US2917856A - Ornamental plastic block - Google Patents

Ornamental plastic block Download PDF

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Publication number
US2917856A
US2917856A US688249A US68824957A US2917856A US 2917856 A US2917856 A US 2917856A US 688249 A US688249 A US 688249A US 68824957 A US68824957 A US 68824957A US 2917856 A US2917856 A US 2917856A
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shell
block
plastic
ornamental
transparent
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Expired - Lifetime
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US688249A
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Soloff Milton
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Robert Wells
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47GHOUSEHOLD OR TABLE EQUIPMENT
    • A47G1/00Mirrors; Picture frames or the like, e.g. provided with heating, lighting or ventilating means
    • A47G1/12Frames or housings for storing medals, badges, or the like

Description

Dec- 22, 1959 M. SOLQFF ORNAMENTAL PLASTIC BLOCK 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 4, 1957 INVENTOR. ML 70/v 30L OFF flTTokWEX Dec. 22, 1959 M. SOLOFF 2,917,356

ORNAMENTAL PLASTIC BLOCK Filed Oct. 4, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet. 2

INVENTOR. 1 1/4 TON $04 OFF ORNAMENTAL PLASTIC BLOCK Milton Solofl, Flushing, N.Y., assignor of one percent to Robert Wells, Lattingtown Harbor, N.Y.

Application October 4, 1957, Serial No. 688,249

7 Claims. (Cl. 41-10) This invention relates to ornamental devices and specifically to such as have the appearance of a solid plastic block, internally carved with an ornamental design, or having embedded therein some ornamental or other article for display purposes.

It has been known to take solid blocks of transparent plastic material, carve ornamental designs therein and thereafter color the said design. The finished article when viewed through the side of the block presents a highly attractive appearance and has utility as bases for atomizers, cigarette lighters, door knobs, and the like. It has also been known to take small articles and embed them within plastic compositions, in the presence of heat and pressure.

Due to the high cost of the plastic material, such articles are extremely expensive and the method of manufacturing such devices results in a large amount of imperfect goods. Only highly skilled workers can carve attractive designs consistently in plastic, and the presence of bubbles or imperfections during the embedding operation results in an unattractive finished product.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a device which will simulate the appearance of an internally carved plastic block, or a solid plastic block with an embedded article therein, and which will be free of the limitations of the previously known manufacturing techniques.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a simulated embedment which will be far less expensive than presently known devices.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a block which will lend itself to assembly by unskilled workers.

Still another object is to provide an ornamental block which is free of the limitations imposed by hand carved objects, insofar as variety of design is concerned.

A feature of the present invention is its use of a hollow shell member for the purpose of defining the shape of the block.

Another feature of the present invention is its use of a liquid within the hollow shaped member to give the appearance of a solid block.

A further feature of the present invention is its use of beveled or curved surfaces to disguise the shell structure and create the illusion of a solid plastic block.

Another feature of the present invention is its use of a novel air bubble entrapping structure whereby any air which may be present in the liquid during the assembly of the object will be permitted to escape therefrom and be retained within an area which will not interfere with the illusion of a solid plastic block.

The invention consists of the construction, combination and arrangement of parts, as herein illustrated, described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof, are illustrated four embodiments of the present invention, inwhich:

nited States atent O ice Figure l is a fragmentary view in perspective of a shell made of a transparent plastic material, showing the double-edged appearance which is characteristic of a hollow, transparent member.

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1, except that it is of a solid plastic block and illustrates the difference in appearance between a solid and a hollow object.

Figure 3 is a view in perspective of a complete embodiment of the present invention, having the appearance of a solid block with an ornamental object contained therein.

Figure 4 is a view in perspective of a second embodiment of the present invention, illustrating the manner in which bevels are employed to create the illusion of a solid block.

Figure 5 is a view in side elevation of a third embodiment of the present invention, showing the manner in which the shape of the shell can be used to disguise the nature of the structure.

