US2813798A - Method for placing paper sheets between slices in a stack - Google Patents

Method for placing paper sheets between slices in a stack Download PDF

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US2813798A
US2813798A US40683954A US2813798A US 2813798 A US2813798 A US 2813798A US 40683954 A US40683954 A US 40683954A US 2813798 A US2813798 A US 2813798A
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paper
slices
shaft
stack
gear
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Max E Toby
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Package Enterprises Inc
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Package Enterprises Inc
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B25/00Packaging other articles presenting special problems
    • B65B25/06Packaging slices or specially-shaped pieces of meat, cheese, or other plastic or tacky products
    • B65B25/08Packaging slices or specially-shaped pieces of meat, cheese, or other plastic or tacky products between layers or strips of sheet or web material, e.g. in webs folded to zig-zag form

Description

Nov. 19, 1957 A M. E. TOBY METHOD FOR PLACING PAPER SHEETS BETWEEN SLICES IN A STACK 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 28

. QM Wm INVENTOR MM 5 TOBY BY TORNEYS Nov. 19, 1957 M. E. TOBY 2,813,798

METHOD FOR PLACING PAPER SHEETS BETWEEN SLICES IN A STACK Filed Jan. 28, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR MAX 5 755K ATTORNEYS Nov. 19, 1957 M TOBY- 2,813,798

E. METHOD FOR PLACING PAPER SHEETS BETWEEN SLICES IN A STACK Filed Jan. 28, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR Fig.3. 4' ,F-MX 575 W ATTORNEYS Nov. 19, 1957 TOBY 2,813,798

METHOD FOR PLACING PAPER SHEETS BETWEEN SLICES IN A STACK Filed Jan. 28; 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR MAX 5 755) BY j ZAI' NEYS United States Patent IVIE'IHOD FOR PLACmG PAPER SHEETS BETWEEN SLICES IN A STACK Max E. Toby, San Francisco, Calif., assignor to Package Enterprises, Inc., Oakland, Calif., a corporation of California Application January 28, 1954, Serial No. 406,839

3 Claims. (Cl. 99-171) This invention relates to the handling of stacked articles, such as meat or cheese slices, and is more particularly directed towards a method and apparatus for inserting a sheet of paper or the like between adjacent slices in a stack as the stack is being formed.

Heretofore, numerous mechanisms have been designed which have greatly facilitated the handling of stacked food products, including the bagging thereof. In general, such mechanisms have included a horizontally disposed member, on which a slicer deposits a predetermined number of slices, movable to an article discharge position for weighing, bagging or both. As typical examples of such apparatus, reference may be had to several of my copending applications, including Serial No. 250,370, filed October 8, 1951, now Patent No. 2,708,539 entitled Apparatus and Method of Receiving and Bagging Articles,

Serial No. 396,630, filed December 7, 1953, entitled Ap paratus for Receiving, Conveying and Weighing Articles; and Serial No. 402,109, filed January 4, 1954, entitled Apparatus and Method for Receiving, Conveying, Weighing and Bagging Articles.

Notwithstanding the advantages created by use of the foregoing types of machines, it has been found that in the packaging of many types of luncheon meats, cheeses, or similar products, it would be most desirable if a sheet of waxed paper or the like could be interleaved between adjacent slices, and still permit the use of mechanical conveying, weighing and bagging operations. Although the end result, i. e. a paper-interleaved stack of slices, is not of itself a complex problem, numerous problems are presented in the design of equipment for the production of the end result. One of the major difiiculties arises when it is considered that a slicer of the type utilized with the previously discussed equipment, cuts slices at the rate of approximately 250 per minute, thereby requiring the placing of four sheets of paper on four slices during every second of operation. Furthermore, it will be appreciated that paper is extremely deformable, it acts as an air foil, and in general cannot be handled in the same manner a a more rigid and heavier product.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for placing a sheet of paper or the like on the respective top slices of a stack as the stack is being formed whereby the finished stack will have an insert between each slice thereof.

Another object of my invention is to provide a method and apparatus of the character described in which the sheets are cut to proper length before the placing thereof on a slice, and in which such sheets are initially introduced along a substantially horizontal plane overlying the horizontal plane of the slice.

A further object of this invention is to provide apparatus of the type described which utilizes a continuous roll of paper from which the individual sheets are subsequently cut, and in which novel means are provided for insuring proper tension on the paper during all phases of the operation.

A still further object of the invention is to provide sheet feeding mechanism of the foregoing character in which the length of the respective sheets may be selectively varied.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide apparatus of the type referred to which may be readily ultilized with stack handling apparatus of the character hereinabove mentioned without in any way interfering with the proper operation of the latter.

Another object of this invention is to provide improved sheet cutting and sheet advancing mechanism which will insure optimum operation of the apparatus over continued and extended periods of time.

