US2830578A - Electro-sonic apparatus - Google Patents

Electro-sonic apparatus Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2830578A
US2830578A US637420A US63742057A US2830578A US 2830578 A US2830578 A US 2830578A US 637420 A US637420 A US 637420A US 63742057 A US63742057 A US 63742057A US 2830578 A US2830578 A US 2830578A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
ultra
sonic
electrical
sound
low voltage
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US637420A
Inventor
Mark E Degroff
Original Assignee
Mark E Degroff
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Mark E Degroff filed Critical Mark E Degroff
Priority to US637420A priority Critical patent/US2830578A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2830578A publication Critical patent/US2830578A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N1/00Electrotherapy; Circuits therefor
    • A61N1/02Details
    • A61N1/04Electrodes
    • A61N1/0404Electrodes for external use
    • A61N1/0472Structure-related aspects
    • A61N1/0492Patch electrodes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N1/00Electrotherapy; Circuits therefor
    • A61N1/02Details
    • A61N1/04Electrodes
    • A61N1/0404Electrodes for external use
    • A61N1/0408Use-related aspects
    • A61N1/0452Specially adapted for transcutaneous muscle stimulation [TMS]
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N1/00Electrotherapy; Circuits therefor
    • A61N1/18Applying electric currents by contact electrodes
    • A61N1/32Applying electric currents by contact electrodes alternating or intermittent currents
    • A61N1/36Applying electric currents by contact electrodes alternating or intermittent currents for stimulation
    • A61N1/36014External stimulators, e.g. with patch electrodes
    • A61N1/36021External stimulators, e.g. with patch electrodes for treatment of pain
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N1/00Electrotherapy; Circuits therefor
    • A61N1/18Applying electric currents by contact electrodes
    • A61N1/32Applying electric currents by contact electrodes alternating or intermittent currents
    • A61N1/322Electromedical brushes, combs, massage devices
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S128/00Surgery
    • Y10S128/07Servo-systems

Description

April 15, 1958 M. E. DE GROFF ELECTRO-SONIC APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 31, 1957 o o a n a on 49 Fig.5

a I v x IN V EN TOR. Mark E. 026/122 ATTORNEY M. E. DE GROFF ELECTRO-SONIC APPARATUS April 15, 1958 3' Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 31, 1957 Fig. 6

16 INVENTOR Mark E. De Groff ATTORNEY Z Fig 7 April 1 1958 M. E. DE GROFF 2,830,5'Z8

ELECTRO-SONIC APPARATUS Filed Jan. 31, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR, Mark E. De Groff BY ATTORNEYQDWIZ jz 7* United States Patent 1 2,830,578 ELECTRO-SONIC APPARATUS Mark E. DeGroif, Tulsa, Okla. Application January 31, 1957, Serial No. 637,420 7 Claims. (Cl. 128-245) This invention relates to improvements in electrotherapy apparatus and more particularly, but not by way of limitation, to a combination low voltage generator and co-acting ultra-sonic applicator to provide simultaneous synchronized low voltage current and ultra-sonic energy for medical therapy.

Medical science in recent years has found it very beneficial to employ electrical current for muscle stimulation in the treatment of sprains, strains, dislocations, fractures and the like. Electro-therapy current is applied to the muscles controlling the injured joint to counteract atrophy of the muscles due to disuse and nutritional reflex, and also aids in removing exudates, and minimizes the formation of adhesions. The electro-therapy currents may be produced from a low voltage electro-tnerapy generator, such as disclosed in the Lawrence R. Paust and Mark E. DeGroff Patent No. 2,764,683 issued September 25, 1956, wherein electrode pads are disposed on the skin of the patient for transmitting the electrical stimulator to the muscle. Three types of electrical current are generally utilized in such electro-therapy treatment, i. e., pulsating current having instantaneous rectified pulsations with rest periods between each pulsation to cause twitch contraction of normally innervated muscles, tetanizing current wherein audio oscillations are superimposed on rectified electrical half waves to produce constant tetanic muscle contraction, and a surge form of current which is obtained by turning the tetanizing current off and on at predetermined periodic time intervals so as effect graduated muscle contractions.

Ultra-sonic therapy has also become of great utility in the medical science field during recent years in the treatment of osteo-arthritis, bursitis, adhesions and the like. The mechanical vibrations created in a sound head applicator by ultra-sonic radio frequencies have the facility of producing a sufiicient mechanical eifect, or vibration without overheating. The stimulation produced by the mechanical vibrations set up in the sound head applicator has proven very satisfactory in producing relief from pain, soreness and tenderness associated with a great variety of physical disturbances which respond favorably to massage an similar therapy.

The present invention contemplates a novel medical therapy apparatus which combines the electro-therapy and ultra-sound application to produce new and completely different therapeutic action than that which results from the utilization of either therapy provided separately. The novel apparatus combines a low voltage generator and an ultra-sonic applicator through a single electrode to produce a simultaneous, superimposed synergistic action of combined ultra-sonic and electro-therapy. The combined results produce a therapeutic synergistic action not capable with single apparatus when used independently. The novel therapeutic action may result in a completely new field of endeavor in the use of electrical and mechanical muscle stimulation for medical therapy for producing new and greatly increased patient treatment results.

it is an important object of this invention to provide a novel medical therapy apparatus for producing a superimposed synergistic action of combined ultra-sonic and electro-therapy.

It is another object of this invention to transmit through a single electrode both a low voltage current and an ultra-sonic radio frequency for producing an improved therapeutic action.

And still another object of this invention is to combine through a single electrode both the low voltage current of a low voltage generator and the ultra-sonic radio frequency by grounding one side of the two circuits to a chassis for the apparatus, thereby producing a combined action for the electrical therapy treatment.

Another object of this invention is to provide an ultrasonic and electro-therapy apparatus which is coordinated in one compact and portable unit.

It is another object of this invention to provide a medical therapy apparatus wherein a plurality of electrode pad members and a sound head applicator are electrically grounded to a common ground for producing co-acting electrical stimulation and mechanical vibrations for patient treatment.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a medical therapy apparatus wherein a low voltage generator and ultra-sonic radio wave transmitter are combined and electrically coordinated to produce dual electrical and mechanical stimulation for patient treatment for a greatly improved therapeutic action in the treatment of a variety of patient illnesses.

