US3111145A - Bellows pump for blood transfusions - Google Patents

Bellows pump for blood transfusions Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3111145A
US3111145A US81691259A US3111145A US 3111145 A US3111145 A US 3111145A US 81691259 A US81691259 A US 81691259A US 3111145 A US3111145 A US 3111145A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
bellows
shell
flange
spherical
hollow
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Kerns Homer
Original Assignee
Kerns Homer
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/0001Containers for suction drainage, e.g. rigid containers
    • A61M1/0011Drainage containers incorporating a flexible member creating suction, e.g. bags in a low-pressure chamber, bellows
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S128/00Surgery
    • Y10S128/12Pressure infusion

Description

Nov. 19, 1963 H. KERNS 3,111,145,

BELLOWS PUMP FOR BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS Filed May 29, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

Nov. 19, 1963 H. K-ERNS 3,111,145

BELLOWS PUMP FOB BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS Filed May 29, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

Nov. 19, 1963 H. KERNS BELLOWS PUMP FOR BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 29, 1959 Nov. .19, 1963 H. KERNS 3,111,145

BELLOWS PUMP FOR BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS Filed May 29, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 PF J' 5..

United States Patent 3,111,145 BELLOWS PUMP FOR BLOOD TRANSFUSIGNS Homer Kerns, 10 Holder Place, New York, N.Y. Filed May 29, 1959, Ser. No. 816,912 3 Claims. (Cl. 141-26) This invention relates to blood transfusion devices or flasks and more particularly to such devices which may be utilized to perform three distinctly different functions: to draw blood from a donor, to store blood or plasma, and for blood and plasma transfusion practice.

The applicant is aware of blood transfusion devices used in hospitals and in clinics which in the main comprise a glass flask or bottle having a rubber stopper and a pair of glass tubes leading into and connecting with the contents in the bottle. One of these tubes is of comparative short length with one end thereof carrying a thin rubber hose with a transfusion needle, with the other end entering the bottle through the stopper. The other tube is longer than the first with one end extending right into the bottle reaching its very bottom and with the other end carrying an air vent host to deliver atmospheric air into the bottle to prevent the forming of a vacuum above the blood level in the bottle. From the above description of the system it is apparent that during blood transfusion, in the event the bottle is not properly hung upside down, and the air vent hose is not held at a sufficient distance or height above the blood level of the fluid in the bottle, air bubbles may be formed in the blood or in the plasma endangering the life of the patient. To overcome this and other disadvantages inherent to the old system of blood transfusion, one object of this invention is to provide a device to prevent both the forming of vacuum over the blood level and the forming of air bubbles in the bottles contents.

Another object is to provide a nipple to secure a flexible transfusion hose with its needle to the plastic flask embodying my invention.

A further object is the provision of a bellows pump and means to mount the plastic flask in the pump.

An additional object is the provision of an air relieve valve to produce a drop in pressure in the bellows pump to distend the flask.

Another object is the provision of means to mount the plastic flask airtight to the bellows pump aforesaid.

Still another object is the provision of a mounting frame for the pump and means to mount the pump with its plastic flask in the frame.

An additional object is to provide storage means for the plastic flask and means for shipping.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combination of elements, and arrangements of parts which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter described in the accompanying drawings, which show just three of the various possible illustrative embodiments of this invention.

Referring to the figures in the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a partial cross section through the plastic flask embodying the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan elevational view of FIG. 1.

PEG. 3 is an enlarged view taken on the line 3-3 of FIG. 2, showing a section through the locking means joining the plastic flask to the bellows pump.

FIG. 4 is a section taken on the line 44 of FIG. 1, through the air exhaust valve.

FIG. 5 shows the manner in which the device in FIG. 1 may be housed in rows or in groups on a storage tray.

FIG. 6 is a plan elevation of the storage tray shown in FiG. 5.

FiG. 7 is a modification of the device in FIG. 1, showing the device in partial cross section.

FIG. 8 is another modification of the device in FIG. 1, showing it housed in a shipping container.

FIG. 9 shows the application of the device in H6. 8, to blood transfusion practice in the field.

FIG. 10 is a bottom view of the device shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 11 is a view on the line 11-11 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 12 is a modification showing the device mounted upon a supporting frame.

