US3017654A - Vacuum cleaners - Google Patents

Vacuum cleaners Download PDF

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US3017654A
US3017654A US82827659A US3017654A US 3017654 A US3017654 A US 3017654A US 82827659 A US82827659 A US 82827659A US 3017654 A US3017654 A US 3017654A
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Prior art keywords
hose
section
end
swivel
tool
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William F Allenby
Gustaf E Lofgren
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Aerus LLC
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Aerus LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/24Hoses or pipes; Hose or pipe couplings
    • A47L9/242Hose or pipe couplings
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16LPIPES; JOINTS OR FITTINGS FOR PIPES; SUPPORTS FOR PIPES, CABLES OR PROTECTIVE TUBING; MEANS FOR THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16L27/00Adjustable joints, Joints allowing movement
    • F16L27/08Adjustable joints, Joints allowing movement allowing adjustment or movement only about the axis of one pipe
    • F16L27/0804Adjustable joints, Joints allowing movement allowing adjustment or movement only about the axis of one pipe the fluid passing axially from one joint element to another
    • F16L27/0808Adjustable joints, Joints allowing movement allowing adjustment or movement only about the axis of one pipe the fluid passing axially from one joint element to another the joint elements extending coaxially for some distance from their point of separation
    • F16L27/0812Adjustable joints, Joints allowing movement allowing adjustment or movement only about the axis of one pipe the fluid passing axially from one joint element to another the joint elements extending coaxially for some distance from their point of separation with slide bearings

Description

Jan 23, 1962 w. F. ALLENBY ET AL 3,017,654

VACUUM CLEANERS Filed July 20, 1959 IN V EN TORS lam/w lz' flan/er 605m; 6. Loren/l THEIR ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,017,654 VACUUM CLEANERS William F. Allenby, Stratford, and Gustaf E. Lofgren, Riverside, Conn., assignors to Electrolux Corporation, Old Greenwich, Conn, a corporation of Delaware Filed July 20, 1959, Ser. No. 828,276 7 Claims. (Cl. 15--327) Our invention relates to vacuum cleaners and more particularly to cleaners of the tank or canister type in which the motor-fan unit and dust separating means are contained within a housing mounted on wheels, runners or the like for movably supporting the housing on a horizontal surface, usually the floor. A flexible suction hose is connected to the housing and to a rigid tube, usually bent or curved, which in turn communicates with a suction cleaning tool, the hose serving the dual purpose of establishing a fluid connection between the tool and the motor-fan unit and of transmitting force to the housing for moving the latter around on the floor.

Due to the comparatively short length of a vacuum cleaner hose, usually between six and seven feet, and the fact that it must be constructed to resist collapse when subjected to a vacuum, it is impossible to twist one end of such a hose relative to the other end without causing it to kink. Hence, it has been common practice to previde a swivel connection between the rigid tube and the hose, or between the hose and the housing, or at both of these locations in order to prevent kinking of the hose when manipulating the nozzle during cleaning.

However, this solution has not been entirely satisfactory. Particularly when a floor cleaning tool is being used, a straight rigid tube is connected between the tool and the bent tube, the straight tube being held at an angle to the floor, the hose end of the bent tube extending substantially horizontally, and the hose connected thereto extending at an angle back down to the floor. This means that the swivel connection between the bent tube and the hose is subject to a bending force which is apt to cause it to bind, thus interfering with the swivel action. Also, inas much as a substantial portion of the hose lies on the floor, there is appreciable friction between the hose and the floor which prevents free turning of the hose all the way back to the swivel connection at the housing. The net result of this is that the hose frequently kinks, which is annoyingto the user and imposes stresses which shorten the life of the hose.

In accordance with our present invention we provide a swivel connection at an intermediate location in the hose, preferably at or near its mid-point. A swivel so positioned is not subject to the bending force present where the hose joins the bent rigid tube, and the section of the hose between the operators hand and the swivel is practically always suspended above the floor and hence there is no frictional resistance to turning. As a result the two sections of the hose may swivel freely with respect to each other, thus eliminating the tendency of the hose to kink.