Still another object of the invention is to provide apparatus of the type described which may be operatively connected to a slicing mechanism whereby sheets of paper will be delivered only during slicing operations of the slicing mechanism.

The invention possesses other objects and features of advantage, some of which, with the foregoing will be set forth in the following description of the preferred form of the invention which is illustrated in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the specification. It is to be understood, however, that variations in the showing made by the said drawings and description may be adopted within the scope of the invention as set forth in the claims.

Referring to said drawings:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a paper interleaving apparatus embodying the present invention.

Figure 2 is side elevational view of the apparatus shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is an end elevational view, taken substantially in'the plane indicated by line 3--3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is an enlarged sectional view of the cutting and feeding mechanism, the plane of the view being substandally indicated by the line 44 of Figure 3. Figure 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially in the plane indicated by line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is an enlarged elevational view taken substantially in the plane indicated by line 66 of Figure 1.

Figure 7 is an enlarged elevational view partly broken away, illustrating the clutch mechanism controlling the forward drive rolls.

Figure 8 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially in the plane indicated by line 88 of Figure 3.

The apparatus of the present invention was designed especially for operation in conjunction with a conventional meat or cheese slicing machine, whereby a sheet of paper or the like will be deposited over each succeeding v slice of meat or cheese as it drops from the slicer upon a platform, such as the platform of a weighing and bag ging apparatus, of the type disclosed in my copending application, Serial No. 402,109, filed January 4, 1954. It will become apparent, however, that this apparatus could be used in other installations where rapid interleaving of paper between sliced objects is desirable.

As is well known in the art, an intermittent slicer is designed to cut a predetermined number of slices, e. g., eight, and then cease slicing for a measured time interval. so as to permit removal of the slices which were deposited in the form of a vertical stack. The apparatus presently to be described is arranged to deposit a sheet of paper on each slice of meat as it falls onto a supporting platform from the slicer until the last slice falls on the stack, at which time the interleaving machine ceases operation.

while the interleaved stack of slices is removed from In bmadterms, the present apparatus includes a cone;

tinuous source of paper supply, means for advancing the paper, a shear for transversely cutting the paper into individual sheets for covering the respective slices in a stack, and means for delivering, the sheets to the stack. For convenience of explanation, the supplying and feeding of the paper stock will first bediscussed.

Referring now to the drawings, means are provided establishing a paper supply and feed mechanism for the subsequently formed individual paper sheets to be interleaved between the slices. As here shown, a roll of paper 12 of a predetermined width is mounted on a mandrel- 13, journaled inbrackets 14 which are secured to a pair of horizontal frame members 16 and 17. The latter are bolted totransverse angle members 18, which may be provided. with necessary support means and a housing; not shown. Also bolted or otherwisesecured to the horizontal frame members 16 and 17 are a pairof diagonal frame members 19 and 21 on which are mounted means for advancing the paper, means for maintainingconstant tension on the paper, and means for cutting the paper to. the desired. length, all. of which will presently be described.

The free end of the paper 12, after leaving the-mandrel 13;extends downwardly to pass around-apaper tensioning' roll 22, later to be'described, then upwardly, between-and generally parallel with. the diagonal frame members 19' and,21. Toward. the upper end of' the diagonal frame members there is providedapair. of spaced paper advancing means generally. indicatedby the numerals Hand paper 12 therebetween, whereby uponrotation of the;

rolls, the, paper will be pulledfrom itsfeed roll andfed past the rolls upwardly along its path of travel. paper isthen passed over a knurled. and roughened intermediate drive roll 26 from. which, it is fed between the:

second or rear one of such advancing means which in" cludesa pair of drive rolls 27 and 28 disposed one immediately above the other. later explained, serve to pull the paper upward,.and after the cutter which ispositioned intermediate the rolls 15.

and 20 has cut the paper, further serves to feedor push the cut portion or sheet forward horizontally whereit:

falls over the slice of meat just deposited on the receiving platform.

Forward drive rolls 23 and 24 are. carried on, shafts:

29 and 31 respectively. In order to maintain the desired pressure between upper and lower rolls 23 and 2.4 for positively driving the paper forward at the required speed, the ends of shaft 29 are journaled in roller tensioning yokes 32. Yokes 32 are carried by frame members'19 and 21 and include blocks slidably engaged in. the yokes and adjustably positionable thereon by means of bolts 30. As-will be'understood, shaft 29 is journalled inthe blocks, and as the latter are moved, the clamping pressure on the paper may be selectively varied. Shaft 31 is journaled in bearings provided on the diagonal frame members 19 and 21, and one end of the shaft extends beyonddiagonal frame member 21 so as to permit operative connection to a suitable drive mechanism. Such mechanism includes a gear 33 rotatably mounted on said shaft end, in engagement with a segment gear 34-which is mounted on a stub shaft 36, journaled on a bracket 37 secured to horizontal frame member 17, all of which will be hereinafter discussed in detail, as the paper movement is directly controlled through the-motion of the segment gear.