FIG. 13 is an enlarged section through the nipple showing the sanitary closure cap.

FIG. 14 is a section on the line 1414 of FIG. 12, showing the air exhaust valve.

FIG. 15 is a section on the line 15-15 of FIG. 14, through the air valve.

FIG. 16 indicates the manner in which the blood transfusion needle punctures the sanitary closure cap shown in FIG. 13.

Specification More particularly referring to FIG. 1, showing my plastic transfusion flask 2% in partial cross section, -it may be seen that it is formed of two separate half round spherical members or shells, one numbered 21 and the other 22. The semi-spherical shell 21 is made of hard non-yieldable material of a substantial wall thickness, while the other shell 22 is formed from a thin, flexible membrane-like tissue. The hard shell 21 is made to retain its original semi-spherical form at all times, while the soft flexible shell or membrane 22 has a tendency to crumble and to flat against the inner wall of the shell 21. Shell 21 discloses a narrow circular flange 23 which is located upon its outer periphery with the soft membrane 22 having a similar flange 24 of lighter material. Both shells, 21 and 22 are co-joined together to form one single airtight spherical body. This is accomplished by gluing flange 23 to the flange 24, as indicated. Upon its outer apex the hard shell 21 has an upright nipple 25 provided to mount the flexible transfusion hose 26 to the device. In the embodiment of my invention as shown in FIG. 1, the flexible trans-fusion hose 26 has a tendency to curl up in helical coils, one coil lying above the other permitting the housing of the device singly or in groups in a specially designed shipping or storage container. The end of the transfusion hose 26 may be permanently secured to the nipple 25, or may be mounted removable therefrom with the other end of the hose carrying the transfusion needle (not shown).

Referring more particularly to my blood pump device 27, the latter is formed including a cylindrical bellows unit which is provided with a number of bellows rings 28, a bellows bottom 29 and a bellows opening 30 with a circular flange 3 1. The flange 23, of the solid half spherical shell 21, the flange 24, of the collapsible shell or membrane 21, and the flange ring 31 of the bellows 27 are fastened together and are made tight by the tightening means '33. In the main the means 33 consists of a circular ring 34 with an internal female thread 35, and a second circular ring 36 having an external male thread 37. The ring 34 has a circular opening 34a through which is passed the hard shell 21, while the ring 36 has an opening 36a permitting the passage of the soft collapsible half shell 22. 3 shows the manner in which the shells are mounted together to form a single one and shows details of the closure means above described.

Referring more particularly to FIGS. 5 and 6 inclusive, it may be noted that my flask design allows storing, with several separate units being mounted together on a sanitary tray in rows or in groups. The tray 38 is provided with a sturdy base 39 and a storage shelf 40, with the latter being perforated in several places to provide a number of large circular openings 31 to receive the flasks 20. The latter are mounted in the openings in the tray being substantially supported on their flange rings 23. The soft and flexible membrane-like shell of the flask is fitted into the hole 41 in the tray, while the hard shells 22 of the flask extend beyond the top of the shelf 49. In this case the transfusion hose 26 is housed in the tray 38 along with its respective flask, to be kept sanitary clean until it is used for transfusion purposes, but this is not necessary. The transfusion hose may be detached from its nipple 25 and the nipple may be made airtight by means of a sanitary stopper or closure cap to be described later. For purposes of safe transport, the tray 33 is housed within a tight fitting cover 44 which is mounted over the extensions 43 on the base or shelf 4%, and the entire group of flasks in the tray may be contained in an aluminum shipping container 44. To prevent damage to the contents, the shipping container is provided with several rubber pads of foam rubber 45 and 46 respectively, the former being fitted around and enclosing the coiled transfusion hose, and the latter being placed below the base 39 of the storage tray 38 to absorb vibrations inherent in transportation.

While in FIGS. 1 to 6 inclusive, I have described the flexible transfusion hose 26 as being wound in helical coils over the nipple 25 in the shell 21, this arrangement is not always possible or necessary. Instead, the hose 26 may be wound around the outer periphery of the hard shell proper as indicated in FIG. 7. It is seen from FIG. 7, that the transfusion hose 26a (shown in cross-section) is wound in helical coils, one above the other around the shell 21a. To prevent damage to the soft flexible shell or the membrane 22a, when the latter is housed in the tray 38, the hard shell has a base flange 23a which is held over the opening 41a in the shelve 40a, with the openings 41a in the tray provided with circular rounded flanges 4112.