A further advantage of providing an intermediately located connection is the possibility thus afiorded of using different hose constructions for the respective sections at opposite sides of the connection. Thus the section connected to the housing which normally lies on the floor and is subject to wear by being dragged thereacross, but which does not have to be bent sharply, may be made relatively heavy and stiff so as to be durable and wear resistant, whereas the other section which normally is off the floor and hence supported by the operator may be made lighter and more flexible. Moreover, if desired the latter section may be tapered with the larger end adjacent to the intermediate connection while the other section may be of uniform diameter at least as large as the maximum creased diameter.

v, an opening in the rear of housing 12.

Patented Jan. 23, 1962 diameter of the tapered section. An advantage of this combination is that a solid object small enough to enter the hose cannot become jammed during its passage there through, inasmuch as the diameter of the hose first increases from the inlet end and then remains at this in- Of course, both sections could be tapered, but there is no significant advantage in tapering the section adjacent the housing and a tapered hose is more expensive than one of constant diameter.

In accordance with our invention the swivel connection also may be readily separable and if so, preferably is the same type as the separable connection between the housing and the hose. Thus, if a longer hose is desired an additional section or sections like that normally connected to the housing may be connected together between the housing and the section connected to the bent tube.

Further objects and advantages of our invention will be apparent from the following description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings which form part of this specification and of which;

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a preferred embodiment of our invention, showing a hose with a centrally located separable swivel connection, the hose being connected between a tank type vacuum cleaner and a suction nozzle;

FIG. 2 is a view partly in cross-section and on an enlarged scale of a separable connection between the hose and the vacuum cleaner;

FIG. 3 is a view partly in cross-section on an enlarged scale of the separable swivel connection located at an intermediate point in the hose;

FIG. 4 is an end view of one of the elements of the connection shown in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

Referring to the drawings, reference character 10 designates a vacuum cleaner unit of the tank type. This unit includes a housing 12 within which is disposed a dust separating and collecting bag 1-4 and a motor-fan unit 16. The housing 12 is provided with suitable means for movably supporting it on a substantially horizontal surface, such means being shown as comprising a pair of. wheels 18 and a castered wheel 20.

A flexible hose designated generally by reference character 22 is provided at one end with a separable coupling 24, shown more in detail in FIG. 2, for removably connecting it to the housing 12 of the vacuum cleaner. The other end of the hose is permanently secured to a preferably curved or bent rigid tube 26. At a point at or near its center the hose 22 is provided with a separable swivel coupling 28 which is shown in detail in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5.

The end of the bent tube 26 may be connected directly to a suction nozzle, or one or more rigid tubes 34 may be interposed between the tube 26 and the nozzle 36, as is shown in FIG. 1. Such tubes are used if it is desired to use a cleaning nozzle on the floor, but if the nozzle is to be used for cleaning furniture or the like it is usually more convenient to omit the tubes 34. The tubes 34 together with the nozzle 36 may be referred to as a cleaning tool.

When in use the bent tube 26 is held in the position shown in FIG. 1 by being grasped by an operator and is moved back and forth in order to move the nozzle 36 back and forth over the surface being cleaned. Opera- I tion of the motor-fan unit 16 produces a flow of air from the nozzle 36 through the tubes 34 and hose 22 to within the dust bag 14 where the dirt is separated from the air, the latter passing through the material of the bag to the motor-fan unit, from which it is discharged through As is shown, the section 32 of the hose hangs down by reason ofgravity and consequently is curved adjacent to the point where it is connected to tube 26. When manipulating the nozzle 36 over the floor and particularly around and under furniture the end of the hose attached to tube 26 may be twisted and if the hose were not free to turn this would result in producing a kink therein. However, as will be explained more in detail hereinafter, the section 32 may turn relative to the section 30 by virtue of the swivel connection 28. Inasmuch as the section 32 is not substantially longer than the tool comprised of tubes 34 and nozzle 36, the swivel 28 is usually suspended above the floor and there is no resistance to this turning and hence no tendency for the hose to kink.

