US3088738A - Archery or similar targets and their associated supporting easels - Google Patents

Archery or similar targets and their associated supporting easels Download PDF

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US3088738A
US3088738A US86168A US8616861A US3088738A US 3088738 A US3088738 A US 3088738A US 86168 A US86168 A US 86168A US 8616861 A US8616861 A US 8616861A US 3088738 A US3088738 A US 3088738A
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target
laminations
arrow
lamination
archery
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Leonard S Meyer
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Leonard S Meyer
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41JTARGETS; TARGET RANGES; BULLET CATCHERS
    • F41J3/00Targets for arrows or darts, e.g. for sporting or amusement purposes
    • F41J3/0004Archery targets
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S273/00Amusement devices: games
    • Y10S273/04Ethylene

Description

May 7, 1963 L. s. MEYER ARCHERY 0R SIMILAR TARGETS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED SUPPORTING EASELS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 51, 1961 /Z /7 INVENTOR.

L0NARO 5. MEYER BY MAHONV,M/LLER& RAMBO BV/M {6 ATTORNEYS.

May 7, 1963 s. MEYER ,0

ARCHERY OR SIMILAR TARGETS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED SUPPORTING EASELS Filed Jan. 31, 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

LEONA/PD 5. M59? BY 31 E E MAHONEV, M/LLER8 RAMBO ATTORNEYS.

May 7, 1963 s. MEYER ARCHERY OR SIMILAR TARGETS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED SUPPORTING EASELS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. 31, 1961 bk x INVENTOR. LEONARD .5. MEYER BY MAHO/VEV, M/LLER & RAMBO "fl 7 M ATTORNEYS.

May 7, 1963 s. MEYER ARCHERY OR SIMILAR TARGETS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED SUPPORTING EASELS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Jan. 51, 1961 BY MAHONEY, MILLER & RAMBO 7 L,

ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent 3,088,738 ARCHERY 0R SIMILAR TARGETS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED SUPPORTING EASELS Leonard S. Meyer, 6423 Bridgewood Road, Columbia, S.C. Filed Jan. 31, 1961, Ser- No. 86,168 6 Claims. (Cl. 273102.4)

This invention relates to archery or similar targets and their associated supporting easels, and more particularly to an improved target of novel laminated construction and to a combination shipping carton, carrying case and supporting easel for an archery target.

Heretofore, archery targets have usually consisted of stacked bales of straw or circular, spirally Wound bundles of straw with a replaceable paper target face. A major disadvantage of such targets is the heavy and bulky nature of each type. Heavy stands or supports must be provided for the spiral type and it is awkward to position targets of that type on stands or remove them therefrom. Also, neither type is suitable for use with both heavy and light drawbows. A target of the stacked bales of straw type, while suitable for use with heavy bows in that the bales are sufiiciently thick and compacted to effectively stop arrows shot from heavy bows, is unsatisfactory for use with light bows as such bows do not provide a suflicient propelling force to cause the arrows to penetrate the target. Consequently, the arrow may be loosely held by the target face or it may be entirely defiected, and for this reason, it is desirable to use circular, spirally wound targets with light drawbows. However, this latter type target is found to be insufficient in etfectively stopping arrows shot from heavy bows as they are not very thick and are not uniform in thickness and frequently an arrow will pass entirely through the target. Both types of these targets are also subject to rapid deterioration in use resulting from the breaking, cutting and splitting of the straw by the arrows. They are also adversely affected by moisture and tend to rot and as a result, must be frequently replaced when their effectiveness is reduced by either wear or moisture.

It is the primary object of this invention to provide a light-weight, readily portable archery target of laminated construction suitable for use with both heavy and light drawbows and an associated combination shipping carton, carrying case and supporting easel for the target.

It is also an object of this invention to provide an archery target of laminated construction wherein several of the laminations are fabricated from easily penetrable materials having high recovery for holding the arrows after they imbed therein and the remaining laminations are fabricated from tough, fibrous materials for impeding the passage of the arrows.

