US2839300A - Baseball batting practice device - Google Patents

Baseball batting practice device Download PDF

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US2839300A
US2839300A US560421A US56042156A US2839300A US 2839300 A US2839300 A US 2839300A US 560421 A US560421 A US 560421A US 56042156 A US56042156 A US 56042156A US 2839300 A US2839300 A US 2839300A
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ball
surface
cord
vertical
batter
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US560421A
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Blaha Donald Louis
Mainland Keith Fredrick
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Albert Giusfredi
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0073Means for releasably holding a ball in position; Balls constrained to move around a fixed point, e.g. by tethering
    • A63B69/0079Balls tethered to a line or cord

Description

June 17, 1958 D. L. BLAHA ETAL 2,839,300

BASEBALL BATTING PRACTICE DEVICE Filed Jan. 20, 1956 INVENTORS DONALD LOU/S BLAHA KEITH FRED/PICK MAINLAND A 7' TORI'VE Y Unitcd States Patent BASEBALL BATTING PRACTICE DEVICE Donald Louis Blalia, Berwyn, Ill., and Keith Fredrick Mainland, Falls Church, Va.; said Mainland assignor v to' Albert Giusfredi, Riverside, Ill.

Application January 20, 1956, Serial No. 560,421

6 Claims. (Cl. 27326) Our invention relates to a device for baseball batting practice in a confined space which can be utilized by a single player without assistance.

Although many of the good hitters in baseball have different stances and different theories of batting, they all have several attributes in common. They all have strong wrists and well-developed arms and shoulders. They all have developed quick, muscular reflex actions. Although many top hitters have unorthodox stances, they all have an easy, fluid swing with proper foot and hip movement. All good hitters must train themselves to keep their eyes on the ball as it approaches the plate. Probably the most important attribute of all for a good hitter is proper timing. It is only through a highly developed sense of timing that a hitter can swing the bat to meet the ball at the precise moment for the maximum effect. Also, it is only through proper timing that a batter can place his hits efiectively.

These attributes of a good hitter can be attained only through regular and consistent batting practice. It is true that there are many exercises that a player can perform to develop some of these attributes, but it is only through regular hitting that all the attributes will be developed to the state required for good batting ability.

Generally, in order to practice batting, a large field is required. In addition, a pitcher, catcher or backstop, and several outfielders are needed in order that one man may practice hitting. Thus five or six players are engaged in giving one man batting practice. Obviously, the time each man can spend at bat is limited. In addition, practice can be carried on only during clement weather and, in many parts of the country, only during the summer months.

The device of the present invention permits an individual player, unassisted by others, to practice batting in a confined space. The device can be set up in the house, if desired, and thus can be used all year around. In brief, a flexible material is suspended on an upright frame to form a vertical surface. An arm extends from the upper part of the frame forwardly of the vertical surface. A baseball is suspended vertically by a flexible nonstretchable cord from the end of the arm and may be adjusted to any desired height about the ground or floor.

The flexible material should be suspended from the frame to have some yieldability to the impact of the ball when it strikes the surface but not in a manner to completely absorb the kinetic energy of the ball. Preferably the flexible material should be suspended from the top cross-bar of the upright frame and connected to the vertical side bars by ropes having some slack.

In practicing with the device of the present invention, the batter takes a normal stance adjacent the ball, oriented so that the vertical surface is in the direction the ball is to be hit. The batter swings and hits the ball, sending it towards the vertical surface in an arcuate path defined by the non-stretchable cord by which the ball is ice suspended. The ball Strikes the vertical surface and forms a slight pocket in the flexible material as that material yields under the initial impact of the ball. This slight pocket, or indentation in the flexible material holds the ball on the surface at the point at which it strikes and prevents the ball from dissipating its kinetic energy by traveling or climbing over the vertical surface. After initially yielding, the flexible surface becomes more taut as the slack in the ropes holding the flexible material to the vertical side bars is taken up. In the more taut condition, the flexible material achieves a resiliency which causes the ball to rebound back toward the batter, in the arcuate path defined by the non-stretchable cord.

