US3008364A - Rotary type sheet cutter - Google Patents

Rotary type sheet cutter Download PDF

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US3008364A
US3008364A US76285258A US3008364A US 3008364 A US3008364 A US 3008364A US 76285258 A US76285258 A US 76285258A US 3008364 A US3008364 A US 3008364A
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Prior art keywords
cylinder
paper
gripper
shaft
grippers
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Anton R Stobb
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Western Publishing Co Inc
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Western Publishing Co Inc
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Priority to US76285258 priority patent/US3008364A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D1/00Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor
    • B26D1/01Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work
    • B26D1/12Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a cutting member moving about an axis
    • B26D1/14Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a cutting member moving about an axis with a circular cutting member, e.g. disc cutter
    • B26D1/24Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a cutting member moving about an axis with a circular cutting member, e.g. disc cutter coacting with another disc cutter
    • B26D1/245Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a cutting member moving about an axis with a circular cutting member, e.g. disc cutter coacting with another disc cutter for thin material, e.g. for sheets, strips or the like
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/04Processes
    • Y10T83/0448With subsequent handling [i.e., of product]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/04Processes
    • Y10T83/0524Plural cutting steps
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/202With product handling means
    • Y10T83/2092Means to move, guide, or permit free fall or flight of product
    • Y10T83/2183Product mover including gripper means
    • Y10T83/219Rotating or oscillating product handler
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/202With product handling means
    • Y10T83/2092Means to move, guide, or permit free fall or flight of product
    • Y10T83/2207Means to move product in a nonrectilinear path
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/465Cutting motion of tool has component in direction of moving work
    • Y10T83/4699Combined with other type cutter
    • Y10T83/4702With slitter
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/465Cutting motion of tool has component in direction of moving work
    • Y10T83/4766Orbital motion of cutting blade
    • Y10T83/4795Rotary tool
    • Y10T83/4812Compound movement of tool during tool cycle
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/465Cutting motion of tool has component in direction of moving work
    • Y10T83/4766Orbital motion of cutting blade
    • Y10T83/4795Rotary tool
    • Y10T83/483With cooperating rotary cutter or backup
    • Y10T83/4838With anvil backup
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6476Including means to move work from one tool station to another
    • Y10T83/6489Slitter station
    • Y10T83/6491And transverse cutter station
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6579With means to press work to work-carrier

Description

Nov. 14:, 1961 A. R. STOBB ROTARY TYPE SHEET CUTTER Original Filed May 25, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 lNl/ENTORi ANTON R. STOBB BK ATTORNEY Nov. 14, 1961 A. R. STOBB 3,008,364

ROTARY TYPE SHEET CUTTER Original Filed May 25, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 lNVENTOR ANTON R. STOBB ATTORNEY g MK 5 mm g a l I 3, 1- ll kw Q3 T w @Am,\

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A. R. STOBB Nov. 14., 1961 ROTARY TYPE SHEET CUTTER Original Filed May 25, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 ANTON R. STOBB .q/ ATTORNEY United States Patent ROTARY SHEET CUTTER Anton R.,Stobb, Racine, Wis, assignor to Western Publishing Company, 111e,, a corporation ofWisconsin- Original applicatiomMay 25, 1956, Ser. No. 587,238, now Patent: No, 2,869,863, dated Jan, 20, 1959. Divided and: this, application Sept;,23,.195.8,, Ser. No. 762,852

' 7 Claims, (Cl. 83-23) This inventionv relates. to a sheetcutter ofv the rotary type, and this, application is a division ofapplication U.S. SeriaLNo. 587,238, filed May 25, 195-6, and now BatentNo. 2,869,863.

It is a generalobject, of this invention to provide an improved rotary sheet cutter, and particularly one which operates tocut the side and trailing edges of a folded signature, Specific this object isthe provision of a rotary cutter-whereinthe signature is positively held, and the trailing edge of the signature is cut square thereacross without the effect of av stepped out edge otherwise obtained, in cutting signatures wrapped around-a cylinder and, also, the trimmings of the trailing edge are positively controlled to adeposit container.

Another object of this invention is to provide a; sheet cutter of the rotary typev wherein. the trailing edge is neatly-severed as the cutter is moved across, as well as through,the.sheet to sever the latter.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a sheet cutter which is adjustable in synchronization with a preceding stitcheror folder to. trim the sheet at the desired point regardless of. the operation of the stitcher or folder. Also, the sidesofthe sheetcan be out at the desired location as the side cutters are adjustable.

The foregoing, and other objects and. advantages, will become apparent upon reading the following description moon-junction. withthe accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational View of a machine including a. preferred embodiment of this invention, shown somewhat diagrammatically and with certain parts sectioned.

FIG. 2 isv a sectional view taken on the line 2.-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a slightly reduced and partially sectioned view takenalong the line 3 .3 of FIG. 1, and also showing in plan view a, member on each side of the sectioned, member of 1..

FIG. 4, isanenlarged; fragmentary view of apart shown in FIG. 3.

Similar reference numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several; views.

FIG. 1 shows an end view of a machine, and it should be understood that for the purpose of' clearly showing the machine, certain parts are shown sectioned, and the reason therefor will appear more clearly hereinafter. At the outset, a general description will be given in order that there will be an. understanding of the overall operation of the machine or mechanism. Thus, it should be understood that a paper, indicated by the reference numeral. 10, is in. its initial position on a feed shelf or mechanism 11 with apaper feed or pusher l2 engaging the trailing end of'the paper. All of'these parts are disposed: to one side of the mechanism to feed, the paper thereinto. Ultimately, the paper, which preferably consists of a number of stackedsheets which have been. printed and are ready for formationintoa signature or book,will come off a guide 13'. at the opposite end of the machine after the paper has been stapled or stitched and folded into book form andtrimmed at the, three unfolded edges.

