US3156514A - Connector - Google Patents

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Publication number
US3156514A
US3156514A US15396761A US3156514A US 3156514 A US3156514 A US 3156514A US 15396761 A US15396761 A US 15396761A US 3156514 A US3156514 A US 3156514A
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Prior art keywords
protrusions
plates
strip
plate
cover
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Expired - Lifetime
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George S Wing
William R Dickie
Josef U Berkl
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Hi Shear Corp
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Hi Shear Corp
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R12/00Structural associations of a plurality of mutually-insulated electrical connecting elements, specially adapted for printed circuits, e.g. printed circuit boards [PCBs], flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures, e.g. terminal strips, terminal blocks; Coupling devices specially adapted for printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures; Terminals specially adapted for contact with, or insertion into, printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables, or like generally planar structures
    • H01R12/50Fixed connections
    • H01R12/59Fixed connections for flexible printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables or like structures
    • H01R12/65Fixed connections for flexible printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables or like structures characterised by the terminal
    • H01R12/67Fixed connections for flexible printed circuits, flat or ribbon cables or like structures characterised by the terminal insulation penetrating terminals
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R4/00Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact
    • H01R4/24Connections using contact members penetrating or cutting insulation or cable strands
    • H01R4/2495Insulation penetration combined with permanent deformation of the contact member, e.g. crimping

Description

Nov. 10, 1964 G. s. WING ETAI. 3,156,514

CONNECTOR Filed Nov. 2l, 1961 2o 56.2 d, 441 26 28 'lll/[1147 i 'n l "ALT-E' e 23 28 'u AVI/[A5 f Muff@ ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent O 3,156,514 CGNNECTR George S. Wing, Palos Verdes Estates, William R. Dickie,

Manhattan Beach, and Josef U. Berkl, West Los Angeles, Calif., assgnors to Hi-Shear Corporation, Torrance, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Nov. 21, 1961, Ser. No. 153,967 12 Claims. (Cl. 339-97) This invention relates to method and means for making low-resistance conductive connective engagement with insulated electrical conductors.

A well-known type of electrical conductor comprises a conductive metal strip, usually copper, enclosed by an insulating cover. A familiar member of this class includes a plurality of fiat, parallel, spaced-apart copper strips sandwiched between two sheets of plastic, all cemented or fused together. This assembly looks like, and is often called, a tape It is an object of this invention to provide means for making circuit and terminal connections to individual ones of the metal strips in such a tape.

It is a related object to provide such a connection in which the resistance thereof is so low as to be negligible.

A connector means for making conductive engagement with the strip in an electrical conductor or" the above type comprises a pair of conductive connector plates. A first of these plates has a substantially hat face and the other of Said plates has a face with a plurality of protrusions on it. When the protrusions and the face of the other plate are pressed toward each other, the protrusions indent into the cover. Thereafter a welding current may be passed between the plates while pressure is applied to weld together the plates and the strip and thereby form a joint with negligible resistance.

A method for applying these connector means comprises placing these connector plates on opposite sides of the conductor as aforesaid, pressing the plates toward each other with a pressure adequate to enable the protrusions to pass at least partially through the cover and thus approach the strip, and thereafter to apply both pressure and electrical current across the plates whereby leakage of current through the cover heats the cover and enables the cover material to be pressed away from the protrusions and away from the strip near the protrusions and also serving to weld the protrusion strip and plate together.

The above and other features of this invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an end View of a housing for holding clip means to which the conductor can be attached;

FIG. 2 is a cross-section taken at line 2 2. of FIG. l;

FIG. 3 is a plan View of a conductor according to the invention with connector means attached thereto;

FIG. 4 is a cross-section taken at line 4;-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the presently preferred embodiment of a plate according to the invention;

FIG. 6 is a side elevation of a portion of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a perspective View of an alternate embodiment of a portion of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a cross-section of an alternate embodiment of connector means according to the invention;

FIGS. 9-ll are fragmentary cross-sections illustrating y the preferred method of the invention;

FIG. l2 is a cross-section taken at line 12-12 of FIG. 8; and

FIG. 13 is a right-hand end view of FIG. l2, taken at line 13-13 thereof.