In FIG. 4, which is a side view in section taken on the line 44 of FIG. 1, I indicate one possible type of air exhaust valve to relieve the air pressure under the bellows pump; although other designs are possible which may be described later. More particularly referring to FIG. 4, the wall portion 27a of the bellows has an opening 44a which is fitted with the air exhaust valve 45a, which is secured to the bellows wall by means of a threaded tightening nut 47. In addition, the valve is provided with a valve seat 46 and a valve seat opening 46a, with a plastic valve closure disk 48 held tight over the opening 46a, the latter communicating with the bellows inside. A helical coil spring '49 is fitted over the valve stem 50 to keep the valve seat 46b closed. It is obvious that when the valve closure 48 is raised above the valve seat 46b, the air trapped in the bellows finds an escape route and the pressure in the bellows is relieved. In the event it is necessary to relieve the air pressure in the bellows, this may be accomplished by manually raising the stem 50. The valve above described need not be very large, not larger than one half of an inch in diameter.

FIGS. 8 and 11 inclusive are illustrative of a modification. In this case the plastic transfusion flask 51 is housed enclosed within a sanitary closure 52 and in the main is formed similar as before from two semi-spherical shells, one numbered now 53 and the other numbered 54; the former being made of a hard non-resilient plastic material and the latter being formed from a soft flexible membrane-like tissue. Both shells, -3 and 54 are joined into one hollow spherical container by means of their particular flanged rings 53a and 54a, which are glued or vulcanized to one another to form a spherical plastic flask. A skirt-like member 55 having a shelve portion 56 and a circular opening 57 is located under the flask 51, with the latter being fitted snugly into the opening 57 in the skirt and made one by means of the flange 54a which is glued to the shelve 56. In such manner the flask 51 becomes an integral part with the skirt 55. The

other end of the skirt 55 which is open has a circumferential flange 55a facing beyond and outwardly from the skirt and is provided with a bail hand-1e 58 which is secured thereto with the bail hooks mounted in the bail holes 5?. A closure means 59a keeps the device enclosed in a sanitary container. When not in use, the bail handle 58 is housed in the skirt 5'5 and in the event it is desirable to hang up the flask for transfusion purposes in field practice, the flask may be secured upside down to any convenient hook or a branch of a tree by the medium of its bail handle.

FIG. 12 shows another modification. In this case the bellows pump 27, with its plastic flask 20 is mounted upside down on a small supporting frame or table 60. More particularly, the frame 60 comprises a substantial base plate 61 which is provided with several upright supporting legs 62 which preferably are disposed peripherally thereto. The base 61 may be shaped square or round and in its very center has a circular opening 63 provided with a flange 64. The plastic flask 20, with its bellows pump 27 has a mounting ring or flange 65 made of hard nylon. the ring 65 is secured to the flange of the wall 27a of the bellows pump 27. By means of the latter the pump is fitted into the opening 63 and is made fast to the base plate 61. -A number of miniature clamps 66 are mounted on top of the plate 60, which by means of the levered arms 67 (manually operated) and the clamping leverage 68 make possible the clamping of the bellows pump in the opening 63 as indicated.

FIG. 13 indicates at A an enlarged cross sectional view through the inlet nipple 25. The latter may be provided with a slanted (30 degree) threaded portion 25a which has one single thread provided to support the closure cap 25b with its plastic insert or washer 25c. The view mark B designates is the top-elevation of the closure cap showing additional details. FIG. 14 is a section taken on the line 1414 of FIG. 12, through the air exhaust valve. More particularly to the valve in question, the solid shell 21 of the plastic flask may be provided with an indentation 27e and an air inlet vent 27 A flexible valve seat or flap 27c glued at 27d, with the opposite end made to flap free to allow the release of the air trapped under the bellows when pressure is applied. FIG. 15 is a section through 1515 in FIG. 14, showing additional details of the flap in the valve seat. The flexible transfusion hose 26:: with its nipple (not shown) may be in this case attached directly to the threaded nipple 25, or the hose may be provided with a piercing needle which is pressed right through the plastic material of the closure cap to contact the contents of the plastic flask without necessitating the removal of the sanitary cap from its seat in the nipple 25.

