover 52 and the .top of the Itank 49 effectively seals the cover to the tank and prevents air leakage therebetween into the tank. Thus in this structure suction through the plastic pipe 48 draws 4the undesired gases Y through the overflow pipe from the toilet bowl 5J..

The attened part 54 of the plastic pipe 43 passes through the gasket 53 and the gasket may be cemented or otherwise jointed to this pipe at this point so as to make an eiective seal therebetween.

The form of the invention shown in FIG. 7 may also be applied to a small kitchen ventilator, as shown in FIG. 9, in which the elongated nozzle Se is attached to the conventional exhaust fan or blower S5. InV this arrangement a small hood 58, which may be made of transparent plastic material, is provided above the kitchen sink 61 and the lower end 59 of the plastic pipe 57 opens under this hood 58 so as to provide suction under this hood whereby undesired odors produced in the preparation of food such as onions may be exhausted and prevented from spreading in the kitchen. The plastic pipes 48 and 57 are preferably positioned in the building walls between the studs or joists.

The embodiment of this invention illustrated in FIG.l

l0 is provided with an air exhauster unit 62 which is mounted on the top of the roof of the building and it is provided with a pipe that extends through a hole in the roof to connect to the upper end of the plastic pipe 48. This air exhauster 62 is of the type made by the G. C. Breidert Company of Pacoima, California which converts the action of winds from every direction into positive suction in the pipe 4S. Inasmuch as this air exhauster does not employ an electric motor this embodiment of this invention diters from that shown in FIG. 7 in that no electrically driven blower is required.

The lower end of the pipe 48 is openA at 50 in the tank 49 and it is positioned above the normal water level in this tank so that fumes from the bowl 51 may be drawn up into the tank 49 through the overflow pipe 49a and into the mouth 59 of the plastic pipe t8 through which said fumes are exhausted to the open atmosphere by means of the air exhauster 62. A gasket 53 is provided between the top of the tank 49 and the cover 52 so that this cover is sealed to the tank. The pipe 48 is brought into the tank 49 through a gap in the gasket 53 and the gasket may be attached to the outside of the pipe.

The toilet bowl 51 is provided with a seat 51b and a cover 51a for the seat of conventional construction. Both the seat Slb and the cover 51a are hinged to the top of the bowl 51. The bottom side of the seat 51b is provided with a plurality of spaced rubber pads 51C which rest on the top of the toilet bowl 51 when the seat is down these pads are positioned on the top of the bowl as shown in FIGURE 1l. Rubber or plastic sealing strips Sld are attached to the bottom of the seat by suitable glue or cement and these strips are positioned between the pads 51C as shown in FIG. 11 so that when the seat is down on the bowl the air spaces between the pads 51e are sealed olf, all around the top of the bowl except at the front thereof. Thus the air space between the front of the bowl and seat is open so that air may enter the bowl through this air space when the atmosphere from the inside of the bowl is drawn out through the overllow pipe 49a, and plastic pipe 48, sealing off the other air spaces by means of the plastic inserts 51d, prevents the undesired odors from leaving the bowl and entering the bathroom therethrough. The gases responsible for these undesirable odors are generally lighter than air and will be exhausted out through the pipe 4S and .air from the bathroom will be sucked into the bowl either through the open space at the front of the bowl when the seat is occupied or covered or through spaces around the top of the seat that are not sealed off even when the seat is occupied. Because these gases are lighter than air, the strips 51d must be used to prevent these lighter gases from leaving the bowl into the bathroom before they are exhausted through pipes 49a and 4S. The front air space between the bowl and the seat may be left open to permit air to enter the bowl from the bathroom therethrough as air and undesired gases are exhausted from the bowl through the pipes 49a and 48 and intermediate connections, while a person is sitting on the seat 51h. However, ordinarily sufficient air will enter the bowl through the hole in the top of the seat even when a person using the water closet bowl is sitting on said seat so that the space between the front pads 51a should also be sealed with a strip such as strip 51d.