Driving power is supplied to segment gear34-through a link,38, thev upper end'of which is pivoted at the lower peripheralyportion of gear 34-while the other end of the link is pivotally attached to one extremity of a rockenarm 39. The opposite end'of rocker arm 33 is pivotedlto an adjustable bracket 41 carried by diagonal frame member 21. An intermediate portion'ofrocker arm 39 is slotted The= These latter, rolls, as will. be.

to slideably receive a block 42 to which is pivoted a crank 43 mounted on a shaft 44 which is driven by a motor 46. Shaft 44 is synchronized with the slicer and timed to make one complete revolution in a counter clockwse direction for each slice of meat that is deposited on the platform. Therefore, through the above described linkage, segment gear 34 rotates about its stud shaft 36 in a counter clockwise direction for somewhat over half the revolution of shaft 44, then in a clockwise direction for the remainder of therevolution. It will be understood however, that the arc of travel of gear 34 will be equal in both directions of its rotation, only the rate of rotation being different.

Means are provided tooperate drive rolls 23', 24, 26, 27 and 28 thereby advancing the paper on the aforesaid counterclockwise rotation of segment gear 34. Such means may include a friction clutch 47 carried on shaft 31 adjacent gear 33, the latter serving as an intermediate drive for all of the above mentioned rolls. Secured to the freely journalled gear 33 is a clutch plate or disk 48 on the inner surface of which is pivotally mounted a block 49, while a clutch housing 51 is keyed to shaft 31 in any suitable manner. A roller 52 is disposed within the clutch housing and as gear 33 is rotated clockwise as indicated in Figure 7, roller 52 is wedged between the block 49 and the housing 51 causing the two clutch elements and hence the shaft 31' carrying drive roll 24 to revolve together. As soon as the direction of rotation of gear 33 is reversed (during clockwise rotation of segment gear 34) the roller is freed from its contact with the block and the clutch plate moves in a counter clockwise direction independent of the shaft. Thus, upon the down stroke of link' 38, no motion will be imparted to gear 33, and consequently all of the drive rolls will remain stationary.

Drive rolls 23 and 24 are arranged for simultaneous rotation through: gears 53 and 54. These drive rolls are likewise geared to the gear drive rolls 27 and 28 by means of 'a gear train consisting of a miter gear 56 secured to shaft 31 engaging at right angles a miter gear 57 carried on the iower'end of'a shaft 58 spaced from, but parallel with diagonal frame member 21. Securedto the upper end of shaft 58 is another bevel gear 59 engaging a bevel gear 61 which. is carried by a shaft 62 on which the rear lower roll 28 is mounted. Rear upper drive roll 27 is carried'on a shaft 60 which is journaled in eccentric bearings in diagonal frame members 19 and 21, such bearings permitting adjustment of roll 27 towards and from its co-operating roll 28; Drive rolls 27 and 28 are geared together. through gears 63 and 64 respectively.

The intermediate knurled roll 26 is driven by a gear 66 through an idler gear 67, and gear 64. Thus, when segment gear 34 is rotatedcounterclockwise, the rolls 23, 24, 26, 27 and 28 will likewise be rotated to drive the paper as previously explained; However, when the segment gear 34'reverses, that is, rotates in a clockwise direction, all'of such drive rolls remain stationary because the clutch no longer engages the shaft 31. In order to insure against clockwise rotation of shaft 31 upon reversal of the segment gear, a roller 68 is disposed exteriorly of clutch housing 51, which, when the segment gear commences clockwise rotation, binds against a block 69 mounted on diagonal frame member 21 holding the clutch housing and consequently the shaft 31 stationary. I

From the foregoing, the mechanism for advancing the paper from the roll to the sheet discharge rolls will be understood. However, as previously mentioned, means pair of radially extending rods 76. The shaft extends between the diagonal frame members, and upon oscillation thereof, the blade is caused to move across the plane of paper movement and effect a cutting of the paper. In order to produce a clean cut, the leading edge of blade 70 is beveled and sharpened to form a cutting surface 72, which upon actuation of the blade cooperates with an adjustably positioned knife 73 having a beveled portion 74 disposed adjacent roll 23 to cleanly shear the paper.