To operate the transfusion device shown in FIGS. 12 to 15 inclusive, all that is necessary is to mount the bellows pump with its plastic flask onto the servicing table (in the manner already described and illustrated in FIG. 12). By applying a slight pressure by hand on to the bottom of the bellows, force is generated to expel the air from under the bellows. When the pressure on the bellows is relieved, the bellows rises and the valve closes producing a vacuum and a suction effect. With the soft pliable membrane shell housed in the bellows cavity, the vacuum and the suction thus created tend to expand the membrane to draw blood into the plastic flask. In the event the device is being utilized for transfusion practice, the bellows pump is being operated in similar manner as described above with the air release valve or flap kept closed. Because the flap is so designed as to open when the bellows is depressed, it must be kept closed by applying pressure to the flap with one of the fingers of the right hand operating the bellows. With the exhaust valve being kept closed, the pressure thus formed in the bellows tends to compress the soft flexible membrane shell producing a flow of plasma. From the above description and operation of my device it is obvious that the bellows pump may be used to produce a flow or a suction effect.

It should be realized that the pnactice of the invention is by no means limited to the embodiment specifically shown herein as modifications therein will be at once apparent to those skilled in the art.

Having described my invention What I claim is:

1. A bellows pump of the class described including in combination a flexible cylindrical bellows open at one end and closed at the other with a pair of half-spherical hollow shells, said shells being mounted into the open end of said bellows, each of said shells in the pair having a circumferential outer flange, With the flange of one shell adhering to the flange of the other shell together to form a hollow spherical reservoir, one of said shells in said pair being made of hard non-yieldable plastic material formed to retain its half-spherical contour at all times, the other shell in said pair being made of soft flexible material in the shape of a yieldable half-spherical membrane, said yieldalble membrane when the pump is inoperative fitting snugly into the hollow half-spherical space provided by the hard shell; the open end of said bellows having a circumferential flange contacting the flange of said reservoir and being made tight thereto, with the soft shell facing into the hollow of said bellows and the hard shell facing outwardly therefrom, a nipple in said hard shell, an opening in said nipple leading into the hollow of the reservoir formed by said pair of shells, said opening being normally closed and covered with a cap allowing no entry of air into the hollow of said reservoir, the puncturing of said nipple allowing fluid to enter said spherical reservoir and to expand said soft yieldable membrane when said bellows pump is in operative position.

2. A bellows pump of the class described including in combination a flexible cylindrical bellows open at one end and closed at the other with a pair of half-spherical hollow shells fitting into the open end of said bellows, each of said shells having a circumferential outer flange, with the flange of one shell adhering to the flange of the other together to form a hollow spherical reservoir; an outlet opening in one of said half-spherical hollow shells, said opening communicating with said hollow spherical reservoir, the open end of said bellows having a circumferential flange contacting the flange of said reservoir, a frame to support said bellows pump, said frame having a base with a flanged opening, said shells mounted into said opening, with said bellows mounted over said shells, the flange of said reservoir contacting the flange on the circumferential flange of said bellows, a clamping ring mounted in said opening and clamping means engaging said clamping ring to secure said bellows fast to said flanged reservoir.

3. A bellows pump as defined in claim 2 in which said clamping means comprises a set of handle operated clamps having clamping levers, said levers contacting said clamping ring, the operation of said handles providing pressure on said levers and said clamping ring respectively to create an air-tight closure between said bellows and said reservoir, the unclamping of said clamps disengaging said bellows from said reservoir.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,152,862 Bergerioux Apr. 4, 1939 2,208,744 Bergerioux July 23, 1940 2,777,612 Bensen Jan. 15, 1957 2,847,007 Fox Aug. 12, 1958 2,911,972 Elinger Nov. 10, 1959 2,947,470 Ruben et al Aug. 2, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,073,659 France Mar. 24, 1954 OTHER REFERENCES Fischer et al.: Experimental Maintenance of Life by Homologous Lungs, Annals of Surgery, vol. 136, No. 3, September 1952 (pp. 476 477 relied on).

