US2913229A - Air conditioning apparatus - Google Patents

Air conditioning apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US2913229A
US2913229A US481886A US48188655A US2913229A US 2913229 A US2913229 A US 2913229A US 481886 A US481886 A US 481886A US 48188655 A US48188655 A US 48188655A US 2913229 A US2913229 A US 2913229A
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damper
air
coil
casing
movement
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Expired - Lifetime
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US481886A
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William E Hood
Carl G Alt
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Carrier Global Corp
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Carrier Corp
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F5/00Air-conditioning systems or apparatus not covered by F24F1/00 or F24F3/00, e.g. using solar heat or combined with household units such as an oven or water heater

Description

Nov. 17, 1959 w. E. HOOD EI'AL 2,913,229
AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 14, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 WILLIAM E. HOOD BY m.
ATTORNEY 17, 959 w. E. HOOD ETAL ,9
AIR counmoumc APPARATUS Filed Jan. 14, 1955 e Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2
INVENTORS CARL G. ALT WILLIAM E. HOOD ATTORNEY Nov. 17, 1959 w. E. HOOD EI'AL 2,913,229
' AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 14, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS 4 CARL 6. ALT
WILLIAM E. HOOD BY ATTORNEY Nov. 17,1959 w. E. HOOD ETAL 2,913,229
AIR counmoumc APPARATUS Filed Jan. 14, 1955 e' Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG. 5
INVENTORS CARL 6. ALT WILLIAM E. HOOD ATTORNEY- Nov. I 17, 1959 Filed Jan. 14, 1955 W. E. HOOD ETAL AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 6
IN VEN TORS CARL 6. ALT
WILLIAM E. HOOD &2 Said.
ATTORNEY Nov. 17,1959 7' w. 5.14000 EI'AL 2,913,229
AIR conm'rxoumc APPARATUS Filed. Jan. 14, 1955 s Sheets-SheetB FIG. 7
8 INVENTORS CARL 6. ALT
WILLIAM E. HOOD ATTORNEY AIR CONDETIONING APPARATUS William E. Hood and Carl G. Alt, Syracuse, N.Y., as-
signors to Carrier Corporation, Syracuse, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Application January 14, 1955, Serial No. 481,886
7 Claims. (Cl. 257295) is heated as it flows over the heat exchanger under the influence of a blower or fan. From the chamber the air fiows through a system of ducts to outletsspaced-throughout the enclosure being supplied with the air.
been proposed to modify the conventional furnace by inj the evaporator coil. there is a requirement for heating, passage of air through the inactive evaporator coil may be undesirahle, likewise s when a cooling action is desired, air passing fromthe in It has serting in the duct assembly anevaporator or cooling coil of a conventional refrigeration system.
The chief object of this invention is the provision of ran-evaporator coil housed-in a casing adapted to be assembled within a duct of a conventional heating unit,
wherein the casing has a movable damper mechanism adapted to either permit or prevent passa'ge'of air over It will be appreciated that when active heating-chamber should be directed through the cooling coil.
A further'object of the invention is the provision of an evaporator coil assembly of a refrigeration system arranged within a mounting member for easy insertion -in the-main supply duct emanating from-the heating pro 'iducing' chamber of a furnace.
Another object of the', invention is the provision of means on the coil mounting member for collecting and A further object of the invention includes the'provision ofa damper construction associated with the coil' assemblyin such a manner that air that'has beenv heated in the furnace will bypass the coil when the unit is used for heating.
A still further object of the invention involves the provision of a damperconstruction'arranged to prevent -.unintentional movement thereof at predetermined positions. This is accomplished by employing a unique linkage in combination with an operating-handle.
Other objects and features of the invention will be apparent from a consideration of the ensuing specification -and drawingsin which:
Figure l is a diagrammatic view of a conventional heating system, for use in a dwelling, modified to include an evaporator coil and mounting therefor, the 'othercomponents of the refrigeration system being shown outside the enclosure.
Figure 2 is a diagrammatic view similar to Figure 1 further illustrating the invention as assembled with a conventionalfurnace.
Figure 3 is a side view of the evaporator coils and tube sheet assembly.
Figure 4 is a plan view of the arrangement shown in Figure 3.
United States Patent O Figure 5 is an exploded view of the casing serving as a mounting for the evaporator coil.