Another object of this invention is to provide an archery target of laminated construction wherein the target face is preferably protected by a transparent protective cover fabricated from 'a material having a self-sealing characteristic for substantially closing each hole made by an arrow after it is withdrawn.

A further object of this invention is to provide an archery target of laminated construction completely enclosed within a transparent material which also serves as a protective cover for the target face as indicated above, and which is fabricated from a resinous or other plastic material, to maintain the relative positions of the several laminations and to provide a protective covering for the several laminations.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a combination shipping carton, carrying case and supporting easel fabricated from corrugated cardboard, heavy paperboard, or other sheet material, which is readily 3,088,738 Patented May 7, 1963 ice transformed from one function to the other by simply refolding the cover.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings of an illustrated embodiment, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the combination carrying case and supporting easel of this invention assembled as a target supporting easel with a target outlined in position;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the combination carrying case and supporting easel assembled as a target carrying case with a target enclosed and partially withdrawn from the outer shipping sleeve;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the target carrying case partially opened and an outlined target partially removed therefrom;

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view of the target supporting easel partially assembled;

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view of a target supporting easel completely assembled taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a horizontal sectional view of a target supporting easel completely assembled taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a laminated target according to this invention with sections removed disclosing the laminated structure;

FIG. 8 is a horizontal sectional view of the target taken on line 88 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 7 but illustrating a modification of the target;

FIG. 10 is a diagram in section illustrating the action of the arrow-stopping laminations of the target; and

FIG. 11 is a view showing the flap-locking corners of a modified form of the target case.

Referring to the present embodiment of the invention illustrated by the drawings, a target supporting easel, indicated as an entirety by the numeral 10, is shown in its completely assembled form by FIG. 1 with a target 11 outlined in position ready for use. The target easel 10 comprises a target enclosing case 12 and a separate but attached folding support and cover 13. The target case 12 consists of a shallow or flat, rectangular, open-topped box appropriately sized to closely correspond to the external dimensions of the target 11 to be supported. Preferably, the case 12 is fabricated in the usual well-known manner from a flat sheet of heavy corrugated, waterresistant cardboard or other suitable paperboard with the sides thereof folded upwardly and suitably fastened together as in this instance by stapling as indicated at 12a (FIG. 6). Attached, for example by staples 14a (FIGS. 1 and 3), to one longitudinal, upturned side 14 of the case 12 is an elongated, rectangular strip of flexible mate rial, preferably the same as that utilized in fabricating the case 12, having a width equal to that of the case and a length suflicient to extend completely around the case flatwise and have the free end inserted within the case, thereby forming the supporting stand and cover 13. Before setting up (FIG. 3), the stand and cover 13 has the one end rigidly attached to the side 14 by the staples 14a, with the remainder extending downwardly or away from the open top of the case 12 and folded at the adjacent bottom corner 15 of the case to permit the cover 13 to lie adjacent to the bottom 16 of the case. Successive folds 17 and 18 are made near the midpoint of the cover 13, closely corresponding to the external dimensions of the opposite upturned side 19 of the case 12 with the remainder of the cover then forming the top 20 of the case. When closed (FIG. 2), the free end of the cover 13 is folded and inserted within the case 12 providing a frictional retaining or locking flap or tab 21.

When it is desired to utilize the target easel as a shipping carton or carrying case for a target, a target 11 is placed within the case 12 and the cover 13 is folded around the case (FIG. 2) with the locking flap 21 inserte'd within the case. For additional protection during shipping, it has been found advisable to insert the folded target easel in an open ended, rectangular tube or sleeve 22 of corrugated cardboard or paperboard as illustrated in FIG. 2.