Dennis et al.: Fump-Oxygenator to Supplant the Heart and Lungs for Brief Periods, Surgery, vol. 29, No. 5, May 1951, pp. 697713 (pp. 701-702 relied on).

Dennis et 211.: Development of a Pump-Oxygenator to Replace the Heart and Lungs; an Apparatus Applicable to Human Patients, and Application to One Case, Annals of Surgery, vol. 134, No. 4, October 1951, pp. 709-721 (pp. 711 and 714 relied on).

(Publications available in Science Library.)

Claims (1)

1. A BELLOWS PUMP OF THE CLASS DESCRIBED INCLUDING IN COMBINATION A FLEXIBLE CYLINDRICAL BELLOWS OPEN AT ONE END AND CLOSED AT THE OTHER WITH A PAIR OF HALF-SPHERICAL HOLLOW SHELLS, SAID SHELLS BEING MOUNTED INTO THE OPEN END OF SAID BELLOWS, EACH OF SAID SHELLS IN THE PAIR HAVING A CIRCUMFERENTIAL OUTER FLANGE, WITH THE FLANGE OF ONE SHELL ADHERING TO THE FLANGE OF THE OTHER SHELL TOGETHER TO FORM A HOLLOW SPHERICAL RESERVOIR, ONE OF SAID SHELLS IN SAID PAIR BEING MADE OF HARD NON-YIELDABLE PLASTIC MATERIAL FORMED TO RETAIN ITS HALF-SPHERICAL CONTOUR AT ALL TIMES, THE OTHER SHELL IN SAID PAIR BEING MADE OF SOFT FLEXIBLE MATERIAL IN THE SHAPE OF A YIELDABLE HALF-SPHERICAL MEMBRANE, SAID YIELDABLE MEMBRANE WHEN THE PUMP IS INOPERATIVE FITTING SNUGLY INTO THE HOLLOW HALF-SPHERICAL SPACE PROVIDED BY THE HARD SHELL; THE OPEN END OF SAID BELLOWS HAVING A CIRCUMFERENTIAL FLANGE CONTACTING THE FLANGE OF SAID RESERVOIR AND BEING MADE TIGHT THERETO, WITH THE SOFT SHELL FACING INTO THE HOLLOW OF SAID BELLOWS AND THE HARD SHELL FACING OUTWARDLY THEREFROM, A NIPPLE IN SAID HARD SHELL, AN OPENING IN SAID NIPPLE LEADING INTO THE HOLLOW OF THE RESERVOIR FORMED BY SAID PAIR OF SHELLS, SAID OPENING BEING NORMALLY CLOSED AND COVERED WITH A CAP ALLOWING NO ENTRY OF AIR INTO THE HOLLOW OF SAID RESERVOIR, THE PUNCTURING OF SAID NIPPLE ALLOWING FLUID TO ENTER SAID SPHERICAL RESERVOIR AND TO EXPAND SAID SOFT YIELDABLE MEMBRANE WHEN SAID BELLOWS PUMP IS IN OPERATIVE POSITION.
US3111145A 1959-05-29 1959-05-29 Bellows pump for blood transfusions Expired - Lifetime US3111145A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3111145A US3111145A (en) 1959-05-29 1959-05-29 Bellows pump for blood transfusions

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3111145A US3111145A (en) 1959-05-29 1959-05-29 Bellows pump for blood transfusions

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3111145A true US3111145A (en) 1963-11-19

Family

ID=25221927

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3111145A Expired - Lifetime US3111145A (en) 1959-05-29 1959-05-29 Bellows pump for blood transfusions

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3111145A (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4067499A (en) * 1976-02-17 1978-01-10 Cohen Milton J Non-aerosol continuous spray dispenser
US4073294A (en) * 1975-07-23 1978-02-14 Medical Development Corporation Negative pressure drainage vessel
US4236516A (en) * 1976-05-07 1980-12-02 Nilson Nils B Syringe and disposable container therefor
US4311140A (en) * 1976-05-10 1982-01-19 Henry Bridgman Vacuum curet having an improved curetting opening
US4392860A (en) * 1979-01-11 1983-07-12 Howmedica, Inc. Disposable wound drainage device
US4578060A (en) * 1983-07-20 1986-03-25 Howmedica, Inc. Wound drainage device
US4726404A (en) * 1986-12-15 1988-02-23 Habley Medical Technology Corporation Combination container and air removal fixture for simplified filling of an implantable hydraulic device
WO1994021312A2 (en) * 1993-03-23 1994-09-29 Life Support Products, Inc. Portable medical vacuum aspiration device

