US2856861A - Vane for use in a rotary fluid apparatus - Google Patents

Vane for use in a rotary fluid apparatus Download PDF

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US2856861A
US2856861A US533304A US53330455A US2856861A US 2856861 A US2856861 A US 2856861A US 533304 A US533304 A US 533304A US 53330455 A US53330455 A US 53330455A US 2856861 A US2856861 A US 2856861A
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vane
opposite
fluid
chamber
cam ring
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US533304A
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Cecil E Adams
John R English
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American Brake Shoe Co
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American Brake Shoe Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04CROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; ROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04C14/00Control of, monitoring of, or safety arrangements for, machines, pumps or pumping installations
    • F04C14/04Control of, monitoring of, or safety arrangements for, machines, pumps or pumping installations specially adapted for reversible machines or pumps
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01CROTARY-PISTON OR OSCILLATING-PISTON MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01C21/00Component parts, details or accessories not provided for in groups F01C1/00 - F01C20/00
    • F01C21/08Rotary pistons
    • F01C21/0809Construction of vanes or vane holders

Description

Oct. 21, 1958 c. E. ADAMS ETAL wms FOR USE IN ,A ROTARY FLUID APPARATUS Filed Sept. 9, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN V EN T 0R5 GEG/L E ADAMS JOHN R. ENGLISH AGENT Oct. 21, 1958 c. E. ADAMS ETAL 2,356,861

VANE FOR USE IN A ROTARY FLUID APPARATUS Filed Sept. 9. 1955 r 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEN TOR CEO/L E. ADA

' BY JOHN R. ENGLISH AGENT' Oct. 21, 1958 c. E. ADAMS ETAL 2,856,861

j VANE FOR USE IN A ROTARY FLUID APPARATUS A Filed Sept. 9, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS" 0501/. E. ADAMS y JOHN R. ENGLISH @mdy.

AGENT oct. 21, 1958 c. E, ADAMS ETAL VANE FOR uss: IN A ROTARY FLUID APPARATUS Filed Sept. 9, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS 050/1. E. ADAMS BY HN R. ENGLISH GENT s 44 44444 g k sgv United States Patent VANE FOR USE IN A ROTARY FLUID APPARATUS Cecil Adams, Columbus, and John R. English, Upper Arlington, Ohio, assignors, by mesne assignments, to American Brake Shoe Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware 1 Application September 9, 1955, Serial No. 533,304

9 Claims. (Cl. 103-136) This invention relates to vanes particularly adapted for use in a rotary fluid apparatus such, for example, as a hydraulic motor or pump of the vane type.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved vane particularly adapted for use in a rotary fluid apparatus.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved construction in a vane particularly adapted for use in a rotary fluid apparatus which vane will be substantially completely hydraulically balanced when used in such apparatus, in other words, a vane which will not be urged radially outwardly against the cam ring apparatus by reason of hydraulic pressure behind the vane.

The foregoing object is accomplished by keeping the radially outermost end of the improved vane at an area substantially equal to the area of the innermost end of the vane and interconnecting these vane ends by grooves,

passages or bores in which fluid may pass to equalize fluid pressures at said opposite ends of the vane, and it is, of course, another object of the invention to provide an improved vane including this structure.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings wherein a preferred form of embodiment of the invention is clearly shown.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view taken through the fluid pressure energy translating device forming the subject matter of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a vertical transverse sectional view taken through the device on the plane indicated by the line IIII of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a similarview taken on the same plane but in the direction of the arrows IIIIII;

Fig. 4 is a detail sectional view on an enlarged scale taken through a portion of the rotor and one of the vanes carried thereby;

Figs. 5 and 6 are perspective views of the fluid pressure energy translating device with a portion of the casing removed to show the relation of interior structure and external indicia.