Actuation of the cutting blade is efiected by oscillation of shaft 71 which carries at one end thereof a lever 75. The latter is driven by a link 76 whose lower end is pivoted to another crank 77 which is carried by the previously discussed shaft 44. Thus, as each slice is cut and shaft 44 makes a single revolution, the paper will be'cut to produce another sheet for deposit upon the slice. Looking now at Figure 5, it will be seen that during counterclockwise rotation of segment gear 34, the cutter blade has been rotating in a counterclockwise direction until it has reached the dotted line position somewhat in advance to segment gear 34 reaching the end of its counterclockwise travel. Through its associated linkage, cutter blade 70 then reverses its direction of rotation and by the time sector gear has reached the end of its counterclockwise travel the cutter blade is at the dot and dash position. Then, upon clockwise rotation of the segment gear, the blade continues upwardly in a clockwise direction engaging paper 12 between bevel edge 74 of the knife 73 and cutting edge 72 of the shearing blade 70, thereby cutting the paper through. Clockwise rotation of shearing blade 70 continues until the full line position of Figure is reached when direction of travel reverses to the position shown in Figure 4 where the apparatus is shown in condition to start a new cycle of operation.

' Therefore it will be seen that as a new cycle commences, the sheet of paper 82 cut at the end of the last operative cycle is driven forward by rolls 27 and 28 and expelled in a horizontal plane over the loading platform which carries the recently deposited slice of meat. At the same time rolls 23 and 24 are advancing paper 12 immediately behind sheet 82 so that when sheet 82 has completely left rolls 27 and 28 the leading edge of paper 12 has been advanced slightly beyond rolls 27 and 28 and the paper adjacent blade 70 is in a position to be cut. As will be apparent, while the paper is at rest, that is, when the rolls are not advancing it, the slicer blade is cutting another slice of meat which falls onto the previously deposited sheet of paper.

Adjustment of knife 73 in relation to cuttting blade 70 is provided through adjustable brackets 78 which carry knife 73. Brackets 78 are slotted to receive pins 79 which are carried on a fixed block 90, and the upper portions of the pins threadedly engage nuts 95. Set screws 80 are threaded into the brackets 78 and bear against pins 79, and by adjustment of such means, the knife may be moved from and towards the general plane of movement of the blade and thereby control the shearing action.

Means are provided independent of the paper drive rolls for supporting and guiding the paper and the cut sheets thereof along its path of movement. For example, supporting plates 83 and 84 may be welded or otherwise secured between diagonal frame members 19 and 21 immediately subjacent the path of paper movement to support the paper from drive rolls 23 and 24 to a freely rotatable roll 86 carried on cutter shaft 71 just forward of the knurled roll 26. These plates are preferably spaced apart just enough to permit passage of blade 70 therebetween. Another supporting plate 87 may be secured just beyond the drive roll 28 in tangential relation to the confronting surfaces of rolls 27 and 28 to maintain sheet 82 in a horizontal position for expulsion over the platform. Also, an arcuate guide plate 85 may be positioned to engage the upper surface of the paper and guide the latter between the rear rolls 27 and 28.

The length of paper to be cut may be varied by 111-" creasing or decreasing the length of travel of segment gear 34, which effects a comparable change in the amount of drive roll rotation, which thereby advances a larger or lesser length of paper during each cycle of operation. To permit such variation, adjustable bracket 41 is provided with slots 93 through which pass bolts 94 threadedly secured to diagonal frame member 21. arm 39 is pivoted to bracket 41, movement of bracket 41 to the right or left, as viewed in Figure 2 will respectively lengthen or shorten the arc of travel of rocker arm 39, and the stroke of link 38 which drives the segment gear will be likewise varied. In this way, by making a simple sliding adjustment of bracket 41, the amount of paper advance for each rotation of shaft 44 is conveniently controlled.

As previously mentioned, shaft 44 is driven by motor 46 and such driving is accomplished in the following manner. As shown in Figure 3, a worm gear 96 is rotatably mounted on shaft 44 and engages a worm 97 secured to-a shaft 98 on which is mounted a sheave 99.

44- until the slicer is again ready to deliver slices to the platform and thus require the feeding of the paper sheets. It is for this reason that no constant positive drive is provided between the motor and shaft 44, and instead, a

clutch mechanism is utilized which is arranged to selectively place the shaft and motor into and out of driving engagement. Preferably, the clutch is placed into operative position upon receiving a suitable impulse from the slicer that the latter is engaged in its cutting operation, and is likewise placed in inoperative position upon receiving another impulse from the slicer that the latter has ceased its slicing.

With particular reference to Figure 3, it will be seen that the clutch mechanism includes a left hand clutch portion 122 which forms an extension of the freely journalled worm gear 96, and a right hand portion 121 which is keyed or otherwise secured to shaft 44 for rotation therewith, but which is capable of axial movement along the shaft. The portions are provided With clutch teeth which are normally urged together by means of a spring 123 seated in aligned bores provided in portion 121 and a fixed collar element 126. Another set of axially aligned bores in the collar and portion 121 receives a pin for guiding said portion. When the portion 121 is urged into engagement with portion 122, it will be understood that rotation of worm 97 will be imparted to shaft 44 through gear 96, clutch portion 122, and clutch portion 121. Such engagement is provided when the slicer is operating, and it will be necessary to effect disengagement of the clutch portions upon the ceasing of the slicing operation.