In the meantime the batter may recover quickly from his initial swing and hit the ball again as it returns to him. Alternately, if he recovers from his initial swing more slowly, he may let the ball go by him and allow it to swing upwardly in an arc. The ball will swing back toward the vertical surface, strike it, and again rebound toward the batter, although with less force than the initial rebound. The batter, at this time, will be ready to take another swing at the ball.

The device is particularly adapted to use by a single player in playing pepper. When so used the batter chokes up on the and hits the ball with a short punching swing toward the vertical surface. As the ball rebounds the batter punches the ball again.

Each of these different uses or" the device developes specific characteristics needed of a good hitter. When the batter takes a full swing at the ball and recovers quickly to hit the ball again on the first rebound he will be developing the strength of his wrists, forearms, and body muscles used in pivoting his body for the swing. On the other hand, when the batter takes a full swing and recovers more slowly to hit the ball on the second rebound he can practice a fluid, rhythmic swing and will soon develope a proper foot and body motion. In the pepper practice the batter will not only achieve practice in bunting but will develop quick reflexes, eye training and timing.

In all uses of the device the ball, on successive hits, will strike the vertical surface in all different positions and hence the ball, on the rebound, will simulate a variety of pitches.

It is therefore a general object of the present invention to provide a device for baseball batting practice which may be used by a single player unassisted.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a baseball batting practice device which can be used in a restricted space.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a baseball batting device which gives the batter practice hitting simulated pitched balls of every type.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a baseball batting device wherein the height of the simulated pitched ball is adjustable.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a device which a single player can utilize to play pepper.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a baseball batting practice device which will develop the batters muscles, reflexes, coordination and timing.

It is an additional object to provide a small, movable, inexpensive batting practice device easy to manufacture and durable in construction.

The novel features which we believe to be characteristic of our invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. Our invention itself, however, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, will be best under- *ground or the floor in a home.

7 V 3 stood by reference to'the conjunction with the accompanying drawings in whichi Figure 1 is a perspective view of the batting device of and Figure 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modified form of the present invention.

The baseball batting practice device of the present invention is shown in Figure 1. A vertical frame, shown generally at 10, is supported on a horizontal base.

' frame and base are constructed of metallic tubing or pipe.

The base consists of two horizontal base bars 12 and 14 extending rearwardly from either end of the frame 19 and joining at a point to form a V-shaped construction. The

base may rest on any horizontal surface such as the The two base bars are joined at their forward euds, by fittings Hand 26, to two vertical bars 20 and 24, which form the sides of the vet-rical frame 10. The two vertical bars 20 and 24 which form the sides of the upright frame are connected to a horizontal top bar 28 by fittings 30 and 32. A diagonal bar 34 extends from the mid point of the horizontal top bar 28, downwardly to the junction of the two horizontal base bars 12 and 14. The diagonal is rigidly attached to the base section by fitting 36 which also receives the two horizontal base bars. The diagonal is secured to the hori- V zontal top bar by fitting 39.

The fittings 22, 26, 3G, 32, 36 and 39 slideably receive the bars which they join and have no internal threads. The bars are held securely in the fittings by set screws threadedly engaged in the fittings as shown in Figure 1.

An arm 50 extends forwardly from the mid point of the top horizontal bar 28, perpendicular to that bar. The arm 50 is connected to bar 23 by fitting 49 which straddles the fitting 39 as shown in Figure 2. The fitting 40 has a sleeve 40a which slideably receives the arm 50. Two webs 40!), connected at one end to opposite sides of sleeve 40a, are connected at their other ends to two sleeves 40c respectively. The two sleeves 400 which are spaced from each other are axially aligned,-perpendicular to the alignment; of sleeve 40a. The sleeves 40c slideably receive horizontal top bar 28 on either side of fitting 39 as shown in Figures 2 and 3. Each of the sleeves 40a and 40c have set screws to secure the respective bars in engagement with the fittings; Since the fitting 40 may be rotated in relation to the toprhorizontal bar 28 the bar 50 may be adjusted to any desired angle.