FIG. l illustrates a molded housing Ztl. The parts include screw holes 23, passages 24, spacer teeth 25 and 3,156,514 Patented Nov. 10, 1964 lCC a recess 26 in the face of the housing adjacent an opening of the passage.

With particular respect to FIG. 2, there is shown an i-l-shaped clip means 27, one of which is provided in each of the passages, the clips having hooks 28 at the extremes of the four arms which are adapted to hook over shoulders 29 to prevent the clip from readily being moved out of the passage.

There are clearances between the arms of the clip means and the housing so that the arms of the clip means are adapted to be sprung apart when connector means Si) on tape 31 are pressed between the arms to make conductive contact therewith.

An insert 31a (see FIG. 4) bearing teeth 32 is placed in the recess and a second insert 33, which is integral with a retainer plate 34, is also fitted in the recess. The retainer plate is adapted to be held to the housing by screws 35 threaded into screw holes 23.

The total width of the inserts is less than that of the recess by an amount about equal to the thickness of tape 31. There is a slot 36 through the retainer plate, to provide for passage of the tape. Teeth 32 are spaced apart by equal distances so as to indent the insulating cover between the strips. This feature is shown in FIG. 4.

In FIG. 3, there is shown a tape with its insulating covers 37, 37a enclosing metal strips 38. Connector plates 39, 4t) (see FIGS. 2 and 3) are attached to the tape by means to be described, and these connector plates are the portion which contacts the clips to make the conductive contact.

Now with respect to connector plates 39, 40, connector plate 39 is shown in FIG. 5. It has a flat face 41 with a plurality of protrusions 42 rising therefrom to equal elevations. The preferred embodiment of such a protrusion is shown in FIG. 6 which has a conical base 43 and a rounded free end 44.

An alternate embodiment of a protrusion is shown in FIG. 7 wherein face 45 is shown with a pyramidal protrusion 46, of which there with ordinarily be a plurality.

The embodiment shown in FIG. 6 is preferably for polyester-type covers. Pyramids are preferred for use with Telion and Kel-F covers where a certain amount of piercing is sometimes required.

FIG. 8 shows a U-shaped clip 47 having a pair of arms 4d, one of which has a flat surface 49, and the other of which has a Hat surface 5) with a plurality of protrusions 51, like protrusions 46. This device is installed simply by clamping the U-shaped clip onto the end of the tape, the protrusions serving to pierce the cover and make contact with the metal strip inside. It may preferably, but not necessarily, pass all the way through the tape and make additional contact with tlat face 49. Y

FIGS. 12 and 13 illustrate a preferred arrangement of protrusions for a connector which is to be crimped on. The protrusions of central row 68 are preferably pyramidal,r and are intended to pierce the metal strip. Outer rows 69, 70 may also be the same height and be pyramidal if desired, but preferably they will be the shape of protrusions 42 and of lesser elevation than those of row SS. Then they merely indent the tape and `act as holding means for it. Particular attention is called to protrusions 71 and 72, which are located beyond any protrusions of the center row. Protrusions 71 and 72 act as strain relief devices, and take up most pulling forces which might be exerted, and protect the protrusions of the center row or rows from these forces. Such forces on the center row would disturb the electrical contact, and either break it or add resistance at those points by loosening it.

The preferred embodiment of connector means comprises connector plates 39 and 40. Plate 39 is shown in .o en

FIG. 5, and plate 40 is simply a lat plate without protrusions and having a flat face. The preferred method of installing them is shown in FIG. 9 wherein tape 3l is shown between plates 39 and itl with platens 55 pressing against them, the force being illustrated by arrows 56, 57. The protrusions ma :e initial contact against layer 37a of the insulating cover, and the pressure, which may be of the order of about 700 pounds on a plate area of about 0.15 square inch, giving a unit pressure at the protrusions on the order of perhaps 2000 p.s.i., indenting Vthe cover adjacent to the protrusions, so that the protrusions can, without the passage of electrical current or the supply of heat, approach the position shown in FIG. l0. In this position, there still remains a thin film at line 59 between the protrusion and the strip. Also, directly below the protrusions, there is still a layer 6i? of the cover which is only beginning to thin out. However, at this time, and with the same pressure applied, it is possible to begin applying current across the two platens, which means across the two plates, through a circuit 6l. At first, rather little current will flow due to the insulating properties of the cover. However, there will be a certain amount of current leakage through it which will generate heat, thereby further softening the cover and permitting the protrusions to move farther toward plate ltd. Finally, the cover is substantially entirely removed between the protrusion and the strip and between the strip and the face of connector plate dit, and at that time the current from circuit 6l can readily lire and creates welds 62, firmly welding ytogether the protrusion and thus plate 39 to the strip and also to plate 40. The tiring of the current is a straightforward problem in welding. The timing and current loads must be 'figured for each type of device. However, this is a technique well within the scope of the abilities of a person skilled in the art.