Elaborating in a further general manner upon the overall machine or mechanism, a combination leading edge gripper, stitcher anvil, and tucker blade cylinder 14 is mounted for rotation in the direction-of the arrow shown thereon; Thus, a leading edge gripper 16 is suitably 3,008,364 Patented Nov.. 1 4, 1961 cc v 2. mounted on the cylinder. 14. for receiving. the leading edges of, thepaperslll asthe latter are fed to the top of the cylinder 14. along the shelf 11-. and, of course, the paper is then rotated around; with. the: rotation of the cylinder 14. A second cylinder or member 17 is mounted on its: shaft. 18.for rotation in the, direction shown by the arrow thereon, and. the cylinder 17 is-adapted to carry either a cam operated stitcher or paper punch mechanism 19. A third. cylinder or member 21is mounted on its shaft 22 for. rotation. in the direction shown bythe arrow thereon, andthis cylinder carries a camoperated stitcher mechanism 23. The usual Wire feed mechanism 24 is show-n adjacentthecylinder 2,1 with the usual SihQ.2r6 also. mounted adjacent the cylinder with both the feed mechanism available for the usual purpose of feeding wire to the stitcher mechanism 23, and the shoe 26 forms the wire into. av staple asthe mechanism rotates past the shoe. A similar wire feed mechanism and a shoe, are provided adjacent. the cylinder 17 when the latter is used as a stapling cylinder. More complete details of the parts thus far referred to will be given later, and also attention I is directed to US. Patent No. 2,717,383 which shows the rotary stitcher mechanism employed herein, and also U.S. patent application No. 476,476 shows the paper folding mechanism employed herein,

A paper folding jaw cylinder 27 ismounted on its shaft 28 adjacent the cylinder 14 for rotation in the direction of the arrow shown thereon. It will be noted that the cylinder 14 carries a paper tucker Q9, and the cylinder 27 carriesa paper folder 31, such that the tucker and folder formithe folded edge of the paper, and the cylinder 27 receives the paper to carry it therearound, with the aid of p the belt32, to another rotating cylinder or member 3-3, which is also termed a trimming block cylinder, gripper cylinder, and trimmer cylinder. Of course, the belt 32 is trained about rotatable shafts or pulleys 34 which are suitably mounted in any well-known manner. The cylinder 33- carries two sets of diametrically oppositely disposed grippers 36 and two sets of trailing grippers 37', and. the sets are mounted on the radially outer ends of bars or arms 38 and 39, respectively. The bars 38 and 39 are, of course, mounted on a shaft 41 for rotation in the direetionshown by the arrow on the member 33. Thus,the leading gripper 36 receives the rotationally leading and folded edge of the paper 10 when the cylinder 27 rotates the paper to a position adjacent the cylinder 33 which is the time when the gripper 36 is adjacent the cylinder 27, and thepaper is thus transferred to the cylinder 33. Also, the trailing gripper 37 holds the rotationally trailing end of the paper 10 to the cylinder 33, as indicated 1. The cylinder 33 rotates the paper past a trimmer orslicer 42 which trims the twoopposite sides of the folded signature 10, and also, the cylinder 33 rotates the signature 10 past the trail cutter cylinder ormember 43 which trims the rotationally trailing end of the signatures with this trimming action occurring. when the parts are in the FIG. 1' position shown. Finally, the signaturelll is transferred to arotatably mounted gripper 44 which takes the paper along the guide 13. and out of the machine, as previously mentioned,

Again retracingthe; path of the signaturesv 1d through the mechanism, the more, detailed description. of the variouspar-tswillnow begiven. The. cylinder 14 ismounted on a shaft 46, and the cylinderalso contains.- a circumferential: shell: 47 and two end plates, such as the shown end plate 48'. Only-the farend: plate 48: is shown, and it should'be understood that the near and plate is removed for thepurpose of showing the working-parts in full in the cylinder 14. It will be noted thatanarcuate- 1y shaped plate 49. is attached toeach end plate 48 by means ofbolts 51 passing. through arcuate slots. 52; in the end: plates 48v such that the plates 49 are adjustable on the cylinder 14 along the circular path of rotation. The plates 49 support a rock shaft 53 which carries the gripper 16, and it should be understood that a series of grippers 16 can. be provided along the rock shaft 53 to rock therewith in the Well-known manner of mounting grippers. A usual cam follower 54 is attached to the rock shaft 53 through a link 56, and it should be under stood that the follower 54 rides 'on a cam, not shown, with both the follower and the cam and the ,link 56 mounted outside the endof the cylinder '14, such that the cam action induces a rocking motion to the shaftl53 to open and close the gripper 16 with respect to the paper which has been fed onto the circumference of the cylinder 14. Of course, the cam is developed to cause the gripper 16 to receive the paper 10 from the feed mechanism and to secure it. to the cylinder '14 until shortly before the gripper 16 reaches the position shown in FIG. 1, at which time the gripper is opened, as shown, to release the paper 16, so that it can betransferred to the cylinder 27.

As previously mentioned, the cylinder 14 also carries a tucker 29 which includes the usual tucker blade 57 'With the latter mounted on the cutaway rock shaft shown, all for the usual purpose of actuating the blade 57 to tuck the paper ltl 'into the folding jaw cylinder 27. A third mechanism on the cylinder 14 is the stitcher anvil 58 which may be constructed according to the teaching in US. Patent No. 2,717,383. Of course, the tucker blade and the anvil both operate on the center line of the signatures, and they are, therefore, interspersed preferably by cutouts in the tucker blade providing space ployed as either a paper punch or a stapler for cooperation with the anvil 58 on the cylinder 14. If it is preferred to send a heavy stack of papers 10 into the machine, it may be desirable to initially punch the paper along a line substantially on the center line thereof by employment of the punch 68, and shortly thereafter, upon continued rotation of the cylinders 14 and 21, the stitcher mechanism 23 can insert its staple or staples into the holes punched by the punch 68, and thus avoid'rer quir'ing that the staples be forced through unpunched paper. Also, if it is preferred that numerous staples be positioned along the center line of the signatures 10, the mechanism 19 on the cylinder 17 can be utilized as a stitcher head for insertion of a staple or staples into the signature 10 along with insertion of another staple or staples by the mechanism 23 of the cylinder 21.