And a still further object of this invention is to provide a novelmedical therapy apparatus wherein the co-acting electrical and mechanical stimulation thereof may be automatically timed or controlled to provide predetermined treatment dosages for patient treatment.

It is another object of this invention to provide a medical therapy apparatus providing electrical stimulation and mechanical vibrations which may be either selectively energized or simultaneously actuated for patient treatment in a variety of painful diseases.

And still another object of this invention is to provide a novel ultra-sonic and electro-therapy apparatus which is simple and economical in construction and durable and efiicient in operation.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be evident from the following detailed description, read in conjunction with the acompanying drawings, which illustrate my invention.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the novel electrotherapy and ultra-sonic apparatus.

Figure 2 is a top view of the ultra-sonic portion of the novel apparatus.

Figure 3 is a bottom view of the sound portion of the novel apparatus.

Figure 4 is a top view of the low voltage generator portion of the novel apparatus.

Figure 5 is a bottom view of the low voltage generator portion of the novel apparatus.

Figure 6 is an electrical circuit diagram of the low voltage generator portion of the apparatus.

Figure 7 is an electrical circuit diagram showing the wiring cable for electrically interconnecting the low voltage generator and the sound portion of the apparatus.

Figure 8 is an electrical circuit diagram of the sound portion or radio frequency transmitter portion of the apparatus.

Figure 9 is a sectional elevational view of the sound head applicator for the novel apparatus.

Figure 10 is a schematic perspective view showing the basic structure for combining the low voltage generator and ultra-sonic radio frequency through a single electrode.

Referring to the drawings in detail, reference character 10 refers in general to a combined low voltage generator and ultra-sonic radio frequency apparatus. A sound head applicator indicated at 12 is operatively connected to a radio frequency generator to provide sound waves for producing mechanical vibrations from the sound head 12 in a manner as will be hereinafter set forth. The ultrasound section 14 (Figs. 2 and 3) functions as a trans Patented Apr. 15, 1958- mitter for transmitting radio waves preferably at one megacycle. This transmission is filtered to avoid radio frequency interference by a suitable line filter 13 which is electrically grounded at 15 (Fig. 7). The electrotherapy apparatus 10 is adapted for connection to any alternating current line with voltage preferably ranging from one hundred ten to one hundred twenty-five volts, and with a frequency between fifty and sixty cycles. The unit may be connected with the line voltage by means of a suitable plug member 16 (Fig. 7). In this manner, electric current is supplied to the apparatus or unit 19 through a series connected fuse 17 and the line filter 13.

The ultra-sound section 14 (Figs. 2, 3 and 8) comprises a self-excited oscillator 18, a full-Wave voltage doubler power supply consisting of two radio tubes 20, and a quartz crystal transducer 22 (Fig. 9). The voltage doubler tubes have their plates and filaments tied into a suitable ultra-sound power transformer 2 (Figs. 2 and 8). The transformer 24 in the present instance supplies current to the tubes 2! at approximately six hundred volts, but not limited thereto. The tubes 20 [function to double the voltage, and therefore discharge a voltage of twelve hundred volts to the oscillator 18. The oscillator tube 18 in turn supplies radio frequency power to a coaxial cable 26 (Figs. 8 and 9) through a suitable tuning condenser 28 and coil 30. The cable 26 transmits the radio frequency waves to an electrode member 32 through a suitable connector member 34 provided in the sound head 12. The electrode 32 is disposed adjacent the quartz crystal member 22 and transmits the radio waves to the crystal whereupon the crystal is resonated or vibrates at its natural frequency. In the present instance, the crystal member 22 is preferably polished or ground in such a manner that it will vibrate only at a frequency of one megacycle per second. Thus, the tuning condenser 28 is suitably adjusted to resonate the coil for producing a vibrating frequency of one megacycle per second in the crystal. The shielding wire 36 of the coaxial cable 26 acts as a second conductor of the radio frequency circuit and is suitably connected to the body of the sound head applicator 12 at a point 3S for electrical grounding.

As hereinbefore set forth, the crystal 22 is caused to vibrate by the radio waves transmitted thereto by the electrode member 32. The vibratory motion of the crystal 22 produces ultra-sonic waves which are mechanical energy. The ultra-sonic waves or vibrations emitted from the crystal 22 produce mechanical compressions and rarifications which are much the same as those produced by the vibrating strings of a violin or a piano. As has been determined by many medical associations, the energy produced for ultra-sound therapy is the tremendous number of vibrations of the crystal per second, which produce vibrations of an ultra-sonic nature so close together that they produce a disturbance of cell size in the tissues of the patient being treated. This cell size disturbance is often called cell massage or micro-massage. The mechanical effect of the ultra-sonic vibrations on the cell molecules of the human or animal tissues causes an agitation of the molecules, which has proven to be very beneficial in the therapeutic treatment of patients.

A suitable perforated plate member 29 (Fig. 2) is preferably provided for the sound section 14 for facilitating the flow of air around the electrical components thereof and avoid any overheating during the operation of the apparatus 10. The electrical components of the sound circuit also include a plurality of suitable condenser members 31, 31a, 31b, 31c and 31d, as well as a potentiometer 33, a plurality of resistor members and 35a and a choke member 37 operably connected in the electrical circuit to assure an efficient operation of the sound section 14 It will be apparent that the electrical wires interconnecting the electrical components of the sound section 14 have been omitted from Figs. 2 and 3 for purposes of illustration. A suitable handle or clamp member 39 is preferably provided on the chassis 11 in the proximity of the sound head member 12 for receiving and storing the sound head 12 when the sound head member is not being utilized for patient treatment.

The transformer 24 receives electric current from the connection of the plug member 16 with the line current, as hereinbefore set forth. The plug connections 41 and 92 of the complementary Jones connectors J and P (Figs. 7 and 8) connect the transformer 24 with the one hundred ten volt alternating current line current in a manner well known in the art.