This application is a continuation-in-part of our c0- pending application Serial No. 226,844, filed May 17, 1951, now Patent No. 2,762,312 dated September 11,

V 1956, for a Vane Type Pump.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the pump or fluid motor, formed in accordance with the invention, is indicated generally by the numeral 20. This device, which may be used either as a pump or motor without alteration, will for convenience hereinafter be referred to as a pump. It includes a casing 21 having three main parts 22, 23 and 24. The part 22 will be hereinafter designated as the body, the part 23 will be designated as the cam ring, and the part 24 will be termed the cover. The body 22 has an inlet port 25 which communicates with a chamber 26. This chamber, in turn, communicates at diametrically opposed points with ports 27 which open 2,856,861 Patented Oct. 21, 1958 ice to a side wall of the body 22, this side wall being formed for engagement with the complemental side wall of the cam ring 23. The opposite side wall of this ring is formed for engagement by the complemental wall of the cover 24. These three parts are secured in assembled relationship by bolts 28, the inner wall of the cam ring forming a substantially elliptical rotor chamber 30. The ports 27 are disposed on opposite sides of this rotor chamber and will be hereinafter designated as inlet ports. From Fig. 2, it will be noted that these ports are arranged adjacent one end of portions of the peripheral wall of the rotor chamber which are spaced a greater distance from the axialcenter of the chamber than the other portions of the peripheral wall. It will also be noted from Fig. 2 that the elliptical chamber or the peripheral wall thereof has four portions which are arcuate, the radii for these portions extending from the axial center of the chamber. One of the important features of this invention is to generate these arcuate portions from a common center. The reason for this construction will be made apparent later.

The cam ring 23 is provided with a plurality of openings 31 to connect the inlet ports 27 in the body 22 with corresponding inlet ports in the cover 24. These inlet ports 27 have extensions, indicated by the numeral 32, which extend toward the cam ring and terminate in openings 33 in the opposed side walls of the body and casing. These openings 33 will be designated hereafter as port extensions. Their purpose will be apparent from the following description.

The cover 24 is provided with outlet ports 34 which are angularly displaced from the inlet ports 27, ports 34 also having port extensions 35 and communicating with an outlet 36. The ports 34 and 35 are connected also by openings in the cam ring with corresponding ports 34A and 35A formed in the body 22. The rotor chamber receives a rotor for transferring fluid from the inlet ports 27 and extensions 33 to the outlet ports 34 and 34A, and extensions 35 and 35A. This rotor has a substantially circular body 37 which has a central opening formed with spline grooves for the reception of a similarly formed end of a shaft 38 which extends into the rotor chamber through a bearing chamber 40 formed in the body 22.

This bearing chamber 40 is formed for the reception of inner and outer ball bearings 41 and 42, the former being disposed in engagement with a shoulder 43 formed at the inner end of the bearing chamber. The bearing 41 is held against this shoulder 43 by a sealing sleeve 44, the bearing 42 being disposed in engagement with'the outer end of the sealing sleeve. Bearing 42 is, in turn, engaged by a shaft seal assembly 45 which is held against the hearing by a tapered retaining ring 46, this member being disposed in a groove formed in the body 22, the taper serving to urge the bearings and sleeve toward the shoulder 43. The sleeve 44 is grooved to receive gaskets 47, the sleeve and the gaskets serving to separate the inlet chamber 26 from the space 48 around the shaft 38. The shaft 38 is supported for rotation by the inner races of the bearings 41 and 42, the outer end of the shaft projecting beyond the end of the body 22 and being formed for connection with a prime mover, not shown. The seal 45 is disposed between the bearing 42 and the outer surface of the body 22.

This seal has a flexible member 50 which is resiliently held against the shaft to prevent the escape of fluid around the shaft. This flexible member projects in an angular direction, being shown in Fig. 1 as projecting toward the interior of the pump. Internal pressure in the pump will force this sealing member into fluid tight engagement with the shaft. With the seal disposed in the position shown in Fig. 1, the pump must be drained externally, that is, fluid escaping from the rotor chamber the spaces at the inner and outer ends of the vane.