The resulting welded structure is shown in FIG. 1l and the platens may then be removed. This results in the construction shown in FIG. 3. Particular attention is called to the fact that the plastic has flowed between the welds, and has been distorted, but it wiill be noted that all of the welds are Ysurrounded by the plastic and the entire area is completelysealed from contactwith the environment. Therefore, this invention results in a corrosion-free welded structure, completely isolated from the surrounding environment.

The plates may conveniently be made of berylliumcopper, or of `some other ydesired conductive material. t will be observed that the technique of welding these plates onto the tape is simple and readily carried out in mass production and when the configuration of FIG. 3V

is achieved (or alternatively that of 12143.18 if welding equipment is not readily available), that the tape is readily applied to the housing as shown simply by passing the tape through the slit in the retainer plate and asembling it with insert 3l, pressing the connector means between the clips, and thereafter tightening the retainer plate o-n the housing. The device of FIG. 2 is ready to receive other connections, such as circuit board connections or other tape means if desired, and it will also be observed that `the clip could have been modified by substituting for the two arms at the left, a simple spade or terminal arm or any 'other desired connector configuration. Also, the recess arrangement on the'k right-hand side in FIG. 2 couldhave been duplicated on Vthe left side. 'f

A plurality of rows of `protrusions, such as rows 65, ed and 67, is to be Vpreferred to the'use of only a single row, and preferably, `the protrusions should be staggered.

When only one row isused, there is sometimes a tendency for the tape tok be mashed or cut. This is avoided by the protrusions enter the tape, the displaced material must move somewhere else. in an unstaggered, rectangular, or single line pattern, the material flows irregularly, and unfavorable internal stresses arise. ln a staggered pattern, the undulating region in which the material may flow readily lends itself to such movement, and the flow is smooth and even.

t is `possible on the same plate to use both types of protrusions shown in FlGS. 6 and 7. Also, staggering need not be provided between all adjacent rows, or even between all members of adjacent rows, some of whose protrusions are staggered. Staggering is preferred at the location where welding takes place, but need not be provided over all of the plate.

Also, protrusions of lesser elevation may also be used, these being provided to minimize creep of the tape, which other protrusions form the welded or crimped contact.

rThis invention is not to be limited by the embodiments shown in the drawings and described in the description which are given by way of example and not of limitation, but only in accordance with the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

l. A method for applying a pair of connector plates, one of which bears protrusions thereon, to an electrical conductor of the class wherein a conductive metal strip is venclosed by a thermoplastic, flexible insulating cover, comprising: placing the connector plates on opposite sides of the conductor,` with the protrusions bearing against the insulating cover, pressing the plates toward each other with a pressure adequate to indent the cover and enable the protrusions to pass at least partially therethrough and approach the strip, and thereafter apply both pressure and electrical current across the plates, whereby leakage of current through the cover heats the cover and enables the cover material to be pressed away using agplurality of rows, because then the tape is pretapes heling;j cut, 'and also makes Ya better joint. When from the protrusions and the strip near the protrusions, and welding the protrusions, strip and the plate without protrusions together.

2. Connector means for making conductive engagement with an electrical conductor of the class wherein a conductive `flat metallic strip is enclosed by a substantially flat insulating cover, comprising: a pair of conductive connector plates, a rst of said plates having a substantially ilat surface, and a plurality of protrusions on a face of the other of said plates, the protrusions passing through the cover and being welded to` the strip, and the strip being welded to the ilat surface of the lirst plate, both portions of the cover between the weldments of the strip and the last-mentioned plate having been displaced laterally by pressure applied across the sandwich of two `plates and the conductor and by heat developed by the passage of current from one plate to the other, thereby structurally welding both plates to the strip and conductively connecting both plates to the strip.