In the forme of the invention shown in FIG. 12 the plastic pipe 48 is provided with a helical section 48a which is wrapped around the exhaust pipe 63. The exhaust or Vent pipe 63 may be such as is provided to a water heater or the like and the helical coil 48a functions as heat exchanger between the pipe 63 and the pipe 48 to cause air to ow upward through the pipe 48. The helical coil 48a may be wrapped around a hot exhaust pipe from the heating system of the house if desired to produce this same result. In the summertime when the atmosphere in the attic of the house is generally quite hot, the arrangement using a coil such as the coil 48a may not be required since heating of the portion of the pipe 48 positioned in the attic is sufficient. In colder laditudes the heat exchanger coil 48a or a similar device may be used in conjunction with the air exauster 62 shown in FIG. if necessary to provide the desired suction.

While I have shown preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be understood that the invention is capable of Variations and modification from the form shown so that its scope should be limited only by the scope of the claims appended hereto.

What I claim is:

1. In a Ventilator for a bathroom water closet which is provided with a water tank, :a toilet bowl, a Valve mechanism for flushing the water out of the tank into the toilet bowl, and an overow pipe in the tank connected to the toilet bowl, the improvement comprising a Ventilating pipe having the upper end thereof open to the atmosphere above the bathroom and the Alower open end thereof positioned in the water tank above the normal water level therein, means connected to the upper part of said ventilating pipe producing air ow upward through `said ventilating pipe to draw air out of said water tank, said overflow -pipe and said bowl, yieldable gasket means positioned between the upper edge of said water tank and the cover thereof, said Ventilating pipe having a flattened portion at the bottom part thereof so that the width thereof does not exceed the thickness of said gasket means, said gasket means having a gap in the rear part thereof through which said flattened portion of said Ventilating pipe is inse-rted into said tank, said toilet bowl having a seat and sealing means between said seat and said toilet bowl for substantially preventing fumes from escaping into the bathroom from said howl Lwhile excrement is being voided int-o said bowl and said fum-es and air are being exhausted from said bowl by said air ow producing means.

2. In a ventilator for a bathroom water closet which is provided with a water tank, a toilet bowl, a valve mechanism for flushing the water out of the tank into the toilet bowl, and an overflow pipe in the tank connected to the toilet bowl, the improvement as set forth in claim l further characterized in that the means connected to the upper part of `said Ventilating pipe to draw air out of said water tank comprises an air exhauster constructed to use wind from different directions to draw air up through said ventilating pipe.

3. In a ventilator for a bathroom water closet which is provided with a water tank, a toilet bowl, a valve mechanism for flushing the water out of the tank into the toilet bowl, and an .overflow pipe in the tank connected to the toilet bowl, the improvement as set forth in claim f1 further characterized in that said Ventilating pipe is made of plastic and the means connected to the upper part of said Ventilating pipe producing air ow upward through said Ventilating pipe comprises a section of said plastic pipe -coiled around a heater Vent pipe.

4. In a ventilator for a bathroom water closet which is provided with a water tank, a toilet bowl, a valve mechanism for -ushing the water out of the tank into the toilet bowl, and an overflow pipe in the tank connected to the toilet bowl, the improvement as set forth in claim 1 further characterized in that the means connected to the upper part of said Ventilating pipe producing air flow upward through said Ventilating pipe comprises a nozzle positioned under the bathroom fan to draw air up through said pipe,

said fan being mounted in a hole in the ceiling of the bathroom, said ventilator pipe including a pipe connected between said bathroom fan and the outer atmosphere.

References Cited bythe Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS ROBERT A. OLEARY, Primary Examiner.

