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US2785425A - Self-feeding paint brush or the like - Google Patents

Self-feeding paint brush or the like Download PDF

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Publication number
US2785425A
US2785425A US25090551A US2785425A US 2785425 A US2785425 A US 2785425A US 25090551 A US25090551 A US 25090551A US 2785425 A US2785425 A US 2785425A
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Prior art keywords
brush
end
paint
tube
handle
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Expired - Lifetime
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Lenk Johannes
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Lenk Johannes
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B11/00Brushes with reservoir or other means for applying substances, e.g. paints, pastes, water
    • A46B11/06Brushes with reservoir or other means for applying substances, e.g. paints, pastes, water connected to supply pipe or to other external supply means
    • A46B11/063Brushes with reservoir or other means for applying substances, e.g. paints, pastes, water connected to supply pipe or to other external supply means by means of a supply pipe

Description

March 19, 1957 J. LENK SELF-FEEDING PAINT BRUSH OR THE LIKE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 11, 1951 INVENTOR.

LENK

gIQHANNES March 19, 11957 J. LENK SELF-FEEDING PAINT BRUSH OR THE LIKE Filed Oct. 11; 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 F'IE. 8

FHE. 9

' INVENTOR. JOH AN N E a FIG.

LENK

SELF-FEEDING PAINT BRUSH OR THE LIKE Johannes Lenk, Jamestown, N. Y.

Application October 11, 1951, Serial No. 250,905

1 Claim. (Cl. 15-428) This invention relates to paint brushes and more part-icularly to structure by which to render a brush selffeeding from a paint container or other convenient source of paint supply.

Many devices, prior to the present invention, have been proposed for the purpose of improving and simplifying the work of painting extensive surfaces, such as the exterior walls of houses and other buildings. Generally, such devices have been of either two forms. In one form the paint was caused to be delivered to the brush through the use of compressed air. Such an arrangement was similar, in some respects, to spray painting devices, and in some instances air under pressure was applied directly to a closed container, a valve in the brush or brush handle being operable to control delivery of paint into the brush. Except in such places as automobile service stations or industrial plants, air under pressure is not generally available. Thus, some form of portable compressor and air storage tank would be required if it was desired to use air pressure as the means of conveying paint from a container to a brush.

The other form of paint delivery device consisted of a paint container that could be suspended above the place of painting and, through the use of some form of syphon or outlet in the base of the container, paint could be fed by gravity through a tube to a brush. Whether the user of such a device carried the paint container or suspended it, there was always the necessity of locating such a con tainer well above the place of use of a brush in order that gravity flow would be adequate to efiect movement of the paint through the tube and into the brush.

The present invention is directed to and discloses a structure that includes a painting brush which is carried at one end of a handle. The handle is hollow and contains a manually operable mechanism by which paint from any reasonably near source of supply may be drawn through a flexible tube and delivered to the brush.

One of the objects of the present invention lies in the provision of a self-feeding brush for painting surfaces, the feeding mechanism being actuable by the brush operator.

Another object of the invention lies in the provision of a paint brush that is attached to a suitable tubular handle in which is located a feeding mechanism that is actuable by an operator at selective intervals.

A further object of the invention lies in the provision of a mechanism for a paint brush that is actuable by an operator to dispense paint from a suitable source of sup ply directly to a brush in selective quantities.

A further and important object of the invention lies in the provision of a paint feeding mechanism for a brush that, being operator actuated, requires neither the aid of gravity nor compressed air as a means of conveying paint from a source of supply to a brush.

Another and important object of the invention lies in the provision of a combined brush handle and paint feeding mechanism to which selective sized brushes may be easily attached and in such manner that the position of nited States Patent the brush may be altered to enable painting variously formed surfaces.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be more fully understood from a consideration of the following specification, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. l is a side elevational view of an assembly embodying the invention and showing its operational arrangernent;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view of the brush end of the device shown in Fig. 1 and illustrates the swivel action of the brush;

Fig. 3 is a slightly enlarged longitudinal sectional view of the brush and handle shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an exposed perspective view showing the brush and attaching parts prior to assembly;

Fig. 5 is a front end view of the open end of the brush handle and brush preparatory to assembly;

Fig. 6 is an end view of the handle and a portion of a brush with a brush locking plate partially in place;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6, showing the locking plate in place;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of the handle, showing the pump or feeding mechanism in position of rest;

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8, showing the pump or feeding mechanism in one operative position; and