Means are provided for selectively placing the clutch portions into and out of engagement upon receiving corresponding impulses from the slicer. As here indicated, a solenoid 104 is mounted on the diagonal frame member 21, and upon slicer operation, a microswitch on the latter is caused to energize the solenoid, causing a solenoid arm 106 to move upwardly as viewed in Figure 3. A pair of links 107 at one end are pivotally attached to the lower portion of the solenoid arm 106, and the other ends are pivoted to the apex 108 of a pair of hell cranks in the form of triangular plate members 109. A fixed pivot 111, at the upper corner of hell cranks 109 is journaled to frame members 112, mounted betweenthe diagonal members 19 and 21. A third pivot 113 at the lower corner of bellcranks 109 and substantially below fixed pivot Since rocker 1:17 passes; through the left hand end of block. 116'. and

is journaled in. members" 112-. The right hand end of block. 116 carries. a lug. 118 that engages a pin 1=1 9-mount= ed on the. right hand clutch portion 121. Therefore, when solenoid 104 is energized the arm 106 is retracted and the linkage-rotates; the lug-118-about fixed pivot117 away frompin 119-, permitting the right hand clutch portion 121 tobe forced into engagement with the leftihand clutch portion 122- throughthe actionof the-springs 123. When the: solenoid is de-energized, such as by receiving an impulse that: the slicer has ceased operation the arm 106 isextended and the aforementioned linkage results in the lug: 118 bearing against the: clutch pin 119 and forcing the two clutch portions apart, resulting in no movement being. imported to the shaft 44, and consequently no advancing of the paper.

In; view of the-intermittent advancing of the paper, it is difficult to maintain the same under constant tension conditions. Therefore, as animportant feature of this invention, and in order to maintain smooth continuous unrolling. of paper 12 and parallel movement thereof, I have provideda tensioning roll 22 disposed intermediate the paper supply roll and the forward feed rolls and around which the paper is. fed; Such roll is journaled on a shaft 127 on either end of which are secured gears 128 which engage racks 129 mounted on diagonal frame members 19 and 21. Gears 128, and hence roll 22, are caused to move upward along racks 129 due to the pulling-action of the paper as the latter is being advanced by the drive rolls during counterclockwise rotation of segment gear 34. However, upon opposite rotation of gear 34,v and resulting-stoppage of the paper movement, ate'nsion spring 131 urges the gears and rolldownwardly, thereby effectively keeping the paper taut during. the cutting-operation, and permitting thepaper 12 to continuously unroll from the mandrel 13. As here-shown, one end ofjtens-ion spring 131 is connected to a rod 132 carried by. two lugs 133 journaled to shaft 127, and the other end of the tension spring is connected. to an adjusting screw 134 threaded through atransverse plate. 136 bolted or otherwise secured to the lower extremities of diagonal frame members 19 and 21, permitting adjustably varied tension loads to be applied to the paper.

The interleaving machine as disclosed herein is particularly well adapted to operate in conjunction with my previously mentioned receiving and weighing apparatus. As here illustrated, the horizontally movable vane 137 of the receiving and weighing mechanism is the platform on which are deposited the slices of meat. As the paper sheets 82 are forcibly expelled horizontally from drive rolls- 27 and 28, they will tend to shoot forward while gravitationally-falling downward, and will hit the wiper mechanism 138 of the receiving and weighing apparatus, the force of which will tendto bounce the sheet 82 back toward-the interleaver. In order to retain the paper within the bounds of the stacked meat I have provided a' pair of vertical stop members 139, and it is believed that the sheet bounces between the members 139 and mechanism 138 until its forward momentum is'dispelled, or until the sheet falls upon the slice. Members 139 are shown as constituting upstanding portions of two bellcranks 141 pivotally mounted in spaced relation on the lower surface of each vane 137. Substantially below the vertical stop members 135! and mounted on the bell cranks 141 are rollers 142 which engagev a cam surface 143 secured to a transverse frame member mounted on diagonal frame members 19 and 21. Springs 144-are attached topins 146 secured to the lower surface of vane 137 and to legs 147 of bell cranks 141. Thus, when the rollers 142. engage cam surface 143,.the vertical stop members 139 are forced into. cut out. portions 148. of vane 137, and thus-provide. means. to maintain the: paperv .withinthe area-1 of. meat; deposit.

When the vane; 13.7 rotates. the;

remove thestack to another. station,,however,;rollers 142. become disengaged from: cam. surface. 1.43, and the ver.= ticalstop members 139. swing; ontwardlyr away, from: the. outer periphery of .vane-.137, inorderto clear the mechaanisnr. of. the receiving; and weighing: apparatus" With the foregoingconstructional and operational. de.- tails explained, the. over-all cycle: of. operation. of the. ap. paratus should be clear. However, the operation. will. now be discussed in: further. detail.

