US2967332A - Building frame construction - Google Patents

Building frame construction Download PDF

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US2967332A
US2967332A US588499A US58849956A US2967332A US 2967332 A US2967332 A US 2967332A US 588499 A US588499 A US 588499A US 58849956 A US58849956 A US 58849956A US 2967332 A US2967332 A US 2967332A
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laminate
construction
major
beam
filler
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US588499A
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John E Donlin
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CONTEMPORARY STRUCTURES Inc
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CONTEMPORARY STRUCTURES Inc
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/56Load-bearing walls of framework or pillarwork; Walls incorporating load-bearing elongated members
    • E04B2/70Load-bearing walls of framework or pillarwork; Walls incorporating load-bearing elongated members with elongated members of wood
    • E04B2/706Load-bearing walls of framework or pillarwork; Walls incorporating load-bearing elongated members with elongated members of wood with supporting function
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/18Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons
    • E04B1/26Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons the supporting parts consisting of wood

Description

Jan. 10, 1961 J. E. DONLIN BUILDING FRAME CONSTRUCTION H .A-M/ WH W% M 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 31, 1956 INVENTOR. JOHN E. DoNL/N Mam-1772M HTTQRNEYS Jan. 10, 1961 J. E. DONLIN 2,967,332

BUILDING FRAME CONSTRUCTION Filed May 31, 1956 l 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 J'oH/v 5. DONL/N HTT'ORNE'YJ United States Patent BUILDING FRAME CONSTRUCTION John E. Donlin, Excelsior, Minn., assignor to Contemporary Structures, Inc., Excelsior, Minn., a corporation of Minnesota Filed May 31, 1956, Ser. No. 588,499

'6 Claims. (Cl. 20.5)

This invention relates to building construction. 7 More particularly, it relates to a building frame unit permitting clear span construction.

The modern trend in home construction is approaching large scale acceptance. In fact it is readily becoming in demand. By the modern trend in construction or contemporary construction as it is sometimes referred to, I mean that design which tends toward single story structures, large glass areas, modular coordination, open space planning, and the use of natural finish materials. In many of such constructions, it is often desirable to utilize the underside of the roof members as the ceiling for the interior and to leave the ceiling area free of cross and supporting members. In addition, the room-defining panels which often substitute as walls in such constructions, are generally of light structure and are non-loadbearing so that the entire frame structure of the building must be self-supportin.

' Most such designs call for relatively fiat and low roofs which, of course, increases the load imposed thereupon by snow in northern climates. This load, in addition to the weight of the materials from which the frame units are constructed, poses a difiicult problem from an engineering standpoint if a clear span construction is to be attained. The usual outside wall structure comprises wooden stud members, 2 inches by 4 inches in cross section, and placed edgewise and vertically at 16 or 24 inches apart. The top and bottom ends of the stud members are usually tied together with upper and lower plates, the plates furnishing fastening means to secure the wall structure together with the foundation and with the roof structure. Window and door openings are framed into the walls during construction. Once the wall frame has been secured in position upon the foundation, the remainder of the building may be constructed in a number of different ways. The roof frame in the conventional structure of the class described is usually made up of roof rafters spaced apart the same distance as the wall studs and COIH'. pressively supported by the wall and by partitions constructed within the building. Outer sheathing is nailed to the fiat outer edge ofthe wall studs. An outer covering such as siding may then be secured to the sheathing. Similarly roof boards, decking, shingles, and other roof materials may be secured at the upper edge of the roof rafters. The floor is usually constructed of joists and may be worked into the wall structure with the outer ends of the floor joists supported on the wall plates or the floor may be first formed with the fioor joists directly on the foundation and the outer wall structure secured peripherally on the floor structure.