Figure 6 is a view in perspective of a further embodiment of the present invention, in which a bafile is employed within the block for the purpose of supporting an ornamental device and bevels are used to disguise the presence of the baffle.

Figure 7 is a view in perspective of an air trap block which is employed in connection with the present invention.

Figure 8 is a view in perspective of a cap member used in conjunction with the air trap block.

Figure 9 is a view in side elevation of an atomizer made in accordance with the present invention, partly broken away to show the air trap for picking up bubbles of air from the fluid after assembly.

Figure 10 is a fragmentary view in perspective showing the use of radii to create the illusion of solidity.

Referring to the drawings, and specifically to Figures 1 and 2, 10 indicates a transparent plastic wall, forming part of a geometrically shaped block 11, which block is in the nature of a hollow shell. It will be seen that where the walls 10 meet there is presented a double line 12, whereby the observer can see that the geometric shape is hollow. In contrast, and referring to Figure 2, it will be seen that the solid block 13, being a geometric shape identical to the shape of the block 11, but not being hollow, presents only a single line 14 at each of the meeting surfaces.

It has been discovered that by taking the hollow shell 11 (shown in Figure 3) and filling the shell with a liquid having the same index of refraction as that of the plastic body forming the shell 11, the double line 12 can be eliminated, and the finished object will have the appearance of a solid block. An ornamental object, such as the Christmas tree 15, placed therein, appears to be embedded within a solid block. A suitable example of a plastic substance which can be used for this purpose is polymerized acrylic resin, sold under the trade marks Lucite and Plexiglas, and a suitable liquid having an index of refraction closely approximating the plastic is mineral oil.

It has also been found possible to combine liquids having diiferent indices of refraction from that of the plastic shell 11, and still create the illusion of a solid block of plastic by employing the embodiments shown in Figures 4 and 5. In these embodiments the angles made by the meeting faces of the geometric shape or other than angles. By providing shapes which have angles greater or less than 90, and by providing the bevels or facets 16, illustrated in Figure 4, the observer is unable to see both edges of the wall, which is the distinguishing characteristic of a hollow shell.

The added weight of the liquids within the shell increases the illusion that the object is of a solid block construction.

It will be seen from an examination of Figure 4, that it consists of a shell made in the form of a hollow block having bevels 16 on all edges thereof. When filled with a liquid 17 the eye is unable to detect the inner surface of the walls of the shell, and any ornamental object carried within the block will appear to be embedded in a solid block of plastic. A suitable beveled cover member 22 may be cemented to the top of the block 11 to hold the liquid 17 within the assembled block. Liquid receiving openings 33 may be provided in the cover 32 to permit filling after the cover is applied. After filling, the openings 33 are sealed in any convenient manner. One such sealing means is illustrated in Figure 6, in which the opening 33 is tapered and is closed by a tapered pin 26 made of the shell material. The top of the pin 26 is forced below the surface of the cap 22, and a clear cement poured into the depression to seal it in place.

The embodiment of the invention shown in Figure comprises a generally pyramidal shape filled with a liquid 17 and having an ornamental object 15 contained therein to simulate a solid block of plastic in which there is an embedment. The shape of the pyramid is such that the angles made by the meeting faces are less than 90 and the eye cannot distinguish the separate inner faces of the shell, despite the fact that the pyramidal shape is filled with a liquid having a different index of refraction from that of the plastic material of which the shell is made.

Referring to Figure 6, there is shown another embodiment of the present invention, in which the hollow shell 11 is formed with bevels 16 on all edges thereof, as has been previously described in connection with Figure 4, and in which there is provided a central partition member 18. The partition 18 may comprise a transparent plastic sheet or a suitably colored foil of material. The partition 18 is joined to opposed walls of the shell 11, as indicated at 19, and the walls of the shell 11 adjacent the ends of the partition 18 are beveled, as shown at 20. The bevels 20 make it impossible to see the flat edge of the partition 18.