In use, the nozzle 36 is not only moved back and forth over the surface, but as cleaning of one area is completed the nozzle is moved to another area and the vacuum cleaner unit is caused to follow along behind the operator. Thus, the hose not only serves to establish a fluid connection between the nozzle 36 and the motor-fan unit 16, whereby dirt-ladened air is conveyed from the nozzle to the dust separating bag 14, but the hose also serves as a means for transmitting force to move the vacuum cleaner it around on the floor.

As is shown more particularly in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, the separable swivel 28 includes an element 40 which is securely aflixed to one end of the hose Section 32. As shown, an inner sleeve 42 is formed with an outwardly extending flange which engages an inwardly extending flange 44, the sleeve 42 having ribs 46 rolled thereinto for biting into the material of the hose 32. In addition glue may be employed to provide a firm connection between the hose and the element 40. Aflixed in a similar manner to the end of hose section 30 is a coupling element 48. Rotatably mounted on element 48 is a ring element St which is provided with interrupted threads 52, shown more particularly in FIGS. 4 and 5. The outer surface of element 40 is formed with similar interrupted threads, the arrangement being such that when it is desired to connect the element 50 to the element 40, the threads in the former are lined up with the circumferential spaces between the threads on the latter, whereupon the two may be telescoped together. Thereafter, a fraction of a turn of the element St] relative to the element 40 causes the threads on the respective elements to engage, thus securing them tightly together. As above stated, the ring element 50 is rotatably mounted on the element 48 and consequently rotation of the hose section 32 relative to the section 30 is possible, the elements 40 and 50 of the coupling turning with the section 32.

Axial displacement of ring 50 to the right relative to element 48 when the former is not connected to element 40 is prevented by providing a slight taper to the respective surface of elements 48 and 50 at 51.

The opposite end of section 30 is provided with a coupling element 40a which is preferably identical with element 40 at the end of section 32. The housing 12 of the vacuum cleaner is provided with a coupling element 54 which is formed with interrupted threads preferably identical with the threads 52 formed in ring element 50. Thus, hose section 30 may be connected to housing 12 by aligning the interrupted threads on element 40a with the space between the interrupted threads in element 54, telescoping the parts together, and thereafter turning the element 40a a fraction of a turn to engage these threads. Inasmuch as the element 40a is identical with the element 40, additional sections 30 may be connected together so as to increase the overall length of the hose 22.

Because of connection 28, the hose sections on opposite sides thereof may be of dilferent types, and they are so shown in the drawings. Inasmuch as the section 30 which is connected to the vacuum cleaner unit lies on the floor and is moved in frictional contact therewith when the vacuum cleaner is moved about, its exterior surface is subjected to much more wear than is the surface of the section 32 which is usually hanging free in the air. Also, it is not necessary that the section 30 be capable of bending about as short a radius as it is desirable to bend section 32. Hence, section 30 may be made heavier and stifler than the other section. As illustrated, section 3% is made of a plastic material molded around a spiral supporting wire 56. This type of hose has a wear resistant outer surface, but is subject to damage it bent about a short radius. Section 32, on the other hand, is shown as having a braided outer surface which has a softer and pleasanter feel to the hand, but is not as wear resistant as the plastic hose constituting section 39. Moreover, a hose of the type constituting section 32 is better able to withstand flexing about a short radius than is that constituting the other section.

It is advantageous that a suction hose for use in a vacuum cleaner have a smaller diameter at its inlet end than at its outlet end so that any object small enough to enter the inlet end will pass all the way through the hose without the danger of becoming jammed therein. This may be accomplished in accordance with the present invention by having the hose section 32 tapered throughout its length with its end of smaller diameter connected to the tube 26. In practice it has been found advantageous to employ a hose having a diameter of 1 /8 at the smaller end and 1 /8" at the larger end. No significant advantage would result from having the hose section 30 tapered and inasmuch as a tapered hose is more expensive to manufacture, it is preferable to have only the section 32 tapered, the other section having a constant diameter equal to the maximum diameter of section 32.