Ultra-sonic energy cannot pass through the atmosphere, therefore, some suitable medium must be provided to conduct the sound waves from the crystal member 22 or sound head 12 to the various tissues of the patient being treated. Suitable mineral oil may be applied to any relatively smooth areas of treatment, and in the case of an irregular area, such as a hand or foot, the part to be treated may be immersed in water in order that maximum transmission of the sound energy will occur. When mineral oil is being used, it is preferable to apply a sufiicient quantity to the skin on the area being treated, and then spread the oil over the area with the sound head 12. When the underwater method is being used, it is preferable to move the applicator 12 slowly over the area being treated while maintaining a space of one-half to one inch between the sound head 12 and the part being treated. The applicator or sound head 12 is so designed and constructed that the entire applicator and cord may be immersed in the water. I

The electro-therapy portion of the apparatus 10 comprises two pairs of electrode pads 40 and 42 operably connected to the low voltage generator section generally indicated at 44 (Figs. 4 and 5). The pads 40 and 42 may be color coded in order to distinguish between them, such as having the pads 40 of a black color and the pads 42 a red color. For clarification, the pair of pads 42 will be hereinafter designated pad 42 and the pair of pads 40 will be referred to as pad 40, since in the application of electro-therapy the pair of pads are used together. However, in the utilization of the pads 49 in conjunction with the sound head 12, only a single pad 40 is utilized as will be hereinafter set forth.

A pair of similar hinged door members 40a and 42a are provided on the chassis 111 to enclose suitable storage chambers (not shown) provided in the chassis 11 for storing the pad members 40 and 42 during periods of nonuse.

The low voltage generator 44 is an automatic muscle stimulator which develops alternating, interrupted, or modulated current, and is similar to the device shown in the L. R. Paust et a1. patent heretofore mentioned. The low voltage circuit (Fig. 6) comprises an oscillator 46 with self rectification of the voltage, and a timing motor 48 which is operably connected to the pads 40 and 42 in a manner as will be hereinafter set forth. The electric input power is supplied to the generator portion 44 through the plug member 16, as previously set forth. Both sides of the alternating current line voltage are filtered through the line filter 13 to prevent radio interference. The line voltage or current is directed to the timing motor 48 and through a relay mechanism 49 to a transformer 50 for passing the current on to the pads 40 and 42.

The timing motor 48 is mechanically connected to a plurality of timing cam members 52 and 54 for rotation of the cams in any well known manner (not shown). The cam members 52 and 54 are in electrical connection with the relay 4? through suitable microswitch members 56 and 58, respectively. The operation of the timing motor 48 may be controlled by a suitable knob member 57 located on the face panel 59 of the unit 10 (Fig. l). The timer knob 57 may be utilized in any well known manner to pre-set or determine the period of time for actuation of the motor 48. For example, the knob may be set at substantially any time interval between two minutes and fifteen minutes in order that the operation of the motor 48 will be automatically terminated after the Selected time period has elapsed. The timer may also be turned 01f manually or the time period may be increased or decreased at will.

The cam member 52 is provided with a plurality of circumferentially spaced radially extending shoulder portions 53 which are preferably designed and spaced to alternately open and close the microswitch 56 in approximately one second cycles. Thereby the current from the transformer 50 will alternate between the pad 40 and the pad 42 according to the one second time cycle. In other words, the pad 40 will be energized and the pad 42 will be simultaneously de-energized for a period of approximately one second, and then the pad 40 will be de-energized and the pad 42 will be simultaneously energized for approximately one second. This produces a pulsating current to the pads for alternate electrical stimulation for patient treatment.

In a similar manner, the cam member 54 is preferably constructed with a plurality of circumferentially spaced radially extending shoulder members 55 which are designed and spaced for alternately opening and closing the microswitch 58 in approximately three second cycles, thereby alternately supplying current to the pads 40 and 42 in three second timevcycles. The selection of operation of the one second or the three second timing cam is selective as will be hereinafter set forth and is usually a matter of choice according to the patient treatment dosage desired.

A surge cam member 60 is suitably mechanically con- I nected to the timing motor 48 for rotation thereby in a similar'manner as that of the earns 52 and 54. The surge cam member 60 is in electrical connection with the relay 49 through a microswitch 62. The surge cam member is designed in a similar manner as the cams 52 and 54 for alternately opening and closing the switch 62. The switch 62, however, provides for supplying current to both the pads 40 and 42 simultaneously instead of alternately as hereinbefore set forth in the case of the cams 52 and 54. The surge cam 60 produces a surge type of electrical energization through the relay 49 such that the pads 40 and 42 are simultaneously energized for a period of approximately six seconds and then both are off for a period of approximately four or five seconds, thereby developing a surge type stimulation for the patient treatment.

The cams 52, 54, and 60 may be selectively operated or energized by a suitable gang switch or selector switch 64 which functions to select the desired operating circuit or current for the low voltage generator portion 44. The selector switch 64 functions in a well known manner for selective operation of the low voltage generator 44 and will be hereinafter set forth in detail. Thus, either the cam 52, the cam 54, or the cam 60 may be in operation to produce desired functioning of the pads 40 and 42 depending upon the position of the selector switch 64.

The selector gang switch 64 also functions to select an automatic timing operation of the pads 40 and 42, if desired. In the automatic position of the switch 64 to be hereinafter set forth, a pair of automatic timing cam members 66 and 68 are placed in electrical connection with the relay 49 through the microswitch members 70 and 72, respectively. The cam members 66 and 68 are mechanically connected to the timing motor 48 for rotation thereby as hereinbefore set forth. The cam members 66 and 68 are timed to rotate in unison in order to coact for control of the supply of electrical current to the pads 40 and 42. They are so timed that during one complete simultaneous revolution of each cam member both microswitches 70 and 72 are closed for a certain .period of time, then only the microswitch 70 is closed while the. switch 72 is open for another period of time, and then only the microswitch 72 is closed with the switch is open for the remaining period of time during the cam revolution cycle. When the cams 66 and 68 are in the position shown in Fig. 6, both themicroswitches 70 and 72 are closed, thereby providing a steady or tetanizing current to both of the pads 40 and 42. As the earns 66 and 68 continue rotating in a clockwise direction as viewed in the drawings, the cam 66 disengages from the switch 70 whereby the switch 70 is opened and only the switch 72 is closed, thereby producing a pulsating current to the pads 40 and 42. A continued rotation of the cams 66 and 68 brings the cam 66 back into contact with the switch 70 and moves the cam 68 out of contact with the switch 72, thereby opening the switch 72 and closing only the switch 70. This produces a surge current for the pads 46 and 42. Thus, the automatic earns 66 and 68 provide for a patient treatment cycle including the three types of current, pulsation, surge and tetanizing, in succession throughout the selected time period of patient treatment.