Itlwill be noted that inthe operation of the various cylinders and rotating parts, the cylinders and parts are mounted adjacent each otherto be in essentially rolling contact for performing the operations describedas the signature is fed between two of the rolling members. As shown, a signature 10 is wrapped partially around the cylinder 14, and the signature is about to be transferred to the folding cylinder 27 as a folding jaw or blade 69 is included in the folding mechanism 31, which also includes a cam fOllOWET'71 for the usual and well-known purpose of rotating the blade 69 in a clockwise direction to clamp the signature 10 against the shell 72 of the cylinder 27 arm mounted on a rock shaft 63 secured to the cylinder 21 for rotation therewith. Also, the usual cam follower 64 is connected to the rock shaft 63 through a link 66 for the usual purpose of imparting the motion of'the follower 64 on its cam 67 to the rock shaft 63 and, therefore, also to the stitcher head 23. Because of the mounting of the stitcher head 23 on the arcuate track 59 in the cylinder, the cam motion causes the stitcher head to move both radially with respect to the cylinder 21, and

also to move along the track 59 with both movements occurring during rotation of the cylinder'21. In the 'of the stitcher head 23 and the anvil 58, which form the stapling means, as the two essentially roll past each other,

and the movement of thehead 23 along the track 59 causes the plunger 61 to remain radial with-respect to the cylinder 14, and, similarly, the stapler is, therefore, inserted transversely into the signature 10 at all times during the stapling process.

The alternate stitcher head and paper puncher cylinder '17 is mounted adjacent the cylinder 14, as shown, and

contains somewhat the same mechanism described in conjunction with the cylinder 21. Thus, the rock shaft 63 has the link 66 and cam follower 64 attached thereto .and the arm 62 extended between the shaft 63 and the mechanism 19. In this instance, the mechanism 19 is shown to differ from the mechanism 23 in that the plunger 61.carries a pin or punch 68, but it should be understood stitcher head 23. The cylinder 17 can, therefore, be emthat the plunger 61 is adapted. to receive staple support-. 'ihg' and inserting means similar to that included in the to form the fold in the signature. Attention is directed to FIG. 3 which shows the cylinder 27 and its mechanism 31 with the cam follower 71 which engages the cam 73. In FIG. 3, it will be noted that the cam and follower are outside of the cylinder 27 and, therefore, the dotted line representation of these parts in FIG. 1 is diagrammatic in that theyhave actually been removed from FIG. '1 by the sectioning thereof. However, for completeness of drawings, they are depicted in FIG. 1 as shown. With further reference to FIG. 3, it will now be noted that the cylinder 27 is suitably rotatably mounted in spaced apart frame members 74 and 76, and the cam 73 is shown bolted to'the frame member 74 to be in a fixed position while, of course, the cam follower rotates around with the cylinder 27 to open and close the folding blade 69 and thus cause the latter to fold the paper along the line upon which it was previously stitched and to retain the paper to the cylinder 27 while the latter rotates to position the, blade 69 adjacent the cylinder or member 33. Of

course, the signature 10 has been removed from the cylinder 27 in FIG. 3. The mounting of the cylinder 27 and the members 33 and 43, in the frame members 74 and 76, as shown in FIG. 3, is the preferred manner of mounting the cylinders '14, 21, and 17, as well as the final gripper 44, in the frame. Thus, all of the parts are preferably mounted in a single frame.

Of course, inorder to permit the cylinder 27 to transfer the paper to the cylinder 33, provision must be made for the-leading grippers 36 to grip the folded edge of the signature Iii when the grippers 36 are adjacent the cylinder 27, which is, of course,'the time when the folder plate 69 is adjacent the cylinder 33. As shown in FIG. 3, this provision consists, of cut-outs 77 in the cylinder shell 72, and the tucker 69 has cut-outs 78 which align with the cut-outs 77 in the shell 72. Thus, the grippers 36 preferably consist of a number of gripper fingers which are disposed to align with the cut-outs on the cylinder 27 As previously mentioned, the cylinder 33 includes a shaft 41 which carries an arm 38, and FIG. 3 shows that there are two spaced apart arms 38 on the shaft 41. A rock shaft 79 is supported at its opposite ends by the arms or bars 38 to carry the grippers 36 along the shaft, shown in FIG. 3. At this time it should be noted that both ends of the bars or arms 38 contain a rock shaft 79 and, therefore, it should be understood thatboth ends of the bars contain all ofthe mechanism, which will be descrihed hereinafter, although: it is shown ononly one end of the bars 38.