Figure 6 is a side view in section showing the mounting of the evaporator in the casing prior to its incorporation in the ductwork.
Figure 7 is a schematic view showing the one position of the damper and controlling mechanism used with the evaporator.
Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7 showing another position of the dampers. V
Figure 9 is a perspective view of a modification of'the invention showing the casing and drip pan.
Referring more particularly to the drawings wherein certain structural arrangements are disclosed for the purpose of describing the invention, Figure 1 shows a conventional heating and cooling apparatus to whichthe invention pertains. A furnace it including a gas fired burner '11 arranged within combustion chamber 12 of heat exchanger 13 is shown located in the basement of a dwelling. It will be appreciated that other burners,
--regardles's of the fuel employed, may be used. Main duct 14- permits passage of air from the furnace to secondary ducts 15 terminating in spaced outlets, not shown, such as wall or floor mounted registers. The unit shown is provided with a fan orblower' 15 for routing air over the heat exchanger.
In order to provide year-around air conditioning to the dwelling an evaporator assembly '16- including'a mounting 1 casing 17 is provided for insertion, preferably 'in'the 30 main supply duct 14. -'The evaporator assembly is part of a conventional refrigeration system, the condenser and compressor of which is located in a weather-proof housing19 situated outside the dwelling. Although the portion of the refrigeration system located outside thedwellingisshownin Figure 2 as mounted on a concrete 'base having an elevation substantially the same asthe floor of the cellar, it will be obvious that the portion of the refrigeration-system may be positioned at a di'lferent elevation. For illustration, the supporting concrete base might be located at an elevation substantially the same as the elevation of the casing 17. Appropriate tubing -connects the'part of the refrigeration system'outside the removing any condensate that might: collect on the coil.
dwelling with the evaporator assemblyaf-ter ithas b'een mounted in the house in a manner to be later described.
Thus a circuit for the flow of refrigerant is established so liquid phaseis introduced into the evaporator tobe vaporized and create acooling action as air is routedover the coils of the assembly under the influence of the fan.
The evaporator assembly consists of spaced coils 20 mounted in front and rear tube sheets 21 formed with an outwardlyextending marginal flange 22. The coils are bent to form a serpentine configuration and are provided with a continuous spiral fin to ensure eflicient heat transfer action between air moving over the coil and'the refrigerant'in the coil. Mounted on the outer surface of the front tube sheet-is a conventional expansion valve 23. The valve is maintained in the position shown in Figure'3 through a bracket 24' and clip 25. The clip is provided, with an outwardly extending intermediate portion, not shown, adapted to embrace a portion of the valve body and secure it to the bracket. Liquid refrigerant line 26 connects the valve with'the condenser located fri'gerant has passed through the valve, it proceeds through 'lines 27," connected to nipple. 28 (secured to the valve),
.ly of the damper.
within the casing 17 in a manner to be presently described. The casing 17 is illustrated in Figures 5 and 6 and includes a body portion 33 having opposed side walls 34, a front wall 35 and a rear wall 36, preferably formed of sheet metal and arranged to form the casing 17, open at both ends. The front and rear walls are somewhat shorter than the side walls. The upper and lower margins of the side walls 34 are bent outwardly to form coplanar upper flanges 37 and lower flanges 38 respectively. The upper ends of the front and rear walls 35 and 36 are also provided with flanges 37 which are coplanar with flanges 37. The lower marginal portions of the front and rear walls are formed by bending the lower end of the members upward out of their plane for a short distance. The bent portion, extending normal to the walls, is further bent by forming the hooked extremity shown in Figure 5 and Figure 6. The front and rear walls are provided with wings 41 to accommodate fastening members for detachably securing them to the side walls.
The body portion 33 has assembled therewith two channel members 43 also formed of sheet metal material. The upper flanges 44 are constructed to engage in the hook-like extremities in the end walls 35 and 36. The members 43 are so proportioned that When assembled in the manner described the bottom surface of the lower flanges 45 lie in the same plane as the bottom surface of flanges 38.