When the baffie 18 and the bevels 20 are colored by applying some suitable material to the face thereof, an observer, looking into the block at the baffie 18, will get the impression that the entire block is formed of some colored material. This illusion is created by reason of the reflection of the color on the side walls of the shell within the liquid filled compartment. An artistic or ornamental object 21 may be secured to the bafile 18 and highly attractive displays produced in this manner. It is also possible to put one design on one face of the bafiie 18, and a different design on the opposite face, employing different colors on each side of the baffle to give interesting and eye-catching effects. After the shell 11 is filled with a suitable liquid, such as water, mineral oil or glycerine, a sealing member 22 may be cemented to the top of the assembly to complete the object.

Where it is desired to use the liquid filled shell as a base for an atomizer or some other useful object, a cap member 23 illustrated in Figure 8 may be cemented over the shell 11, as illustrated in Figure 9. The cap member 23 may be provided with a well 24 to receive the bowl 25 of an atomizer or other useful object. The cap member 23 may be either transparent or opaque and must be securely cemented to the top of the shell 11 to prevent fluid from escaping therefrom.

In assembling ornamental objects in accordance with the present invention, it is sometimes necessary to eliminate all trace of air from the fluid. It will be apparent that air bubbles within the ornamental block will not only be objectionable but will destroy the illusion of a solid object. It has been found that by the use of small hourglass-shaped wells 27 within a sealing block 28 (shown in Figure 7), any air within the fluid may be trapped and kept from re-entering the said fluid. The block 28 is adapted to fit within the shell 11, and can be cemented '4 therein. The block 28 can be centrally bored, as indicated at 29, to receive the well 24 of the cap member 23. After the sealing block 28 is in place, it will occupy a space in the filled shell 11, wherein the liquid will rise at least to the constricted opening 30 of the hourglass shape opening 27. Any bubbles within the fluid will find their way up through the opening 30 and become entrapped in the large upper portion of the opening 27. Thereafter, due to the restriction of the opening 30 and the surface tension of the liquid, it will be difficult for air to re-enter the lower portion of the block even though the filled block may be temporarily tipped over. The cap 23 may be made of metal and can be slipped over the sealing block 28 to hide the construction thereof.

Referring to Figure 10, there is shown a fragmentary view of a corner of a block suitable for use in the present invention. It will be seen that the corners have been rounded both internally and externally of the block, as indicated at 31 and 34. As a result of the construction shown in Figure 10, the observer is unable to distinguish the separate faces of the hollow shell 11, and the illusion of a solid block is thereby created. It will be understood that wherever bevels are employed herein to create angles other than angles, radii may be substituted therefor with satisfactory results.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that there have been provided various ornamental blocks having the appearance of solid plastic blocks, within which there are incorporated artistic or ornamental designs for the purpose of serving as bases for useful objects or for ornamentation in their own right. The devices lend themselves to inexpensive commercial displays of small objects which are to be sold, and also to the displaying of photo graphs. keepsakes, commercial trademarks, and the like.

Having thus fully described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. An ornamental transparent resinous plastic block having the appearance of a solid plastic block with an article embedded therein comprising, a sealed hollow transparent resinous plastic polygonal shell having a plurality of transparent plane faces thereon, a bevel between all adjacent transparent faces, a quantity of liquid completely filling said shell and an ornamental object secured to at least one of the inside surfaces of the shell, said liquid having an index of refraction closely approaching that of the resinous plastic shell.

2. An ornamental transparent resinous plastic block having the appearance of a solid plastic block with an article embedded therein comprising, a sealed hollow transparent resinous plastic polygonal shell having a plurality of transparent plane faces thereon and an inclined angle of less than 90 between adjacent transperent faces, a quantity of liquid completely filling said shell and an ornamental object secured to at least one of the inside surfaces of the shell, said liquid having an index of refraction closely approaching that of the resinous plastic shell.

3. An ornamental transparent resinous plastic block having the appearance of a solid plastic block with an article embedded therein comprising, a sealed hollow transparent resinous plastic polygonal shell of polymerized acrylic resin having a plurality of transparent plane faces thereon, a bevel between all adjacent transparent faces, a quantity of liquid completely filling said shell consisting of mineral oil and an ornamental object secured to at least one of the inside surfaces of the shell, said liquid having an index of refraction closely approaching that of the resinous plastic shell.