While we have shown one more or less specific embodiment of our invention, it is to be understood that this has been done for purposes of illustration only and that the scope of our invention is not to be limited thereby, but is to be determined from the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. In a vacuum cleaning device, structure including means for producing flow of air, means for movably supporting said structure on a substantially horizontal surface, a suction cleaning tool, a flexible hose secured to said structure for establishing a fluid connection between said tool and said first-mentioned means and for transmitting force to said structure to move the latter about on said surface, and a swivel connection disposed at an intermediate point in said hose for permitting one end of said hose to turn on its axis relative to the other end ereof, the length of said hose from said swivel connection to the end of the hose adjacent to said tool being not substantially longer than said tool.

2. In a vacuum cleaning device, structure including means for producing flow of air, means for movably supporting said structure on a substantially horizontal surface, a suction cleaning tool, a flexible hose secured to said structure for establishing a fluid connection between said tool and said first-mentioned means and for transmitting force to said structure to move the latter about on said surface, and a swivel connection disposed at an intermediate point in said hose for permitting one end of said hose to turn on its axis relative to the other end thereof, the portion of said hose between said tool and said swivel being of a lighter construction than the portion between the swivel and said structure, the length of the first mentioned portion being not substantially longer than said tool.

3. In a vacuum cleaning device, structure including means for producing flow of air, means for movably supporting said structure on a substantially horizontal surface, a suction cleaning tool, a flexible hose secured to said structure for establishing a fluid connection between said tool and said first-mentioned means and for transmitting force to said structure to move the later about on said surface, and a swivel connection disposed at an intermediate point in said hose for permitting one end of said hose to turn on its axis relative to the other end thereof, the section of said hose between said tool and said swivel being tapered with the larger end adjacent to the swivel, the remaining section of said hose having a constant diameter at least as large as the maximum diameter of the tapered section, the length of the tapered section being not substantially longer than said tool so that said swivel connection is above said surface.

4. In a vacuum cleaning device, structure including means for producing flow of air, means for movably supporting said structure on a substantially horizontal surface, a suction cleaning tool, a flexible hose secured to said structure for establishing a fluid connection between said tool and said first-mentioned means and for transmitting force to said structure to move the latter about on said surface, and a separable swivel connection disposed at an intermediate point in said hose for permitting one end of said hose to turn on its axis relative to the other end thereof, the length of said hose from said swivel connection to the end of the hose adjacent to said tool being not substantially longer than said tool.

5. In a vacuum cleaning device, structure including means for producing flow'of air, means for movably supporting said structure on a substantially horizontal surface, a suction cleaning tool, a rigid tube connectable to said cleaning tool, a flexible hose non-rotatably secured at one end to said rigid tube and non-rotatably secured at the other end to said structure for establishing a fluid connection between said tool and said firstmentioned means and for transmitting force to said structure to move the latter about on said surface, and a swivel connection disposed at an intermediate point in said hose for permitting the section of hose on one side of said swivel to turn on its axis relative to the section on the other side of the swivel, the section of hose between said swivel and said rigid tube being not substantially longer than said tool.

6. In a vacuum cleaning device, structure including means for producing flow of air, means for movably supporting said structure on a substantially horizontal surface, a suction cleaning tool, a rigid tube connectable to said cleaning tool, a flexible hose non-rotatably secured at one end to said rigid tube, a separable connection for non-rotatably connecting the other end of said hose to said structure, said tube and hose establishing a fluid connection between said tool and the first-mentioned means and serving to transmit force to said structure for moving the latter about on said surface, and a separable swivel connection disposed at an intermediate point in said hose for permitting the section of hose on one side of said swivel to turn on its axis relative to the section on the other side of the swivel, the section of hose between said swivel and said rigid tube being not substantially longer than said tool.

