US3115541A - Electrical wiring connector - Google Patents

Electrical wiring connector Download PDF

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Publication number
US3115541A
US3115541A US196391A US19639162A US3115541A US 3115541 A US3115541 A US 3115541A US 196391 A US196391 A US 196391A US 19639162 A US19639162 A US 19639162A US 3115541 A US3115541 A US 3115541A
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halves
connector
wires
half
aperture
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US196391A
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Thomas E Hanner
Donald M Turnbull
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Pullman Inc
Trailmobile Leasing Corp
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Pullman Inc
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Assigned to TRAILMOBILE LEASING CORP. reassignment TRAILMOBILE LEASING CORP. CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). FEB. 10, 1984 Assignors: TRAILMOBILE INC.
Assigned to TRAILMOBILE INC., A CORP OF DE reassignment TRAILMOBILE INC., A CORP OF DE ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. SEE RECORD FOR DETAILS Assignors: TRAILMOBILE LEASING CORP., A CORP OF DE
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RELECTRICALLY-CONDUCTIVE CONNECTIONS; STRUCTURAL ASSOCIATIONS OF A PLURALITY OF MUTUALLY-INSULATED ELECTRICAL CONNECTING ELEMENTS; COUPLING DEVICES; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R4/00Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact, i.e. touching one another; Means for effecting or maintaining such contact; Electrically-conductive connections having two or more spaced connecting locations for conductors and using contact members penetrating insulation
    • H01R4/24Connections using contact members penetrating or cutting insulation or cable strands
    • H01R4/2404Connections using contact members penetrating or cutting insulation or cable strands the contact members having teeth, prongs, pins or needles penetrating the insulation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02GINSTALLATION OF ELECTRIC CABLES OR LINES, OR OF COMBINED OPTICAL AND ELECTRIC CABLES OR LINES
    • H02G3/00Installations of electric cables or lines in or on buildings, equivalent structures or vehicles
    • H02G3/02Details
    • H02G3/08Distribution boxes; Connection or junction boxes
    • H02G3/14Fastening of cover or lid to box

Description

Dec. 24, 1963 T.VE. HANNER ETAL ELECTRICAL WIRING CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 21, 1962 INVENTOR 5.

A T TOEWEXfi.

De 1963 T. E. HANNER ETAL ATTORNEX.

United States Patent 3,ll5,54l ELECTRICAL WllRiNG @UNNECTQR Thomas E. Harmer and Donald linrnhuil, Cincinnati, @hio, assignors, by mesne assignments, to Pullman Incorporated, a corporation of Delaware Filed May 21, 1962, Ser. No. 196,391 8 Claims. ('Cl. 174 2) This invention relates to wiring connectors and more particularly, to a wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires without the necessity of removing the insulation from the wires.

in many industries, such as the automobile manufacturing industry where there is a large amount of wiring involved in the finished product, it has been found desirable to tap into a wire and electrically connect it to another without removing the insulation from the wires. There has been a need for along time in the electrical wiring industry for an inexpensive, uncomplicated wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires without removing the insulation from the wires. While prior attempts have been made to supply such a wiring connector, these earlier attempts have involved relatively complex structures which were diflicult to handle and which did not positively and permanently electrically lock the wires together.

This invention arose out of the need for an inexpensive connector to electrically engage two wires of very small diameter, as for example, A in diameter including the electrical insulation. In order to conserve space, the con nectors are usually not more than /2" in length and /2" or less in width. These small wires and the small connectors used to electrically connect them present handling problems for a person in a production type industry who must handle these parts in a minimum of time without errors. It is imperative that an electrical connector designed for this type of use be easy to handle and positive in operation so as to minimizw assembly time. Because of the small size of many of these connectors, it is also imperative that the connector have a minimum of parts and not require a great effort to align and assemble the parts in their proper relationship.

It has therefore been an objective of this invention to provide an electrical connector which has a minimum of parts and is easily and positively placed in position to lock insulated wires in electrical engagement.