groove 51 which is connected by an angular passage 52 with-a pair of threaded ports 53 and 54. The port 54 is provided with-a conduit for conducting the fluid drainageto asuitable point of discharge. If it is desired to drain the -leakage internally, a plug 55, disposed in the port- 53, is removed'and the conductor in port 54 is replacedby asuitable plug; fluid then may flow from the passage 52 into the inlet chamber 26 and be mingled with the fluid flowing through the inlet port to the pump. It willbe-noted that the body of the seal has radially extending-groove 56 to establish-communication between the space around the shaft and the annular groove 51. When the pump is in operation, fluid seeping between the rotor and theehamber wall will be caused to flow along the s'haftthrough the space between the shaft and the casingor other parts, around the bearings 41 and 42, past the inner end of the shaft seal and into the groove 51 from which it will be conducted to exhaust either internally or externally as above pointed out. be noted that, when the leakage is to be drained internally, the shaft seal 45 is reversed so that the flexible -member 50 will extend toward the exterior of the pump meral 60, thevanes closely fitting the slots so that a *miniinum of fluid seepage will take place between the vanes and the slot walls. The vanes are of a transverse lengthsufiicient to have sliding engagement at both ends with the opposed faces of the rotor chamber side walls. This sliding engagement is also designed to provide a minimum of leakage between the vanes and the walls.

Each vane comprises a one-piece body of plate-like form with 'flat' front, rear and bottom surfaces, 61, 62 and 63, respectively, the ends and the top surface of the body being grooved to provide spaced wall-engaging edges 64. The groove in the top surface of the body is of such dimensions that the sealing edges 64 will be located on or 'sub'tsaritially in alignment with the front andrear surfaces'61 and 62 of the vane body. By this construction, the top surface of the vane will present a pressure receiving area substantially equal to the pressure receiving area at the bottom or inner end 63 of the vane. When these areas are exposed to equal pressures, the forces of the fluid pressures tending to move the vane radially will be balanced. The presures on these areas are equalized by establishing communication between In the first place, the grooves in the end walls of the vane establish communication between the groove in the top wall and the inner portion of the slot for the vane. Additional communication is provided by forming the vane with one or more openings 66 which extend from the top or-outer'end tothe bottom or inner end of the vane. These openings are counterbored at their inner ends" to receive coil springs 67, these springs also being disposed in sockets formed in the rotor body 37. The springsare provided to urge'the vane-bodies in a radial or outward direction and maintain the sealing edges 64 at the outerends thereof'in engagement with the peripheral wall' 'oftherotor-chamber. Through the provision of the spacedsealing edges at the top and ends of each vane and "thebalancing-of pressures at'the top and bottom of the It will 7 vane, leakage from the space at the front to the space at the rear of the vane is"niinim'ized. A double seal with an intermediate pressure zone therebetween is provided. It will be obvious from Figs. 2 and 4 that, if outlet port or high pressure exists in front of the vane, it will have to pass two seals before reaching the inlet or low pressure which exists in back of the vane. In so moving, there will be a pressure drop from the higher pressure zone to the space between the sealing edges 64 and a second pressure drop from this space to the lower pressure zone. The'efliciency of the seals provided by the edges 6 3 engaging the cam ring and the end walls of the rotor chamber will determinethe pressure in the intermediate pressure zone between the sealing edges 64. During the movement of a vane along the concentric arcuate portions of the cam ring, the intermediate pressure zone will be sealed from the other pressure zones in the manner described hereafter.

The rotor chamber forming surfaces of the body 22 and cover 24 have bearing plates 69 secured thereto for engagement with the sides of the rotor body. These hearing plates are formed from a suitable bearing material to minimize wear. The cam ring, as shown in Fig. 1,- is held in engagement with the body 22 by bolts 68 which are disposed on opposite sides of the cam ring. These bolts permit the bolts 23 to be removed whereby cover 24 may be separated from the casing without the cam ring being displaced. The bolts 68 may then beremoved and the cam ring reversed, that is, the sideformerly engaged by the cover 24 being disposed in engagement with the body 22 and vice versa. When this reversal is made, the lower portion of the cam ringis moved to the top. The purpose of this arrangement will be'apparent later. When the cam ringis reversed, the longitudinal axis of the elliptical chamber will be shifted from its angular position-relative to the vertical, as 'shown in Fig. 2,-to a similar angular position on-the opposite side of the vertical. This shifting of the cam ring will then dispose the pumping chambers formed by the 'ends of the ellipse between the inlet ports 27 and the outlet-port opposite that which previously communicated with the particular pumping chambers. The rotor may then-be revolved in the opposite direction to cause fluid'toflow through the device in the same direction as previously.