A. roll, of paper'is-placed omrnarrdrel 13 and theendfed around tension roll 22, between forwardtdrive;rollsr23- and 24, over roll 2.6,,and betweemthereardischarge rolls- 27 and 23.. With; the mechanisminthe. position shown. in Figurefi, the'rnotor may bar started, but asthe clutch: portions are .disengageino rotary movementwillbe. im.-- parted to the. main drive'.shaft-.44,, and consequently, no; advancing or cuttingofithe paper results; It will of-courser be understood that: the rotationalspeedlofz shaftA l must' be synchronized withlthe.speedmf theslicenasgsuch shaft-; is required tomake; a completetrevolutionas .each slice in. a stack is deposited. Accordingly, the. motor. assembly 46 or the. pulleys connected. theretomay/be. of..the. variespeed type,.or' other; controls well k-nown inthe art, may be incorporated. to.- permit proper. speed ofrotationz. While it: might: be theoretically' possible to' have. the sole-.- noid. 1041 actuatedr upmrthe. delivery. of. each. slice, this. would cause. the paper to be undesirably. intermittently unrolledfrom the-mandrel 13, rather. than permitting. the continuous feedarrangement; as. disclosed herein.

Upon. the deposit ofslices upon.the.receiving,platform,, the shaft 44 commences rotating, andinthe instant 3P)" paratus, the shaft is. actuated through the solenoid l04-- which, through the described linkage, causes operative en--- gagernenti ofthe clutch portions and resulting. rotation of. shaft 44.

A: simple. rotation of shaft 44-elfects' a vertical reciprocatingmovement on link 38' through crank 43 and rocker arm 39, andsuch movement. is transmitted to segmentv gear 34, causingthe latter to first rotate counter-clockwise and thenclockwise. for anadjustably. controlled length of: arc. Upon the counter-clockwise rotation of the gear all of the drive rollsare operatively connected therewith. to advance the paper, and therpreviously cut paper sheet will be ejected from the discharge rolls. When gear 34 commences its clockwise rotation, the drive rolls are operatively disconnected and cutting blade 72 is swungabout. its shaft to transversely shear the paper through the action of cranks and 77 and link 76 which is actuated by rotation of drive shaft 44.

As will be understood, once the paper has been cut, the nextcycle of operation constitutes a pulling and ejectionactionon the cutsheet by rolls 27 and 28, and a pushing action on the free. endof! the paper strip. willbe dis;- posed immediately adjacent" thetrailing. edge ofv the cut sheet until the latter is finally discharged over the article; slice.

The apparatus is capable of; rapid. positive. sheet. de-- livery, and by. meansof the tension roller 22, the. paper: mandrel. is permitted. to rotate. continuously during the complete cycle of. the selected-number of sheets, thereby insuring. uniform tensionon thepaper atall times.

What is claimed is:.

1. The method of interleaving paper sheets between. adjacent slices of a food productwhich comprises receiving such slices at a substantially constant rate in vertical-- ly. superimposedrelation to provideastack thereof, feeding a strip of paper towards the. slices from a paper sup-.- ply roll, intermittently pulling on the unrolled end portion I of said strip so as to advance the. latter towards said slices. in timed relation to the reception thereof, transversely: cutting said strip upon stoppageof saidintermittent pulling to provide a cut sheet of paper, and then ejecting said: out sheet. alonga generally. horizontal pathto fall upon a just'received food .slice.

2. A. method of: inserting paper; sheetsbetweenadjav cent slices of a food product during formation of a stack of such slices, including receiving such slices at a substantially constant rate in vertically superimposed relation to form said stack, feeding a paper strip towards said slices from a paper supply roll, continuously pulling on and maintaining substantially uniform tension on an intermediate unrolled portion of said strip, intermittently pulling on the unrolled end portion of said strip so as to advance such end portion towards the slices in timed relation to the reception thereof, transversely cutting said 10 strip upon stoppage of said intermittent pulling to provide a cut sheet of paper, and then ejecting said out sheet along a generally horizontal path to fall upon a just received food slice.