Another objective of this invention has been to provide an electrical connector made from two identical parts so as to minimize the cost of manufacture and maximize the ease of handling of small connectors for the workmen using the connectors.

Still another objective of this invention has been to provide an electrical connector which is easily snapfit into positive locked engagement.

Very briefly, this invention comprises an electrical wiring connector made from a non-conducting semi-flexible plastic material. The connector is made from two identical halves, each of which is provided with two long longitudinally extending V-shaped grooves in the opposing faces. A Phosphor bronze, or any conductive material staple is embedded in each half in such a fashion that one prong protrudes upwardly from the base into the two longitudinally extending grooves. Located between the grooves in each half is a stud or post which is generally in the shape of a right circular cylinder except that the peripheral surface has a plurality of concentric ribs whose cross sections are tapered giving the impression that the right circular cylinder is composed of a series of identical truncated cones superimposed one on top of another. The stud or post is located near one end of each half. Also located between the grooves but at the other end 3,115,541 Patented Dec. 24, 1963 from the protrusion or stud is a hole sized to receive the stud or post.

When the two halves are opposed, face to face, and end for end, the stud on one half is forced into the hole of the other with a certain pressure, depending upon the plasticity of the material. Thus the ribs on the post are forced through the hole in the opposing mating half so as to snap-fit and positively lock the two halves into engagement with the wires in the grooves sandwiched therebetween and connected electrically by the staples in each half.

This combination provides a wiring connector which is made from two identical symmetrical halves so that only one mold must be utilized to manufacture the die-cast halves of the connector. In addition, because the halves are symmetrical, the workman assembling the wires and connectors need not concern himself with properly selecting the parts of the connector in order to correctly assemble them.

In addition, this connector has the advantage of providing an el'ficient snap-it lock mechanism which may be easily and inexpensively molded onto a die-cast connector.

The invention can best be further described with reference to the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the assembled wiring connector,

FIGURE 2 is an exploded perspective View of the connector in unassembled position,

FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 33 of FIGURE 1,

FIGURE 4 is a cross-sectional view of a modified form of connector shown in an unassembled position,

FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view of the connector shown in FIGURE 4 in the assembled position.

The wiring connector of this invention consists of two identical halves 2, 4, which are adapted to be snap-fit into locked en agement. The two identical symmetrical halves are molded from a non-conducting semi-flexible plastic material such as high-density polyethylene or polypropylene. Each of the halves is in the form of a generally rectangular block having a flat inner surface which is adapted, when the connector is assembled, to be located adjacent the fiat surface of the mating block. Each of the blocks has a pair of longitudinally extending Vshaped recesses 8 and In in the fiat inside surface 6. These recesses extend from a point near one end of the block to a point near other end. Because the recesses do not extend the full length of the block, a small lip 112. of resilient plastic material is left between the end of the recess and the outer surface of the block. When wires ll, 3 are placed in the recesses and the two blocks are fitted together with the wires sai'ldwiched therebetwcen, the lips 12 are caused to deform and form a resilient moisture seal around the wires.

A U-shaped staple 14 made from Phosphor bronze or any other electrically conductive material is embedded in the plastic block with its ends extending up into each of the recesses of the block. The ends it? of the staples are pointed and extend into the recesses a sufficient distance so that when a wire is placed in the recess, the pointed ends of the staples penetrate the insulation E7 of the wires in the recess and project into engagement with the conductive material w of the wire.

In the modification shown in FIGURES l to 3, a stud or protrusion l8 extends outwardly normal to the plane of the fiat inner surface 6. The protrusion 18 is located between the two recesses 8 and lit at a point offset from the center of the block. The stud has the general shape of a right circular cylinder except that the peripheral surface has a plurality of concentric ribs 2d thereon whose cross sections are tapered so as to give the appearance that the stud or post is composed of a series of 3 identical truncated cones superimposed one on top of the other.