The usual cam 81' is ftagmentarily shown: in FIG. 1 with the usual cam follower 82 engaging the cam 81. A 83 connects the cam followertothe'rock shaft 79 to induce the cam motion to the shaft 79 and cause the grippers to-open and" close during; rotation of the cylinder=33l In this instance, a return spring 84 engages one end of the link 83 to maintain the follower 82 in engagement with the cam 81' as the spring is mounted betweerrthe link 83 and the ban-38; FIG. 3 al'soshows that the cam 81 is suitably bolted in a fixed position to the-fi'ame piece 76'. Thus, he conventional manner the memberSS-isprovided with a group of grippers 36 which operate in the usual way to receive the folded edge of the: signature fromthe cylinder-27; It will also be noted that the cylinder'33 includes the trailing grippers 37 whicharelocated at each end of the bars 39-mounted on the shaft 41. Again, FIG. 3 shows: that two bars 39 are: spacedf apart on the shaft 41 but, unlike the bars 38; the bars 39 are welded to the shaft- 41 to be in a rotated. fixed position therewith. The opposite endsof the bars 39'carry two rock shafts 86 and 87 which are suitably mounted on the cylinder 33 for rotation there with and in the mannerin which the shaft 79 is mounted onto the cylinder. The shaft 86 has an arm or link 88 secured thereto while the opposite. end of the arm carlies the usual cam follower 89 for riding on the cam 91, a fragment of which is shown in FIG. 1. Again, as shownin FIG. 3, the cam 91 is fixed to the frame piece 74 and the cam follower 89 is associated with the cam for rotation thereof during rotation of the cylinder. Of course, in this action, the. cam follower induces a rocking motion to the shaft 86, and to an upper gripper 92 which is attached to a plate on the shaft 86 through a bolt 93,. such that the finger 92. rocks with the motion of the shaft 86. The rock shafts 87' have bars 94 secured thereto to support underneath grippers 9'6 and-the latter, therefore, are rocked with the motion of the bar 94:. In, this instance, it will be noted that a; compression coil spring 97 is secured between the circumference of the cylinder 33 and a projection 98 on the end of the bar 94. such that the spring 97 continuously urges the bar 94 into a position where the gripper'96 abuts a cutting block 99. It will be noted that the cam follower axle 101 extends. from the cam, as shown in FIG. 3, to be in line with. the. projection 98 on the piece 94 such that when the follower 89 moves radially outwardly on the cylinder 33', the follower axle 101 abuts the projection 98 to cause the bar 94 to rock and, correspondingly, move the underneath gripper 96' away from the circumference of the cylinder 33.. Thus, both the grippers 92 and 96 are operated by the cam follower 89 with the spring 97 yieldingly urging the gripper 96 toward the cylinder. With this arrangement, it will be noted that the gripper 96 is underneath the signature 10 while the gripper 92 is above thesignature 10; and the latter, therefore, is held between the two grippers; for a reason explained later.

The cylinder 33 also includesa circumferential rim 102 which is suitably secured to the cylinder 33 along the length thereof, and the sections-102 have a series of parallel shear edges or grooves 103. Also, the grooves 103 are continued through pieces suchas the cutting block 99 which lies on the circumferenceof the cylinder 33. Therefore, circumferential shear edges 103 are provided continuousl yaround the cylinder 33 for receivingthe cutting edge of spaced apart cutters or discs or. slicers 104; such as best shown in- FIG. 2-. The general operation of the slicers10 4' with the cutter cylinder 33" is the trimming of the signature 10' at the opposite sides, as shown in FIG. 2. It should beuinderstoodthat the slicers 104 are mounted on a shaft 106 and are clamped thereto by bolts 107 engaging the hubs of the sheets 104, such that the slicers 10-4 are rotatable with the shaft 106, and they are also movable axially of the shaftfor adjustment to align with different ones of the circumferential grooves 103. It: should be further under stood that theshaftf 106'. is powered and, therefore, the discs 104' are rotated in the direction indicated by the arrow 'showninFIG; 1 and the discs are, therefore, in essentially rolling contact with the, cylinder 33. FIGS. 1 and 2' further show: that: a frame bar 108 is stationarily mounted in the position shown while a U-shaped piece 109 engages the bar 108 to clamp thereon through suitablebolts and with the piece 111-. The latter has a bracket 112 pivoted thereon by a pin 133 while the lbwer end of the bracket rotatably supportsapulley 1 14- for guiding a belt 116-around the pulley while a second pulley 117' forms the other terminal of the belt 116 with the pulleys 114 and 117'disposed to cause the belt 116 to conform to thezcurvatur'e of'the cylinder 33 and-there by hold the signature 10 to the cylinder 33 when'the signatures pass the' position of the belt 116. It will be noted that a compression coil spring 115 is preferably employed to urge-the arm 112 into a position where the belt 116 is maintained tight as the pulley 114 is urged awayfrorn the pulley 117 by the spring 115. Of course, thebelt 116 moves rolling contact with the signatures, as indicated by the arrow on the pulley 114. Also, it is preferred that a pressure roller 118 be mounted adjacent each of the discs 104 for rolling over the signatures 10 and tightly pressing the same to the circumference' of the cylinder 33 along the line on which the discs'104 are cutting the signature 10. With regard to the line of cutting, it"will be noted that the disc 164 intersects the cylinder 33 ata line which is essentially the line of rolling contact of the pressure rollers 118 on the, signatures- 10, and, therefore, the pressure rollers hold the signatures to the cylinder 33 at the point of cutting of the signatures. The rollers 118 are mounted on pivot arms 119 which pivot about the shaft 121 and the opposite end of the arm 119 is urged by the spring122 in one direction of'pivot to press the rollers 1'18 onto the signatures 10. FIG; 2 also. shows the section 102 is attached to the cylinder 33 through bolts 123, and the cylinder 33 is provided with oversized openings 124 such that the section 102 can bernoved axially of the cylinder 33 for slight adjustment of the shear edges 103 axially on the cylinder 33.

FIGS. 1 and 3 also show that the two bars 38.are ro tationally adjustablewith respect to the two bars 39 and, therefore, the leading grippers 36 can be selectively spaced from the. trailing grippers 37'. To accomplish this, it, will benotedthat the bars 38 are provided with arcuate slots 126 which receive bolts 127 with. the latter threaded into the bars 39. Thus, loosening of the bolts 127 permits the bars 38 to be rotated as the slots 1'26 slidealong the bolts, and the latter are eventually tightened to, again. secure the bars.3.8 and39. together. The purpose for this adjustment is, of course, to adjust the trim of the sigma.- tures and to accommodate longer signatures 10 and, as explained hereinafter, it will be noted thatwhen, the bars 38 and 39-are respectively adjusted, other portions of the machine are correspondingly adjusted to remain in synchronization with the: respective rotational positionsof'the grippers 3'6 and 37;

As is customary with grippers'of' the type employed on the cylinder33', grippers 3'6 and 37 are preferably adjustable along theaxes of their'rock shafts. In this instance, itwill-be, noted in FIG, 3- that grippers 36 are shown tobe positionedwith a gripper outside of the lateral limits of the sheared'ges W3" and, therefore, the two outside grippers36' areavailable for retaining the trimmed sides of the signature 10, even afterthe sides are severed from the signature. Ofjcourse, a similar lateral positioning of two of of the grippers 37- is also preferred in order that the entire strip trimmed-'- fromeach side of the signature 10 will be retained by the grippers until the latter are opened at the bottom of' their circle of rotation, as shown in FIG. 1, and the severed strips can thus be deposited inadesiredspot; such as adjacent a vacuum. duct 12-8v which is available to suck the severed strips into it for depositing of'the strips.