3. A method of inserting paper sheets between adjacent slices of a food product during formation of a stack of such slices, including receiving such slices at a substantially constant rate in vertically superimposed relation to form said stack, feeding a paper strip towards said slices from a paper supply roll, intermittently pulling on the unrolled end portion of said strip so as to advance the latter towards said slices in timed relation to the reception of each of the food slices, transversely cutting said strip to provide a paper sheet upon each stoppage of said intermittent pulling, and then advancing said cut sheet along a generally horizontal path overlying the 10 slices being received upon the next intermittentpulling of said strip and depositing said sheet on the last received slice.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 517,558 Ward Apr. 3, 1894 571,292 Sweet Nov. 10, 1896 751,560 Robinson Feb. 9, 1904 925,097 Harris et a1 June 15, 1909 1,235,805 Jennings Aug. 7, 1917 1,262,189 Froehlich Apr. 9, 1918 1,400,777 Spiess Dec. 20, 1921 2,113,239 Petskeyes Apr. 5, 1938 2,136,521 Petskeyes Nov. 15, 1938 2,224,390 Holley Dec. 10, 1940 2,254,097 Wood Aug. 26, 1941 2,380,267 Ruth July 10, 1945 2,430,281 Eaton et al Nov. 4, 1947 2,530,061 Holley Nov. 14, 1950 2,530,062 Holley Nov. 14, 1950 2,539,602 Wehr Jan. 30, 1951 2,585,076 Bandura et a1. Feb. 12, 1952 2,615,714 Ford Oct. 28, 1952 2,683,557 Jenney July 13, 1954

Claims (1)

1. THE METHOD OF INTERLEAVING NANER SHEETS BETWEEN ADJACENT SLICES OF A FOOD PRODUCTS WHICH COMPRISES RECEIVING SUCH SLICES AT A SUBSTANTIALLY CONSTANT RATE IN VERTICALLY SUPERIMPOSED RELATION TO PROVIDE A STACK THEREOF, FEEDING A STRIP OF PAPER TOWARDS THE SLICES FROM A PAPER SUPPLY ROOL, INTERMITTENTLY PULLING ON THE UNROLLED END PROTION OF SAID STRIP SO AS TO ADVANCE THE LATTER TOWARDS SAID SLICES IN TIMED RELATION TO THE RECEPTION THEREOF, TRANSVERSELY
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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2877120A (en) * 1956-12-24 1959-03-10 Us Slicing Machine Co Inc Method of interleaving sheets of material between slices of food and apparatus therefor
US2970921A (en) * 1958-07-07 1961-02-07 Toby Entpr Method and apparatus for cutting paper sheets
US3026657A (en) * 1958-05-09 1962-03-27 Lever Brothers Ltd Slicing and interleaving machines
US3051581A (en) * 1959-01-02 1962-08-28 Swift & Co Method and apparatus for packaging food
US3150982A (en) * 1961-07-19 1964-09-29 Sr Herman H Eickerman Meat flavoring and tenderizing device and method
US3481746A (en) * 1966-10-25 1969-12-02 Swift & Co Interleaving of food slices
US3488798A (en) * 1966-12-15 1970-01-13 Owen P Barnes Jr Patty forming apparatus
US3538674A (en) * 1966-10-25 1970-11-10 Swift & Co Interleaving of food slices
DE3326687A1 (en) * 1983-07-23 1985-01-31 Dixie Union Verpackungen Gmbh Paper-inserting device
DE3620593A1 (en) * 1985-06-26 1987-01-08 Sitma Device for controlling the unwinding of a plastic film in a packaging machine
EP0251337A2 (en) * 1982-10-22 1988-01-07 Natec Reich, Summer GmbH & Co. KG Paper feed mechanism for a slicer
DE3249925C2 (en) * 1982-10-22 1990-06-13 Natec Reich, Summer Gmbh & Co Kg, 8999 Heimenkirch, De Device for cutting blocks of material to be cut, such as blocks of cheese and sausage meat or the like
EP1491302A1 (en) * 2003-06-27 2004-12-29 Bizerba GmbH & Co. KG Dispenser for interleaves and method of dispensing interleaves
US20150053057A1 (en) * 2013-08-22 2015-02-26 Weber Maschinenbau Gmbh Breidenbach Apparatus for slicing food products and method of providing intermediate sheets