Located between the recesses 8, 1d and ofiset from the transversely disposed center line of the block the same distance as the stud is offset but in the opposite direction from the center of the block, is a conical aperture 22 which extends through the block and is tapered outwardly and toward the axis of the aperture from the fiat surface 6. As an alternative or added locking feature, each block may have a rib .2 3 which extends inwardly into the aperture 22 and serves as a. locking ring when the stud 18 of the opposite half is forced into the aperture 22. The locking rib 28 may be used as an alternative to the conical shape of the aperture 2-2 to aid in locking the two halves of the connector together.

A V-shaped recess 24- extends inwardly from the outer surface of the block and across its width in the plane of the axis of the aperture 22. A similar V-shaped recess 26 in the outer surface of the block extends along the longitudinal axis of the block in the plane of the axis of the aperture 22. Because of the resiliency of the material of which the block is constructed, these slots cooperate with the studs and apertures to permanently loci: the blocks in assembled engagement when the studs are forced into the apertures.

Referring to FIGURES l and 2, it will be seen that in order to assemble the blocks with the wires 1 and 3 locked in electrical connection, the blocks are placed in opposing relationship with the stud 18 of one block 4 opposing the aperture 22 of the opposite block 2. The wires which are to be electrically connected, are placed in the recesses 8, in of one block and the studs lid of the opposing blocks are forced into the apertures in the opposite blocks. When the two blocks are forced together so as to sandwich the wires in the recesses, the staples 1d puncture the insulation of the wires so as to connect the two wires electrically. As should be readily obvious, two staples are not necessary to make the electrical contact between the two wires. However by utilizing two staples, the two blocks may be made identical and a good electrical contact is doubly assured.

The cylindrical studs 18, on entering the conical apertures 22 force them to assume a cylindrical shape, thereby springing open the recesses 24, 26 in the opposite block and bowing both blocks in both the longitudinal and the transverse directions.

When the bowed blocks meet, with the wires between them, pressure exerted so as to squeeze them together tends to straighten out the bow which in turn tends to close the recesses 24, 26 and make the apertures 22 grip the studs 18 more tightly in their attempt to resume their original conical shape. It is in this manner that the grooves 24, 26 in the outer surface of the blocks coopcrate with the studs 13 and apertures 2-2 to lock the blocks in assembled relation.

As the stud 18 of the block is passed through the aperture 22 of the opposing block, the ribs formed by grooves on the periphery of the stud l8 compress until the stud passes through the outer surface of the opposing block at which time the ribs expand against the outer surface of the opposing block and lock the two blocks in engagement with the Wires sandwiched therebetween.

Referring to FIGURES 4 and 5, there is shown a slightly modified form of locking arrangement between the identical halves 42-, 44 of the connector. Aside from this modification in the snap-fit look of this embodiment, the connector of FIGURES 4 and 5 is similar to the connector of FIGURES 1-3.

In this embodiment, the studs 46 and apertures 48 are cylindrical in shape rather than tapered. The studs have concentric ribs 50 on their periphery similar to the connector of FIGURES 1-3. These ribs are adapted to compress as the stud is forced through the aperture and those ribs which are on the end of the stud resume their original shape after passing through the aperture. ecause the ribs are tapered outwardly and downwardly toward the half of the connector up which the studs are mounted, these ribs are easily forced into the aperture and after passing through the aperture, hook over the top surface of the opposite block to lock the halves of the connector in assembled relationship. Of course, the aperture could be counterbored so that the ribs would hook over the edge of the smaller portion of the counterbored aperture and wit 1 this arrangement, the studs would not have to protrude completely through the opposite block to achieve the same type of locking action between the studs and apertures.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIGURES 4 and 5, the inner surfaces 52 of the symmetrical halves of the connector are slightly concave so that as the halves of the connector are forced together into locked engagement, the abutting lateral edges 54 of the halves force each half of the connector to fulcrum about the lateral edges 54 so as to bow the center portion of each half downwardly into the plane of the lateral edges. As the center portion of each half is bowed downwardly, the outer portion of the aperture constricts around the stud to lock the two halves of the connector in engagement. To facilitate this fulcruming action, each half of the connector shown in this embodiment has a longitudinal V-shaped recess 56 in its outer surface. As the halves are forced together and the upper portion of the aperture constricts, the V-shaped recesses are forced to partially close.