JOHN F. OCONNOR, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A VENTILATOR FOR A BATHROOM WATER CLOSET WHICH IS PROVIDED WITH A WATER TANK, A TOILET BOWL, A VALVE MECHANISM FOR FLUSHING THE WATER OUT AT THE TANK INTO THE TOILET BOWL, AND AN OVERFLOW PIPE IN THE TANK CONNECTED TO THE TOILET BOWL, THE IMPROVEMENT COMPRISING A VENTILATING PIPE HAVING THE UPPER END THEREOF OPEN TO THE ATMOSPHERE ABOVE THE BATHROOM AND THE LOWER OPEN END THEREOF POSITIONED IN THE WATER TANK ABOVE THE NORMAL WATER LEVEL THEREIN, MEANS CONNECTED TO THE UPPER PART OF SAID VENTILATING PIPE PRODUCING AIR FLOW UPWARD THROUGH SAID VENTILATING PIPE TO DRAW AIR OUT OF SAID WATER TANK, SAID OVERFLOW PIPE AND SAID BOWL, YIELDABLE GASKET MEANS POSITIONED BETWEEN THE UPPER EDGE OF SAID WATER TANK AND THE COVER THEREOF, SAID VENTILATING PIPE HAVING A FLATTENED PORTION AT THE BOTTOM PART THEREOF SO THAT THE WIDTH THEREOF DOES NOT EXCEED THE THICKNESS OF SAID GASKET MEANS, SAID GASKET MEANS HAVING A GAP IN THE REAR PART THEREOF THROUGH WHICH SAID FLATTENED PORTION OF SAID VENTILATING PIPE IS INSERTED INTO SAID TANK, SAID TOILET BOWL HAVING A SEAT AND SEALING MEANS BETWEEN SAID SEAT AND SAID TOILET BOWL FOR SUBSTANTIALLY PREVENTING FUMES FROM ESCAPING INTO THE BATHROOM FROM SAID BOWL WHITE EXCREMENT IS BEING VOIDED INTO SAID BOWL AND SAID FUMES AND AIR ARE BEING EXHAUSTED FROM SAID BOWL BY SAID AIR FLOW PRODUCING MEANS.
US300414A 1963-08-01 1963-08-01 Ventilators for water closets, kitchens and the like Expired - Lifetime US3192539A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US300414A US3192539A (en) 1963-08-01 1963-08-01 Ventilators for water closets, kitchens and the like

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US300414A US3192539A (en) 1963-08-01 1963-08-01 Ventilators for water closets, kitchens and the like

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3192539A true US3192539A (en) 1965-07-06

Family

ID=23159005

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US300414A Expired - Lifetime US3192539A (en) 1963-08-01 1963-08-01 Ventilators for water closets, kitchens and the like

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3192539A (en)