This device,'as previously mentioned, will serve both as a fluid motor and as a pump. The Working parts-may be revolved in either direction with the camring as shown or reversed without dismantling 'or altering the pump in any way. However, when the -rotor is *revolved in one direction, fluid will flow through the device in a predetermined direction. If the rotoris then revolved in the opposite direction without revers ing the cam ring, the direction of fluid flow through the casing will also be reversed; If it is desired to reverse the direction of rotation without reversing the 'direction'of fluid flow through the casing, the cam ring must be reversed as abovedescrioed. The device is provided, as-shownfin Figs. 5 and 6, with indicia-to show the direction of fliiid flow for each direction of rotation of the-shaft. This indicia comprises the-abbreviation Rot. with oppositely extending arrows at the ends thereofQaS at 70 on'the casing to show clockwise and counter-clockwise directions of rotation, and the word Flow with oppositely directed arrows, as at 71 and'72'at-two placeson the cam ring, the arrows registering with the ar'rowson the casing and serving to'show the direction of fluid flow through the casing for each direction of rotationof the shaft. Two sets of indicia are provided on the cam ring, one set being disposed adjacent to and cooperating with the indicia on the casing in one position of the cam ring and the other set being so disposed and used Wvhenthe cam ring is reversed, as described. It will be noted that the arrows are reversed in the sets. With this indicia, an observer can tell at a glance 'Which'direc'tion fluid will flow through the casing when the shaft is revolved in a selected direction.

The above described features of the cam ring are claimed in a copending application Serial No. 533,294, filed September 9, 1955, by Darby B. Neff, for a Vane Pump.

It will be noted from Fig. 3 that the inlet and outlet ports and extensions are provided with bleed slots 73 extending in opposite directions from the ends thereof, the slots 73 terminating in sharp pointed extremities. These slots permit, communication between the spaces between the vanes, the spaces between the sealing edges on the vanes, the vane slots and the inlet and outlet ports to be relatively gradually established to eliminate shock and and noise resulting therefrom. The ends of adjacent bleed slots are spaced circumferentially to provide sealing areas 74 on the side walls of lengths at least equal to the angular distance between adjacent vanes in the rotor. These sealing areas permit the vane slots and the spaces between the sealing edges on the vanes to be sealed from the spaces at the sides of the vanes and from the inlet and outlet ports. These sealing areas provide intermediate pressure zones including the inner end portions of the vane slots, the spaces at the ends of the vanes, the passages in the vanes and the spaces between the sealing edges at the outer end of the vanes; fluid pressure will be the same in all portions of this zone. Since the outer ends of the vanes have the same area as the inner ends thereof, the vanes will be balanced by fluid pressure, a tendency to move outward being imparted by centrifugal force. This tendency is augmented by the springs 67. Due to the provision of the intermediate pressure zones, the leakage around the vanes from the space at one side of each vane to the space at the other will be minimized, the fluid having to pass two sealing edges. This construction increases the efficiency of the device both from a volumetric as well as a pressure standpoint.

It will be noted from Fig. 2 that, when the vanes move from the concentric arcuate portion of the peripheral wall having the smaller radius to the other concentric arcuate wall portion, one of the sealing edges of the vanes will be spaced from the peripheral wall. At this time, however, the vane is exposed to the pressure in the inlet or outlet port and all edges of the vane will be exposed to the same fluid pressure. It will be further apparent that a fluid pressure balance on each vane is maintained continuously throughout the rotation of the rotor. When the vane registers with the inlet port, the pressure of the inlet port will be maintained completely around the edges of the vane. When the vane moves along the pumping zone, the intermediate pressure will obtain on all the vane edges and, when the vane moves across the outlet port, all of the edges of the vane will be exposed to outlet port pressure. The vane will, therefore, be urged toward the peripheral wall only by, centrifugal force plus the force of the springs 67. Through proper calculation and design, the most eflicient spring force may be employed. Since only the spring force required will be used, wear on the cam ring by the vanes will be kept at a minimum and the life of the device will be increased.