It has been found that, in northern climates, the snow load alone may cause the peak of such a generally flat roof as is contemplated in contemporary construction, to lower approximately an inch. Such a deflection in the truss rafters or rafter beams will in standard construction cause the supporting studs to swing outwardly at their lower ends or else how outwardly substantially intermediate the end, either of which is highly undesirable. This Z,967;33Z Patented Jan. 10, 1951 is true because the upper ends of the studs are rigidly aflixed to the lower ends of the truss rafters against relative movement therebetween. My invention is directed toward eliminating these disadvantages.

It is a general object of my invention to provide a novel and improved wooden frame unit for clear span construction.

A more specific object is to provide a novel and improved wooden frame unit for clear span construction which is simple and inexpensive in construction and assembly.

A still more specific object is to provide a novel and improved wooden frame unit which, in addition to being simple and inexpensive to construct and assemble, gives a clear span structure completely free of cross support members.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved wooden frame unit of relatively heavy and clear span construction which will bear a substantial load over and above its own weight without utilizing cross support members.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved clear span building construction frame unit which will facilitate erection to such an extent as to cause a substantial reduction in the man hours required for assembly.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved clear span building construction frame unit which permits the use of dual function decking which combines both framing and finishing materials.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved building construction which will permit the use of clear span structures at a substantial saving in both labor and material as compared to constructions of this type as heretofore known.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved angled or pitched peak roofing beam of unique construc tion and increased strength which requires no crosssupporting members to carry its own weight and has additional load-bearing capacity.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved method of forming an angled laminated roofing beam.

These and other objects of my invention will more fully appear from the following description made in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to the same or similar parts throughout the several views, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a partial perspective view of a building frame constructed through the use of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view for the purpose of illustrating how the truss rafters or rafter beams are made.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a building frame showing how one of the laminated studs may be omitted for the purpose of the installation of a picture window or the like.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a building frame unit taken along line 44 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 5 is an exploded view of one of my building frame units.

One embodiment of my invention is illustrated in Fig. 1 and is shown supported by a foundation wall W upon which floor joists 6 rest. Floor boards 7 are secured to the upper edge of these floor joists to complete the basement cap as it is referred to in the art. A plate 8 is secured to the floor boards and upon this plate the building frame construction unit is to be secured. The construction herebefore described is standard construction and does not constitute a part of my invention.

Secured to the plate 8 and extending upwardly therefrom is a building frame unit U which embodies my invention. This building frame unit U includes an elon gated truss rafter or rafter beam B which, as shown in Fig. 1, is formed in a pitched peak at P at a point inter-L asaassa mediate its ends. The rafter beam B is generally horizontal but it must have a certain amount of pitch to it and because of this, in order to economically construct the rafter beam, the angled portions thereof indicated generally by the numerals9 and 10, are joined together by a scarf joint indicated generally as S adjacent the area where the two angled portions meet. Reference to Fig. 1 and Fig. 5 clearly shows that the rafter beams B are laminated, the laminates thereof being adhered to each other in vertical side-to-side relation. A socket 11 is formed in each of the angled portions 9 and 10 adjacent its outer end but inwardly fromthe extreme end thereof. This socket 11 can best be seen through reference to Fig. 5.

Supporting the rafter beam B adjacent each of its outer end portions is a laminated stud 12. This laminated stud as best shown in Figs. 4 and 5,. has a reduced upper end portion so that there is provided a shoulder 13 and an upwardly extending tongue 14. This shoulder 13 and tongue 14 are formed by theouter two laminates being slightly shorter in length and the two middle laminates of the stud 12 extending upwardly therebeyond to form the tongue 14 as is clearly shown in Fig. 5. The studs 12 as best shown in Fig. 4 have facing sides indicated as 15 and in these facing sides thereare formed modular recesses 16 which are spaced vertically. Rectangularly shaped connector boards 17 are provided. for extending between the spaced studs 12 and connecting the same, the edges of these boards 17 lying flush with the outer surface of the studs 12 when placed in the modular recesses 16. The side boards 18 aresecured to these connector boards 17 in any conventional manner well known in the art.