The selector switch circuit is shown in Fig. 7. The selector switch 64 is any well known type of gang switch and as shown herein comprises a plurality of wafer members A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Each of the wafer members is provided with a wafer arm member 65. All of the wafer arm members 65 are adapted for simultaneous rotation on the respective wafers upon manual rotation of the switch knob 64:: (Fig. 1) located on the top panel 59. The arm members 65 physically contact the terminals or steps (clearly indicated in Fig. 7) of the wafer members according to the disposition of the knob 64a in order to establish electrical connections in the well known manner for operation of the low voltage generator 44 as will be hereinafter set forth. Thus, the knob 64a may be manually positioned as desired to select the type of current required for operation of the low voltage generator 44 in accordance with the patient treatment requirements.

In one position of the knob 64a, the arm members 65 are positioned with respect to the wafer members of the switch 64 in such a manner that electrical communication is established through the connections 67 and 69 of the complementary Jones connector members I and P The electrical connection between the members 67 and 69 supplies electrical current to the motor 48 in a mannor to energize the automatic timing earns 66 and 63 for producin an automatic timing for the electrical energization of the pads 40 and 42, as hereinbefore set forth. In another position of the knob 64a, the arms 65 of the switch 64 are moved on the wafer members to provide electrical connection between the terminals 71 of the members I and P as well as the terminals 67. The electrical connection between the terminals 71 and 67 supplies electrical current for energizing the microswitch 56 of the one second pulse cam 52, thereby selecting the one second cam for operation or energization of the pads 4i) and 42 to provide a one second pulse type current as hereinbefore set forth. In yet another position of the switch knob 64a, the terminals 73 of the complementary plug members 3 and P are connected as well as the terminals 67 to place the microswitch 58 of the three second cam member 54 in the electrical circuit, thereby selecting the three second cam for energization of the pads 4i) and 42 to provide a three second pulse type current. Another position for the switch knob 64a places the terminals 75 as well as the terminals 67 in con nection to place the microswitch 62 of the surge cam 60 in the electrical circuit for energization of the pads 49 and 42 to provide a surge current. And yet another position of the switch knob 64a places the terminals 77 in connection as well as the terminals 67 to place the automatic timing earns 66 and 68 in the electrical circuit for energization of the pads 40 and 42 to provide surge, tetanizing and pulsating current in sequence.

The line current is supplied to both the low voltage generator portion 44 and the sound portion 14 through the plug member 16. The plug 16 is a part of the .cable wiring circuit shown in Fig. 7. The cable wiring circuit functions to electrically connect the sound portion 14 with the low voltage generator portion 44 and the line current. The selector switch 64 is in the cable wiring circuit, and functions to provide electrical connection of the pulse cams 52, 54, the surge cam 60, or the automatic timing earns 66 and 68 to the pad members 40 and 42 through the connections 74 and 76 as hereinbefore set forth. A switch 78 is provided in the cable wiring circuit to ground the pad 40 when the sound head 12 is being used, as will be hereinafter set forth. A switch member 80 is also provided in the cable wiring circuit and is in connection with a power transformer 81 through a connection 83 to turn the low voltage generator portion 44 on or off, as desired. As hereinbefore set forth, the line current is simultaneously transmitted to the sound portion 14 through the connection 41.

A power meter 82 of the cable wiring is in connection with a variable resistor 33 of the sound portion through the connection 86, and is grounded through the connection 88. The power meter 82 is disposed on the top panel 59 and indicates the power output when the sound head 12 is being utilized. The transformer 24 of the sound portion is in connection with an on-off switch 90 of the cable wiring circuit through a connection 92 for alternately energizing and de-energizing the sound portion 14 as desired. A pilot light 93 is electrically connected in the cable wiring circuit and glows only when the power is on in the sound circuit.

A switch 109 is provided in the cable wiring circuit (Fig. 7) to place either one or both of a pair of similar condenser members 192 and 104 of the low voltage circuit (Fig. 6) in the electrical circuit through connection between the terminals 106 and 198. the switch 106, only the condenser 102 is in the electrical circuit, while another position of the switch 1M places both the condensers 104 and 1&2 in the circuit. The electric current collects in the condensers before being discharged into the transformer 50. The current will accumulate up to the saturation point of the condenser and then discharge into the transformer 50 as is well known. It will be apparent that the pulsation of the current will be slower when both the condensers are in the circuit than when just one of the condensers is included.

A volume control knob 110 (Figs. 1 and 6) is provided on the panel 59 for controlling the volume of the pad 40 through the terminal connections 11, 112 and 113 of the plug members I and P A similar volume control knob 114 is provided on the panel 59 for controlling the volume of the pad 42 through the terminals 115, 116 and 76 of the plug members I and P The terminals 118 and 119 of the complementary connector members 1 and P provide for a level control or sound intensity control for the ultra-sound circuit (Fig. 8) through operation I of the control knob 12 9 located on the panel 59. A pilot light or pulse rate indicator 122 is provided on the top panel 59, and is electrically connected with the cable wiring circuit (Fig. 7) to glow when the switch 80 is on and power is being supplied to the low voltage generator section 44.

It will be apparent that a suitable electrical cord memher 126 (Fig. 1) extends from the plug 16 into connection with the apparatus 1% for electrically interconnecting the unit with the line voltage. Furthermore, a suitable plug connection 128 may be provided on the coaxial cable 26 for connecting the sound head 12'. with the apparatus it in any well known manner. In addition, a suitable potentiometer 139 (Fig. 7) is operably connected with the wafer B of the selector switch 64 and functions in any well known manner to vary or change the time interval between the electrical pulsations in the pulse type electric current supplied to the pads 40 and 42. The operation of the potentiometer 130 may be controlled by rotation of a suitable knob member 132 (Fig. 1) pro- In one position of vided on the top panel 59. The control knob varies the pulse or twitch contraction of the pulsation current in the pads 40 and 42 from approximately one per second to a full tetanizing by manually rotating the knob 132 in a clockwise direction as viewed in the drawings.