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2152862A (en) * 1936-09-30 1939-04-04 Bergerloux Rene Container for dispensing materials
US2208744A (en) * 1936-09-30 1940-07-23 Georges Bardin Container provided with a flexible diaphragm for dispensing materials
FR1073659A (en) * 1953-01-31 1954-09-28 syringe bulb
US2777612A (en) * 1951-05-15 1957-01-15 Richard E Bensen Compression type dispensing device
US2847007A (en) * 1954-07-19 1958-08-12 Fox Dorothy Brown Fluid handling unit and apparatus
US2911972A (en) * 1954-09-14 1959-11-10 Elinger Adolfo Scholcoff Hypodermic syringe-ampulla
US2947470A (en) * 1956-03-02 1960-08-02 Henning M Ruben Aspirating apparatus

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2152862A (en) * 1936-09-30 1939-04-04 Bergerloux Rene Container for dispensing materials
US2208744A (en) * 1936-09-30 1940-07-23 Georges Bardin Container provided with a flexible diaphragm for dispensing materials
US2777612A (en) * 1951-05-15 1957-01-15 Richard E Bensen Compression type dispensing device
FR1073659A (en) * 1953-01-31 1954-09-28 syringe bulb
US2847007A (en) * 1954-07-19 1958-08-12 Fox Dorothy Brown Fluid handling unit and apparatus
US2911972A (en) * 1954-09-14 1959-11-10 Elinger Adolfo Scholcoff Hypodermic syringe-ampulla
US2947470A (en) * 1956-03-02 1960-08-02 Henning M Ruben Aspirating apparatus

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4073294A (en) * 1975-07-23 1978-02-14 Medical Development Corporation Negative pressure drainage vessel
US4067499A (en) * 1976-02-17 1978-01-10 Cohen Milton J Non-aerosol continuous spray dispenser
US4236516A (en) * 1976-05-07 1980-12-02 Nilson Nils B Syringe and disposable container therefor
US4311140A (en) * 1976-05-10 1982-01-19 Henry Bridgman Vacuum curet having an improved curetting opening
US4392860A (en) * 1979-01-11 1983-07-12 Howmedica, Inc. Disposable wound drainage device
US4578060A (en) * 1983-07-20 1986-03-25 Howmedica, Inc. Wound drainage device
US4726404A (en) * 1986-12-15 1988-02-23 Habley Medical Technology Corporation Combination container and air removal fixture for simplified filling of an implantable hydraulic device
WO1994021312A2 (en) * 1993-03-23 1994-09-29 Life Support Products, Inc. Portable medical vacuum aspiration device
WO1994021312A3 (en) * 1993-03-23 1994-11-24 Life Support Products Inc Portable medical vacuum aspiration device

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3520300A (en) Surgical sponge and suction device
US3312221A (en) Urinary drainage apparatus
US3507395A (en) Cardiotomy reservoir
US3478743A (en) Closed urinary drainage system
US3334628A (en) Vacuum indicating connection for surgical wound-closing apparatus
US3299442A (en) Bottle with hanger support
US3871377A (en) Evacuator apparatus
US3266910A (en) Liquid nourishment dispensing package
US3556101A (en) Surgical suction assembly
US3376868A (en) Surgical evacuator device
US3150637A (en) Milking machine milker
US3021942A (en) Needle package
US6517526B1 (en) Container for lyophilizing biological products
US2848995A (en) Transfusion apparatus
US4013076A (en) Aspirator jar
US2890699A (en) Nasal suction device
US2123353A (en) Inhaler
US3866608A (en) Aseptic suction collection system and method
US4111204A (en) Suction collection system
US2934067A (en) Blood oxygenating apparatus
US4402687A (en) Suction collection system
US4278089A (en) Wound drainage device
US4048990A (en) Heart massage apparatus
US3721238A (en) Disposable anesthesia device
US20110118683A1 (en) Reduced pressure treatment system