The arm it) is made of hollow metal tubing or pipe and carries inside a flexible non-stretchable cord 52. The cord is attached, at one end, to a T-shaped fitting 38 fastened to' the upper side of the diagonal bar 34 as shown in Figures 1 and 2. The cord 52 suspends from the for ward end of arm 50 and is attached to a ball 54, which may be a regulation league hard ball.

The'fiexible material 41, which preferably is canvas,

is carried in the vertical frame 10 as shown in Figure 1. At the upper edge of the material is a plurality of holes 42 reinforced by grommets 44." A cord 46 is wound around the top horizontal bar 28 and through the holes 42, as shown in Figures 1 and 3. Adjacent its lower edge, whichis a short distance above the ground or floor, the flexible-material has two holes 48, each spaced close to one side edge of the material. A cord 49 is tied at oneend through hole 48 and at the other end is tied to vertical side bars 20 and 24, respectively, as shown in Figure 1. The cord 49 should be long enough to have some'slack when the flexible material 41 is hanging in a common plane with the vertical frame 10;

Another embodiment of the invention is shown in Figure 4; In this embodiment, the horizontal base bars 112 following description taken and 114 are connected to two vertical bars 120Jand124 similar to the construction" of Figure 'Al'so,,diag6nal The somewhat taut condition.;-

embodiment, however, the top horizontal bar 128extendsbeyond the'vertical bars and curves in' a forwardly' direo;

tion as shown in Figure 6. A U-shaped member;.144

is connected to each vertical'bar and extends forwardly and outwardly in the sameplane as the curved extension on the top horizontal bar- 128 as shown in Figure"4.j The flexible material141 is connected to the top horizontal bar 123 in the same fashion as in the construction of Figure l. The flexiblemater ial is not connectedto the vertical bars 120 and 124 but has a plurality of weights 149 suspended from its lower edge. to hold the material 141 in The vertical surface of the present invention should not be hard and unyielding. It is evident that such a surface would damage theball -and,i in a short timerren'derit unsuitable for use. Additionally when a ball is travelling '1. in an arcttate path it tends to climb or travel over a hard'surface when it. strikes that surface. This dissi5 pates much of'the kinetic energy ofthe ball and results inan unsatisfactory rebound. When'the surface hassome yieldability a slight pocket or indentation will form "at the point the ball strikes the surface and the ball will be prevented from traveling over the surface. I

While the vertical surface-should not be hard'itis desirable that the ball, when struck, should rebound from the surface with more speedthan results from'the'for'ce of gravity acting on the pendulous ball. in the construction of Figure'l the cord-49 permitsthe flexible mate- V rial 41 to yield only a limited distance before the slack is taken up and the material becomes taut and conseimpact of theballit becomes more taut and hence more resilient. Additionally the weighted material picks up potential energy as the ball deflectsit, which energy is returned to the ball after its rearward motion is stopped,

to cause it to rebound. I i g Before use the balls 54 and 154 may be adjusted to any desired position in relation to the ground or floor and in relation to the vertical surface. The adjustment ofthe distance of the ball from the vertical surface is achieved by adjusting the angle of the arm 50, or arm 150T The height of the ball above the ground or floor is achieved "by winding or unwinding the cord 52 around the T fitting I In using the baseball batting practice device, the batter assumes his normal stance adjacent the, suspended ball 54 or 154. The batter is oriented so that a ball struck properly will travel toward the vertical surface defined by material 41 or 141. The batter takes his normal swing at the ball, hitting it toward the vertical surface. After his swing, the batter brings thebat back to a position ready to swing again. In the meantime, the ball strikes the vertical surface and rebounds toward the batter; By this time, the batter has recovered fromhis initial swing and is ready to strike the ball again. When the ball has returned to the position adjacent the batter, the batter strikes it again toward the vertical surface and the operation is repeated.