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3495282A (en) * 1967-11-16 1970-02-17 Allaird B Taggart Toilet bowl and exhaust device
US3523309A (en) * 1967-10-31 1970-08-11 Walter B Munden Toilet exhaust system
US3681790A (en) * 1970-06-15 1972-08-08 John Dooley Ventilated water closets automatically affording protection of its ventilating means from water damage
US3691568A (en) * 1970-08-24 1972-09-19 William L Martz Ventilator for water closets
US3703010A (en) * 1970-05-12 1972-11-21 Dale F Russell Ventilated toilet
US3896509A (en) * 1974-04-11 1975-07-29 Donald Stipp Ventilating system for bathrooms
US3900908A (en) * 1973-12-12 1975-08-26 Galen L Stump Water closet evacuation means
US3938201A (en) * 1974-11-04 1976-02-17 Mcgrew Dan Ventilator for a toilet bowl
US3939506A (en) * 1974-01-18 1976-02-24 Pearson Raymond H Odor control ventilator
US3942200A (en) * 1975-01-13 1976-03-09 Pearson Raymond H Odor control ventilator
US3967545A (en) * 1974-02-14 1976-07-06 John Baker Controlling the supply of electric current to a room
US4007498A (en) * 1976-01-05 1977-02-15 Pearson Raymond H Toilet ventilator including overflow-responsive sensor
US4017916A (en) * 1975-01-13 1977-04-19 Pearson Raymond H Toilet ventilator including motion-responsive electrical transducer
US4044408A (en) * 1976-09-27 1977-08-30 Pearson Raymond H Deodorizing accessary for water closets
US4165544A (en) * 1978-05-15 1979-08-28 Barry Bill H Odorless toilet stool
US4232406A (en) * 1979-05-18 1980-11-11 Beeghly Lester R Water closet ventilating system with vacuum breaker valve
US4318192A (en) * 1979-10-31 1982-03-09 Williams Jack D Ventilated toilet
US4442555A (en) * 1980-06-07 1984-04-17 Yoshitaka Aoyama Toilet bowl odor removal suction control
US4590629A (en) * 1984-07-27 1986-05-27 Lusk Leonard A Toilet ventilating device
US4922557A (en) * 1989-03-08 1990-05-08 Poly-John Enterprises Corp. Outdoor toilet holding tank ventilation system
US5010600A (en) * 1990-02-16 1991-04-30 Anthony Prisco Toilet odor removal system
US5054131A (en) * 1990-06-29 1991-10-08 Sim Jae K Toilet assembly
US5170512A (en) * 1990-02-16 1992-12-15 Anthony Prisco Toilet odor removal system
US5179737A (en) * 1991-03-14 1993-01-19 Ricard Vernon F Odor remover device
WO1993014276A1 (en) * 1992-01-16 1993-07-22 Canadian Commercial Corporation Limited Lavatory vent and/or cistern
US5305472A (en) * 1993-02-08 1994-04-26 Eger Leroy O Ventilation unit for a toilet
US5355536A (en) * 1990-02-16 1994-10-18 Anthony Prisco Ventilated toilet seat assembly
WO1995030802A1 (en) * 1993-02-08 1995-11-16 Leroy Eger Ventilation unit for a toilet
US5930844A (en) * 1996-10-04 1999-08-03 Scott, Iii; Louis J. Commode valving arrangement
US6167576B1 (en) 1999-12-09 2001-01-02 Jimmie L. Sollami Ventilated toilet seat
US6219853B1 (en) * 1998-12-03 2001-04-24 Steven W. Johnson Toilet ventilation system
US6298500B1 (en) 1996-12-19 2001-10-09 Jimmie L. Sollami Ventilated toilet seat
US6523184B2 (en) 1998-04-28 2003-02-25 Delpriss Management Services, Inc. Toilet ventilation system
US6786815B1 (en) * 2003-08-12 2004-09-07 Hy-Tech Inventions, Inc. Apparatus for venting rooms with exhaust fans
US6804837B1 (en) 2003-09-09 2004-10-19 Guess Sr Robert L Odor transporter system for a toilet bowl
US20040205882A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2004-10-21 Mundt Fred S. Ventilated toilet system with a pressure relief valve
US20050081285A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2005-04-21 Mundt Fred S. Ventilated toilet system
US20050155140A1 (en) * 2004-01-21 2005-07-21 Joshua Zulu Central toilet/bathroom venting
US6928666B1 (en) 2004-03-03 2005-08-16 Richard C. Schaffer Toilet with self-contained ventilation system
US20050210571A1 (en) * 2004-03-25 2005-09-29 Rozana Sustar Air water closet
US20050277380A1 (en) * 2002-12-18 2005-12-15 Horner Joseph W Recreational vehicle holding tank exhaust fan. Removes all odor from holding tank. Makes camping much more pleasant
US20060200896A1 (en) * 2005-03-14 2006-09-14 Yang Chang-Jin Ventilation check valve for bathrooms and toilets
US20060248634A1 (en) * 2005-05-09 2006-11-09 Sollami Jimmie L Ventilated toilet seat
US20090293182A1 (en) * 2006-06-20 2009-12-03 Ryszard Kret Method for Air Removal from a Water-Closet Bowl and a Device for air removal from a water-closet bowl
DE102008038120A1 (en) 2008-08-17 2010-04-08 Scholta, Winfried E. Smell adsorption module for use as container for axially sucked and blown air stream, has bars and grooves formed at inner and outer wall sides of container for switch, battery, sensors, operating elements and other functional elements
US20100089235A1 (en) * 2008-10-15 2010-04-15 Lee Foerster Deodorizing device and kit, and methods for odor removal
US8695123B2 (en) 2011-06-23 2014-04-15 Franklin Lanza Ventilated toilet

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1802617A (en) * 1928-08-08 1931-04-28 John J Mullin Ventilating apparatus
US1929776A (en) * 1931-10-24 1933-10-10 Churchill Cabinet Company Telephone booth
US2161863A (en) * 1938-04-08 1939-06-13 Louis N Harbeke Lavatory ventilator
US2371923A (en) * 1943-02-15 1945-03-20 Hugh W Sanford Toilet deodorizer
US2847682A (en) * 1955-04-18 1958-08-19 William L Shay Toilet ventilator
US3087168A (en) * 1960-05-10 1963-04-30 Maurice A Huso Toilet filtering ventilator