Operation .In using the electro-therapy and ultra-sonic therapy simultaneously to produce a superimposed synergistic action in patient treatment, both the switches and .90 may be positioned to place the low voltage section 44 and the sound section 14 in the electrical circuit for the apparatus 10. It is usually desirable to use only one of the pad members 40 when the sound head applicator 12 is being used in this manner. The switch 78 is, therefore, preferably closed in order to electrically ground one of the pads 40 (as shown in Fig. 10) at a point 96 on the chassis 11. As shown in Fig. 10, the sound head 12 is also electrically grounded at the point 96, thereby providing a common ground for both the pad 40 and the sound head 12. In this manner, the chassis 11 functions as the common ground for both the pad 40 and sound head 12, thereby combining the low voltage current and the ultra-sonic radio frequency through a single electrode to produce a combined action for the electrical therapy treatment.

The pad 40 and sound head applicator 12 are both movable, and may be manually adjusted or moved on the skin or area of the patient to be treated as desired for the most effective treatment. The nerve controlling the painful area is often remotely located with respect to the actual pain. Thus, the ungrounded elecrode pad member 40 may be disposed on the skin adjacent the remote nerve area and retained thereon in any suitable manner while the sound head 12 is moved along the surface of the skin in the proximity of the actual painful area, thereby readily stimulating both the controlling nerve areaand the painful area. For example, an arm muscle, or the like, may be treated by placing the pad 40 against one portion, such as the under portion of the arm, and the sound head 12 may be movable adjacent the opposed portion, or upper surface of the arm. In this manner, the electrical stimulation from the pad 40 and the sound head 12 and the sound waves emitting from the sound head 12 coact for producing mechanical stimulation in the tissue cells of the arm muscle in a synchronized manner with the electrical stimulation of the muscle, thereby providing a patient treatment result not possible with either type of stimulation form taken singly.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the electrical stimulation is discharged through the indifferent electrode pad 4% simultaneous with a discharge thereof to the sound head 12. Furthermore, the ultrasonic energy produced by the sound portion 14 and sound head 12 emit from the sound head 12 in synergistic relation with the electrical stimulation also emitting therefrom. As has been previously mentioned, the grounding of the electrode 49 and the sound head 12 at the common point 96 on the chassis 11 provides the above synchronized and combined action. The indifferent electrode pad 40 is usually placed on the patient in a position remote from the painful or area to be treated, which area is sometimes called the motor area and receives the movable application of the sound head 12. In treatment, due to the remote location of the pad 40, the patient is usually not as cognizant of the electrical stimulation of the pad 40, which is more significant in the sound head 12 movable over the motor area particularly with the dual discharge of both electrical stimulation and mechanical energy therefrom.

It will be apparent that the low voltage generator section 44 of the unit 10 may be utilized for energization of the pads 40 and 42 without the use of the sound head 12 when the on-otr' switch is positioned to place the sound portion 14 out of the electrical circuit. The unit 10 may thus be used for electrical muscle stimulation through usage of the pads 40 and 42 in the well known manner.

The sound portion or section 14 may be utilized without the low voltage generator portion 44, if desired. This is done by operation of the switches 36? and 95 in such a manner as to turn the low voltage generator portion id off, and the sound section 14 on. In this manner, the sound head applicator 12 may be utilized for ultra-sonic patient treatment in the well known manner.

By way of summation, the unit 19 is essentially utilized to provide a simultaneous and synchronized electrical and mechanical stimulation for therapeutic treatment. A simultaneous and synchronized electrical and mechanical or ultra-sound stimulation is provided to a patients tissues and muscles by positioning the switches 80 and 90 in such a position as to place both the electrical and sound circuit in the electrical circuit for the unit 10. The pad 40 and the sound head 12 may be utilized in a coaction operation by closing the switch 78 for electrically grounding the pad 40 and the sound head 12 to the chassis 11 at a common point to provide a low voltage current and ultra-sonic radio Wave emission through a single electrode, whereby the electrical and ultra-sonic therapy treatment is combined to produce an electroultra-sonic energy which is beneficial in patient treatment not possible with either stimulation taken singly.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the present invention provides a novel medical therapy apparatus which permits a combination or coaction of electrical and mechanical stimulation for the treatment of a variety of muscular disorders and the like. The coaction between the ultra-sonic stimulation of the tissue cells and the electrical stimulation of the tissues produces a therapeutic action which has a synergistic action to provide novel and unique therapeutic treatment in this field of medical science. Thus, it may be possible to efiect an etliciency in the treatment of painful osteoarthirtis, bursitis, and the like, not possible with any other type of patient treatment known to the field of medical science today.

Changes may be made in the combination and arrang ment of parts as heretofore set forth in the specification and shown in the drawings, it being understood that any modification in the precise embodiment of the invention may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. A medical therapy apparatus comprising in combination, a low voltage generator, an ultra-sonic generator, an electrode connected to the low voltage generator, an electrode connected to the ultra-sonic generator, and means connecting said low voltage generator and the ultra-sonic generator whereby dual electrical and mechanical stimulation will be produced through one electrode.

2. A medical therapy apparatus for patient treatment comprising in combination, a low voltage generator for producing electrical therapy stimulation, electrode pad members connected to the low voltage generator for transmitting the electro-therapy stimulation to the patient, an ultra-sonic generator for producing ultra-sonic energy, a sound head applicator connected to the ultra-sonic generator for transforming the ultra-sonic energy into ultra-sonic vibrations for transmission to the patient, means operably coupling the low voltage generator and the ultra-sonic generator to produce simultaneous electrical and mechanical energy to the sound head.

3. A medical therapy apparatus comprising in combination, a low voltage generator, an ultra-sonic generator, electrical circuit means for coordinating the operation of the low voltage generator and the ultra-sonic generator, electrode pad members operably coupled to the low voltage generator for producing electrical stimulation, a sound head applicator member operably coupled to the ultrasound generator for receiving the ultra-sonic waves 10 therefrom, means provided in the sound head applicator for transforming the ultra-sonic waves into mechanical vabrations, switch means provided in the electrical circuit means for selective operation of the low voltage generator portion and ultra-sonic portion to provide a synergistic therapeutic action.