Alternately, the batter may recover from his initial swing more slowly and allow the ball to swing pasthis position in an arc defined by the flexible non-stretchable cord 52 or 152. The ball will swing back-to the'vertical surface and again rebound toward the batter. The batter hits the ball and the cycle is repeated. A hitter may also. play pepper bychoking his bat and punching the ball-toward thev vertical surface 41 or 141. When the device is so used the ball may be initially set close to the surface 41 or 141. Each rebound is again punched or tapped back to the surface.

The flexible non-stretchable cord 52 or serves to define the path of travel of the ball 54 or 154. it provents the ball from rebounding too low to be hit by the batter. it should be noted that the velocity of the ball as it returns to the batter is greater than that which would be achieved by the force of gravity acting on a pendulous body. Some of the kinetic energy of the bail travelling from the hitters bat is absorbed by vertical surface and returned to the ball for its travel back to the hitter. This causes the ball to simulate an actual pitched ball. Since the ball, when it is originally struck, may hit on any part of the canvas, the ball may be returned to the hitter from a variety of points to simulate different types of pitches. In addition, by adjusting the height of the ball 54 or 154 the batter may practice on low or high balls as he may desire.

While we have shown and described specific embodiments of the present invention, it will of course be evident that various modifications and alternative constructions may be made without departing from the true spirit and scope thereof. We therefore intend by the appended claims to cover all such modifications and alternative constructions as come within their true spirit and scope.

What we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A device resting on a horizontal surface for baseball batting practice in a restricted space, the device comprising in combination: a vertically upstanding frame having a top horizontal bar, two vertical bars, and a plurality of base horizontal bars extending rearwardly of the vertical bars; a flexible material suspended from the top horizontal bar and held by slack non-stretchable means between the vertical frame bars to form a surface which is yieldable from a position in the vertical frame to a taut position; an adjustably fixed arm attached to the top horizontal bar extending forwardly; a ball; and a flexible non-stretchable cord depending in spaced relation to the frame from a point on the arm and connected at its lower end to the ball, the length of the cord being at least as great as the length of the arm between the top bar and said point and less than the vertical distance from the point on the arm to the horizontal surface and less than the distance from the point on the arm to any point on the bottom edge of the surface of flexible material, whereby the-cord will guide the ball in a path into contact with the surface of flexible material when the ball is properly struck toward said surface and will guide the ball back along said path as it rebounds from said surface of flexible material.

2. A device resting on a horizontal surface for baseball batting practice in a restricted space, the device comprising in combination: a vertically upstanding frame having a top horizontal bar and two vertical bars; a flexible material held between the bars of the frame to form a vertical surface; a flexible non-stretchable cord; a ball connected to one end of said cord; and adjustable fixed means attached to the frame to receive the other end of said cord and sustain the ball above the horizontal surface spaced from the vertical surface a distance within the reach of said cord to permit contact of said ball with the vertical surface as the ball is struck towards that surface.

3. A device resting on a horizontal surface for baseball batting practice in a restricted space, the device comprising in combination: a frame having a top horizontal bar curved forwardly at either end; a surface defined by flexible material having weights at its bottom edge suspended from said top horizontal bar and extending to the ends of said bar to drape in accordance with the curved ends of the bar; a flexible non-stretchable cord; a ball connected to one end of said cord; and adjustable fixed means attached to the frame to receive the other end of said cord and sustain the ball above the horizontal surface spaced from the surface of flexible material a distance within the reach of said cord to permit Contact of said ball with the latter surface as the ball is struck towards that surface.