7. In a vacuum cleaning device, structure including means for producing flow of air, means for movably supporting said structure on a substantially horizontal surface, a suction cleaning nozzle, a straight rigid tube connectable at one end to said nozzle, a curved rigid tube connectable to the other end of said straight tube, a flexible hose non-rotatably secured at one end to said curved rigid tube and non-rotatably secured at the other end to said structure for establishing a fluid connection between said nozzle and said first-mentioned means and for transmitting force to said structure to move the latter about on said surface, and a swivel connection disposed at an intermediate point in said hose for permitting the section of hose on one side of said swivel to turn on its axis relative to the section on the other side of the swivel, the section of hose between said swivel and said curved rigid tube being not substantially longer than said straight rigid tube.

References Cited in the flle of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 980,355 Spencer Jan. 3, 1911 1,218,578 Osley Mar. 6, 1917 1,269,924 Gathright June 18, 1918 1,853,014 Carlson Apr. 5, 1932 1,892,382 Carlsted-t Dec. 27, 1932 2,148,566 Leon Feb. 28, 1939 2,321,231 Missmer June 8, 1943 2,579,314 Grumblatt Dec. 18, 1951 2,914,790 Warburton Dec. 1, 1959

US3017654A 1959-07-20 1959-07-20 Vacuum cleaners Expired - Lifetime US3017654A (en)

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3212795A (en) * 1962-07-16 1965-10-19 Hoover Co Connecting devices
US3309113A (en) * 1966-02-24 1967-03-14 Hoover Co Coupling for suction cleaner attachments
US3401420A (en) * 1966-06-17 1968-09-17 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner device with hose and cord storage
US3403929A (en) * 1967-07-28 1968-10-01 Hercules Inc Coupling means for corrugated tubing
US3493251A (en) * 1968-07-16 1970-02-03 Crushproof Tubing Co Connector for flexible hose
US3520725A (en) * 1966-08-19 1970-07-14 Jet Line Products Inc Retractable hose-type vacuum cleaning system and method
US3727949A (en) * 1971-12-20 1973-04-17 Dayco Corp Hose construction
JPS53138466U (en) * 1977-04-07 1978-11-01
US4152014A (en) * 1978-01-30 1979-05-01 Soeffker Eldred E In-line hose swivel
US5257836A (en) * 1992-03-27 1993-11-02 Armtec Inc. Stab joint coupler
US6478342B1 (en) * 1999-10-12 2002-11-12 Shop Vac Corporation Swivel coupling for a hose
DE10131175A1 (en) * 2001-06-29 2003-06-12 Bsh Bosch Siemens Hausgeraete vacuum cleaner
US20050060838A1 (en) * 2003-09-22 2005-03-24 Scott Walter Vacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
WO2008078064A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-07-03 Dyson Technology Limited Hose for a surface treating appliance
US20080174105A1 (en) * 2007-01-22 2008-07-24 Hyatt Andrew C Flexible vacuum cleaner hose coupling
WO2010018101A1 (en) 2008-08-13 2010-02-18 BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbH Vacuum cleaner hose and hose seat for a vacuum cleaner with increased suction
US8205296B1 (en) * 2008-09-16 2012-06-26 Bissell Homecare, Inc. Pet grooming vacuum accessory tool

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140318664A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-10-30 Robert Bosch Gmbh Non-Kinking Fluid Delivery Hose

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US980355A (en) * 1909-03-19 1911-01-03 Spencer Turbine Cleaner Company Hose connection.
US1218578A (en) * 1916-09-29 1917-03-06 Vacuum Hose Protector Company Antifriction device for vacuum-hose.
US1269924A (en) * 1917-10-18 1918-06-18 Josiah Baker Gathright Hose-coupling.
US1853014A (en) * 1930-08-25 1932-04-05 Erie Meter Systems Inc Automobile filling stand connection
US1892382A (en) * 1930-12-18 1932-12-27 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2148566A (en) * 1937-06-23 1939-02-28 Leon Frances Swivel joint hose coupling
US2321231A (en) * 1941-05-15 1943-06-08 Electrolux Corp Cleaning tool
US2579314A (en) * 1950-06-22 1951-12-18 Gen Electric Swivel and locking connection for tubes
US2914790A (en) * 1954-12-17 1959-12-01 Hoover Co Suction cleaner and flexible and extensible hose therefor