3. Connector means according to claim 2 in which some of the protrusions comprise pyramidal structures.

4. Connector means according to claim 2 in which someof the protrusions comprise-conical structures with rounded free ends.

5. Connector means according to claim 4 in which the Vsaid'face on the second plate is fiat, and all protrusions have the same elevation relative thereto.

6. Connector means according to claim 2 in which the protrusions are provided in a plurality of rows, and at least some Vof the protrusions are staggered.

7. Connector means'for making circuit connections to electrical Vconductors of the .class wherein a dat ccn-. ductive metal strip is enclosed by a flat, flexible insulating cover, comprising: conductive'connector plates on oppositeY sides of the conductor protrusions `projecting from and integral with one of the plates, `a'nd'afliat surface on the other of said plates, theprotrusions passing through the cover Yand beingV welded to the Astrip and the strip being welded to the fiat surface of the other plate, both portions of the cover between the weldments of the strip and the last-mentioned plate having been displaced laterally by pressure applied across the sandwich of two plates and the conductor and by heat developed by the passage of current from one plate to the other, thereby structurally welding both plates to the strip and conductively connecting both plates -to the strip; a housing having a passage therethrough; conductive clip means in the passage adapted to straddle and conductively engage the plates; said housing having a recess surrounding a passage opening; tooth means comprising an insert adapted to lit in said recess and having teeth for indenting into the cover; another insert. also adapted to tit into said recess in opposition to the tooth means; and a retainer plate having a slit for passing the conductor and attachable to the housing to hold the inserts and tooth means in the recess, with the teeth restraining removal of the conductor from the housing.

8. Connector means according to claim 7 in which some of the protrusions comprise pyramidal structure.

9. Connector means according to claim 7 in which said plates comprise the arms of a U-shaped conductive element crimped to the conductor.

1G. Connector means according to claim 9 in which the protrusions are provided in a plurality of rows, and at least some of the protrusions are staggered.

11. Connector means according to claim 10 in which there are at least three rows of protrusions, the outerand the protrusions being staggered.

12. Connector means according to claim 11 in which the protrusions of the outermost rows have a lesser elevation than those of the innermost rows, the outermost rows lying outside the area encompassed by the strip, and indenting the cover at the sides of the strip.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNlTED STATES PATENTS 1,231,804 Staten luly 3, 1917 2,265,057 Burt Dec. 2, 1941 2,446,262 Clark Aug. 3, 1948 2,590,886 Pedersen Apr. 1, 1952 2,678,429 Abbott May 11, 1954 2,724,736 Klumpp Nov. 22, 1955 2,749,420 Ptyo June 5, 1956 2,759,161 Berg Aug. 14, 1956 2,802,195 Martines Aug. 6, 1957 2,962,692 White Nov. 29, 1960 2,968,016 Angele Ian. 1G, 1961 2,993,188 Anderson July 18, 1961 2,999,997 Tuchel Sept. 12, 1961 FOREGN PATENTS 233,970 Australia May 3l, 1961

Claims (1)