In utilizing the combination carrying case and supporting easel as a target easel as illustrated in FIG. 1, the target easel 10 is first removed from its associated shipping sleeve 22. The top portion 20 of the cover 13 is swung outwardly from the case '12 permitting the target 11 to be removed. The entire cover 13 is then swung away from the bottom 16 of the case ,as it is hinged at the corner 15 until the fold corner 23 between the locking tab 21 and the cover top is adjacent to the top edge 24 of the side 19, as shown in FIGURE 4. The locking flap 21 is then folded further to be within the case 12 and parallel to the inner surface of the side 19, as shown in FIGURE 5. A target 11 is then placed within the case 12 and serves to hold the locking flap 21 in the desired position. It is preferable to place the target easel 10 on the floor or ground with the top portion 20 of the cover 13 resting flat on the supporting surface. The weight of a target thereby aids in holding the locking flap 21 in position. It will be noted that in thus assembling the target easel, the folds 17 and 18 are so positioned that the flap 20a therebetween is in the same plane as the flap 21. This forms an acute angle between the top portion 20 and the bottom portion 26 of the cover 13. The portion 26 is now an angular brace for holding the case 12 in a rearwardly inclined position. The portion 20 may be bent slightly at the line 20b to provide a flap portion 200 in contact with the adjacent wall 19 at the lower edge of the case 12 and to facilitate insertion of the flap 21. It is obvious that the fold could be made at the fold 18 to provide a different angle of the case 12 with respect to the cover portion 20 resting on the supporting surface.

The target case may be modified if desired to provide positive retaining or locking means for the locking flap. Thus, in FIG. 11, I show a case 12d in which flap-receiving grooves 21d are provided at the ends of the side wall 19d for receiving and retaining the ends of the locking flap 21 and holding it in flat contact with the inner surface of the side wall 19d. Similar grooves 2lle are provided at the ends of the wall 14d for receiving and retaining the flap 211 when the cover is closed.

The target 11 provided by this invention to be utilized in conjunction with the target easel 10 described in the preceding paragraphs is illustrated in detail by FIGS. 7 and 8. This target comprises several laminations of various materials, which will be subsequently described in detail, encased within a preferably transparent covering or bag 27 but which could be translucent or opaque. This transparent covering 27 serves primarily to hold the several laminations in their respective positions and is preferably fabricated from a resinous plastic material, such as polyethylene, that is characteristically flexible and non-porous. Secondarily, the covering 27 provides protection to the several laminations from moisture and contains the small bits of material that are cut, split or broken from the laminations when an arrow punctures the target.

The several laminations behind the face of the easily penetrable covering 27 as defined by their particular functions are an easily penetrable target face 28, a first easily penetrable lamination 29, a second arrow-holding lamination 30, and one or more arrow-stopping laminations, four such laminations being illustrated by the present embodiment by numerals 31, 32, 33 and 34. Each lamination, including the target face 28, is a thin rectangular sheet with one or both surfaces being placed parallel to and in a surface contacting relationship to an adjoining lamination. Each lamination is separable with a close contacting relationship between laminations being maintained by the enclosing transparent covering '27. Although the preferred embodiment of the present invention contemplates a rectangular target structure, other target shapes, such as that of the circular type, are equally well adapted to utilization by this invention. It is also to be understood that the thickness of each lamination need not be the same and that the relative positions of each lamination may be interchanged with the exception of the target face 28 which must have an exposed external surface. Instead of the target face 28 being a separate member, the target could be printed on the face part of the covering 27. Also, a stiffening sheet 29a, such as a waterproofed corrugated sheet, can be used if desired, as shown in FIG. 9, between the laminations 29 and 30.

The target face 28, in the preferred embodiment of this invention, is preferably fabricated from cheap paper material upon which the target configurations are printed. The material must be sufiiciently [thin to permit an arrow to readily penetrate and imbed itself in the succeeding laminations. The face of the covering 27 will be relatively self-sealing so as to close over the openings formed in the paper face 28 upon withdrawing the arrows. For scoring purposes, there is imprinted on the exposed surface of the target face 28 the usual multicolor scoring circles or other suitable markings. Although a target face separate from the self-sealing covering 27 has been described and is preferred, it is to be understood that, as explained above, the target may be printed on the covering 27.