4. A medical therapy apparatus comprising in combination, a low voltage generator and an ultra-sonic generator, electrical circuit means for coordinating the low voltage generator and ultra-sound generator transmitter for simultaneous operation thereof, a timing motor for automatic control of the low voltage generator, electrode pad members operably connected with the low voltage generator to produce electrical stimulation for medical therapy, said ultra-sound generator comprising means providing a predetermined ultra-sonic wave output, a sound head applicator operably connected to the ultra-sound generator for receiving the ultra-sonic waves, means on the sound head for transmitting the ultra-sonic waves into mechanical stimulation, switch means provided in the electrical circuit means for selectively energizing the low voltage generator to provide variable types of electrical current therefor, means for electrically connecting the low voltage generator and the ultra-sound generator to provide a dual electrical andultra-sonic mechanical stimulation having synergistic therapeutic action.

5. A medical therapy apparatus comprising in combination, a low voltage generator and a ultra-sound generator, electrode pad members operably connected to the low voltage generator for producing electrical simulation for electro-therapy, a sound head applicator, a coaxial cable member electrically interconnecting the ultra-sound generator and the sound head applicator, a crystal member provided in the sound head applicator, said crystal member operably coupled with the coaxial cable for receiving the ultra-sound energy for transformation thereof into ultra-sonic mechanical vibrations, and means operably coupling the low voltage generator and the ultrasound generator for producing combined mechanical vibrations and electrical stimulation through the sound head.

6. A medical therapy apparatus comprising in combination, a low voltage generator and an ultra-sonic generator, means electrically coupling the low voltage generator and ultra-sound generator, electrode means operably connected to the low voltage generator to provide electrical stimulation, means for receiving the ultra-sonic energy, means coupling with the receiving means for transforming the ultra-sonic energy into ultra-sonic mechanical vibrations, said ultra-sonic mechanical vibrations and electrical stimulation coacting to produce a superimposed synergistic therapeutic action.

7. A medical therapy apparatus comprising a chassis member, a low voltage generator, an ultra-sonic generator, electrode pad members operably connected to the low voltage generator to produce electrical stimulation, a sound head applicator operably connected with the ultra-sonic generator for transforming the ultra-sonic energy into mechanical vibrations, said low voltage generator and ultra-sonic generator electrically connected together whereby a superimposed synergistic coaction between the electrical stimulation and mechanical vibrations for medical therapy.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,410,499 Hinsey et al Nov. 5, 1946 2,704,064 Fizzell et al Mar. 15, 1955 2,764,683 Paust et al. Sept. 25, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,005,674 France Dec. 26, 1951 293.294 Switzerland Sept. 15, 1953

US637420A 1957-01-31 1957-01-31 Electro-sonic apparatus Expired - Lifetime US2830578A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US637420A US2830578A (en) 1957-01-31 1957-01-31 Electro-sonic apparatus

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US637420A US2830578A (en) 1957-01-31 1957-01-31 Electro-sonic apparatus

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2830578A true US2830578A (en) 1958-04-15

Family

ID=24555855

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US637420A Expired - Lifetime US2830578A (en) 1957-01-31 1957-01-31 Electro-sonic apparatus

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2830578A (en)

Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3102535A (en) * 1960-07-11 1963-09-03 Dailey Ultrasonics Inc Transducer device
US3109430A (en) * 1959-01-29 1963-11-05 Electronic Aids Inc Cardiac nerve control device
US3219029A (en) * 1963-03-25 1965-11-23 Groff De Remote control medical therapy instrument
US3241557A (en) * 1962-05-02 1966-03-22 Sutetaro Yamashiki Low frequency therapeutic equipment
US3294092A (en) * 1965-09-13 1966-12-27 Fred S Landauer Therapeutic apparatus
US3364929A (en) * 1964-12-21 1968-01-23 Burroughs Wellcome Co Method for administering muscle relaxant drug
US3371660A (en) * 1966-09-01 1968-03-05 Air Shields Equipment for use in ultrasonic eye examination
US3419945A (en) * 1966-05-16 1969-01-07 Sawyer Entpr Embalming machine
US3557793A (en) * 1965-04-06 1971-01-26 Jury Grigorievich Ediny Method for crushing stones in urinary bladder and instrument for same
DE2230563A1 (en) * 1971-06-23 1973-01-11 Medco Products Co Duplex ultrasonic transducer and combined electrical muscle stimulator
US3735764A (en) * 1970-11-23 1973-05-29 O Balev Instrument for crushing stones in urinary bladder
US4112923A (en) * 1976-08-24 1978-09-12 Tomecek Jerry J Antonomic transcutaneous affect device
DE2843805A1 (en) * 1978-10-06 1980-04-17 Hartwig Dr Schuldt Body area pain-killing equipment - uses induction coils with south poles facing away from body on positive signals
US4315503A (en) * 1976-11-17 1982-02-16 Electro-Biology, Inc. Modification of the growth, repair and maintenance behavior of living tissues and cells by a specific and selective change in electrical environment
WO1982000413A1 (en) * 1980-07-28 1982-02-18 Lab Abbott Improved radiopaque medical tubing
WO1982000414A1 (en) * 1980-08-08 1982-02-18 Corp R2 Physiological electrode systems
WO1984002081A1 (en) * 1982-11-24 1984-06-07 Vascular Tech Inc A method and apparatus for disassociation of clots
US5816910A (en) * 1997-05-09 1998-10-06 Steele; Richard G. Infant soother apparatus
US6001072A (en) * 1994-06-30 1999-12-14 Fujiwara; Kazumichi Apparatus for imparting acoustic vibrational bodily sensation
US6001073A (en) * 1997-07-22 1999-12-14 Schmidt; Jurgen G. Device for inducing alternating tactile stimulations
US20030163068A1 (en) * 2002-02-23 2003-08-28 Kang Hyun Song Total skin management system and total skin management method using the same
US20040171970A1 (en) * 2001-03-29 2004-09-02 Kurt Schleuniger Hand-held device for pain relief
WO2004112885A2 (en) 2003-06-17 2004-12-29 Ebr Systems, Inc. Methods and systems for treating arrhythmias using a combination of vibrational and electrical energy
US20060161061A1 (en) * 2003-11-06 2006-07-20 Ebr Systems, Inc. Vibrational therapy device used for resynchronization pacing in a treatment for heart failure
US20070055154A1 (en) * 2003-03-13 2007-03-08 Eldad Torbati Cellulite ultrasound treatment
US20070093732A1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2007-04-26 David Venturi Vibroacoustic sound therapeutic system and method
US20070123939A1 (en) * 2003-08-18 2007-05-31 Ebr System, Inc. Methods and systems for treating arrhythmias using a combination of vibrational and electrical energy
US20080046053A1 (en) * 2006-06-19 2008-02-21 Wagner Timothy A Apparatus and method for stimulation of biological tissue
US20090227909A1 (en) * 2008-03-04 2009-09-10 Sonic Tech, Inc. Combination Ultrasound-Phototherapy Transducer
US20100070006A1 (en) * 2006-06-19 2010-03-18 Wagner Timothy Andrew Interface apparatus for stimulation of biological tissue
US20110275927A1 (en) * 2006-06-19 2011-11-10 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems and methods for stimulating and monitoring biological tissue
JP2014526307A (en) * 2011-09-06 2014-10-06 ハイランド インストゥルメンツ, インコーポレイテッド System and method for synchronizing stimulation of cellular function in tissue
US8892200B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2014-11-18 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems and methods for stimulating tissue using focused energy
US9050463B2 (en) 2011-08-24 2015-06-09 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems and methods for stimulating cellular function in tissue
USD759803S1 (en) 2014-10-28 2016-06-21 Highland Instruments, Inc. Adjustable headpiece with anatomical markers
WO2016168385A2 (en) 2015-04-14 2016-10-20 Photosonix Medical, Inc. Method and device for treatment with combination ultrasound-phototherapy transducer
US9649396B2 (en) 2014-04-04 2017-05-16 Photosonix Medical, Inc. Methods, devices, and systems for treating bacteria with mechanical stress energy and electromagnetic energy
US9681820B2 (en) 2010-10-21 2017-06-20 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems for detecting a condition