it should be noted that in the embodiment illustrated in FEGURES 4 and 5, the lateral edges 54 of the halves need not be forced into abutting relation in order to cause constriction of the apertures. If the connector is used to electrically connect large wires which do not permit the inner surfaces 52 of the halves to abut, the halves still fulcrum about the wires because of the engagement of the wires with the wire receiving V-shaped recesses 53 which are laterally displaced from the longitudinal axis.

The snap-fit lock arrangement illustrated in the two embodiments has the advantage of providing an inexpensive lock which is very easily assembled by a workman and which has absolutely no tendency to release or become inadvertently displaced. In addition, this lock arrangement has the advantage of interconnecting two wires at any point along their length with a connector which is made of two identical parts. Even if the connector is very small the halves of the connector are easily handled by a workman and may be quickly snapped over the wires to lock the two wires in electrical connection.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described in this application, numerous modifications of the invention will be readily apparcut to those skilled in this art. For example, the particular snap-fit lock illustrated in these embodiments could be utilized in different and other typs of connectors than those illustrated. We do not wish to be limited to the particular structure shown in the drawings but intend that the invention be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

Having described our invention, we claim:

1. A wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires, said connector comprising two halves adapted to be fitted together into locked engagement, at least one of said halves having electrically conductive means mounted thereon adapted to puncture the insulation of wires placed between said connectors when said halves are placed in locked engagement, and snap-fit means on said halves for locking them in engaged relation with a face on one half adjacent and parallel to a face of the other half when said connector is assembled, said snap-fit means comprising a post extending outward- 1y from said face of said one half and an aperture in the face of the other half, said post having concentric resilient ribs on the periphery thereof, said post being adapted to be received in said aperture and extend through said aperture to lock the halves into engagement.

2. A wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires, said connector comprising two halves adapted to be fitted together into locked engagement, at least one of said halves having electrically conductive means mounted thereon adapted to puncture the insulation of wires placed between said connectors when said halves are placed in locked engagement, and snap-fit means on said halves for locking them in engaged relation with a face on one half adjacent and parallel to a face of the other half when said connector is assembled, said snap-fit means comprising a post extending outwardly from said face of said one half and a tapered aperture in the face of the other half, said post being adapted to be received in said aperture to lock the halves into engagement.

3. A wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated Wires, said connector comprising two halves made from semi-resilient material and adapted to be fitted together into locked engagement, at least one of said halves having electrically conductive means mounted thereon adapted to puncture the insulation of wires placed between said connectors when said halves are placed in locked engagement, and snap-fit means on said halves for locking them in engaged relation with a face on one half adjacent and parallel to a face of the second half when said connector is assembled, said snap-fit means comprising a post extending outwardly from said face of said one half and an aperture in the face of said second half, said second half having a recess in a surface opposite said planar surface, said recess being in a plane intersecting the axis of said aperture whereby the sides of said recms are forced apart when said post is forced into said aperture and are subsequently forced together when said connector is completely assembled to lock said halves in engagement.

4. A wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires, said connector comprising two halves made from semi-resilient material and adapted to be fitted together into locked engagement, at least one of said halves having electrically conductive means mounted thereon adapted to puncture the insulation of wires placed between said connectors when said halves are placed in locked engagement, and snap-fit means on said halves for locking them in engaged relation with a face on one half adjacent and parallel to a face of the second half, said snap-fit means comprising a post extending outwardly from said face of said one half and an aperture in the face of the second half, said post having concentric ribs on the periphery thereof, said second half having a recess in a surface opposite said planar surface, said recess being in a plane intersecting the axis of said aperture whereby the sides of said recess are forced apart when said post is forced into said aperture and are subsequently forced together when said connector is completely assembled to lock said halves in engagement.