Drip pan 46, having a bottom wall 47 provided with an opening 48 defined by an upstanding flange 49, opposed side walls 50 and opposed end walls 51, integrally formed from a single sheet, is positioned within the casing as shown in Figures 6 and 9. Connection between the pan 46 and the casing is made through conventional fastening elements such as screws or the like. The drip pan is provided with drain pipes 52 for a purpose to be later explained. In addition to the pan 46 the casing 17 includes a base member 53 having a central opening 54, the portions of the base member surrounding the opening being bent upwardly to form connecting strips 55. The purpose of the base member 53 is to support a layer of insulating material 56' to be disposed beneath the drip pan. To accomplish this the connecting strips 55 are secured to the upstanding flange 49 of the pan 46 substantially as shown in Figure 6.
In assembling the evaporator coil assembly in the casing the tube sheets are secured at their lower portions to the flange 49 on the drip pan. The casing is so dimensioned that adequate space, for the accommodation of the expansion valve and the accessories shown, is provided. An access panel, not shown, may be provided in the front panel to permit access to the interior of the casing for servicing.
When the heating unit is operated it may be desirable to prevent the heated air from passing through the coil as it moves from the heat exchanger to the duct system for eventual distribution to the rooms in the dwelling. Accordingly, a damper mechanism arranged to route air through the coil when there is a requirement for cooling and to prevent air from contacting the coil when the heating unit is active, is provided.
Referring more particularly to Figures 4, '7 and 8 there is shown a pair of dampers 60 and 60' pivotally mounted on rods 61 through side portions 62 projecting rearward- The rods 61 are in turn mounted in the opposed tube sheets supporting the evaporator coils. As clearly shown in Figures 7 and 8 the dampers are constructed for movement between a first position covering the coil so that air passing through the aligned openings 48 and 54 in the members 46 and 53 respectively continues in a linear path to the distributing duets without contacting the evaporator coils and a second position wherein the edges on the unattached ends of the damper are in abutting relation, across the path of flow of air moving under the influence of the fan. In the latter position the air is directed over the coils and thence upwardly, through the space between the coils and the sides of the casing, to the distributing ducts.
Movement of the dampers may be either automatic or manual and is preferably controlled by a mechanism adapted to prevent unintentional movement of the dampers due to vibration or other causes. For the purpose of illustrating one form of the damper assembly an arrangement suitable for manual use is shown in Figure 4. An operating rod 63 is shown mounted for rotary movement in the opposed tube sheets, intermediate the dampers. A portion 64 of the rod extends from the front tube sheet through the front wall of the casing and is provided with a handle 65. Considering in detail the linkage between the rod 63 and the damper members 60, reference is made once again to Figures 4, 7 and 8 wherein there is shown a series of three modified U-shaped clips 66, 67 and 68 having aligned openings 69 in the legs 70 for receiving the rod 63. The portion 71 of the clip connecting the legs has a threaded opening therein adapted to accommodate a set screw 72. The set screw serves to maintain the clip in a certain position on the rod through engagement between the end of the screw and the rod.
As more particularly shown in Figure 4 the two clips 66 and 68 are positioned adjacent the confronting surfaces of the tube sheets, while clip 67 is disposed substantially midway between the sheets. Clips 66 and 68 have one of their parallel legs 70 longer than the other. The elongated leg cooperates with a stop or abutment member 73 mounted on the tube sheet to limit movement of the rod.
In addition to the rod accommodating openings 69 in the clips, a second set of aligned openings 74 are provided in legs 70 of clips 66 and 68. The purpose of these openings is to provide a connection between one end 75 of a resilient generally U-shaped wire-like connecting member 76. A pair of holding brackets 78 secure a linear portion 79 of the resilient member 76 to the surface of the damper 60. The part of the member 76 connecting portion '79 and ends 75 is arched or bowed as shown in Figures 7 and 8. A second resilient member 80 constructed similar to member 76 is shown connected to the intermediate legs of the clip 67 in the manner described above. Only one holding bracket 81 is required to secure the member 80 to the damper 60'. The parts are so arranged that the legs of clips 66 and 68 extend in one direction while the legs of clip 67 extend in the opposite direction.
When it is desired to move the dampers to the position shown in Figure 8, the rod 63 is rotated by tuming the handle until the lower edges of the dampers are in contact. Thereafter, continued movement of the rod in the same direction causes the clips to rotate against the resistance of the resilient members 76 and 80. This action produces a slight pivotal movement of the resilient members 76 and 80. When the movement of the rod is finally arrested by the abutment elements 73, the points of connection between the clips and the resilient member are as shown in Figure 8. Under this arrangement any force applied to the damper that tends to separate them will tend to further stretch the resilient member in the bowed portion rather than to be transmitted to the clip and thereby elfect rotation of the rod.