4. A device resting on a horizontal surface for baseball batting practice in a restricted space, the device comprising in combination: an upstanding vertical frame having a horizontal top bar and two vertical side bars; a flexible material suspended from the top bar of the frame, the flexible material having weight connected to the bottom edge to form a vertical surface; a flexible non-stretchable cord; a ball connected to one end of said cord; and adjustable fixed means attached to the frame to receive the other end of said cord and sustain the ball above the horizontal surface spaced from the vertical surface a distance within the reach of said cord to permit contact of said ball with the latter surface as the ball is struck towards that surface.

5. A device for baseball batting practice on a horizontal surface in a restricted space, the device comprising: an upstanding frame; a ball; a flexible material impervious to passage of the ball therethrough held in the frame to form a vertical surface having some resiliency; a flexible cord connected at one end to the ball; and adjustable fixed means to receive the other end of said cord and sustain the ball above the horizontal surface in an initial position spaced from the vertical surface a distance within the reach of said cord, whereby the ball, when hit towards the vertical surface, strikes that surface and rebounds to substantially its initial position where it may be hit again.

6. A device resting on a plane surface for baseball batting practice in a restricted space, the device comprising in combination: a frame; a ball; an upwardly extending surface of flexible material impervious to the passage of a ball therethrough and carried by the frame; a flexible non-stretchable cord connected at one end to the ball; and means to sustain the other end of said cord and hold the ball above the plane surface spaced from said surface of flexible material a distance within the reach of said cord.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 536,176 Austin et al Mar. 26, 1895 903,679 Courtney Nov. 10, 1908 1,127,279 Ramsey Feb. 2, 1915 1,879,316 Kleb Sept. 27, 1932 2,017,720 Lake Oct. 15, 1935 2,060,817 Mahoney Nov. 17, 1936 2,082,018 Atwell June 8, 1937 2,331,236 Schaefer Oct. 5, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,989 Great Britain Ian. 26, 1911 333,591 Great Britain Aug. 18, 1930 733,543 France Mar. 15, 1932 486,880 Great Britain June 13, 1938 489,842 Great Britain Aug. 4, 1938 955,553 France June 27, 1949

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Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3012781A (en) * 1959-10-01 1961-12-12 Haldeman Homme Inc Basketball training apparatus
US3013801A (en) * 1959-07-30 1961-12-19 Jr Oliver A Kirkconnell Simulated golf fairway
US3023001A (en) * 1961-02-07 1962-02-27 Frank R Gourdouze Basketball rebound practice device
US3366383A (en) * 1964-10-14 1968-01-30 Jerome A Reiner Baseball batting practice device
US3592475A (en) * 1968-08-26 1971-07-13 Playrite Sportsgear Ltd Apparatus for practising golf
US3994494A (en) * 1970-06-04 1976-11-30 Kelley Burdette C Tethered ball baseball practice device
US4049270A (en) * 1976-04-22 1977-09-20 Mccall Adrian W Tethered ball and shaft game device
US4127267A (en) * 1977-05-20 1978-11-28 Bay Marvon W Collapsible frame with hanging net ball arresting apparatus
US4521016A (en) * 1980-06-26 1985-06-04 Yasuhiro Tominaga Ball game apparatus
US4643423A (en) * 1984-10-31 1987-02-17 Wright Robert L Pitching target
US4674744A (en) * 1983-02-28 1987-06-23 Walsh William A Batting practice assembly
US4828262A (en) * 1986-01-04 1989-05-09 Henley Douglas R Ball hitting practice device
US4872674A (en) * 1988-01-19 1989-10-10 Deal Clifton R Baseball pitching practice devices
US4993709A (en) * 1987-10-05 1991-02-19 Pan Pacific Corporation Ball game apparatus
US5002274A (en) * 1990-05-16 1991-03-26 Bidema Mark D Baseball batting practice device
US5040791A (en) * 1989-03-20 1991-08-20 Aleksandar Ratajac Batting cage
US5072937A (en) * 1991-01-11 1991-12-17 South Texas Sports Manufacturing, Inc. Baseball batting practice device
US5178384A (en) * 1991-09-05 1993-01-12 Gorman Thomas E Collapsible sports practice device
US5401018A (en) * 1992-11-13 1995-03-28 Lazer-Tron Corporation Baseball simulation game
WO1995026787A1 (en) * 1994-04-01 1995-10-12 Ballwall, Inc. Multiple sport practice system
US5505443A (en) * 1995-07-31 1996-04-09 Padilla; Ronald G. Combination ball-hitting and pitching practice apparatus
US5795250A (en) * 1995-11-02 1998-08-18 Cripe; Larry Duane Tethered ball practice device
US6099419A (en) * 1994-06-20 2000-08-08 Incaudo; Peter J. Interchangeable ball-practice trainer
US6168540B1 (en) * 1999-06-28 2001-01-02 Mckenna Joe Portable apparatus for practicing batting
US20030228943A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-11 Powell Richard Dean Strike zone pitching backstop
US20060293124A1 (en) * 2005-06-28 2006-12-28 Mooney Bert E Batting cage
US20090163301A1 (en) * 2007-12-21 2009-06-25 John Flading Baseball Practice Systems
ITVR20110237A1 (en) * 2011-12-28 2013-06-29 Angiolino Marangoni The security element
US20160158618A1 (en) * 2014-12-04 2016-06-09 Raymond R. Falzon Apparatus for hitting a ball and a ball assembly
GB2546112A (en) * 2016-01-11 2017-07-12 Mohammed Sohail Batting training aid