' speed through the machine.

. med tail end of the signature away from the cylinder 33.

Upon closing the tail gripper 37, the cam 89 moves away from the projection 98, allowing the spring 97 to return the gripper 96 to a position of abutment with the circumference of the cylinder 33, and continued cam action causes the gripper 92 to mover-adially inwardly to grip the signatures, as shown in FIG. 1.

At this point, it should be noted that While two signatures 10 are shown, one on the feed platform 11 and the other between the cylinder 33 and the gripper 44, another signature could be in the machine and carried by the other, but unshown, set of leading grippers 36 on the cylinder 33. Also, it will be noted that all of the parts which convey'the paper are in essentially rolling contact so that'the paper transferred between the parts is moved in a serpentine path but'transferred from one part to another Without reducing the speed of the signature, stopping, or changing their direction of travel at, the point of transfer between parts. The peripheral speed of all parts is the same and the signatures are, therefore, conveyed at one constant I Also, it will be noted that the stitcher and folder cylinders are of a given diameter while. the gripper cylinder 33 and the cutter cylinder 43 have diameters twice that of the given diameter and, therefore, double sets of operating parts are provided on the cylinders 33 and 43.

With reference to the cutter. cylinder or cutter bar 43,

it will be noted that it is comprised of an elongated bar the shaft 131 shows the circular path of cutting'blades 132 movably mounted on the opposite ends of the bar 129. Adjacent each blade 132 is a spring biased pressure bar 133 which is also mounted on each end of the bar 129. The general function ofthe blade 132 is to trim the tail ends of the signatures 10 as the latter are rotated in essentially rolling contact with the blade 132 and therepast. Of course, the rotation of the blades 132 positions the blades for cutting the signatures 10 as the cutting edges 134 of the blades abut the cutting block 99 on the cylinder 33. In the action of the cutting blades 132, the blades are moved parallel to their cutting edges 134, which movement is also parallel to the axes of rotation of both the cylinder 33 and the cutter 43. The shown mechanism for achieving the movement of the blade 132 for producing a slicing action on the signatures 10 will now be described.

A stationarilymounted sun gear 136 is shown'bolted to the frame piece 74 in FIGS. 3 and 4, and two planet gears 137 are suitably mounted on the bar 129 for meshing engagement with the gear 136 which is concentric with the shaft 131 and, therefore, the gears 137 are rotatal along with their shafts 138 upon rotation of the shaft 131 on which the bar 129 is mounted. Each shaft138 is rotatably mounted in spaced apart bearing blocks 139 secured to the bar 129, and a bevel gear 141 is mounted on each shaft 138. A second shaft 142 is rotatably mounted in an opening 140 extended through'the bar 129, and the shaft is disposed to be transverse to the shaft 138. Of course, two such shafts 142 are provided since, as previously mentioned, all parts on the member 43 are in duplicate, and at this time it should be noted that the sectioning of the member 43 in FIG. 1 is along two difierent planes on the member 43 and, therefore, the drawing appears different at the opposite ends of the bar 129. The shaft 142 is rotatably mounted in suitable bearings within the bar 129, and the shaft 142 supports. a second bevel gear 143 which'is disposed in meshing relation with the bevel gear 141 and is, therefore, driven by the latter..

As shown in FIG. 1, the upper end of the shaft 142 contains a crank or eccentric 144 which has a ball bearing 146, and a link or arm 147 is suitably secured over the bearing 146. v

At this time it should be understood that rotation of the bar 129 causes the planet gears 137 to move around the gear 136 and rotate the bevel gears 141 which in turn rotate the meshing bevel gears 143. Rotation of the gears 143 causes the shafts142 to rotate, and the eccentircor crank 144 induces the usual crank motion to the link 147, and it is the reciprocating component of the crank motion which is transmitted to the cutters 132 by means hereinafter. described. j a 7 One endof thelink 147 connects through a pin 148 to a projection 149 on the cutter bar or cutter mounting bar 151. The latter extends substantially acrossthe bar 129, and the drawings show the. bar 151 is disposed within a suitable opening in the bar 129 and, of course, .two bars 151 are employed with one at each end of the bar 129. A series of bolts 152 attach the blade 132 and the bar 151 1 together, and thus the reciprocating motion of the a wedge 156 which engages a taper 157 on the piece 151 and a taper 158 on the back edge of the blade 132. With this arrangement, loosening of the bolts 152, which are accessible through opening 159 in the bar 129, and adjustmentof the Wedge bolts 154, which are accessible through openings 161 in the bar 129, will permit the blade to be moved radially with respect to its center of rotation, and in this manner, the cutting edge 134 can be positioned asdesired. The blade can be removed to be sharpened and then repositioned to extend toward the cylinder 33 the required amount for cutting the signatures10.

I It will be noted that a plurality of rollers 162 are disposed behind the member 151 to support the latter in an anti-friction manner against the bar 129 in order that the member 151 and the cutter 132 can move axially of their center of rotation when the cutter is trimming the signatures 10. FIG. l also shows a compression coil spring 163 disposed between the bar 129 and the pressure bar 133. The shoulder is provided on top of the bar 133 to restrict the latter in its sliding movement radially outwardly, and it should be understood that the pressure bar 133 presses against the signature '10 to. hold the same against the cylinder 33 while the blade 132 slices or trims the signatures.