This action is primarily effective because of the relationship between the elevation of the longitudinal center of the rod and the point of connection between the clip and resilient member. The dampers are likewise maintained against movement when in the position shown in Figure 7, the action desired depending also on the relative elevations of the points mentioned above.
The evaporator unit, complete with its mounting assembly may be referred to as a package and assembled in the following manner. The drip pan 46 may have the coils and tube sheets secured to the flange 49 in the "manner-mentioned .above. The channel-members 42 mitting passage of drain element 52 may be formed in the intermediate portion of the member 42. The side walls 34 are likewise secured to opposed edges of the drip pan 46. Base member SS'is then secured to the drip pan." The last step involves the application of the front and rearpanels 35 and 36 to complete the enclov sure.
Considering the operation of the system as contemsidered as a ventilating duct or a component of the ventilating ductwork of the air conditioning system.
- The necessary connections are then made between the refrigeration system and the-lines associated with the evaporator unit. When there is a requirement for heatin Figure 7. Air heated in the furnace passes upwardly A throughaligned openings 48 and 54 into the duc't'system for distribution to the enclosure.
When there is a requirement for cooling, the refrigeration system isoperated and the heating system is temporarily inactivated. Air flow proceeds from the furnace upwardly through the ducts against the dampers in the manner described above.
The drip pan serves to collect any condensate that may form on the coils as the air flows over the coils. Drain pipe 52 permits the condensate to flow to a drain member. The base member 53 serves as a fixed plate member directing the air through the aligned openings 48 and 54.
Other constructions may be employed without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention. For example, the operating mechanism controlling the dampers may be automatic in operation. This arrangement would entail using a motor for controlling the movement of the operating rod 63. The control circuit for the motor would include a switch in series with the circuit controlling the refrigeration system so that when the unit is on the cooling cycle the damper would automatically assume the position shown in Figure 8. Actuation of the main control circuit for the unit to produce a desired heating eifect would cause the damper to assume the position shown in Figure 7.
Another form of the invention is illustrated in Figure 9 wherein the casing has provided in one of the side walls, openings 84 permitting communication between horizontal ducts and the casing. Under these circumstances flow of air from the casing may occur in a direction substantially normal to the direction indicated in Figure 1. A top cover, not shown, may be placed over the top flanges 37 of the casing. It will be noted that the top of the coils terminate at a lower elevation than the top of the casing to permit air flow in the space above the coil. Air passing over the coil remote from the openings will pass through the space to the ducts.
It will thus be apparent that the invention herein disclosed will permit one to convert an existing furnace to a unit capable of supplying cool air during the periods when outside temperature is in excess of that desired for comfort. Further air passing through the cooling coil may also be dehumidified resulting in air having more ideal temperature and moisture content characteristics being supplied to the enclosure.
We claim:
1. In combination with a system of ducts for supplying air to an enclosure, means for changing the temperature of the air in the system, damper means for selectively changing the direction of air flow to either p -by-pass -'or flow over the temperature "changing: means, may be secured to the outer margins of the drip pan 46 in the manner shown in Figure 6. An opening perplated by the invention, the casing 17, with the evaporatorcoils'mounted therein is assembled either with an adapter as-shownin Figure 1- or directly'on top of the furnace, as-desired. Thus the casing 17 maybe cariand damper actuating means for moving thedamper means, said actuating means being effective to prevent undesired movement of the damper means when moved to one of the positions, said damper actuating means including an operating member, a resilient member for -=-connecting the damper means and the operatingmember, p'redetermined movement of the operating member serving to create forces in the resilient connecting member resisting movement of the damper means. I
2. In combination with a heating plant including a "combustion chamber, means for delivering air to the combustionchamber to be heated, and a plurality of duct units forming a system, providing a path for the tion system including an-evaporator assembly compris- 'flow of air from the combustion chamber, a refrigeraing a casing adapted to beinterchanged with one of sa'id duct units so'that airflowing'in the systemmay be' cooled, said evaporator assembly further including spaced coil members, means mounting'said coil mem- {bers'in spaced relation, said mounting means including an opening for the passage of air through said casing, damper means operable'to selectivelydirect air flowing in said 3 ducts over the coils andto prevent air flowing -.in' said ducts from flowing over said coils and damper actuating means for moving the damper means, said actuating means being etfective to prevent undesired movement of the damper means when moved to one of the positions, said damper actuating means including an operating member, a resilient member for connecting the damper means and the operating member, predetermined movement of the operating member serving to create forces in the resilient connecting member resisting movement of the damper means.