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US903679A (en) * 1908-01-18 1908-11-10 Cyrus William Courtney Game apparatus.
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GB333591A (en) * 1929-03-18 1930-08-18 Ronald Vivian Laurence Improved apparatus for playing a ball game with practice target
US1879316A (en) * 1931-06-20 1932-09-27 George A Kleb Baseball strike zone target
FR733543A (en) * 1931-03-17 1932-10-07 Device to learn to play tennis
US2017720A (en) * 1933-02-09 1935-10-15 Kum Bak Sports Toys & Games Mf Apparatus for practicing ball games
US2060817A (en) * 1932-07-27 1936-11-17 Mahoney Henry Charles Screen for optical projections
US2082018A (en) * 1935-07-13 1937-06-01 James Harry Layne Portable shovel
GB486880A (en) * 1935-12-14 1938-06-13 Arthur Percival Masters Improved game apparatus
GB489842A (en) * 1938-02-16 1938-08-04 Norman Kantrowitz Apparatus for use in practising and teaching lawn tennis
US2331236A (en) * 1941-07-03 1943-10-05 Harry Alter Company Golf practice apparatus
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US536176A (en) * 1895-03-26 Willis r
FR955553A (en) * 1950-01-17
US903679A (en) * 1908-01-18 1908-11-10 Cyrus William Courtney Game apparatus.
GB191101989A (en) * 1911-01-26 1911-11-09 James Ballantyne Improved Target for Playing Balls.
US1127279A (en) * 1914-07-25 1915-02-02 Edia Ray Ramsey Game apparatus.
GB333591A (en) * 1929-03-18 1930-08-18 Ronald Vivian Laurence Improved apparatus for playing a ball game with practice target
FR733543A (en) * 1931-03-17 1932-10-07 Device to learn to play tennis
US1879316A (en) * 1931-06-20 1932-09-27 George A Kleb Baseball strike zone target
US2060817A (en) * 1932-07-27 1936-11-17 Mahoney Henry Charles Screen for optical projections
US2017720A (en) * 1933-02-09 1935-10-15 Kum Bak Sports Toys & Games Mf Apparatus for practicing ball games
US2082018A (en) * 1935-07-13 1937-06-01 James Harry Layne Portable shovel
GB486880A (en) * 1935-12-14 1938-06-13 Arthur Percival Masters Improved game apparatus
GB489842A (en) * 1938-02-16 1938-08-04 Norman Kantrowitz Apparatus for use in practising and teaching lawn tennis
US2331236A (en) * 1941-07-03 1943-10-05 Harry Alter Company Golf practice apparatus