  1. 2. CONNECTOR MEANS FOR MAKING CONDUCTIVE ENGAGEMENT WITH AN ELECTRICAL CONDUCTOR OF THE CLASS WHEREIN A CONDUCTIVE FLAT METALLIC STRIP IS ENCLOSED BY A SUBSTANTIALLY FLAT INSULATING COVER, COMPRISING: A PAIR OF CONDUCTIVE CONNECTOR PLATES, A FIRST OF SAID PLATES HAVING A SUBSTANTIALLY FLAT SURFACE, AND A PLURALITY OF PROTRUSIONS ON A FACE OF THE OTHER OF SAID PLATES, THE PROTRUSIONS PASSING THROUGH THE COVER AND BEING WELDED TO THE STRIP, AND THE STRIP BEING WELDED TO THE FLAT SURFACE OF THE FIRST PLATE, BOTH PORTIONS OF THE COVER BETWEEN THE WELDMENTS OF THE STRIP AND THE LAST-MENTIONED PLATE HAVING BEEN DISPLACED LATERALLY BY PRESSURE APPLIED ACROSS THE SANDWICH OF TWO PLATES AND THE CONDUCTOR AND BY HEAT DEVELOPED BY THE PASSAGE OF CURRENT FROM ONE PLATE TO THE OTHER, THEREBY STRUCTURALLY WELDING BOTH PLATES TO THE STRIP AND CONDUCTIVELY CONNECTING BOTH PLATES TO THE STRIP.
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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3252126A (en) * 1963-04-02 1966-05-17 Hughes Aircraft Co Electrical connector
US3252203A (en) * 1962-10-05 1966-05-24 Trw Inc Welding process
US3259873A (en) * 1963-10-21 1966-07-05 Itt Terminals for flat electrical conductors
US3300851A (en) * 1964-01-02 1967-01-31 Gen Electric Method of making bonded wire circuits
US3355698A (en) * 1965-04-28 1967-11-28 Amp Inc Electrical connector
US3366919A (en) * 1966-02-11 1968-01-30 Schjeldahl Co G T Electrical connector
US3387365A (en) * 1965-09-28 1968-06-11 John P. Stelmak Method of making electrical connections to a miniature electronic component
US3412701A (en) * 1964-01-06 1968-11-26 Amp Inc Insulation-piercing electrical connectors
US3418444A (en) * 1963-10-21 1968-12-24 Elco Corp Method and apparatus for bonding through insulating material
US3444347A (en) * 1966-01-10 1969-05-13 Unitek Corp Method for solder reflow connection of insulated conductors
US3448431A (en) * 1966-03-17 1969-06-03 Elco Corp Contact carrier strip
US3531971A (en) * 1965-07-26 1970-10-06 Itt Cable insulation piercing crimp tool,terminal,and method of forming
US3557983A (en) * 1968-03-14 1971-01-26 Dow Chemical Co Joining of laminates
US3762028A (en) * 1972-02-25 1973-10-02 Dow Chemical Co Joining of plastic/metal foil laminates
US3891293A (en) * 1973-06-21 1975-06-24 Itt Flat cable terminating
US3932018A (en) * 1972-09-11 1976-01-13 Amp Incorporated Electrical connections for closely spaced conductors and apparatus for forming such connections
US4034152A (en) * 1973-06-18 1977-07-05 Warner Allan S Termination system for fusing aluminum-type lead wires
US4037073A (en) * 1967-02-11 1977-07-19 Otto Alfred Becker Resistance welding of sheet metal coated with layers
US4267542A (en) * 1978-09-21 1981-05-12 Norbert Weiner Thermal fuse for electrical apparatus
US4525020A (en) * 1982-09-21 1985-06-25 Junkosha Company Ltd. Electrical connector
EP0198566A2 (en) * 1985-04-18 1986-10-22 Innovus Electrical interconnect system, method of making the same and mass flow meter incorporating such system
US9498851B2 (en) * 2012-09-06 2016-11-22 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. Methods for forming apparatus for stud bump formation

Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1231804A (en) * 1916-11-27 1917-07-03 Harry Culp Staton Wire-clamp.
US2265057A (en) * 1939-06-12 1941-12-02 Guy H Burt Electrical plug
US2446262A (en) * 1945-05-30 1948-08-03 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Wire grip for electrical fittings
US2590886A (en) * 1948-04-08 1952-04-01 Pedersen Svend Laessphie Strain relief for electrical connectors
US2678429A (en) * 1950-12-29 1954-05-11 Abbott Developments Inc Plug assembly
US2724736A (en) * 1953-02-27 1955-11-22 Jr Ferdinand Klumpp Spring type strain-relief bushing
US2749420A (en) * 1954-04-06 1956-06-05 Albert F Pityo Method of and apparatus for attaching terminals to the ends of wires
US2759161A (en) * 1953-01-13 1956-08-14 Aircraft Marine Prod Inc Electrical connector and method
US2802195A (en) * 1954-12-09 1957-08-06 Martines Rene Insulation-piercing electric terminal
US2962692A (en) * 1957-05-02 1960-11-29 North American Aviation Inc Electric contact terminal
US2968016A (en) * 1958-09-19 1961-01-10 Angele Wilhelm Blade connector
US2993188A (en) * 1957-12-02 1961-07-18 Ericsson Telefon Ab L M Terminal for printed circuit card
US2999997A (en) * 1957-12-19 1961-09-12 Tuchel Ulrich Electrical socket for printed circuit cards