An important feature of my invention is the. scarf joint at the peak of the rafter beam or truss rafter B. This truss rafter or rafter beam B is'formed through the use of a unique method. As peviously described, the rafter beam B is laminated and it is constructed in the following manner. A primary or major laminate 20 is formed with a reverse pitch end cut as at 21, as shown in Fig. 2. A filler laminate 22 is then formed. with a reverse pitch end cut and placed with itsend abutting against the longer longitudinal edge 20a of the primary or major laminate as shown in the upper portion of Fig. 2. The shorter longitudinal edge 22a of the filler laminate constitutes an extensionof the reverse pitch cut end 21 of the primary laminate. A second primary laminate 23 with a reverse pitch cut end is then superimposed on the filler laminate 22 with the reverse pitch cut'end 23a extending along the shorter longitudinal edge 20b of the first mentioned primary or major laminate. Thus the'reverse pitch cut end 23a will lie flush with the shorter longitudinal edge 20b of the primary or major laminate 20. A second filler laminate 24 with a reverse pitch cut end 24a is then superimposed on the primary or major laminate 20 with the reverse pitch cut end 24a abutting against the longer longitudinal edge 23b of the second primary laminate 23, as shown in the lower portion of Fig. 2. Before superimposing the primary laminate23 and the filler laminate 24 upon .the filler laminate 22 and the primary laminate 20, the adjacent sides of each having adhesive or glue such as National Caseins Aircraft casein glue applied thereto so as to hold them in the desired relative position after they have, been so superimposed. The are clamped in the desired relative positions and a minimum of 100 pounds per square inch pressure is applied to them for a period of four to seven hours, depending upon drying room controls.v

The beam B is continued to be built up in the manner as described above. In other words, a third primary laminate, (not shown) is superimposed on. the second filler laminate 24 in a position corresponding to the first primary laminate 20. Similarly a third filler laminate, .(notshown) is superimposed upon the second primary laminate 23 and adheredthereto the thirdprirnary and filler laminate being arranged in the same relation to each other as the first mentioned primary laminate 20 and filler laminate 22. The fourth pair of primary and secondary laminates will then be superimposed and adhered to the third pair of major and secondary laminates and this last mentioned pair will be arranged relative to each other similarly to the arrangement shown between the laminates23 and 24. In this manner the truss rafter or rafter beam B may be comprised of as many laminates as is considered desirable.

'It will be noted that when the laminates are'adhered to each other in the relationship set forth in the preceding paragraph, the resultwill be the scarf joint S which gives substantial strength without the need for cross supporting members as has been heretofore used in conventional construction. Fig. 5 shows the relationship between the various laminates if the scarf joint were exploded.

In use the tongues 14 of the studs 12 are inserted within the sockets 11 of the rafter beam B and the bottom or.lower endportions of the studs are secured to the plate8. The weight of the beam B rests upon the shoulderv 13 of the stud 12 and the tongue 14, together with the socket 11, form an interlock between the beam B and the stud 12. The stud of course supports the weight of the beam B and also, whatever additional load is superimposed thereupon. If desired, roof planks such as 25 may be applied to the upper surface of the roof beams B and utilized as the ceiling for the interior of the. structure. The studs 12 are spaced 4 feet from each other and the connector board 17 connects the studs to provide support. for the side sheathing 18.

If it is desired to eliminate one of the studs 12 in order to leave a space such. as 26, as shown in Fig. 3, to permit a picture window or the like to be installed, this may be readily accomplished by chipping away the outer two laminates of the stud 12 at the point where the upper recess 16 is disposed and applying on the shoulder thereby formed a header beam 27. This header beam would then be 8. feet long and it would support the rafter beam indicated as 28 which. would normally be supported by the stud 12 which has been removed.