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3013801A (en) * 1959-07-30 1961-12-19 Jr Oliver A Kirkconnell Simulated golf fairway
US3012781A (en) * 1959-10-01 1961-12-12 Haldeman Homme Inc Basketball training apparatus
US3023001A (en) * 1961-02-07 1962-02-27 Frank R Gourdouze Basketball rebound practice device
US3366383A (en) * 1964-10-14 1968-01-30 Jerome A Reiner Baseball batting practice device
US3592475A (en) * 1968-08-26 1971-07-13 Playrite Sportsgear Ltd Apparatus for practising golf
US3994494A (en) * 1970-06-04 1976-11-30 Kelley Burdette C Tethered ball baseball practice device
US4049270A (en) * 1976-04-22 1977-09-20 Mccall Adrian W Tethered ball and shaft game device
US4127267A (en) * 1977-05-20 1978-11-28 Bay Marvon W Collapsible frame with hanging net ball arresting apparatus
US4521016A (en) * 1980-06-26 1985-06-04 Yasuhiro Tominaga Ball game apparatus
US4674744A (en) * 1983-02-28 1987-06-23 Walsh William A Batting practice assembly
US4643423A (en) * 1984-10-31 1987-02-17 Wright Robert L Pitching target
US4828262A (en) * 1986-01-04 1989-05-09 Henley Douglas R Ball hitting practice device
US4993709A (en) * 1987-10-05 1991-02-19 Pan Pacific Corporation Ball game apparatus
US4872674A (en) * 1988-01-19 1989-10-10 Deal Clifton R Baseball pitching practice devices
US5040791A (en) * 1989-03-20 1991-08-20 Aleksandar Ratajac Batting cage
US5002274A (en) * 1990-05-16 1991-03-26 Bidema Mark D Baseball batting practice device
US5072937A (en) * 1991-01-11 1991-12-17 South Texas Sports Manufacturing, Inc. Baseball batting practice device
US5178384A (en) * 1991-09-05 1993-01-12 Gorman Thomas E Collapsible sports practice device
US5401018A (en) * 1992-11-13 1995-03-28 Lazer-Tron Corporation Baseball simulation game
WO1995026787A1 (en) * 1994-04-01 1995-10-12 Ballwall, Inc. Multiple sport practice system
US5527032A (en) * 1994-04-01 1996-06-18 Ballwall, Inc. Multiple sport practice system
US6099419A (en) * 1994-06-20 2000-08-08 Incaudo; Peter J. Interchangeable ball-practice trainer
US5505443A (en) * 1995-07-31 1996-04-09 Padilla; Ronald G. Combination ball-hitting and pitching practice apparatus
US5795250A (en) * 1995-11-02 1998-08-18 Cripe; Larry Duane Tethered ball practice device
US6168540B1 (en) * 1999-06-28 2001-01-02 Mckenna Joe Portable apparatus for practicing batting
US20030228943A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-11 Powell Richard Dean Strike zone pitching backstop
US20060293124A1 (en) * 2005-06-28 2006-12-28 Mooney Bert E Batting cage
US7547260B2 (en) 2005-06-28 2009-06-16 Mooney Bert E Batting cage
US20090163301A1 (en) * 2007-12-21 2009-06-25 John Flading Baseball Practice Systems
US7914400B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2011-03-29 John Flading Baseball practice systems
ITVR20110237A1 (en) * 2011-12-28 2013-06-29 Angiolino Marangoni The security element
US20160158618A1 (en) * 2014-12-04 2016-06-09 Raymond R. Falzon Apparatus for hitting a ball and a ball assembly
GB2546112A (en) * 2016-01-11 2017-07-12 Mohammed Sohail Batting training aid

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