While the form of embodiment of the present invention as herein disclosed constitutes a preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow:

We claim:

1. A vane for use in a fluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end walls, a peripheral cam ring Wall and a rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front'and rear surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end walls, and outer end adapted to seal with said cam ring wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length and terminating at its sides in sharp edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extending between the opposite ends of said vane, said sharp edges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of the opposite inner end of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane ends exert equal forces in opposite directions on said vane, and means in said vane for conducting fluid between the inner and outer ends thereof for equalizing said fluid pressures. r

2. A vane for use in a fluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end walls, a peripheral cam ring wall and a rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front and rear surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end walls, an outer end adapted to seal with said cam ring wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length and terminating at its sides in sharp edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extending between the opposite ends of said vane, said sharp edges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of the opposite inner end of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane ends exert equal forces in opposite directions on said vane, and said opposite vane ends forming grooves connecting said inner and outer ends thereof forequalizing said fluid pressures.

3. A vane for use in a fluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end walls, a peripheral cam ring wall and a rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front and rear surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end walls, an outer end adapted to seal with said cam ring wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length and terminating at its sides in sharp edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extending between the opposite ends of said vane, said sharp edges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of the opposite inner end of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane ends exert equal forces in opposite directions on said vane, and a bore extending through said vane connecting said inner and outer ends thereof for equalizing said fluid pressures.

4. A vane for use in a fluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end walls, a peripheral cam ring wall and a rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front and rear surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end walls, an outer end adapted to seal with said cam ring wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length and terminating at its sides in sharp edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extending between the opposite ends of said vane, said sharp edges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of the opposite inner end of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane ends exert equal forces in opposite directions on said vane, said opposite vane ends forming grooves connecting said inner and outer ends thereof aiding in equalizing said fluid pressures, and a bore extending through said Vane connecting said inner and outer ends thereof for aiding in equalizing said fluid pressures.

7 5. A -vanefor use in afluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end walls, a peripheral cam ring wall and a rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front and rear surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end walls, an outer end adapted to seal With said cam ring wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length and terminating at its sides in sharp' edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extending between the opposite ends of said vane, said sharp edges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of the opposite inner end of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane ends exert equal forces in opposite'directions on said vane, and a bore extending through said vane connecting said inner and outer ends thereof for equalizing said fluid pressures, said bore being adapted to receive one end of a spring and including shoulder means against which said spring end may bear.

6. A vane for use in a fluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end walls, a peripheral cam ring Wall and a rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front and rear surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end Walls, an outer end adapted to seal with said cam ring wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length and terminating at its sides in sharp edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extendingbetween the opposite ends of said vane, said sharp edges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of the opposite inner end of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane end exert equal forces in opposite direction on said vane, said opposite vane ends forming grooves connecting inner and outer ends thereof aiding in equalizing said fluid pressures, and a bore extending through said vane connecting said inner and outer ends thereof for aiding in equalizing said fluid pressures, said bore being adapted to receive one end of a spring and including shoulder means against which said spring end may bear.

7. A vane for use in a fluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end walls, a peripheral cam ring Wall and a rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front and rear' surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end walls, an outer end adapted to seal with said cam ring wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length, the outer end of said Vane terminating at its sides in sharp edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extend ing between the opposite ends of said vane, said sharp edges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of theopposite inner end of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane ends exert equal forces in opposite directions on said vane, and said opposite vaneend forming grooves connecting said inner and outer ends thereof for equalizing said fluid pressures.