It should be noted that the connection between the studs 12 and the roof beam Bis a limited pivotal connection, the roof beam B pivoting about the tongue 14 as it is caused to deflect as a result of the imposition of an unusual load thereupon. For example, when a heavy loadof. snow falls upon the roof planks 25, it has been found that a deflection of as much as one inch may result from the strain placed'upon the roof beams B. Through the use of the pivotal connection provided by the tongue 14 and the socket 11, the roof beam B will pivot about the tongue 14 and. the studs 12 will not be caused to spring outwardly atthe bottom or bow outwardly at their intermediate portions. I have found that, when there is as muchdeflection. as one inch, the studs 12 will still remain in a vertically upright position and will not bow or spring out at their lower ends. This is a very desirable feature in building construction.

It should also benoted that, through the formation and use of a scarf joint intermediate the ends of the rafter beams. B, I have provided a roofing beam which is more than adequate to support its own weight plus the load which it will normally be called upon to support as a result of snowfall and the like. The use. of the scarf joint permits clear span construction without the interference of any cross support members between the ends of the rafter beams B as is conventionally used in conventional construction.

Another distinct advantage of my invention is the fact that there is a substantial reduction in the number of man hours required to. assemble my building frame unit as. compared to other building. frame constructions. It is a relatively simple matter to assemble one of my buildingframe units andany number of such units .may be utilized as desired. In any event, for a construction of a given size, many less man hours will be required to assemble the total construction when my building frame units are utilized.

Another advantage of my invention is that, through its use, clear span construction may be utilized at a substantial saving in both labor and materials as cprnpared to construction of this type as heretofore known. Clear span construction by conventional methods as heretofore known, is substantially more expensive than a construction wherein my invention is utilized.

Through the use of my invention ceiling joists, bridging, plaster and lath and/or dry wall, as used in conventional construction, are eliminated. Also, through the use of my invention, all cornice materials are eliminated. In addition, my building frame units permit the use of modular wall construction which is an accepted money saver because materials can be applied with a minimum amount of cutting and fitting.

Another advantage of my building frame units which should be noted, is the fact that, through the use of laminated building frames, it is possible to use dual function decking which combines both framing and finishing materials. In other words, through the use of my building frame construction, certain portions of the construction such as roofing planks, may be utilized both as a roof and as a ceiling structure.

Thus it can be seen that I have provided a novel and improved building frame unit which simplifies and effects a substantial saving in man hours over other clear span construction and effects a substantial saving in labor and material over other conventional construction. The use of my building frame unit saves the need for support at predetermined points as required by beam and ridge construction. Thus it gives elasticity in planning room and wall arrangements and the walls may be utilized as additional beam supports regardless of the position of the wall. Thus over conventional construction, the cost of the ridge beam is saved and there is a substantial saving in the cost of erection in the form of labor. It also saves the engineering requirements if ordinary plank and beam construction is used.

It will, of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, details, arrangement and proportions of the various parts without departing from the scope of my invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An angled scarf joint comprising an elongated straight major laminate having longitudinally extending edges and having an end cut at an angle to its length, an elongated filler laminate having longitudinally extending edges and having one of its ends cut at an angle to its length and abutting flush along the length of its end out against one of the longitudinal edges of said major laminate and having one of its longitudinal edges extending in parallel to the cut end of said major laminate and as substantially a continuation thereof, a second straight major laminate of substantially the same construction as said first mentioned major laminate and extending along and being adhesively secured along its length to one side of said filler laminate and to the angular cut end of said first mentioned major laminate, said second major laminate having its angular cut end extending parallel to and along the opposite longitudinal edge of said first mentioned major laminate, and a second filler laminate of substantially the same construction as said first mentioned filler laminate and extending along and being adhesively secured at its side and along its length to the side of said first mentioned major laminate and having its angular cut end abutting flush along its length against the longitudinal side edge of said second mentioned major laminate.

2. The structure defined in claim 1 wherein said pair of second mentioned major and filler laminates are superimposed on said first mentioned pair of laminates in the manner described, and a plurality of additional pairs of major and secondary laminates are superimposed there on and adhesively received in corresponding relation thereto.