3. The invention set forth in claim 2 wherein said damper means includes two dampers each arranged to control flow of air through one coil.
4. The invention set forth in claim 3 wherein said damper actuating means includes an operating rod disposed between the two dampers, two substantially U-' shaped members each having a central portion connected to the damper and opposed arcuate leg portions provided with oppositely extending foot portions, a first U-shaped clip member detachably' secured to the rod and having opposed leg portions connected to the foot portions of one of said U-shaped members, second and third U- shaped clip members detachably secured to the rod on opposite sides of the first clip member, and being provided with opposed leg portions connected to the other of said U-shaped members, abutment means for restraining rotational movement of said second and third clip members imparted thereto by said rod, the U-shaped clip members being so arranged that rotational movement of said rod causes movement of said dampers to a first position whereby portions thereof are in engagement with one another or to a second position whereby the portions thereof are in engagement with the coils, additional rota tional movement of the rod when in either of the positions serving to stress the resilient member so that before reverse movement of the rod may be affected the stress must be overcome.
5. In a system for treating air, a duct for guiding the flow of the air; coil supporting means having an opening therein, extending from the sides of the duct; a cooling coil positioned adjacent the opening; a movable damper mounted above the coil, said damper operable in one position to direct air, flowing in the duct, through the coil and operable in another position to prevent air from passing through the coil; and means for selectively moving the damper to the desired position, said last mentioned means being operable after the damper has been moved to one of said positions to prevent undesired movement of the damper, and including a rotatable operating member, and resilient means connecting the operating member to the damper whereby movement applied to the operating member will be transmitted to the damper and forces accompanying unintentional movetherein, extending from the sides of the duct; a cooling coil positioned adjacent the opening; a movable damper mounted above the coil, said damper operable in one.
position to direct air, flowing in the duct, through the coil and operable in another position to prevent air from passing through the coil; and means for selectively moving the damper to the desired position, said last mentioned means being operable after the damper has been moved to one of said positions to prevent undesired movement of the damper, and including an operating member, a resilient member having a portion connected to the damper and means secured to said operating member forming a connection between the operating member and the resilient member.
7. The combination as set forth in claim 6 wherein the connection between the operating member and the resilient member is positioned with respect to the operating member when the damper is at either limit of its movement that force applied'to the damper is resisted by the resilient member rather than transmitted to the operating member.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,592,718 Browne July 13, 1926 1,784,956 Benjamin Dec. 16, 1930 1,870,460 Lambert Aug. 9, 1932 2,082,441 Child June 1, 1937 2,148,238 Krackowizer Feb. 21, 1939 2,150,505 Hunicke Mar. 14, 1939 2,251,881 Danielson Aug. 5, 1941 2,252,064 Cornell Aug. 12, 1941 2,265,272 Ditzler Dec. 2, 1941 2,286,115 Shelton June 9, 1942 2,286,491 Kucher June 16, 1942 2,396,025 Seid Mar. 5, 1946 2,644,321 Borgerd July 7, 1953 2,699,922 Herbst Jan. 18,1955 2,702,994 Borgerd Mar. 1, 1955 2,737,027 Kleist Mar. 6, 1956 2,753,157 Hoyer July 3, 1956
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3129753A (en) * 1959-04-03 1964-04-21 Trane Co Heating and cooling apparatus