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1802617A (en) * 1928-08-08 1931-04-28 John J Mullin Ventilating apparatus
US1929776A (en) * 1931-10-24 1933-10-10 Churchill Cabinet Company Telephone booth
US2161863A (en) * 1938-04-08 1939-06-13 Louis N Harbeke Lavatory ventilator
US2371923A (en) * 1943-02-15 1945-03-20 Hugh W Sanford Toilet deodorizer
US2847682A (en) * 1955-04-18 1958-08-19 William L Shay Toilet ventilator
US3087168A (en) * 1960-05-10 1963-04-30 Maurice A Huso Toilet filtering ventilator

Cited By (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3523309A (en) * 1967-10-31 1970-08-11 Walter B Munden Toilet exhaust system
US3495282A (en) * 1967-11-16 1970-02-17 Allaird B Taggart Toilet bowl and exhaust device
US3703010A (en) * 1970-05-12 1972-11-21 Dale F Russell Ventilated toilet
US3681790A (en) * 1970-06-15 1972-08-08 John Dooley Ventilated water closets automatically affording protection of its ventilating means from water damage
US3691568A (en) * 1970-08-24 1972-09-19 William L Martz Ventilator for water closets
US3900908A (en) * 1973-12-12 1975-08-26 Galen L Stump Water closet evacuation means
US3939506A (en) * 1974-01-18 1976-02-24 Pearson Raymond H Odor control ventilator
US3967545A (en) * 1974-02-14 1976-07-06 John Baker Controlling the supply of electric current to a room
US3896509A (en) * 1974-04-11 1975-07-29 Donald Stipp Ventilating system for bathrooms
US3938201A (en) * 1974-11-04 1976-02-17 Mcgrew Dan Ventilator for a toilet bowl
US3942200A (en) * 1975-01-13 1976-03-09 Pearson Raymond H Odor control ventilator
US4017916A (en) * 1975-01-13 1977-04-19 Pearson Raymond H Toilet ventilator including motion-responsive electrical transducer
US4007498A (en) * 1976-01-05 1977-02-15 Pearson Raymond H Toilet ventilator including overflow-responsive sensor
US4044408A (en) * 1976-09-27 1977-08-30 Pearson Raymond H Deodorizing accessary for water closets
US4165544A (en) * 1978-05-15 1979-08-28 Barry Bill H Odorless toilet stool
US4232406A (en) * 1979-05-18 1980-11-11 Beeghly Lester R Water closet ventilating system with vacuum breaker valve
US4318192A (en) * 1979-10-31 1982-03-09 Williams Jack D Ventilated toilet
US4442555A (en) * 1980-06-07 1984-04-17 Yoshitaka Aoyama Toilet bowl odor removal suction control
US4590629A (en) * 1984-07-27 1986-05-27 Lusk Leonard A Toilet ventilating device
US4922557A (en) * 1989-03-08 1990-05-08 Poly-John Enterprises Corp. Outdoor toilet holding tank ventilation system
US5010600A (en) * 1990-02-16 1991-04-30 Anthony Prisco Toilet odor removal system
US5170512A (en) * 1990-02-16 1992-12-15 Anthony Prisco Toilet odor removal system
US5355536A (en) * 1990-02-16 1994-10-18 Anthony Prisco Ventilated toilet seat assembly
US5054131A (en) * 1990-06-29 1991-10-08 Sim Jae K Toilet assembly
US5179737A (en) * 1991-03-14 1993-01-19 Ricard Vernon F Odor remover device
WO1993014276A1 (en) * 1992-01-16 1993-07-22 Canadian Commercial Corporation Limited Lavatory vent and/or cistern
US5305472A (en) * 1993-02-08 1994-04-26 Eger Leroy O Ventilation unit for a toilet
WO1995030802A1 (en) * 1993-02-08 1995-11-16 Leroy Eger Ventilation unit for a toilet
US5930844A (en) * 1996-10-04 1999-08-03 Scott, Iii; Louis J. Commode valving arrangement
US6298500B1 (en) 1996-12-19 2001-10-09 Jimmie L. Sollami Ventilated toilet seat
US6523184B2 (en) 1998-04-28 2003-02-25 Delpriss Management Services, Inc. Toilet ventilation system
US6219853B1 (en) * 1998-12-03 2001-04-24 Steven W. Johnson Toilet ventilation system
US6167576B1 (en) 1999-12-09 2001-01-02 Jimmie L. Sollami Ventilated toilet seat
US20050277380A1 (en) * 2002-12-18 2005-12-15 Horner Joseph W Recreational vehicle holding tank exhaust fan. Removes all odor from holding tank. Makes camping much more pleasant
US20040205882A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2004-10-21 Mundt Fred S. Ventilated toilet system with a pressure relief valve
US7162751B2 (en) 2003-04-17 2007-01-16 Mundt Fred S Ventilated toilet system
US20050081285A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2005-04-21 Mundt Fred S. Ventilated toilet system
US6786815B1 (en) * 2003-08-12 2004-09-07 Hy-Tech Inventions, Inc. Apparatus for venting rooms with exhaust fans
US6804837B1 (en) 2003-09-09 2004-10-19 Guess Sr Robert L Odor transporter system for a toilet bowl
US20050155140A1 (en) * 2004-01-21 2005-07-21 Joshua Zulu Central toilet/bathroom venting
US6928666B1 (en) 2004-03-03 2005-08-16 Richard C. Schaffer Toilet with self-contained ventilation system
US20050210571A1 (en) * 2004-03-25 2005-09-29 Rozana Sustar Air water closet
US20060200896A1 (en) * 2005-03-14 2006-09-14 Yang Chang-Jin Ventilation check valve for bathrooms and toilets
US20060248634A1 (en) * 2005-05-09 2006-11-09 Sollami Jimmie L Ventilated toilet seat
US20090293182A1 (en) * 2006-06-20 2009-12-03 Ryszard Kret Method for Air Removal from a Water-Closet Bowl and a Device for air removal from a water-closet bowl
DE102008038120A1 (en) 2008-08-17 2010-04-08 Scholta, Winfried E. Smell adsorption module for use as container for axially sucked and blown air stream, has bars and grooves formed at inner and outer wall sides of container for switch, battery, sensors, operating elements and other functional elements
US20100089235A1 (en) * 2008-10-15 2010-04-15 Lee Foerster Deodorizing device and kit, and methods for odor removal
US8337602B2 (en) 2008-10-15 2012-12-25 Tf Industries, Llc Deodorizing device and kit, and methods for odor removal
US8695123B2 (en) 2011-06-23 2014-04-15 Franklin Lanza Ventilated toilet