The first arrow-holding lamination 29 is preferably placed panallel to and in a surface contacting relationship to the target face 28 and is fabricated preferably from a self-sealing resilient foam material such as rubber or a synthetic material having similar characteristics. Thus, foam material has been found to have the best recovery action to close the arrow openings when the arrows are withdrawn. The primary purpose of this lamination is to provide a structural backing for the target face 28' although in the preferred form it is not physically attached to theface but could be glued thereto. Utilizing a material wi-th a self-sealing characteristic permits the lamination 29 to maintain an unpunctured surface in relation to the target face 28 after the arrows which have penetrated them are withdrawn, thereby preventing an excessive tearing or ripping of the target face after prolonged use. The lamination 29 also aids in holding arrows which penetrate it greatly facilitating scoring.

A second arrow holding lamination 30 is placed parallel to and in a surface contacting relationship to the spacer or arrow-holding lamination 29 and is fabricated from a non-resilient closely bound fibrous material such as, in the present embodiment, Fiberglas. In addition to aiding in holding arrows which penetrate the lamination 29 and imbed therein, the lamination 30 presents small resistance to the passage of an arrow shot from a strong bow. Although this lamination in the present embodiment is placed immediately adjacent to the first arrow holding lamination 29, it may be desirable to interpose one or more of the arrow-stopping laminations 31-34 between laminations 29 and 30 or to even eliminate the lamination 30 entirely from the target construction as may be dictated by the particular arrows and drawbows with which the target will be utilized. However, the lamination 30 serves mainly to provide a substantial mass in which the arrow can imbed after it passes through the lamination 30 to prevent dropping or sagging thereof due to the leverage of the arrow. Similar results could be obtained 5, by using a single thick lamination 29 but this foam material is relatively expensive.

The remaining laminations positioned parallel to and in a surface contacting relationship to each other are the arrow-stopping laminations 31, 32, 33 and 34. The first arrow-stopping lamination 31 is placed adjacent and parallel to a surface of arrow-holding lamination 30 with the other laminations 32, 33 and 34 following, thus completing the laminated target structure exclusive of the outer transparent covering 27. Each of the arrowstopping laminations is similarly fabricated from a matting of tough, fibrous material stitched to a heavy woven fabric referred to herein as a backing. Each of these laminations is positioned such that an arrow will first penetrate the fiber matting before passing through the fabric backing, which flexes and cushions the blow of the arrow, thereby offering considerable resistance to its penetration. In the present embodiment, sisal fiber is utilized as the matting material for its resistance to the penetration of an arrow and capability of being tightly compacted and stitched to a backing. Burlap cloth is utilized as the flexible backing in the present embodiment for its durability and economy. Four such arrowstopping laminations 3-1-34 have been illustrated in the present embodiment; however, it is to be understood that this number may be increased or decreased as may be determined necessary in considering the type of arrows and weight of drawbows to be utilized with a particular target.

After the target easel has been folded into the preferred form in accordance with the method described in the preceding paragraphs, a target 11, such as the preferred embodiment also previously described, is placed within the target case 12 as is best shown in FIG. 1. An archer may then place the target easel 10 with its target 11 in an appropriate location on a supporting surface, thus completing the setting up of the archery target. It will be noted that a target will be automatically positioned at the desired angle to accommodate the arching trajectory of an arrow. The weight of the target and the folded construction of the target easel thus advantageously combine to make a lightweight, rigidly constructed and easily transported archery target capable of being utilized by both heavy and light drawbows.