The member 44 is mounted through its shaft 164 for rotation, as indicated. A gripper 1-66 is pivotally mount ed on the member 44 for the well-known gripper action of receiving the signature 10 from the cylinder 33. The member 44'is also provided with an arcuate guide .167 which supports the trailing portion of the signature 10 Whenthelatter is moved along the guide 13 and out of the machine. The guide 167 rotates with the member 44 and, with the signature 10 disposed between the members 33 and 44, asshown in FIG. 1, it will be seen that the signature 10 is curved essentially an equal amount around each of the members 33 and 44, such that the trailing end of the signature 10 has the various sheets substantially aligned and, therefore, the cutter 132 will cut the sheets equally so that the completed book is formed having even margins along that cut edge which is opposite the folded edge. V

FIG.'3 shows the mounting and gearing of the three members 27, 33, and 43. The shaft 28 of the member 27 has a spur gear 168 keyed thereto, and it should be understood that the gear=168 is driven from a gear 169-; fragmentarily shown; The gear- 168 thusdrivesthe shaft 128, and it will henoted that a seco'nd spurgear 17-1 is keyed to-the shaft 1-28't'o be'in meshing relation with'adonblesized spur gear-1 72' whieh is mount'edon the shaft. 41;. but is not' keyed thereto: belt 173 affixes the gear 172?- with thebar 1'38'so that-*the twoare rotatahle together, and it will also be noted that't-he bolt'1 27 passesthrough thegear- I722 Thus, -aspreviouslymentioned, loosening of the bolts 127'wil1'permit the -har'38' and the gear 172 to be rotated together'with respect to the bar 39, and this correspondingly rotates the gear 171, and thus the rotational position of the cylinder Z7 is synchronized with the adjustment of the leading grippers 36 on the bars 38; It should also be understoodthat justasthemembersZTand 33' are geared together, the'cylinders-14; 17, 21, and' 44 are also'geared withthe cylinders and 33 inthemanner shown with regard'to the latter t'wo cy-lindersg and; therefore, the punch; stapler, tucker, and'folder, both sets-ofleading' grippers-36, and the final grippers 1'66 are-all geared together in one gear train:

Another gear train is providedinthe machine for driving the rem'aind'er' of the parts. FIG. 3 shows a spur gear 174- keyed to the shaft=41 and a meshingspur gear 176 is keyed to the shaft 131 so that the shafts 41' and 131 are rotated together in synchronization. FIG. 3 also shows that, since the-liars 39 are'welded to the shaft 41, the gear 174 drives the bars:39*'which carry the two sets of trailing grippers 37. With this arrangement, the trailing grippers 37' are synchronized with-the cutter bars-132, and in addition to this, by conventionalgearing, the feed mechanism 12 is similarly gearedwiththe gears 174 and 116 so: that the other gear train includes the initial feed mechanism-12- andlthe trailing grippers-3 7 andthe cutter Bars 32. With the two gear trains provided, it should be obvious-that any adjustment made in the position of the bars 38. w accommodate longer sections or-adjust for different trimming thereof, will automatically be" carried throughout the machine along one gear train which-drives allof the par-ts associated withthe center line of'the'signature, priorto folding thereof, and the leading edge of the signature, which is the center line after folding. The other gear train is similarly synchronized to drive all of the parts which operate on the trailing end of the signature.

While a specific embodiment of this invention has been shown and described, it should be obvious that certain changes could be made therein, and the scope of this invention should, therefore, be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A rotary trimmer for use in trimming a stack of paper or the like, comprising in combination a rotatably mounted cylinder, grippers mounted on said cylinder for securing said stack of paper to the circumference of said cylinder upon rotation of the latter, a take-off gripper rotatably mounted adjacent said first cylinder in essentially rolling contact with said cylinder to be in paper transfer communication therewith, and pass the leading edge of said paper to said take-01f gripper, an arcuate guide disposed adjacent said cylinder and on the path of said take-off gripper when the latteris rotated past said cylinder, a paper cutter mounted adjacent said first cylinder and having a cutting edge disposed parallel to the axis of said first cylinder, means for actuating said cutting edge toward the circumference of said first cylinder and in synchronization with the rotation thereof and through said stack of paper at the rotationally trailing edge thereof and timed therewith when said stack of paper is curved equally about the circumference of said cylinder and said arcuate guide.

2. A rotary trimmer for use in trimming paper or the like, comprising in combination a rotatably mounted cylinder, grippers mounted on said cylinder for securing paper to the circumference of said cylinder upon rotation of the latter, certain ofsaid grippers being disposediin.

a rotationally leading position onsaid cylinder and with other of the grippers being disposed in a rotationally trailing position on said cylinderand with said grippers being-adjustable in spacing around the circumference of said' cylinder with respect to both said leading position and' said trailing position, a paper cutter disposed ad'- jacent said'cylinderand rotatable in timed relation therewith and extended to pass through said paper fortrimming the end of said paper held'bysaid other of said grippers and during rotation: of'said cylinder, a take oif gripper rotatabliy dis-posed adjacent said cylinder and operable in timed relation therewith for receiving the leading edge of said paper from said certain of said grippers and'remo'ving the leading portion of saidpaper from said cylinder prior to-trinnningsaid paper, and an arcuate guide-disposed on the path of said take-off gripper and extending for at least the length from the time said take-off gripper grips said paper to the time said paper is trimmed.

3. A method of cutting folded sheets of paper, cornprising the steps of placing the folded edge in the rotationally leading position and gripping said folded edge of said paper onto a rotating cylinder at both the rotationally leading and trailing edges of said paper, pressing said paper against saidcylinder substantially along the entire length thereof for disposing said paper flat against said cylinder, slicing the opposite sidesof said paper while the latter is being pressed against said cylinder and rotated therewith, passing said folded edge to another gripper off said cylinder and curving said paper to a condition Where all the folded sheets thereof are of equal length, cutting said trailing edge of said paper along a line rotationally immediately in front of the-point of'gripping said trailing edge and at said equal length, and-releasing the grip on said-leadingand trailing edges with the release depositing the sliced and cut portions out of the path of rotation of'the next paper.