Fig. 10 is a further view showing the pump or feeding mechanism in another operative position.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, the rel? erence numeral 10 is employed to generally designate a device embodying the invention. This device consists of. a tubular handle 11 which, at its forward end, is formed with an inclined flat surface 12. The end wall 13 of this surface is formed with an open-ended notch or recess 14. The remainder of the end of the handle extends slightly beyond the end of the portion 12, as indicated by the shoulders 16. To one side of the portion 12 is a slot 17, whereas on the other side, and located within the handle, is a rod 18 having a threaded end 19 that extends slightly beyond and in the direction of the length of the handle. A locking cover 21 is provided for the end of the handle and may be of the appearance and structure shown in Figs. 4 and 6. This cover is provided with a rolled or inclined lower edge 22, a tab 23, and an opening 24. The edge 22 is intended to fit in the notch-like space formed by the shoulders 16, the tab 23 projecting through opening 17, and opening 24 receiving the threaded end 19 of rod 18. The assembly of these parts and their purpose will hereinafter he more fully set out.

A brush 26, of any desired width and len th of bristles, is shown having a base 27. Extending from the central portion of the top edge 28 of the base is a circular lug 29, having a flat upper surface and an annularly undercut or flared wall 31. Mounted in the brush is a paint nozzle 32, one end of which terminates near the free ends of the bristles, whereas the other end extends through the base 27 and terminates in a short end slightly beyond the lug 29. A flexible tube 33 is removably engaged at one end with the nozzle 32.

To assemble the brush with the forward end of the handle 11, it is merely necessary to project the lug into the slot 14 of the inclined surface 12 to the limit of said slot. The undercut 31 of the lug causes the upper surface 28 of the brush base to bear snugly against said inclined surface. When the brush is in place, the locking cap 21 is mounted, the tab 23 being projected into the opening 17, and the opening 24 receiving the threaded end of rod 19. A wing nut 34 is now engaged with the threaded end of the rod and, when drawn down, forces the cover 21 into a flush position with the end of the handle, the edge 22 thereof projecting slightly under the lug 29 and cooperating with the surface 12 to completely enclose the lug and provide further bearing surface for the brush base 27. It will be noted that the brush 26 may be swiveled about the lug 29 to change its position such, for example, as the change suggested in Figs. 1 and 2. A suitable stop 36 may be provided at the rear of the inclined surface 12 to prevent complete swiveling of the brush and twisting the tube 33 beyond its limits. For convenience, a bracket 37 may be attached to the upper side of the handle, adjacent the brush end, this bracket including a hook portion 38 which enables hanging up the device in such a position that no harm can come to the brush or other parts.

For convenience, the rear end of the handle ll may be curved, as suggested at 39. Adjacent the rear end, the underside of the handle is cut away to provide an elongated slot 41. Extending from somewhat slightly beyond the forward end of the slot, and terminating adjacent the rear end thereof, is a flexible tube 42. The diameter of this tube is such that it can be easily projected into or removed from the handle through the slotted opening 41. The forward end of the tube receives a metal plug 43, through the length of which is a passageway 44. The outer end of this passageway is threaded, as at 46, to receive a nipple 47, on the free end of which is a reduced diametered portion 43 with which the other end of the flexible tube 33 is engaged. The other end of the passageway 44 is of reduced diameter, as indicated at 49, and the connecting areas between the passageway 44 and 49 forms a valve seat 51. Mounted in the passageway 44 is a valve 52, having a stem 53 that is encircled by a spring 54. The valve 52 is normally held against the valve seat 51 by compression of the spring obtained by theinner or threaded end of the nipple 47. The plug 43 is held in fluid-tight engagement with this end of the tube 42 in any suitable manner, as by the encircling wire band 56.

The other end of tube 42 is closed by a metal plug 57. This plug is provided with a lengthwise passageway 58, the inner end of which is threaded to receive a sleeve 59. The passageway 58 connects with a reduced diametered passageway 61 which is shown to have a rim or collar 62 extending beyond the outer end of the plug. This collar is adapted to receive one end of a further flexible tube 63. At the meeting point of passageways 58 and 61 is a valve seat 64 that is adapted to receive a valve 66. This valve includes a stem 67 that is encircled by a spring 68. The spring is tensioned to yieldingly hold the valve in closed position by means of the threaded sleeve 59. Plug 57 is fluid-sealed to the tube 42 by the wire bands 69 shown. The portion of the tube between plugs 43 and 57, is highly flexible and it is conceivable that by compressing the walls of this portion, the valves 52 and 66 may be caused to function in a manner to produce a pumping action of any fluid therewithin.