In operation, as shown in FIG. 10, the laminated target advantageously serves to stop arrows shot from either heavy or light drawbows and to hold the arrows in extended non-sagging position for scoring purposes. The self-sealing characteristics of the target covering 27 and the first arrow-holding lamination 29 provide a relatively permanent archery target as the punctures are effectively closed when the arrows which have penetrated the target are withdrawn. An arrow shot from a light bow readily penetrates the target covering 27, the face 28 and the resilient, foam rubber arrow-holding lamination 2 9 and usually its point imbeds in the lamination 30' and is thereby conveniently held in position. Lamination 30 also offers some resistance to the passage of arrows in addition to aiding in holding the arrows which have penetrated. Arrows shot from heavier bows which penetrate the arrow-holding laminations 29 and 30 will have their progress completely stopped by one or more of the arrowstopping laminations 31, 32, 33 or 34. The closely matted, tightly bound, sisal fibers stitched to a burlap cloth backing has proven very effective in stopping arrows shot from even very heavy hows when several of such laminations are used. The matting of these laminations serves as additional low-cost, high strength masses in which the point of the arrow can imbed to prevent sagging of the extended arrow which the tightly woven fabric backing serves as a flexible wall which will give under the impact of the point of the arrow and will flex to gradually absorb a substantial portion or all of the shock, either stopping or slowing the passage of the arrow point. As the several 6 target laminations are preferably separable, they are en closed within a flexible covering to maintain their relative positions. This covering also serves to protect the laminations from moisture and to retain the small bits of target material which may be broken off by the arrows making the target cleaner in use, which is very desirable in indoor target ranges, and in transporting and storing the target. Also, it facilitates replacement of the face of the target.

This completes a detailed description of the invention and its operation, it being understood that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. An archery target comprising a multiplicity of laminations in a parallel and surface-contacting relationship enclosed within and bound together by a transparent, flexible covering including a self-sealing face portion, a first easily penetrable lamination fabricated from a selfsealing resilient, foam material, a second arrow-holding lamination fabricated from a non-resilient, closely bound fibrous material, and a plurality of arrow-stopping lami nations fabricated from a tough fibrous material backed up by a tightly woven fabric.

2. An archery target comprising a multiplicity of laminations in a parallel and surface-contacting relationship having a target face, a first easily penetrable lamination fabricated from a self-sealing, resilient foam material, a second arrow-holding lamination fabricated from a nonresilient, closely bound fibrous material, and a plurality of arrow-stopping laminations fabricated from a tough, fibrous material backed up by a closely woven fabric, said laminations being enclosed within and bound together by a transparent flexible covering.

3. A target according to claim 2 including a stiffener sheet disposed between at least two of said laminations.

4. An archery target comprising a multiplicity of laminations in a parallel and surface-contacting relationship having a target face, a first lamination fabricated from a self-sealing, resilient foam material, and a plurality of arrow-stopping laminations fabricated from a tough, fibrous material backed up by a closely woven fabric, said laminations being enclosed within and bound together by a transparent, flexible covering.

5. An archery target comprising a multiplicity of laminations in a parallel and surface-contacting relationship having a target face, an arrow-holding lamination fabricated from a non-resilient, closely bound fibrous material, and a plurality of arrow-stopping laminations fabricated from a tough, fibrous material stitched to a heavy woven fabric, said laminations being enclosed within and bound together by a transparent, flexible covering.