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2410499A (en) * 1945-05-16 1946-11-05 Joseph C Hinsey Stimulator
FR1005674A (en) * 1947-09-05 1952-04-15 Apparatus for the simultaneous application of different kinds of vibrations
CH293294A (en) * 1949-08-06 1953-09-15 Ultrakust Geraetebau Dr Ing Os Therapy device.
US2704064A (en) * 1952-09-10 1955-03-15 Meditron Company Neurosurgical stimulator
US2764683A (en) * 1952-04-18 1956-09-25 Physical Medicine Products Co Low voltage electro-therapy generator

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2410499A (en) * 1945-05-16 1946-11-05 Joseph C Hinsey Stimulator
FR1005674A (en) * 1947-09-05 1952-04-15 Apparatus for the simultaneous application of different kinds of vibrations
CH293294A (en) * 1949-08-06 1953-09-15 Ultrakust Geraetebau Dr Ing Os Therapy device.
US2764683A (en) * 1952-04-18 1956-09-25 Physical Medicine Products Co Low voltage electro-therapy generator
US2704064A (en) * 1952-09-10 1955-03-15 Meditron Company Neurosurgical stimulator

Cited By (60)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3109430A (en) * 1959-01-29 1963-11-05 Electronic Aids Inc Cardiac nerve control device
US3102535A (en) * 1960-07-11 1963-09-03 Dailey Ultrasonics Inc Transducer device
US3241557A (en) * 1962-05-02 1966-03-22 Sutetaro Yamashiki Low frequency therapeutic equipment
US3219029A (en) * 1963-03-25 1965-11-23 Groff De Remote control medical therapy instrument
US3364929A (en) * 1964-12-21 1968-01-23 Burroughs Wellcome Co Method for administering muscle relaxant drug
US3557793A (en) * 1965-04-06 1971-01-26 Jury Grigorievich Ediny Method for crushing stones in urinary bladder and instrument for same
US3294092A (en) * 1965-09-13 1966-12-27 Fred S Landauer Therapeutic apparatus
US3419945A (en) * 1966-05-16 1969-01-07 Sawyer Entpr Embalming machine
US3371660A (en) * 1966-09-01 1968-03-05 Air Shields Equipment for use in ultrasonic eye examination
US3735764A (en) * 1970-11-23 1973-05-29 O Balev Instrument for crushing stones in urinary bladder
DE2230563A1 (en) * 1971-06-23 1973-01-11 Medco Products Co Duplex ultrasonic transducer and combined electrical muscle stimulator
US4112923A (en) * 1976-08-24 1978-09-12 Tomecek Jerry J Antonomic transcutaneous affect device
US4315503A (en) * 1976-11-17 1982-02-16 Electro-Biology, Inc. Modification of the growth, repair and maintenance behavior of living tissues and cells by a specific and selective change in electrical environment
DE2843805A1 (en) * 1978-10-06 1980-04-17 Hartwig Dr Schuldt Body area pain-killing equipment - uses induction coils with south poles facing away from body on positive signals
WO1982000413A1 (en) * 1980-07-28 1982-02-18 Lab Abbott Improved radiopaque medical tubing
WO1982000414A1 (en) * 1980-08-08 1982-02-18 Corp R2 Physiological electrode systems
WO1984002081A1 (en) * 1982-11-24 1984-06-07 Vascular Tech Inc A method and apparatus for disassociation of clots
US6001072A (en) * 1994-06-30 1999-12-14 Fujiwara; Kazumichi Apparatus for imparting acoustic vibrational bodily sensation
US5816910A (en) * 1997-05-09 1998-10-06 Steele; Richard G. Infant soother apparatus
US6001073A (en) * 1997-07-22 1999-12-14 Schmidt; Jurgen G. Device for inducing alternating tactile stimulations
US20040171970A1 (en) * 2001-03-29 2004-09-02 Kurt Schleuniger Hand-held device for pain relief
US20030163068A1 (en) * 2002-02-23 2003-08-28 Kang Hyun Song Total skin management system and total skin management method using the same
US7090649B2 (en) * 2002-02-23 2006-08-15 Hwajin Cosmetics Co., Ltd. Total skin management system and total skin management method using the same
US7914469B2 (en) 2003-03-13 2011-03-29 Real Aesthetics Ltd. Cellulite ultrasound treatment
US20070055154A1 (en) * 2003-03-13 2007-03-08 Eldad Torbati Cellulite ultrasound treatment
EP1641526A2 (en) * 2003-06-17 2006-04-05 EBR Systems, Inc. Methods and systems for treating arrhythmias using a combination of vibrational and electrical energy
WO2004112885A2 (en) 2003-06-17 2004-12-29 Ebr Systems, Inc. Methods and systems for treating arrhythmias using a combination of vibrational and electrical energy
EP1641526A4 (en) * 2003-06-17 2008-09-10 Ebr Systems Inc Methods and systems for treating arrhythmias using a combination of vibrational and electrical energy
US20070123939A1 (en) * 2003-08-18 2007-05-31 Ebr System, Inc. Methods and systems for treating arrhythmias using a combination of vibrational and electrical energy
US7809438B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2010-10-05 Ebr Systems, Inc. Methods and systems for treating arrhythmias using a combination of vibrational and electrical energy
US20060161061A1 (en) * 2003-11-06 2006-07-20 Ebr Systems, Inc. Vibrational therapy device used for resynchronization pacing in a treatment for heart failure
US20100179458A1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2010-07-15 David Venturi Vibroacoustic sound therapeutic system and method
US20070093732A1 (en) * 2005-10-26 2007-04-26 David Venturi Vibroacoustic sound therapeutic system and method
US20110275927A1 (en) * 2006-06-19 2011-11-10 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems and methods for stimulating and monitoring biological tissue
US20100070006A1 (en) * 2006-06-19 2010-03-18 Wagner Timothy Andrew Interface apparatus for stimulation of biological tissue
US9950153B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2018-04-24 Highland Instruments, Inc. Interface apparatus for stimulation of biological tissue