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US980355A (en) * 1909-03-19 1911-01-03 Spencer Turbine Cleaner Company Hose connection.
US1218578A (en) * 1916-09-29 1917-03-06 Vacuum Hose Protector Company Antifriction device for vacuum-hose.
US1269924A (en) * 1917-10-18 1918-06-18 Josiah Baker Gathright Hose-coupling.
US1853014A (en) * 1930-08-25 1932-04-05 Erie Meter Systems Inc Automobile filling stand connection
US1892382A (en) * 1930-12-18 1932-12-27 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2148566A (en) * 1937-06-23 1939-02-28 Leon Frances Swivel joint hose coupling
US2321231A (en) * 1941-05-15 1943-06-08 Electrolux Corp Cleaning tool
US2579314A (en) * 1950-06-22 1951-12-18 Gen Electric Swivel and locking connection for tubes
US2914790A (en) * 1954-12-17 1959-12-01 Hoover Co Suction cleaner and flexible and extensible hose therefor

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3212795A (en) * 1962-07-16 1965-10-19 Hoover Co Connecting devices
US3309113A (en) * 1966-02-24 1967-03-14 Hoover Co Coupling for suction cleaner attachments
US3401420A (en) * 1966-06-17 1968-09-17 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner device with hose and cord storage
US3520725A (en) * 1966-08-19 1970-07-14 Jet Line Products Inc Retractable hose-type vacuum cleaning system and method
US3403929A (en) * 1967-07-28 1968-10-01 Hercules Inc Coupling means for corrugated tubing
US3493251A (en) * 1968-07-16 1970-02-03 Crushproof Tubing Co Connector for flexible hose
US3727949A (en) * 1971-12-20 1973-04-17 Dayco Corp Hose construction
JPS53138466U (en) * 1977-04-07 1978-11-01
US4152014A (en) * 1978-01-30 1979-05-01 Soeffker Eldred E In-line hose swivel
US5257836A (en) * 1992-03-27 1993-11-02 Armtec Inc. Stab joint coupler
US6478342B1 (en) * 1999-10-12 2002-11-12 Shop Vac Corporation Swivel coupling for a hose
DE10131175B4 (en) * 2001-06-29 2008-06-19 BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbH vacuum cleaner
DE10131175A1 (en) * 2001-06-29 2003-06-12 Bsh Bosch Siemens Hausgeraete vacuum cleaner
US20050060838A1 (en) * 2003-09-22 2005-03-24 Scott Walter Vacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
US7226302B2 (en) 2003-09-22 2007-06-05 Scotech Systems Inc. Vacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
US20070218734A1 (en) * 2003-09-22 2007-09-20 Scotech Systems Inc. Vacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
CN1856268B (en) 2003-09-22 2010-05-12 诗歌技术系统有限公司 Vacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
WO2005027705A1 (en) * 2003-09-22 2005-03-31 Scotech Systems Inc. Vacuum cleaner current-carrying hose connection system
US8272098B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2012-09-25 Dyson Technology Limited Hose and wand assembly for a surface treating appliance
CN101568288B (en) 2006-12-22 2012-11-21 戴森技术有限公司 Hose for a surface treating appliance
US20100095479A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2010-04-22 Dyson Technology Limited Hose and wand assembly for a surface treating appliance
US20100095474A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2010-04-22 Dyson Technology Limited Hose for a surface treating appliance
WO2008078064A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-07-03 Dyson Technology Limited Hose for a surface treating appliance
US20080174105A1 (en) * 2007-01-22 2008-07-24 Hyatt Andrew C Flexible vacuum cleaner hose coupling
WO2010018101A1 (en) 2008-08-13 2010-02-18 BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbH Vacuum cleaner hose and hose seat for a vacuum cleaner with increased suction
DE102008041231B4 (en) * 2008-08-13 2015-12-24 BSH Hausgeräte GmbH Vacuum cleaner hose and hose attachment for a vacuum cleaner with increased suction power
US8205296B1 (en) * 2008-09-16 2012-06-26 Bissell Homecare, Inc. Pet grooming vacuum accessory tool

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