6. In combination with an archery target, a carrying case which in one condition contains the target and in a second condition serves as an easel for supporting the target in an angular position to display the face of the target, said case comprising a flat rectangular box with an open top and with upstanding side walls and a flat bottom, a foldable cover attached to a first upstanding cover attaching side wall of said box and being foldable around the flat box in said one condition so that it has a cover panel extending over and covering the top of the box and a bottom panel extending beneath said flat bottom of the box, said cover also having a connecting flap between the bottom and cover panels which will extend over a second upstanding side wall opposite to the first one where the cover is attached, said cover panel also having a retaining flap at its edge opposite to its connected edge which in said one condition can be tucked into the box inside the first upstanding cover attaching side wall, said case, when in said second condition, having the box supported with said attaching wall uppermost, with the open top facing forwardly, with the bottom panel of the cover extending rearwardly and downwardly to said top cover portion which is flat and extends for- 7 wardly beneath the second upstanding side wall of the box opposite the attaching wall with the locking flap folded inwardly and rearwardly over said last-named Wall, said target being disposed in said box and resting on said locking flap, said target comprising a multiplicity of laminations in a parallel and surface contacting relationship enclosed within and bound together by a transparent, flexible covering having a self-sealing face portion, a first lamination fabricated from a self-sealing resilient, foam material, a second arrow-holding lamination fabricated from a non-resilient, closely bound fibrous material, and a plurality of arrow-stopping laminations fabricated from a tough fibrous material backed up by a heavy closely Woven fabric.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 922,717 Parker May 25, 1909 2,535,280 Gartrell Dec. 26, 1950 2,657,793 Goldshine Nov. 3, 1953 2,818,258 Stern Dec. 13, 1957 2,868,364 Helser Jan. 13, 1959

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Cited By (42)

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US3244419A (en) * 1963-02-25 1966-04-05 Milbern Foam Products Co Laminated dart board having impact sound of cork board
US3367660A (en) * 1964-07-21 1968-02-06 Dominic P. Di Maggio Fibrous archery target with laminated reinforcing means
US3476390A (en) * 1967-07-06 1969-11-04 August F Roloff Non-piercing archery target
US3682478A (en) * 1968-02-08 1972-08-08 Lindsay Charles Knight Thin, self-supporting, ductile, plastic target sheet
US3720411A (en) * 1971-03-08 1973-03-13 Vogelaere G De Portable target to receive, contain, and prevent splashback of medium velocity projectiles
US4066261A (en) * 1976-06-01 1978-01-03 Stewart Marvin L Multi-layered archery target
US4076246A (en) * 1974-12-18 1978-02-28 Meyer Leonard S Target particularly for archery
US4247116A (en) * 1979-01-16 1981-01-27 Mcquary Kenneth L Indicating target
US4456264A (en) * 1982-09-27 1984-06-26 Donna Detwiler Compound archery target
US4491328A (en) * 1982-07-23 1985-01-01 Meyer Leonard S Target having shiftably movable target structure
US4688804A (en) * 1983-11-16 1987-08-25 Maxwell Shooting Enterprises Limited Upstanding target structure for playing a game
US4744568A (en) * 1986-04-14 1988-05-17 Jeffery H Bernahl Target system for low velocity projectiles
US4913444A (en) * 1988-10-03 1990-04-03 Hatt Lee R Reversible dart board
FR2693792A1 (en) * 1992-07-16 1994-01-21 Muller Patrick Archery target - is made from cardboard box with cushions of cardboard, and stretch film, inner layer of straw and outer covering of stretch film and corrugated plastics
US5280920A (en) * 1992-09-03 1994-01-25 Knapper Ii William J Portable target system
US5290042A (en) * 1992-11-12 1994-03-01 Worley Kirk C Archery target and a method of making an archery target
US5351928A (en) * 1993-02-04 1994-10-04 Wallace Computer Services, Inc. Easel and pad pack and method of use
US5354066A (en) * 1993-12-21 1994-10-11 Swanson Dale A Projectile target
US5435437A (en) * 1993-01-29 1995-07-25 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Device-accommodating box
US5860655A (en) * 1996-04-04 1999-01-19 American Excelsior Company Archery targeting system and method
US5865440A (en) * 1997-07-28 1999-02-02 Pulkrabek; Larry Foam archery target
US6450328B1 (en) * 2000-05-15 2002-09-17 Bisco, Inc. Dental equipment and material storage and multi-positional display apparatus
US20040108659A1 (en) * 2002-12-06 2004-06-10 Pulkrabek Larry R. Three dimensional archery target with replaceable target elements
US20040140623A1 (en) * 2002-12-06 2004-07-22 Pulkrabek Larry R. Archery target with covering layer
US6799764B2 (en) 2002-06-03 2004-10-05 Mckenzie Sports Products Layered archery target
US6926281B1 (en) 2004-01-16 2005-08-09 Garrett Corporation Compressed foam target
US20060157938A1 (en) * 2004-12-10 2006-07-20 Joe Box Archery target
US20070013138A1 (en) * 2005-07-12 2007-01-18 Hinnant Kenneth A Target assembly for holding clay targets
US20070029733A1 (en) * 2005-08-02 2007-02-08 Mckenzie Sports Products Layered foam target and method of manufacturing the same
DE102007026481A1 (en) * 2007-06-05 2008-12-11 Schauber, Thomas, Dr. Archery target has a cellular cover panel with parallel guides for arrow tips and with foam filling
US20110062667A1 (en) * 2009-09-14 2011-03-17 Jose Medina Reality based training target trap
US20120043723A1 (en) * 2010-08-19 2012-02-23 Everett Rakes Tossing Game
US20140091527A1 (en) * 2012-09-14 2014-04-03 Paul W. Schneider Corner-Mounted Target
US8757626B2 (en) 2010-04-23 2014-06-24 Arrowmat, LLC Self sealing target
US20150330747A1 (en) * 2014-05-14 2015-11-19 Roger H. Ferrell Target Holder
US20160298942A1 (en) * 2015-04-08 2016-10-13 Keith Skinner Conformable target mount
US9623307B1 (en) * 2015-10-23 2017-04-18 Patrick Devor Game system
US9689647B1 (en) 2016-06-14 2017-06-27 Todd Ian Dolgoff Target stand
US20180119160A1 (en) * 2011-09-13 2018-05-03 Monsanto Technology Llc Methods and Compositions for Delaying Senescence and Improving Disease Tolerance and Yield in Plants
USD847269S1 (en) * 2016-03-24 2019-04-30 Dwight N Leung Collapsible and portable shape-sorting learning and development toy
US10335672B1 (en) 2018-09-05 2019-07-02 Patrick Devor Game kit and assembly
USD860376S1 (en) 2018-07-01 2019-09-17 Holdover Target Systems LLC Two-piece firearms target