5. A wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires, said connector comprising two halves of 6 symmetrical configuration, at least one of said halves having means thereon adapted to electrically connect said wires, each of said halves having cooperating symmetrical snap-fit locking means thereon, said snap-fit locking means comprising a protrusion and aperture on each of said halves whereby the protrusion on one half will be received in aperture of the other half when the halves are placed in locking engagement.

6. A wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires, said connector comprising two halves of identical configuration, each of said halves being made integral of semi-resilient material, at least one of said halves having means thereon adapted to electrically connect said wires, each of said halves having cooperating snap-fit locking means thereon adapted to lock said halves in engagement.

7. A wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires, said connector comprising two halves of symmetrical configuration, each of said halves having an inner face, at least one of said halves having electrically oonductiye means protruding from said face and adapted to puncture the insulation of said wires to electrically connect said Wires, each of said halves having cooperating symmetrical snap-fit means thereon, said snapfit means comprising a protrusion on the inner face of each half and an aperture in the inner face of each half, said protrusions being adapted to be received in said apertures to lock said halves in engagement with said wires located between said planar faces.

8. A wiring connector for electrically connecting two insulated wires, said connector comprising two halves adapted to be fitted together into locked engagement, at least one of said halves having electrically conductive means mounted thereon adapted to puncture the insulation of wires placed between said connectors when said halves are placed in locked engagement, and snap-fit means on said halves for locking them in engaged relation with a substantially concave face on a firs-t half adjacent a substantially concave face of a second half, said snap-fit means comprising a post extending outwardly from said concave face of said first half and an aperture in the concave face of the second half, said post being adapted to be received in said aperture to lock the halves into engagement, said second half having a recess in a surface opposite said concave face, said recess being in a plane intersecting the axis of said aperture whereby the recess will be caused to narrow and constrict a portion of said aperture when said halves are forced together into locked engagement.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,231,804 Staton July 3, 1917 2,810,115 Abbott Oct. 15, 1957 3,027,419 Owen et al. Mar. 27, 1962 3,030,604 Moody Apr. 17, 1962

Claims (1)