US3212288A (en) * 1961-03-24 1965-10-19 Heil Quaker Corp Heat exchanger with condensate collector
US3277956A (en) * 1961-10-26 1966-10-11 Carrier Corp Air heating and cooling apparatus
US20140216685A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 Trane International Inc. HVAC System With Selective Flowpath

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1592718A (en) * 1923-11-01 1926-07-13 Milton W Browne Cold-air circulation and humidity-control system
US1784956A (en) * 1924-07-28 1930-12-16 Edward O Benjamin Distilling apparatus and method
US1870460A (en) * 1931-10-15 1932-08-09 Heintz Mfg Co Air cooling cabinet and method for preventing condensation of moisture thereon
US2082441A (en) * 1934-06-08 1937-06-01 Air Devices Corp Air conditioner
US2148238A (en) * 1936-10-24 1939-02-21 Hermann J Krackowizer Air circulator
US2150505A (en) * 1935-04-19 1939-03-14 Auditorium Conditioning Corp Air conditioner
US2251881A (en) * 1938-06-23 1941-08-05 Honeywell Regulator Co Zone air conditioning control system
US2252064A (en) * 1938-10-22 1941-08-12 Jr Edward S Cornell Heat exchange unit and system
US2265272A (en) * 1941-12-09 Air conditioning apparatus
US2286115A (en) * 1940-09-26 1942-06-09 Shelton Jack Fenner Air tempering apparatus
US2286491A (en) * 1940-03-30 1942-06-16 Gen Motors Corp Refrigerating apparatus
US2396025A (en) * 1942-08-20 1946-03-05 Carrier Corp Outlet arrangement
US2644321A (en) * 1951-07-12 1953-07-07 Int Harvester Co Wall mounted air conditioning unit
US2699922A (en) * 1951-06-23 1955-01-18 Gen Electric Air conditioning system
US2702994A (en) * 1951-06-20 1955-03-01 Int Harvester Co Air conditioning apparatus for buildings
US2737027A (en) * 1950-11-04 1956-03-06 Air conditioning structure
US2753157A (en) * 1952-12-12 1956-07-03 James L Hoyer Economy air conditioning system for buildings

Patent Citations (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2265272A (en) * 1941-12-09 Air conditioning apparatus
US1592718A (en) * 1923-11-01 1926-07-13 Milton W Browne Cold-air circulation and humidity-control system
US1784956A (en) * 1924-07-28 1930-12-16 Edward O Benjamin Distilling apparatus and method
US1870460A (en) * 1931-10-15 1932-08-09 Heintz Mfg Co Air cooling cabinet and method for preventing condensation of moisture thereon
US2082441A (en) * 1934-06-08 1937-06-01 Air Devices Corp Air conditioner
US2150505A (en) * 1935-04-19 1939-03-14 Auditorium Conditioning Corp Air conditioner
US2148238A (en) * 1936-10-24 1939-02-21 Hermann J Krackowizer Air circulator
US2251881A (en) * 1938-06-23 1941-08-05 Honeywell Regulator Co Zone air conditioning control system
US2252064A (en) * 1938-10-22 1941-08-12 Jr Edward S Cornell Heat exchange unit and system
US2286491A (en) * 1940-03-30 1942-06-16 Gen Motors Corp Refrigerating apparatus
US2286115A (en) * 1940-09-26 1942-06-09 Shelton Jack Fenner Air tempering apparatus
US2396025A (en) * 1942-08-20 1946-03-05 Carrier Corp Outlet arrangement
US2737027A (en) * 1950-11-04 1956-03-06 Air conditioning structure
US2702994A (en) * 1951-06-20 1955-03-01 Int Harvester Co Air conditioning apparatus for buildings
US2699922A (en) * 1951-06-23 1955-01-18 Gen Electric Air conditioning system
US2644321A (en) * 1951-07-12 1953-07-07 Int Harvester Co Wall mounted air conditioning unit
US2753157A (en) * 1952-12-12 1956-07-03 James L Hoyer Economy air conditioning system for buildings

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3129753A (en) * 1959-04-03 1964-04-21 Trane Co Heating and cooling apparatus
US3212288A (en) * 1961-03-24 1965-10-19 Heil Quaker Corp Heat exchanger with condensate collector
US3277956A (en) * 1961-10-26 1966-10-11 Carrier Corp Air heating and cooling apparatus
US20140216685A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 Trane International Inc. HVAC System With Selective Flowpath
US9797617B2 (en) * 2013-02-07 2017-10-24 Trane International Inc. HVAC system with selective flowpath
US10648693B2 (en) 2013-02-07 2020-05-12 Trane International Inc. HVAC system with selective flowpath

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