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4232406A (en) Water closet ventilating system with vacuum breaker valve
US4165544A (en) Odorless toilet stool
US3763505A (en) Toilet ventilation device
US6804837B1 (en) Odor transporter system for a toilet bowl
US5906009A (en) Toilet bowl noxious fume and mist evacuation
US4494255A (en) Ventilated toilet device
US20020194670A1 (en) Ventilation system for malodorous air removal
US3495282A (en) Toilet bowl and exhaust device
US4365361A (en) Toilet bowl odor educting and powered exhaust system
US4159550A (en) Toilet facility
US8555915B2 (en) Dual action low head isolation valve
US4318192A (en) Ventilated toilet
US2575778A (en) Ventilated toilet
US8505123B2 (en) Ventilated toilet
US4007498A (en) Toilet ventilator including overflow-responsive sensor
US5386594A (en) Toilet ventilating manifold system
US3913150A (en) Toilet stool ventilating means
CA2016488C (en) Toilet deodorizer
US3939506A (en) Odor control ventilator
US2985890A (en) Toilet bowl ventilating apparatus
US4402093A (en) Emergency valve unit for preventing overflow of a toilet
US3887949A (en) Ventilated seating for a water closet
KR790001882B1 (en) Water closet
US7275271B1 (en) Toilet evacuation system
US2603797A (en) Water motor-driven ventilator