3. An angled scarf joint comprising an elongated straight major laminate having longitudinally extending edges and having an end cut at an angle to its length, an elongated straight filler laminate having longitudinally extending edges and having one of its ends cut at an angle to its length and abutting flush along the length of its end cut against one of the longitudinal edges of said major laminate and having one of its longitudinal edges extending in parallel to the cut end of said major laminate and as substantially a continuation thereof, a second major laminate of substantially the same construction as said first mentioned major laminate and extending along and being adhesively secured along its length to one side of said filler laminate and to the angular cut end of said first mentioned major laminate, said second major laminate having its angular cut end extending parallel to and along the opposite longitudinal edge of said first mentioned major laminate, a second filler laminate of substantially the same construction as said first mentioned filler laminate and extending along and being adhesively secured along its length to one side of said first mentioned major laminate and abutting flush along the length of its end cut against one of the longitudinal edges of said second mentioned major laminate, a third major laminate of substantially the same construction as said other major laminates and extending along and being adhesively secured at its side and along its length to the other side of said second mentioned filler laminate and to the other side of the cut end of said second mentioned major laminate and having its angularly cut end extending parallel to and along one of the longitudinal edges of said second mentioned major laminate, and a third filler laminate of substantially the same construction as said other filler laminates and extending along and being adhesively secured at its side and along its length to the other side of said second mentioned major laminate and having its angularly cut end abutting flush along its length against the longitudinal side edge of said third mentioned major laminate.

4. A wooden frame unit for home building which includes a truss rafter having elongated straight component members in vertical side-to-side adhered lamination and formed intermediate its ends in a pitched peak and having a scarf joint formed as a component laminated member defining said peak, said scarf joint comprising an elongate straight major laminate having longitudinally extending edges and having an end cut at an angle to its length, an elongated filler laminate having longitudinally extending edges and having one of its ends cut at an angle to its length and abutting flush along the length of its end cut against one of the longitudinal edges of said major laminate and having one of its longitudinal edges extending parallel to the cut end of said major laminate and as substantially a continuation thereof a second straight major laminate, a second straight major laminate of substantially the same construction as said first mentioned major laminate and extending along and being adhesively secured along its length to one side of said filler laminate and to the angular cut end of said first mentioned major laminate, said second major laminate having its angular cut end extending parallel to and along the opposite longitudinal edge of said first mentioned major laminate, and a second filler laminate of substantially the same construction as said first mentioned filler laminate and extending along and being adhesively secured to its side and along its length to the side of said first mentioned major laminate and having its angular cut end abutting along its length against the longitudinal side edge of said second major laminate, and a pair of spaced upright studs supporting the opposite ends of said truss rafter, said studs each being connected to its respective end of said truss rafter for pivotal movement therebetween.

movement is limited.

6. The structure defined in claim 4 wherein said unit is free of cross members extending between said component members of said truss rafter.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Bramble Aug. 26, 1879 Dake Mar. 30, 1897 Rockwell July 1, 1919 8 Vaaler ..,,Apr. 8, 1930 Landsem May 24,1938 Thompson et;al. Sept. 5, 1939 Brunton et a1 May 2, 1944 Kump Dec. 24, 1946 Haines Jan. 31, 1950 Dinn Aug. 9, 1955 Gonser Oct. 28, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS Australia Aug. 8, 1949

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3039152A (en) * 1960-09-01 1962-06-19 Albert J Hillesheim Laminated building arch
US3067544A (en) * 1958-04-22 1962-12-11 Willatts William Henry Building components and structures
US3285636A (en) * 1964-06-04 1966-11-15 Potlatch Forests Inc Joint in timbers
US3385013A (en) * 1965-07-26 1968-05-28 Page E. Severson Prefabricated delta building structures
US3470661A (en) * 1965-03-19 1969-10-07 Harvey H Johnson Roof box frame haunch joint
US4441287A (en) * 1980-07-24 1984-04-10 Engineered Roof Trusses Pty. Ltd. Framed building construction
FR2540159A1 (en) * 1983-01-28 1984-08-03 Bier Gustave Method for constructing detached houses with the facades having a linear raised structure and architecture
US4677806A (en) * 1986-04-04 1987-07-07 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Agriculture Wooden building system with flange interlock and beams for use in the system
US5304011A (en) * 1992-02-10 1994-04-19 Jon Seeders Wedgelock laminated joint
FR2723388A1 (en) * 1994-08-05 1996-02-09 Colet Fernand Method for producing angular elements in laminated wood -colle