Attention is now particularly directed to the structure by which the flexible portion of tube 42 is made to function as a pump. Figs. 1 and 3 of the drawing show a lever 71. The forward end of this lever is provided with a pair of ears 72 which span the handle 39 just forwardly of the forward end of slot 41. Suitable pins 73 pivotally mount this end of the lever. Centrally, the inner face of the lever is provided with a bracket 74 which has an upstanding arm 76, the end of which is formed with an opening 77. This bracket is secured to the lever in any suitable manner, as by the rivets 78 shown. A shoe 79 is provided with a slot into which the arm 76 projects and a pin 81 provides pivotal engagement of these parts. The shoe includes an elongated flat portion 82 which is intended to at all times contact the flexible intermediate portion of the tube 42. Such permanent contact of the shoe with the tube is obtained through use of a spring 83.

One end of the spring seats on a lug 84 formed on the inner face of the lever 71, whereas the other end of the spring seats on a lug 36 carried by the handle 11. It is evident that when the handle 11 is grasped with the fingers encircling lever '71, a squeezing action, to compress spring 83, will move the shoe into the handle and compress the flexible portion of tube 42.

in order that a clear understanding of the advantages of the present invention may be had, a brief description of the operation is set out. It may be assumed that the flexible tube 63 is of sutficient length to extend to a suitable source of paint supply, such as the container 87 indicated in Fig. l of the drawing. This container is not closed except as may be found desirable to exclude foreign matter, but for all purposes 01": use of the invention, the paint within the container is exposed to atmospheric pressure. An operator squeezes on the lever 71, forcing the shoe 82 from the position of Fig. 8 to that of Fig 9. This compresses the flexible intermediate portion of tube 42 and forces air within this portion to open valve 52 and allows this somewhat compressed air to pass out through the nipple 47 and flexible tube 33. Such compression of the flexible portion of the tube acts to hold valve 66 against its seat. As the lever 71 is released and the shoe 82 withdraws from the position of Fig. 9 to that of Fig. 10, the expansion of the flexible portion of tube 42 causes valve 66 to open against the tension of spring 68 and draw in a further column of air into the space within this tube. Of course, with the flexible tube 63 extending into paint within the container 87, such action has moved a column of paint upwardly of the tube. Repeated operation of the lever 71 continues drawing paint through tube 63 until it is caused to flow into the flexible portion of tube 42. From this point on, paint moves past valve 52 (Fig. 9), through tube 33, and then out of nozzle 32 into the end of the brush 26. The brush may now be used in the conventional manner to spread the paint and, upon exhausting the supply of paint in the brush, the lever 71 is again actuated.

Particular attention is directed to the fact that the operator of a painting device embodying the invention has full control over the supply of paint conveyed to the brush. In other words, the operator may avail himself of a large quantity of paint at the brush end to fill cracks and crevices by manipulating the lever 71 through one or more full. strokes. On the other hand, if only a slight quantity of paint is required from time to time, the lever may be only partially actuated and a proportionately lesser supply of paint may be delivered through the nozzle into the brush. Thus, it is clear that an operator of the device has full control not only over the frequency with which paint is delivered to the brush, but also the quantity in which such paint is delivered.

Although applicant has shown and described only one modification of the invention, it will be understood that variations in the structure may be made not only to adapt the device for use with different types of painting brushes, but also to adapt the device for different conditions of painting, and such adaptations and modifications are considered as being within the spirit and scope of the invention insofar as they are set out in the annexed claim.

Having thus set forth my invention, what I claim as new and for which I desire protection by Letters Patent In a device of the class described having a tubular handle and a manually operable fluid pump in said handle, together with a fluid tube joined to one end of said pump and of suflicient length to extend beyond one end of said handle; a brush, a flared flat end lug rigid with and extending from the base of said brush, a fluid nozzle in said brush projecting through and beyond said lug and joined to said tube, a flat portion at one end of 5 6 said handle disposed at an incline to the direction of the References Cited in the file of this patent length of said handle, said portion having an opeln-ended UNITED STATES PATENTS slot for receiving and enabling projecting said ug into the open end of said handle, a plate closing said open end g g 5 and engaged with said lug and serving to prevent slid- 5 1 038,376 I 35 -l 1912 able displacement of said lug from said slot and serving 1,983,923 i gP 11 19 4 to secure said brush in perpendicular relationship to the 2,412,397 Havens D 10 1936 plane of said portion, and further means operable to con- 648,288 l trol the extent to which said plate secures said lug where- Mar 3 11, 1953 by to selectively permit swiveling said brush with respect 10 FOREIGN PATENTS to said handle. 485,219 Great Britain May 17, 1938

US2785425A 1951-10-11 1951-10-11 Self-feeding paint brush or the like Expired - Lifetime US2785425A (en)