4. An ornamental transparent resinous plastic block having the appearance of a solid plastic block with an article embedded therein comprising, a sealed hollow transparent resinous plastic polygonal shell having a plurality of transparent plane faces thereon, a bevel between all adjacent transparent faces, a bafile member in the nature of a foil within the shell and secured at its edge to the shell, 2. quantity of liquid completely filling said shell and an ornamental object secured to the bafiie mem her, said liquid having an index of refraction closely approaching that of the resinous plastic shell.

5. An ornamental transparent resinous plastic block having the appearance of a solid plastic block with an article embedded therein comprising, a sealed hollow transparent resinous plastic polygonal shell having a plurality of transparent plane faces thereon, a bevel between all adjacent transparent faces, a baflle member in the nature of a foil within the shell and secured at its edge to the shell, a quantity of liquid completely filling said shell and an ornamental object secured to the bafile member, a bevel in the shell faces adjacent the baffle to hide the bafiie edge, said liquid having an index of refraction closely approaching that of the resinous plastic shell.

6. An ornamental transparent resinous plastic block having the appearance of a solid plastic block with an article embedded therein comprising, a sealed hollow transparent resinous plastic polygonal shell of polymerized acrylic resin having a plurality of transparent plane faces thereon, a radius between all adjacent transparent faces, a quantity of liquid completely filling said shell consisting of mineral oil and an ornamental object se' cured to at least one of the inside surfaces of the shell, said liquid having an index of refraction closely approaching that of the resinous plastic shell.

7. An ornamental transparent plastic block having the appearance of a solid plastic block with an article embedded therein comprising, a sealed hollow transparent resinous plastic polygonal shell having a plurality of transparent plane faces thereon, a bevel between all adjacent transparent faces, a colored bafile member in the nature of a foil within the shell and secured at its edge to the shell, a quantity of liquid completely filling said shell and an ornamental object secured to the baffle mcmher, said liquid having an index of refraction closely approaching that of the resinous plastic shell.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,788,058 Jyumi Jan. 6, 1931 2,076,782 Jedlicka Apr. 3, 1937 2,440,205 McLain Apr. 20, 1948 2,601,658 Bussert June 24, 1952 2,651,870 Lipic Sept. 15, 1953 2,731,672 Davis Jan. 24, 1956 2,747,230 Magnus May 29, 1956

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2989813A (en) * 1959-02-16 1961-06-27 Sr Jerome Elbert Hess Ash tray with display insert
US3123885A (en) * 1964-03-10 Means for molding articles
US3708175A (en) * 1971-11-11 1973-01-02 T Barney Golf swing practice device
US3806577A (en) * 1972-02-28 1974-04-23 A Szebenyi Process for embedding biological materials in plastic
US3944691A (en) * 1974-04-09 1976-03-16 Smith John A Decorative assembly or toy
US3997686A (en) * 1974-10-16 1976-12-14 Mcclure Stewart Ornament and method of manufacture
US4054000A (en) * 1976-03-31 1977-10-18 Lisle Carolyn L Lawn marker
US4584212A (en) * 1980-01-29 1986-04-22 Toan Klein Decorative glass sculpture and method of manufacture
US4639101A (en) * 1985-04-22 1987-01-27 Stefancin Jr Ronald J Three dimensional mirrored aquarium ornament
US4642251A (en) * 1986-02-05 1987-02-10 Quinn Susanne M Honey-moon
US6592706B1 (en) * 1996-06-21 2003-07-15 Marbleous World B.V. Method of manufacturing a transparent object and an object obtained with method
US20070141945A1 (en) * 2005-09-29 2007-06-21 Chipman Roger N Device and method for repelling insects and novelty item
US20070281303A1 (en) * 2006-06-05 2007-12-06 Dna Security, Inc. Dna storage and display vessel and method
US20090031612A1 (en) * 2007-07-30 2009-02-05 Eric Heine Non-chemical fly repellant device
US20150044934A1 (en) * 2012-01-06 2015-02-12 Flype Object that rotates in a flow of air, suitable for recreational use
USD736668S1 (en) 2013-03-14 2015-08-18 Natalina Calitri Skate blades imprisoned into faked ice blocks
USD849860S1 (en) * 2016-05-04 2019-05-28 Charles Martin Wallace Cube-shaped sports training device