4*. A method ofacutting a folded signature of paper, comprising the steps of gripping said paper onto a rotating cylinder at both the rotationally leading and trailing edges of said paper, with the folded edge of said paper being the rotationally leading edge, pressing said paper against said cylinder substantially along the entire length thereof for disposing said paper flat against said cylinder, slicing the opposite sides of said paper While the latter is being pressed against said cylinder and rotated therewith, removing said leading edge from said cylinder and reversely curving said paper along the leading portion off said cylinder and the trailing portion on said cylinder, cutting said trailing edge of said paper along a line rotationally immediately in front of the point of gripping said trailing edge and While said paper is reversely curved, and releasing the grip on said leading and trailing edges with the release depositing the sliced and out portions out of the path of rotation of the next paper.

5'. A rotary trimmer for use in trimming the edges of paper, the combination comprising a rotatably mounted gripper cylinder, a gripper mounted on said cylinder at both the rotationally leading edge and the rotationally trailing edge of said paper for securing both said edges of said paper to said cylinder during rotation of the latter, a paper slicer mounted adjacent said cylinder and extending radially inwardly of the circumference of said cylinder and having a cutting edge disposed in the plane of the direction of rotation of said cylinder for trimming the side edge of said paper on said cylinder when the latter rotates said paper past said slicer, means adjacent said slicer and engaged with said paper for moving with the latter and pressing it flat against said cylinder at least prior to the time when said paper is sliced, a take-off gripper, means movably mounted adjacent said gripper cylinder and having said take-off gripper mounted thereon and being driven in timed relation to said grip- 1 1 per on said gripper cylinder at said leading edge of said paper for having said take-ofi? gripper grip said'leading edge of said paper, 'a; cutter rotatably mounted adjacent said cylinder to be essentially in rolling relation therewith and having a cutting edge disposed parallel to the axis of said cylinder for rotating in synchronization with said cylinder and trimming said trailing edge of said paper transverse to said side edge of said paper, means connected to said cutter and being rotatable for moving said cut-ting edge against said paper after said leading edge has been gripped by said take-off gripper, and means connected to each said gripper for opening the latter to release said edges at selected rotational positions of said cylinder. a V

6. A rotary trimmer for use in trimming paper, the combination comprising a rotatably mounted gripper cylinder, grippers attached to said gripper cylinder at spaced apart positions along the circumference of said gripper cylinder to provide rotationally leading and rotationally trailing grippers for receiving and securing paper respectively at the rotationally forward edge and the rotationally rearward edge of said paper on the circumference of said gripper cylinder, a paper slicer mounted adjacent said gripper cylinder for trimming the side of said paper as the latter is rotated with said gripper cylinder past said slicer, means mounted adjacent said gripper cylinder and extending for substantially the length of said paper for engaging and moving with the latter and pressing it against said gripper cylinder, apaper' cutter, a cutter cylinder rotatably mounted adjacent said gripper cylinder and supporting said paper cutter with the latter having a cutting edge disposed parallel to the axis of said gripper cylinder and extending to the circumference of the latter when rotated therepast for trimming said rearward edge of said paper as the latter is rotated with said cylinder past said cutter, and a take-oil? gripper movably mounted adjacent said gripper cylinder and being operated in timed relation with said paper cutter for removing said forward edge of said paper from said gripper cylinder prior to the trimming of said paper by said paper cutter.

7. A rotary trimmer for use in trimming paper or the like, comprising in combination a rotatably mounted cylinder including shear edges at. opposite ends of said cylinder and disposed around the circumference thereof in planes transverse to the axis of rotation of said cyl: inder, said cylinder also including a cutting. block disposed on the circumference of said cylinder across the length thereof, grippers on said cylinder for securing paper thereto upon rotation of said cylinder, means adjacent said cylinder for pressing said paper against said circumference, a paper slicer mounted adjacent said cylinder with cutting edges disposed in shearing relation with said shear edgesfor trimming the opposite sides of said paper while the latter is pressed against said cylinder and during rotation of said cylinder, 21 paper cutter mounted for rotation in essentially rolling contact with said, cylinder and having a cutting edge disposed radially outwardly of said cutter and parallel to the axis of rotation and extending to said cutting block when rotated therepast for trimming an edge of said paper along a line'parallel to the axis of said cylinder, means. connected to said cutter for displacing the latter in said parallel direc tion while rotating and while trimming said edge, a take'oti gripper movably mounted adjacent said cylinder for operation in timed relation to said cylinder and said cutter for said take-off gripper to remove the leading edge of said paper from said cylinder before said cutter trims said paper.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 240,529 McKean Apr. 26, 1881 516,317 Smith Mar. 13, 1894 974,198 Smith Nov. 1, 1910 1,249,550 Straubel Dec. 11, 1917 1,351,751 Hoff Sept. 7, 1920 1,691,026 Novick Nov. 6, 1928 1,797,448 Sheldon Mar. 24, 1931 1,831,660 Hancock Nov. 10, 1931 2,138,406 Huck Nov. 29, 1938 2,412,047 Huck Dec. 3, 1946 2,445,831 Hoffman et al July 27, 1948 2,518,960 Tollison et al. Aug. 15, 1950

US76285258 1956-05-25 1958-09-23 Rotary type sheet cutter Expired - Lifetime US3008364A (en)

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US58723856 US2869863A (en) 1956-05-25 1956-05-25 Signature sititching, folding and trimming mechanism
US76285258 US3008364A (en) 1956-05-25 1958-09-23 Rotary type sheet cutter