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US218920A (en) * 1879-08-26 Improvement in timber-joints
US579673A (en) * 1897-03-30 Rim-joint for vehicle-wheels
US1308372A (en) * 1919-07-01 Joint
US1753487A (en) * 1926-10-13 1930-04-08 Clemetsen Company Joint construction
US2118048A (en) * 1937-03-29 1938-05-24 Timber Engineering Co Laminated structure
US2172093A (en) * 1936-09-12 1939-09-05 Unit Structures Inc Process of manufacturing building arches
US2347879A (en) * 1941-04-30 1944-05-02 Selection Engineering Co Ltd Hollow beam and column for use in buildings
US2413145A (en) * 1943-07-20 1946-12-24 Jr Ernest J Kump Laminated plywood arch
US2495966A (en) * 1944-06-10 1950-01-31 Mcdowell & Torrence Lumber Com Joint between structural members of buildings
US2714782A (en) * 1953-10-20 1955-08-09 Dinn Louise Johnson Toy houses
US2857632A (en) * 1949-11-29 1958-10-28 Semico Inc Method of making panels

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US218920A (en) * 1879-08-26 Improvement in timber-joints
US579673A (en) * 1897-03-30 Rim-joint for vehicle-wheels
US1308372A (en) * 1919-07-01 Joint
US1753487A (en) * 1926-10-13 1930-04-08 Clemetsen Company Joint construction
US2172093A (en) * 1936-09-12 1939-09-05 Unit Structures Inc Process of manufacturing building arches
US2118048A (en) * 1937-03-29 1938-05-24 Timber Engineering Co Laminated structure
US2347879A (en) * 1941-04-30 1944-05-02 Selection Engineering Co Ltd Hollow beam and column for use in buildings
US2413145A (en) * 1943-07-20 1946-12-24 Jr Ernest J Kump Laminated plywood arch
US2495966A (en) * 1944-06-10 1950-01-31 Mcdowell & Torrence Lumber Com Joint between structural members of buildings
US2857632A (en) * 1949-11-29 1958-10-28 Semico Inc Method of making panels
US2714782A (en) * 1953-10-20 1955-08-09 Dinn Louise Johnson Toy houses

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3067544A (en) * 1958-04-22 1962-12-11 Willatts William Henry Building components and structures
US3039152A (en) * 1960-09-01 1962-06-19 Albert J Hillesheim Laminated building arch
US3285636A (en) * 1964-06-04 1966-11-15 Potlatch Forests Inc Joint in timbers
US3470661A (en) * 1965-03-19 1969-10-07 Harvey H Johnson Roof box frame haunch joint
US3385013A (en) * 1965-07-26 1968-05-28 Page E. Severson Prefabricated delta building structures
US4441287A (en) * 1980-07-24 1984-04-10 Engineered Roof Trusses Pty. Ltd. Framed building construction
FR2540159A1 (en) * 1983-01-28 1984-08-03 Bier Gustave Method for constructing detached houses with the facades having a linear raised structure and architecture
US4677806A (en) * 1986-04-04 1987-07-07 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of Agriculture Wooden building system with flange interlock and beams for use in the system
US5304011A (en) * 1992-02-10 1994-04-19 Jon Seeders Wedgelock laminated joint
FR2723388A1 (en) * 1994-08-05 1996-02-09 Colet Fernand Method for producing angular elements in laminated wood -colle
WO1996004439A1 (en) * 1994-08-05 1996-02-15 Fernand Colet Method for fabricating angular elements made of glued lamellated wood

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