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US571292A (en) * 1896-11-10 Machine for cutting leather
US751560A (en) * 1904-02-09 Stocking-top-cutting machine
US925097A (en) * 1908-05-01 1909-06-15 Harris Automatic Press Co Collator.
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US1262189A (en) * 1909-01-22 1918-04-09 Us Envelope Co Cutting mechanism.
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US2113239A (en) * 1935-06-05 1938-04-05 Micro Westco Inc Wrapping machine
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US2380267A (en) * 1944-10-03 1945-07-10 Eastman Kodak Co Print trimming gauge
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US2530062A (en) * 1949-03-19 1950-11-14 Holly Molding Devices Inc Patty molding device
US2530061A (en) * 1949-03-19 1950-11-14 Holly Molding Devices Inc Molding device
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US2585076A (en) * 1948-02-14 1952-02-12 Gen Corrugated Machine Company Box blank handling machine
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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US517558A (en) * 1894-04-03 Veneer-mortising machine
US571292A (en) * 1896-11-10 Machine for cutting leather
US751560A (en) * 1904-02-09 Stocking-top-cutting machine
US925097A (en) * 1908-05-01 1909-06-15 Harris Automatic Press Co Collator.
US1262189A (en) * 1909-01-22 1918-04-09 Us Envelope Co Cutting mechanism.
US1235805A (en) * 1914-02-09 1917-08-07 Emerson P Jennings Jr Feeding mechanism for webs of paper and the like.
US1400777A (en) * 1920-07-08 1921-12-20 Spiess Georg Paper-cutting device
US2136521A (en) * 1934-05-18 1938-11-15 Micro Westco Inc Wrapper feed mechanism for wrapping machines
US2113239A (en) * 1935-06-05 1938-04-05 Micro Westco Inc Wrapping machine
US2224390A (en) * 1939-02-20 1940-12-10 Albert J Fihe Patty molding machine
US2254097A (en) * 1940-01-27 1941-08-26 Hawalian Pincapple Company Ltd Packaging machine
US2430281A (en) * 1942-08-12 1947-11-04 Pneumatic Scale Corp Web feeding mechanism
US2539602A (en) * 1944-04-21 1951-01-30 Cleveland Crane Eng Shear press
US2380267A (en) * 1944-10-03 1945-07-10 Eastman Kodak Co Print trimming gauge
US2615714A (en) * 1945-11-16 1952-10-28 Ford Frank Ronald Sheet receiver for duplicating machines
US2585076A (en) * 1948-02-14 1952-02-12 Gen Corrugated Machine Company Box blank handling machine
US2530062A (en) * 1949-03-19 1950-11-14 Holly Molding Devices Inc Patty molding device
US2530061A (en) * 1949-03-19 1950-11-14 Holly Molding Devices Inc Molding device
US2683557A (en) * 1950-12-23 1954-07-13 Kellog Co Packaging machine

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2877120A (en) * 1956-12-24 1959-03-10 Us Slicing Machine Co Inc Method of interleaving sheets of material between slices of food and apparatus therefor
US3026657A (en) * 1958-05-09 1962-03-27 Lever Brothers Ltd Slicing and interleaving machines
US2970921A (en) * 1958-07-07 1961-02-07 Toby Entpr Method and apparatus for cutting paper sheets
US3051581A (en) * 1959-01-02 1962-08-28 Swift & Co Method and apparatus for packaging food
US3150982A (en) * 1961-07-19 1964-09-29 Sr Herman H Eickerman Meat flavoring and tenderizing device and method
US3481746A (en) * 1966-10-25 1969-12-02 Swift & Co Interleaving of food slices
US3538674A (en) * 1966-10-25 1970-11-10 Swift & Co Interleaving of food slices
US3488798A (en) * 1966-12-15 1970-01-13 Owen P Barnes Jr Patty forming apparatus
DE3249925C2 (en) * 1982-10-22 1990-06-13 Natec Reich, Summer Gmbh & Co Kg, 8999 Heimenkirch, De Device for cutting blocks of material to be cut, such as blocks of cheese and sausage meat or the like
EP0251337A2 (en) * 1982-10-22 1988-01-07 Natec Reich, Summer GmbH & Co. KG Paper feed mechanism for a slicer
EP0251337A3 (en) * 1982-10-22 1988-05-18 Summer Gmbh & Co. Kg Natec Reich Paper feed mechanism for a slicer
DE3326687C3 (en) * 1983-07-23 1998-01-08 Dixie Union Verpackungen Gmbh An apparatus for cutting and loading of paper or the like
DE3326687A1 (en) * 1983-07-23 1985-01-31 Dixie Union Verpackungen Gmbh Paper-inserting device
US4693053A (en) * 1985-06-26 1987-09-15 Sitma Societa Italiana Macchine Automatiche S.P.A. Device for controlling the unwinding of a plastics film in a packaging machine
DE3620593A1 (en) * 1985-06-26 1987-01-08 Sitma Device for controlling the unwinding of a plastic film in a packaging machine
DE3620593C2 (en) * 1985-06-26 1999-06-10 Sitma Spa A device for controlled feeding of film in a packaging machine
EP1491302A1 (en) * 2003-06-27 2004-12-29 Bizerba GmbH & Co. KG Dispenser for interleaves and method of dispensing interleaves
US20050034588A1 (en) * 2003-06-27 2005-02-17 Bizerba Gmbh & Co. Kg Separating-sheet dispenser, and dispensing method for dispensing separating sheets
US20150053057A1 (en) * 2013-08-22 2015-02-26 Weber Maschinenbau Gmbh Breidenbach Apparatus for slicing food products and method of providing intermediate sheets
US9981400B2 (en) * 2013-08-22 2018-05-29 Weber Maschinenbau Gmbh Breidenbach Apparatus for slicing food products and method of providing intermediate sheets

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