US20080046053A1 (en) * 2006-06-19 2008-02-21 Wagner Timothy A Apparatus and method for stimulation of biological tissue
US9913976B2 (en) * 2006-06-19 2018-03-13 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems and methods for stimulating and monitoring biological tissue
US9597499B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2017-03-21 Highland Instruments Apparatus and method for stimulation of biological tissue
US8718758B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2014-05-06 Highland Instruments, Inc. Interface apparatus for stimulation of biological tissue
US9597498B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2017-03-21 Highland Instruments Apparatus and method for stimulation of biological tissue
US8886304B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2014-11-11 Highland Instruments, Inc. Apparatus and method for stimulation of biological tissue
US8892200B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2014-11-18 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems and methods for stimulating tissue using focused energy
US8897871B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2014-11-25 Highland Instruments, Inc. Apparatus and method for stimulation of biological tissue
US9550060B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2017-01-24 Highland Instruments, Inc. Apparatus and method for stimulation of biological tissue
US8929979B2 (en) * 2006-06-19 2015-01-06 Highland Instruments, Inc. Apparatus and method for stimulation of biological tissue
US8977354B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2015-03-10 Highland Instruments, Inc. Interface apparatus for stimulation of biological tissue
US9498650B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2016-11-22 Photosonix Medical, Inc. Method of treatment with combination ultrasound-phototherapy transducer
US20090227909A1 (en) * 2008-03-04 2009-09-10 Sonic Tech, Inc. Combination Ultrasound-Phototherapy Transducer
US8206326B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2012-06-26 Sound Surgical Technologies, Llc Combination ultrasound-phototherapy transducer
US8574174B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2013-11-05 Sonic Tech, Inc. Combination ultrasound-phototherapy transducer
US9681820B2 (en) 2010-10-21 2017-06-20 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems for detecting a condition
US9050463B2 (en) 2011-08-24 2015-06-09 Highland Instruments, Inc. Systems and methods for stimulating cellular function in tissue
US9623264B2 (en) 2011-08-24 2017-04-18 Highland Instruments Systems and methods for stimulating cellular function in tissue
JP2014526307A (en) * 2011-09-06 2014-10-06 ハイランド インストゥルメンツ, インコーポレイテッド System and method for synchronizing stimulation of cellular function in tissue
EP2776123A4 (en) * 2011-09-06 2015-09-09 Highland Instr Systems and methods for synchronizing the stimulation of cellular function in tissue
US10207125B2 (en) 2014-04-04 2019-02-19 Photosonix Medical, Inc. Methods, devices, and systems for treating bacteria with mechanical stress energy and electromagnetic energy
US9649396B2 (en) 2014-04-04 2017-05-16 Photosonix Medical, Inc. Methods, devices, and systems for treating bacteria with mechanical stress energy and electromagnetic energy
USD759803S1 (en) 2014-10-28 2016-06-21 Highland Instruments, Inc. Adjustable headpiece with anatomical markers
WO2016168385A2 (en) 2015-04-14 2016-10-20 Photosonix Medical, Inc. Method and device for treatment with combination ultrasound-phototherapy transducer

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3646940A (en) Implantable electronic stimulator electrode and method
US5285781A (en) Electrical neuromuscular stimulation device
US8170683B2 (en) Dermatome stimulation devices and methods
US5487759A (en) Nerve stimulating device and associated support device
US7894907B2 (en) Systems and methods for implantable leadless nerve stimulation
EP0223354B1 (en) Apparatus for modulating brain signals through an external magnetic field to reduce pain
US6564103B2 (en) Electrical stimulator and method of use
US4759368A (en) Transcutaneous nerve stimulator
US5458625A (en) Transcutaneous nerve stimulation device and method for using same
US8494637B2 (en) Systems and methods for implantable leadless gastrointestinal tissue stimulation
JP2923049B2 (en) Electrical therapy devices
EP1333884B1 (en) Apparatus for conditioning muscles during sleep
US5540735A (en) Apparatus for electro-stimulation of flexing body portions
US8498715B2 (en) Systems and methods for implantable leadless cochlear stimulation
US6249706B1 (en) Electrotherapy system
US5211175A (en) Method for implanting electra-acupuncture needle
EP0154976B1 (en) Electrical muscle stimulator
US5578060A (en) Physical therapy apparatus having an interactive interface, and method of configuring same
US20040073271A1 (en) Method and apparatus for neurophysiologic performance
US5010896A (en) Pulsed galvanic stimulator
US3796221A (en) Apparatus for delivering electrical stimulation energy to body-implanted apparatus with signal-receiving means
US5217009A (en) Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation
US6564101B1 (en) Electrical system for weight loss and laparoscopic implanation thereof
CA2336955C (en) Method and device for producing illusory magnetic stimulation
US20040059395A1 (en) Patient interactive neurostimulation system and method