  1. 6. A WIRING CONNECTOR FOR ELECTRICALLY CONNECTING TWO INSULATED WIRES, SAID CONNECTOR COMPRISING TWO HALVES OF IDENTICAL CONFIGURATION, EACH OF SAID HALVES BEING MADE INTEGRAL OF SEMI-RESILIENT MATERIAL, AT LEAST ONE OF SAID HALVES HAVING MEANS THEREON ADAPTED TO ELECTRICALLY CONNECT SAID WIRES, EACH OF SAID HALVES HAVING COOPERATING SNAP-FIT LOCKING MEANS THEREON ADAPTED TO LOCK SAID HALVES IN ENGAGEMENT.
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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3204212A (en) * 1962-08-20 1965-08-31 Theodore W Becker Jr Electrical connector
US3221096A (en) * 1963-01-28 1965-11-30 Thomas & Betts Corp Electrical splicer block for ribbon type cables
US3519731A (en) * 1966-12-26 1970-07-07 Juan Jose Torralva Grunbaum Connector for cables
US3533049A (en) * 1966-11-09 1970-10-06 Mb Metals Ltd Strip cable connector
US3829822A (en) * 1971-10-23 1974-08-13 Licentia Gmbh Connecting element for conductors
US4394602A (en) * 1981-11-25 1983-07-19 Western Electric Co., Inc. Enclosed electrical devices
US4451104A (en) * 1982-05-27 1984-05-29 At&T Technologies, Inc. Apparatus for splicing electric wires
US4471159A (en) * 1982-05-24 1984-09-11 Burndy Corporation Electrical connector and method of making an electrical connection
EP0119316A1 (en) * 1983-02-18 1984-09-26 VDO Adolf Schindling AG Motor casing
US4550965A (en) * 1983-04-25 1985-11-05 Thomas & Betts Corporation Connector assembly for insulated cable
US4701137A (en) * 1983-04-04 1987-10-20 Molex Incorporated Electrical connector for coaxial cables
US4795857A (en) * 1988-01-29 1989-01-03 Gardenamerica Corporation Waterproof housing for the spliced ends of electrical cables
US4812693A (en) * 1986-08-11 1989-03-14 Johnson Electrical Industrial Manufactory, Limited Solderless connection for an electric motor
US5055065A (en) * 1989-11-29 1991-10-08 Marcella Pearl Snap
FR2694663A1 (en) * 1992-07-17 1994-02-11 Pons Luc Electrical connector for different cables, wires and conductors - has insulating hinged body with channels to take wires and sharp ended conducting pin inlaid in insulation to penetrate wire sheathing
US5378171A (en) * 1993-07-09 1995-01-03 Intermatic, Inc. Electrical cable connector
US5656797A (en) * 1995-08-09 1997-08-12 Lin; Shwu-Min Protective jacket for light strings
US5821465A (en) * 1995-05-26 1998-10-13 Yazaki Corporation Joint section between flat cable and lead wires
US6660935B2 (en) * 2001-05-25 2003-12-09 Gelcore Llc LED extrusion light engine and connector therefor
US6664475B1 (en) * 2002-01-04 2003-12-16 Abram Arnold Ellison Electric wire distributor connector
US20040173373A1 (en) * 2003-03-07 2004-09-09 Wentworth Stuart Hazard Locking device for male/female electrical cable connectors
US20050221659A1 (en) * 2004-04-06 2005-10-06 Gelcore, Llc Flexible high-power LED lighting system
US20050227529A1 (en) * 2004-04-08 2005-10-13 Gelcore Llc Multi-conductor parallel splice connection
WO2006008131A1 (en) * 2004-07-20 2006-01-26 Rdp S.R.L. Device for electrical connection of discontinuous conductors
US20060035511A1 (en) * 2004-04-06 2006-02-16 Gelcore Llc Flexible high-power LED lighting system
US7114841B2 (en) 2004-03-22 2006-10-03 Gelcore Llc Parallel/series LED strip
US7156686B1 (en) 2005-12-27 2007-01-02 Gelcore Llc Insulation displacement connection splice connector
US20090064465A1 (en) * 2006-04-17 2009-03-12 Kirk Andrade Cord Fastening System and Method
US8647147B2 (en) 2010-03-09 2014-02-11 Nii Northern International Inc. Dual conductor cable connector
US9225078B1 (en) 2015-01-29 2015-12-29 Homer Tlc, Inc. Electrical connectors
US9362636B2 (en) 2014-05-09 2016-06-07 Chien Luen Industries Co., Ltd., Inc. Low voltage connector

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1231804A (en) * 1916-11-27 1917-07-03 Harry Culp Staton Wire-clamp.
US2810115A (en) * 1955-08-22 1957-10-15 Abbott Developments Inc Connectors for lamp cords
US3027419A (en) * 1959-12-28 1962-03-27 Nathan B Owen Device for harnessing multiple wires
US3030604A (en) * 1960-02-01 1962-04-17 Robert E Breidenthal Apparatus for connecting a plurality of conductors

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1231804A (en) * 1916-11-27 1917-07-03 Harry Culp Staton Wire-clamp.
US2810115A (en) * 1955-08-22 1957-10-15 Abbott Developments Inc Connectors for lamp cords
US3027419A (en) * 1959-12-28 1962-03-27 Nathan B Owen Device for harnessing multiple wires
US3030604A (en) * 1960-02-01 1962-04-17 Robert E Breidenthal Apparatus for connecting a plurality of conductors