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1788058A (en) * 1929-03-06 1931-01-06 Jyumi Motogo Lamp
US2076782A (en) * 1935-04-22 1937-04-13 Hancock Nelson Mercantile Comp Specialized jar or bottle closure
US2440205A (en) * 1946-05-21 1948-04-20 Kusan Inc Toy block
US2601658A (en) * 1952-02-19 1952-06-24 Clarence E Bussert Immersed floral display
US2651870A (en) * 1951-07-24 1953-09-15 Ritepoint Co Ornamental device for pyrophoric lighters
US2731672A (en) * 1953-02-25 1956-01-24 Gen Motors Corp Method of forming an ornamental plastic article
US2747230A (en) * 1952-04-24 1956-05-29 Finn H Magnus Method for producing plastic encased articles

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1788058A (en) * 1929-03-06 1931-01-06 Jyumi Motogo Lamp
US2076782A (en) * 1935-04-22 1937-04-13 Hancock Nelson Mercantile Comp Specialized jar or bottle closure
US2440205A (en) * 1946-05-21 1948-04-20 Kusan Inc Toy block
US2651870A (en) * 1951-07-24 1953-09-15 Ritepoint Co Ornamental device for pyrophoric lighters
US2601658A (en) * 1952-02-19 1952-06-24 Clarence E Bussert Immersed floral display
US2747230A (en) * 1952-04-24 1956-05-29 Finn H Magnus Method for producing plastic encased articles
US2731672A (en) * 1953-02-25 1956-01-24 Gen Motors Corp Method of forming an ornamental plastic article

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3123885A (en) * 1964-03-10 Means for molding articles
US2989813A (en) * 1959-02-16 1961-06-27 Sr Jerome Elbert Hess Ash tray with display insert
US3708175A (en) * 1971-11-11 1973-01-02 T Barney Golf swing practice device
US3806577A (en) * 1972-02-28 1974-04-23 A Szebenyi Process for embedding biological materials in plastic
US3944691A (en) * 1974-04-09 1976-03-16 Smith John A Decorative assembly or toy
US3997686A (en) * 1974-10-16 1976-12-14 Mcclure Stewart Ornament and method of manufacture
US4054000A (en) * 1976-03-31 1977-10-18 Lisle Carolyn L Lawn marker
US4584212A (en) * 1980-01-29 1986-04-22 Toan Klein Decorative glass sculpture and method of manufacture
US4639101A (en) * 1985-04-22 1987-01-27 Stefancin Jr Ronald J Three dimensional mirrored aquarium ornament
US4642251A (en) * 1986-02-05 1987-02-10 Quinn Susanne M Honey-moon
US6592706B1 (en) * 1996-06-21 2003-07-15 Marbleous World B.V. Method of manufacturing a transparent object and an object obtained with method
US20070141945A1 (en) * 2005-09-29 2007-06-21 Chipman Roger N Device and method for repelling insects and novelty item
US20070281303A1 (en) * 2006-06-05 2007-12-06 Dna Security, Inc. Dna storage and display vessel and method
US20090031612A1 (en) * 2007-07-30 2009-02-05 Eric Heine Non-chemical fly repellant device
US20150044934A1 (en) * 2012-01-06 2015-02-12 Flype Object that rotates in a flow of air, suitable for recreational use
USD736668S1 (en) 2013-03-14 2015-08-18 Natalina Calitri Skate blades imprisoned into faked ice blocks
USD849860S1 (en) * 2016-05-04 2019-05-28 Charles Martin Wallace Cube-shaped sports training device

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