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US2657793A (en) * 1951-01-10 1953-11-03 American Safety Razor Corp Cover operated display box
US2818258A (en) * 1953-06-25 1957-12-31 Peter Fries Jr Archery target
US2868364A (en) * 1956-02-01 1959-01-13 Florez Inc Display device

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US922717A (en) * 1909-03-05 1909-05-25 George H Parker Game.
US2535280A (en) * 1946-11-08 1950-12-26 Us Rubber Co Self-sealing rifle target
US2657793A (en) * 1951-01-10 1953-11-03 American Safety Razor Corp Cover operated display box
US2818258A (en) * 1953-06-25 1957-12-31 Peter Fries Jr Archery target
US2868364A (en) * 1956-02-01 1959-01-13 Florez Inc Display device

Cited By (50)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3244419A (en) * 1963-02-25 1966-04-05 Milbern Foam Products Co Laminated dart board having impact sound of cork board
US3367660A (en) * 1964-07-21 1968-02-06 Dominic P. Di Maggio Fibrous archery target with laminated reinforcing means
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US9623307B1 (en) * 2015-10-23 2017-04-18 Patrick Devor Game system
USD847269S1 (en) * 2016-03-24 2019-04-30 Dwight N Leung Collapsible and portable shape-sorting learning and development toy
US9689647B1 (en) 2016-06-14 2017-06-27 Todd Ian Dolgoff Target stand
USD860376S1 (en) 2018-07-01 2019-09-17 Holdover Target Systems LLC Two-piece firearms target
US10335672B1 (en) 2018-09-05 2019-07-02 Patrick Devor Game kit and assembly

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