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1231804A (en) * 1916-11-27 1917-07-03 Harry Culp Staton Wire-clamp.
US2265057A (en) * 1939-06-12 1941-12-02 Guy H Burt Electrical plug
US2446262A (en) * 1945-05-30 1948-08-03 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Wire grip for electrical fittings
US2590886A (en) * 1948-04-08 1952-04-01 Pedersen Svend Laessphie Strain relief for electrical connectors
US2678429A (en) * 1950-12-29 1954-05-11 Abbott Developments Inc Plug assembly
US2759161A (en) * 1953-01-13 1956-08-14 Aircraft Marine Prod Inc Electrical connector and method
US2724736A (en) * 1953-02-27 1955-11-22 Jr Ferdinand Klumpp Spring type strain-relief bushing
US2749420A (en) * 1954-04-06 1956-06-05 Albert F Pityo Method of and apparatus for attaching terminals to the ends of wires
US2802195A (en) * 1954-12-09 1957-08-06 Martines Rene Insulation-piercing electric terminal
US2962692A (en) * 1957-05-02 1960-11-29 North American Aviation Inc Electric contact terminal
US2993188A (en) * 1957-12-02 1961-07-18 Ericsson Telefon Ab L M Terminal for printed circuit card
US2999997A (en) * 1957-12-19 1961-09-12 Tuchel Ulrich Electrical socket for printed circuit cards
US2968016A (en) * 1958-09-19 1961-01-10 Angele Wilhelm Blade connector

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3252203A (en) * 1962-10-05 1966-05-24 Trw Inc Welding process
US3252126A (en) * 1963-04-02 1966-05-17 Hughes Aircraft Co Electrical connector
US3418444A (en) * 1963-10-21 1968-12-24 Elco Corp Method and apparatus for bonding through insulating material
US3259873A (en) * 1963-10-21 1966-07-05 Itt Terminals for flat electrical conductors
US3300851A (en) * 1964-01-02 1967-01-31 Gen Electric Method of making bonded wire circuits
US3412701A (en) * 1964-01-06 1968-11-26 Amp Inc Insulation-piercing electrical connectors
US3355698A (en) * 1965-04-28 1967-11-28 Amp Inc Electrical connector
US3531971A (en) * 1965-07-26 1970-10-06 Itt Cable insulation piercing crimp tool,terminal,and method of forming
US3387365A (en) * 1965-09-28 1968-06-11 John P. Stelmak Method of making electrical connections to a miniature electronic component
US3444347A (en) * 1966-01-10 1969-05-13 Unitek Corp Method for solder reflow connection of insulated conductors
US3366919A (en) * 1966-02-11 1968-01-30 Schjeldahl Co G T Electrical connector
US3448431A (en) * 1966-03-17 1969-06-03 Elco Corp Contact carrier strip
US4037073A (en) * 1967-02-11 1977-07-19 Otto Alfred Becker Resistance welding of sheet metal coated with layers
US3557983A (en) * 1968-03-14 1971-01-26 Dow Chemical Co Joining of laminates
US3762028A (en) * 1972-02-25 1973-10-02 Dow Chemical Co Joining of plastic/metal foil laminates
US3932018A (en) * 1972-09-11 1976-01-13 Amp Incorporated Electrical connections for closely spaced conductors and apparatus for forming such connections
US4034152A (en) * 1973-06-18 1977-07-05 Warner Allan S Termination system for fusing aluminum-type lead wires
US3891293A (en) * 1973-06-21 1975-06-24 Itt Flat cable terminating
US4267542A (en) * 1978-09-21 1981-05-12 Norbert Weiner Thermal fuse for electrical apparatus
US4525020A (en) * 1982-09-21 1985-06-25 Junkosha Company Ltd. Electrical connector
EP0198566A2 (en) * 1985-04-18 1986-10-22 Innovus Electrical interconnect system, method of making the same and mass flow meter incorporating such system
EP0198566A3 (en) * 1985-04-18 1988-07-20 Innovus Electrical interconnect system, method of making the same and mass flow meter incorporating such system
US9498851B2 (en) * 2012-09-06 2016-11-22 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. Methods for forming apparatus for stud bump formation

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