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3204212A (en) * 1962-08-20 1965-08-31 Theodore W Becker Jr Electrical connector
US3221096A (en) * 1963-01-28 1965-11-30 Thomas & Betts Corp Electrical splicer block for ribbon type cables
US3533049A (en) * 1966-11-09 1970-10-06 Mb Metals Ltd Strip cable connector
US3519731A (en) * 1966-12-26 1970-07-07 Juan Jose Torralva Grunbaum Connector for cables
US3829822A (en) * 1971-10-23 1974-08-13 Licentia Gmbh Connecting element for conductors
US4394602A (en) * 1981-11-25 1983-07-19 Western Electric Co., Inc. Enclosed electrical devices
US4471159A (en) * 1982-05-24 1984-09-11 Burndy Corporation Electrical connector and method of making an electrical connection
US4451104A (en) * 1982-05-27 1984-05-29 At&T Technologies, Inc. Apparatus for splicing electric wires
EP0119316A1 (en) * 1983-02-18 1984-09-26 VDO Adolf Schindling AG Motor casing
US4701137A (en) * 1983-04-04 1987-10-20 Molex Incorporated Electrical connector for coaxial cables
US4550965A (en) * 1983-04-25 1985-11-05 Thomas & Betts Corporation Connector assembly for insulated cable
US4812693A (en) * 1986-08-11 1989-03-14 Johnson Electrical Industrial Manufactory, Limited Solderless connection for an electric motor
US4795857A (en) * 1988-01-29 1989-01-03 Gardenamerica Corporation Waterproof housing for the spliced ends of electrical cables
US5055065A (en) * 1989-11-29 1991-10-08 Marcella Pearl Snap
FR2694663A1 (en) * 1992-07-17 1994-02-11 Pons Luc Electrical connector for different cables, wires and conductors - has insulating hinged body with channels to take wires and sharp ended conducting pin inlaid in insulation to penetrate wire sheathing
US5378171A (en) * 1993-07-09 1995-01-03 Intermatic, Inc. Electrical cable connector
US5821465A (en) * 1995-05-26 1998-10-13 Yazaki Corporation Joint section between flat cable and lead wires
US5656797A (en) * 1995-08-09 1997-08-12 Lin; Shwu-Min Protective jacket for light strings
US6660935B2 (en) * 2001-05-25 2003-12-09 Gelcore Llc LED extrusion light engine and connector therefor
US20070285933A1 (en) * 2001-05-25 2007-12-13 Gelcore, Llc (Now Lumination, Llc) Illuminated signage employing light emitting diodes
US7217012B2 (en) 2001-05-25 2007-05-15 Lumination, Llc Illuminated signage employing light emitting diodes
US20050030765A1 (en) * 2001-05-25 2005-02-10 Paul Southard Illuminated signage employing light emitting diodes
US20080266858A1 (en) * 2001-05-25 2008-10-30 Gelcore, Llc (Now Lumination Llc) Illuminated signage employing light-emitting diodes
US7686477B2 (en) 2001-05-25 2010-03-30 Lumination Llc Flexible lighting strips employing light-emitting diodes
US7399105B2 (en) 2001-05-25 2008-07-15 Lumination Llc Illuminated signage employing light emitting diodes
US6664475B1 (en) * 2002-01-04 2003-12-16 Abram Arnold Ellison Electric wire distributor connector
US20040173373A1 (en) * 2003-03-07 2004-09-09 Wentworth Stuart Hazard Locking device for male/female electrical cable connectors
US7114841B2 (en) 2004-03-22 2006-10-03 Gelcore Llc Parallel/series LED strip
US8348469B2 (en) 2004-04-06 2013-01-08 Ge Lighting Solutions Llc Flexible high-power LED lighting system
US20050221659A1 (en) * 2004-04-06 2005-10-06 Gelcore, Llc Flexible high-power LED lighting system
US20070190845A1 (en) * 2004-04-06 2007-08-16 Gelcore Llc Flexible high-power led lighting system
US20060035511A1 (en) * 2004-04-06 2006-02-16 Gelcore Llc Flexible high-power LED lighting system
US7429186B2 (en) 2004-04-06 2008-09-30 Lumination Llc Flexible high-power LED lighting system
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