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3110209A (en) * 1957-10-19 1963-11-12 Takehara Kokuji Fiber feeding and cutting device
US3149517A (en) * 1959-02-12 1964-09-22 Johnson & Johnson Automatic web cutting machine with clamp means for holding cut web portions
US3153964A (en) * 1960-05-26 1964-10-27 Sun Printers Ltd Production of magazines, pamphlets and the like
US3165954A (en) * 1960-10-14 1965-01-19 William F Huck Apparatus for trimming sheeted material
US3174372A (en) * 1962-03-19 1965-03-23 William F Huck High speed web cutting and delivery machine
US3178981A (en) * 1958-12-22 1965-04-20 Harold E Paulson Perforator attachments for offset presses
US3200687A (en) * 1963-02-21 1965-08-17 Harold E Paulson Perforator attachments for offset printing machines
US3483780A (en) * 1967-07-19 1969-12-16 Nypel Inc Cutter
US3491641A (en) * 1966-11-21 1970-01-27 Edward Vandenberg Adjustable rotary knife structure
US4025373A (en) * 1973-09-24 1977-05-24 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Method for applying adhesive tapes to pads
US4171239A (en) * 1973-09-24 1979-10-16 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Method and apparatus for applying adhesive attaching tapes to pads
EP0085485A2 (en) * 1982-01-28 1983-08-10 Dec (Realisations) Limited Apparatus for rotary die-cutting and stripping
US5370024A (en) * 1992-06-16 1994-12-06 Color Communication, Inc. Apparatus for the manufacture of sheets bearing display samples
US5427005A (en) * 1992-01-21 1995-06-27 Heidelberg Harris Gmbh Device for extracting samples from a folder

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US240529A (en) * 1881-04-26 Machine for booking and cutting cigar-wrappers
US516317A (en) * 1894-03-13 Perforating attachment for printing-presses
US974198A (en) * 1909-04-01 1910-11-01 Harris Automatic Press Co Paper-trimming machine.
US1249550A (en) * 1917-02-16 1917-12-11 Louis A Straubel Cutting mechanism for interfolding-machines.
US1351751A (en) * 1919-08-19 1920-09-07 Leslie D Hoff Combination slitter and perforator
US1691026A (en) * 1921-04-01 1928-11-06 Smithe Machine Co Inc F L Variable-feed mechanism
US1797448A (en) * 1925-11-03 1931-03-24 Hoe & Co R Cutting mechanism
US1831660A (en) * 1929-04-30 1931-11-10 Alice B Hancock Printing press attachment
US2138406A (en) * 1936-12-23 1938-11-29 Hoe & Co R Mechanism for cutting and delivering sheets from a web
US2412047A (en) * 1944-09-08 1946-12-03 Hoe & Co R Web feeding and slitting mechanism
US2445831A (en) * 1945-02-20 1948-07-27 P L Andrews Corp Window cutting means for envelope machines
US2518960A (en) * 1946-03-09 1950-08-15 Wood Newspaper Mach Corp Web severing mechanism

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US240529A (en) * 1881-04-26 Machine for booking and cutting cigar-wrappers
US516317A (en) * 1894-03-13 Perforating attachment for printing-presses
US974198A (en) * 1909-04-01 1910-11-01 Harris Automatic Press Co Paper-trimming machine.
US1249550A (en) * 1917-02-16 1917-12-11 Louis A Straubel Cutting mechanism for interfolding-machines.
US1351751A (en) * 1919-08-19 1920-09-07 Leslie D Hoff Combination slitter and perforator
US1691026A (en) * 1921-04-01 1928-11-06 Smithe Machine Co Inc F L Variable-feed mechanism
US1797448A (en) * 1925-11-03 1931-03-24 Hoe & Co R Cutting mechanism
US1831660A (en) * 1929-04-30 1931-11-10 Alice B Hancock Printing press attachment
US2138406A (en) * 1936-12-23 1938-11-29 Hoe & Co R Mechanism for cutting and delivering sheets from a web
US2412047A (en) * 1944-09-08 1946-12-03 Hoe & Co R Web feeding and slitting mechanism
US2445831A (en) * 1945-02-20 1948-07-27 P L Andrews Corp Window cutting means for envelope machines
US2518960A (en) * 1946-03-09 1950-08-15 Wood Newspaper Mach Corp Web severing mechanism

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3110209A (en) * 1957-10-19 1963-11-12 Takehara Kokuji Fiber feeding and cutting device
US3178981A (en) * 1958-12-22 1965-04-20 Harold E Paulson Perforator attachments for offset presses
US3149517A (en) * 1959-02-12 1964-09-22 Johnson & Johnson Automatic web cutting machine with clamp means for holding cut web portions
US3153964A (en) * 1960-05-26 1964-10-27 Sun Printers Ltd Production of magazines, pamphlets and the like
US3165954A (en) * 1960-10-14 1965-01-19 William F Huck Apparatus for trimming sheeted material
US3174372A (en) * 1962-03-19 1965-03-23 William F Huck High speed web cutting and delivery machine
US3200687A (en) * 1963-02-21 1965-08-17 Harold E Paulson Perforator attachments for offset printing machines
US3491641A (en) * 1966-11-21 1970-01-27 Edward Vandenberg Adjustable rotary knife structure
US3483780A (en) * 1967-07-19 1969-12-16 Nypel Inc Cutter
US4025373A (en) * 1973-09-24 1977-05-24 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Method for applying adhesive tapes to pads
US4171239A (en) * 1973-09-24 1979-10-16 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Method and apparatus for applying adhesive attaching tapes to pads
EP0085485A2 (en) * 1982-01-28 1983-08-10 Dec (Realisations) Limited Apparatus for rotary die-cutting and stripping
EP0085485A3 (en) * 1982-01-28 1986-07-02 Dec (Realisations) Limited Apparatus for rotary die-cutting and stripping
US5427005A (en) * 1992-01-21 1995-06-27 Heidelberg Harris Gmbh Device for extracting samples from a folder
US5370024A (en) * 1992-06-16 1994-12-06 Color Communication, Inc. Apparatus for the manufacture of sheets bearing display samples
US5622594A (en) * 1992-06-16 1997-04-22 Color Communications, Inc. Apparatus for the manufacture of sheets bearing display samples

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