8. A vane for use in a fluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end walls, a peripheral cam ring wall and a rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front and rear surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end walls, an outer end adapted to seal with said cam ring, wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length, the outer end of said vane terminating at its sides in sharp edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extending between the opposite ends of said vane, said sharpedges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of the opposite inner end'of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane ends exert equal forces in'opposite directions on said vane, said opposite vane ends forming grooves connecting said inner and outer ends thereof aiding in equalizing said fluid pressures, and a bore extending through said vane connecting said inner and outer ends thereof for aiding in equalizing said fluid pressures.

9. A vane for use in a fluid pressure energy translating device including a rotor chamber having spaced end Walls, a peripheral cam ring Wall 'anda rotor in said chamber including vane slot means, said vane including a body having front and rear surfaces adapted to seal with said vane slot, opposite ends adapted to seal with said chamber end walls, an outer end adapted to seal with said cam ring wall, and an inner end adapted to be positioned in said vane slot, the outer end of said vane forming a groove extending throughout its length, the outer end of said vane terminating at its sides in sharp edges, said sharp edges extending along and being formed in part by said front and rear vane surfaces and extending between the opposite ends of said vane, said sharp edges and opposite vane ends defining an area equal to the area of the opposite inner end of said vane whereby equal fluid pressures acting on said inner and outer vane ends exert equal forces in opposite directions on said vane, said opposite vane ends forming grooves connecting said inner and outer ends thereof aiding in equalizing said fluid pressures, and a bore extending through said vane connecting said inner and outer ends thereof for aiding in equalizing said fluid pressures, said bore being adapted to receive one end of a spring and including shoulder means against which said spring end may bear.

References (Iitedin the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,393,223 Rosen Jan. 15, 1946 2,423,271 Talbot July 1, 1947 2,455,303 Grate Nov. 30, 1948 2,599,927 Livermore June 10, 1952

US533304A 1955-09-09 1955-09-09 Vane for use in a rotary fluid apparatus Expired - Lifetime US2856861A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3125031A (en) * 1964-03-17 Multi-chamber rotary pump
US3184156A (en) * 1957-09-06 1965-05-18 Medard W Welch Skin stimulating and cleaning device and pump therefor
WO1981001446A1 (en) * 1979-11-13 1981-05-28 Kayaba Industry Co Ltd Vane pump
US5267840A (en) * 1991-09-03 1993-12-07 Deco-Grand, Inc. Power steering pump with balanced porting
US5290155A (en) * 1991-09-03 1994-03-01 Deco-Grand, Inc. Power steering pump with balanced porting

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2393223A (en) * 1941-12-29 1946-01-15 Oscar E Rosen Hydraulic motor
US2423271A (en) * 1942-09-11 1947-07-01 Frank A Talbot Rotary motor, pump, and the like
US2455303A (en) * 1945-03-05 1948-11-30 Earl L Grate Rotary pump
US2599927A (en) * 1944-10-06 1952-06-10 William T Livermore Slipper pump

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2393223A (en) * 1941-12-29 1946-01-15 Oscar E Rosen Hydraulic motor
US2423271A (en) * 1942-09-11 1947-07-01 Frank A Talbot Rotary motor, pump, and the like
US2599927A (en) * 1944-10-06 1952-06-10 William T Livermore Slipper pump
US2455303A (en) * 1945-03-05 1948-11-30 Earl L Grate Rotary pump

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3125031A (en) * 1964-03-17 Multi-chamber rotary pump
US3184156A (en) * 1957-09-06 1965-05-18 Medard W Welch Skin stimulating and cleaning device and pump therefor
WO1981001446A1 (en) * 1979-11-13 1981-05-28 Kayaba Industry Co Ltd Vane pump
US4408964A (en) * 1979-11-13 1983-10-11 Kayaba Kogyo Kabushiki-Kaisha Vane pump
US5267840A (en) * 1991-09-03 1993-12-07 Deco-Grand, Inc. Power steering pump with balanced porting
US5290155A (en) * 1991-09-03 1994-03-01 Deco-Grand, Inc. Power steering pump with balanced porting

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