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2898618A (en) * 1957-05-02 1959-08-11 Whitfield William Allen Paint applying means
US2932043A (en) * 1956-03-01 1960-04-12 Edward S Bischoff Liquid coating applicator
US2960040A (en) * 1956-03-01 1960-11-15 Edward S Bischoff Pump device
US3080590A (en) * 1960-01-22 1963-03-12 Mulligram Inc Swimming pool cleaning device
US3101506A (en) * 1960-06-02 1963-08-27 Wagner E R Mfg Co Squeezable-handle cleaning device having brush-sponge head
US3120676A (en) * 1962-03-30 1964-02-11 Wayne Chemical Company Floor cleansing device
US3135005A (en) * 1961-08-31 1964-06-02 Henry E Karkut Inc Combined paint pump and roller applicator
DE1176094B (en) * 1962-06-30 1964-08-20 Walter Stahl Waschgeraet, especially for Autowaesche
US3184780A (en) * 1961-11-13 1965-05-25 Whirlpool Co Cleaning tool
US3192554A (en) * 1962-10-04 1965-07-06 Henry E Karkut Inc Paint applicator
US3400996A (en) * 1966-11-15 1968-09-10 Edward W Macrum Toothbrush with integral dentifrice dispenser
US3603694A (en) * 1969-11-10 1971-09-07 Ronald D Hamm Device for feeding paint to a painting brush
US4640638A (en) * 1983-03-24 1987-02-03 Sani-Fresh International, Inc. Cleaning system
US4705420A (en) * 1983-03-24 1987-11-10 Sani-Fresh International, Inc. Cleaning system having cleaning fluid capsule
US20070237568A1 (en) * 2001-11-14 2007-10-11 Ecolab Inc. Floor finish application system using applicator pad and matched floor finish composition

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US28758A (en) * 1860-06-19 Eufus lapham
US141522A (en) * 1873-08-05 Self and louis vasaly
US1038376A (en) * 1911-08-15 1912-09-10 Alfred Jaeschke Self-feeding paint-brush.
US1983923A (en) * 1933-01-09 1934-12-11 Neo Brush Holder Corp Brush holding clamp
GB485219A (en) * 1937-02-10 1938-05-17 Aero Brush Company Ltd Improvements in or relating to self-feeding brushes
US2412397A (en) * 1943-12-31 1946-12-10 Lyndus E Harper Flexible tube pump
US2648288A (en) * 1946-03-11 1953-08-11 William J Marks Fluid pump

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US28758A (en) * 1860-06-19 Eufus lapham
US141522A (en) * 1873-08-05 Self and louis vasaly
US1038376A (en) * 1911-08-15 1912-09-10 Alfred Jaeschke Self-feeding paint-brush.
US1983923A (en) * 1933-01-09 1934-12-11 Neo Brush Holder Corp Brush holding clamp
GB485219A (en) * 1937-02-10 1938-05-17 Aero Brush Company Ltd Improvements in or relating to self-feeding brushes
US2412397A (en) * 1943-12-31 1946-12-10 Lyndus E Harper Flexible tube pump
US2648288A (en) * 1946-03-11 1953-08-11 William J Marks Fluid pump

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2932043A (en) * 1956-03-01 1960-04-12 Edward S Bischoff Liquid coating applicator
US2960040A (en) * 1956-03-01 1960-11-15 Edward S Bischoff Pump device
US2898618A (en) * 1957-05-02 1959-08-11 Whitfield William Allen Paint applying means
US3080590A (en) * 1960-01-22 1963-03-12 Mulligram Inc Swimming pool cleaning device
US3101506A (en) * 1960-06-02 1963-08-27 Wagner E R Mfg Co Squeezable-handle cleaning device having brush-sponge head
US3135005A (en) * 1961-08-31 1964-06-02 Henry E Karkut Inc Combined paint pump and roller applicator
US3184780A (en) * 1961-11-13 1965-05-25 Whirlpool Co Cleaning tool
US3120676A (en) * 1962-03-30 1964-02-11 Wayne Chemical Company Floor cleansing device
DE1176094B (en) * 1962-06-30 1964-08-20 Walter Stahl Waschgeraet, especially for Autowaesche
US3192554A (en) * 1962-10-04 1965-07-06 Henry E Karkut Inc Paint applicator
US3400996A (en) * 1966-11-15 1968-09-10 Edward W Macrum Toothbrush with integral dentifrice dispenser
US3603694A (en) * 1969-11-10 1971-09-07 Ronald D Hamm Device for feeding paint to a painting brush
US4640638A (en) * 1983-03-24 1987-02-03 Sani-Fresh International, Inc. Cleaning system
US4705420A (en) * 1983-03-24 1987-11-10 Sani-Fresh International, Inc. Cleaning system having cleaning fluid capsule
US20070237568A1 (en) * 2001-11-14 2007-10-11 Ecolab Inc. Floor finish application system using applicator pad and matched floor finish composition

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