US2696095A - Two-by-two rib knitted fabric with selvage - Google Patents

Two-by-two rib knitted fabric with selvage Download PDF

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US2696095A
US2696095A US279534A US27953452A US2696095A US 2696095 A US2696095 A US 2696095A US 279534 A US279534 A US 279534A US 27953452 A US27953452 A US 27953452A US 2696095 A US2696095 A US 2696095A
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wales
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William A Zieve
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/06Non-run fabrics or articles

Description

Dec. 7, 1954 w. A. zlEvE 2,696,095
TWOBYTWO RIB KNITTED FABRIC WITH SELVAGE Sheets-Sheet 1 ffl-w y @Mimi Mm@ www SwOi? 513m@ im@ www @JOS 2 S 5MM@ @HSW S United States Patent O TWO-BY-TWO RIB KNIT'IED FABRIC WITH SELVAGE William A. Zieve, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Application March 31, 1952, Serial No. 279,534
23 Claims. (Cl. 66-172) The present invention relates to selvaged rib knitted fabrics, such as are used for bottoms, cuffs, and/or collars and the like on garments, gloves or hose.
The main object of my invention is to provide a two by two rib knitted fabric with a special selvage in which the wales forming front ribs and the wales forming the back ribs, in the course or courses forming the selvage, arie1 not shogged or racked to cross with respect to each o er.
Another object is to provide a two by two rib knitted fabric provided with a selvage as indicated and of such advantageous construction that is adapted for economic production on simpler type machines.
It is also a practical object to have such a selvaged two by two rib knitted fabric as indicated that may be produced on such types of machines as have two banks of needles, but is readily produced in most advantageous manner on circular rib knitting machines of the cylinder and dial type construction.
Other objects and advantages of my invention will appear in greater detail as the specification proceeds.
In order to facilitate ready comprehension of this invention for a proper appreciation of the salient features thereof, the invention is illustrated on the accompanying drawings, forming part hereof, and in which:
Figure 1 is a diagrammatic layout of a selvaged two by two fabric knitted in what may be termed string formation as a continuation from a previously knitted length of the same fabric joined to it by a draw thread, and as produced on a typical machine for knitting fabrics of this class;
Figure 2 is a similar diagrammatic layout of such a selvaged two by two rib knitted fabric with the draw thread removed;
Figure 3 is a diagrammatic layout of a variation of that shown in Figure 1; and
Figure 4 is also a diagrammatic layout of a two by two rib knitted fabric having no selvage, and illustrating how some of the Wale loops tend to ladder or run upwardly from the edge when they are not held by the selvage strand.
In these views, the same reference numerals indicate the same or like parts or features.
Heretofore, when a selvaged two by two rib fabric was knitted on a cylinder and dial type rib knitting machine in conventional manner, it was necessary to rack the dial needles in relation to the cylinder needles in forming the selvage. However, normally, this procedure of this racking operation slows down production, and in addition, various troublesome features and phases of the operation tend to crop up and contribute to delaying production. On the other hand, production of such fabric up to now is limited to cylinder and dial machines especially equipped with racking and other mechanisms incidental to this operation, in order to enable the machine to rack either the dial or the cylinder with respect to each other.
The fabric herein described (since the wales are not racked) lends itself advantageously to manufacture on cylinder and dial machines other than just those equipped to perform the racking operation.
1 Hence, 1n the practice of my mventron; and referring also again to the drawings, as shown in Figure l, references 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, designate needle wales among which 1, 2, 3 and 4 form one repeat of the pres- ICC fabric generally indicated at k, and any desired number of courses may be included between the first course a and a draw thread z. In each of the views, the twoneedle rib formed by the wales 1 and 2 indicate front ribs and are taken as facing the front of the fabric and are preferably knitted by the cylinder needles of the cylinder and dial machine. Thus, a strand or yarn floated in back of these wales will appear on the back of the fabric k.
The two-needle rib formed by wales 3 and 4 are rear or back ribs facing the back of the fabric, and are knitted by the dial needles. Thus, a strand or yarn floated in back of these wales will appear on the front or face of the fabric. The wales of the inverted loops l1, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 and 17 between the needle wales 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 are termed sinker wales and the loops forming these wales are therefore termed sinker loops, although it is commonly known that cylinder and dial knitting machines do not ordinarily have sinkers to form such loops. The stitches shown which form the selvage are exaggerated in order to clarify the relative disposition and arrangement of the-loops and courses. ln actual fact, the binder strand a is laid in comparatively tighter, and the interlooping of the following courses made by strands b and c makes the floats still tighter, but imparts the necessary give or yield to the initial course required in practical wear of the fabric. The result is a novel and desirable ribbed selvage with ample give or yielding character, with the floats enmeshed therein.
With the introduction of multiple feed knitting machines having a comparatively great number of feeds, the desirability of a selvaged knitted fabric made according to the present invention becomes even more apparent, since it lends itself particularly well to those machines where production is paramount and due to space and timing limitations, the racking and allied mechanisms can not be incorporated in the machines.
lt is, of course common practice to produce knitted articles, such as bottoms, cuffs, collars, hose tops and the like in string formation. Such articles are knitted to any predetermined length and one article is connected to the next in order by means of a knitted draw thread course which is later pulled out in order to separate one article from the other. As already mentioned in connection with Figure l, the invention may be practised by connecting one fabric or article to be produced to fl, Ul
i than normally would be the case.
the previous, as for example fabric k to fabric m by the draw thread z, first forming apparently a single whole, but actually a series of knitted two-by-two rib knitted articles in a sequence that remain together during pro- 'duction, but are separated by removal of the draw threads between the articles. Thus, to produce such articles of the selvaged two by two ribbed fabric, the end of fabric as shown in m is knitted substantially as per the arrangement illustrated by strands u, v, w, x, and y, etc., as already outlined.
Eand depending on the nature of the yarn strand used, that is, the tendency of the loops of the discontinued wales to slip out and run downwards. Thus, as may be noted on the drawing, by welting wales 1, 3, and S at courses t to x, while the intermediate wales have l been knitted for several loops, the strain and conse- 'quent tendency to run under normal conditions have been removed from wales 2, 4, 6 and 8 in this area of the fabric. The course knitted by strand y is then knitted as shown, and is preferably knitted more loosely Draw thread z is very loosely knitted at wales 1, 3, 5 and 7.
The same result may be effected in another manner, 1f desired, or if the machine lends itself to such opera- `knitted right up to and including draw thread z, in
which case the course knitted by strand z will be in regular two by two rib formation, and then Wales 2, 4, 6,
ent two by two arrangement, while letters a, b, c, d, e, f, and 8 cast off. The tension of the fabric take-up would g, h, and i indicate strands forming courses in the ,r then cause these loops of these particular wales to slip out of at least the course formed by strand z and thereby cause the remaining loops of this courseV to become longer and thus more loose.
The looseness of the loops formed by the draw thread z and the preceding strand y, as well as thev absence of the wales that have been cast off or dropped will facilitate easy withdrawal of draw thread z which separates the beginning of article k from the end of the previous article m in the string of articles being produced.
Considering the construction up to and including the draw thread strand z of Figure l, if strand a` which will form the selvage binder were now knitted in regular two-by-two rib formation, the discontinued wales 2, 4, 6 and 8 Would again be started and might appear to be bound. However, when the draw thread z is later removed, it will be seen that the. edge is as shown by the course made by strand a in Figure 4. The sinker Wale loops 22, 24 and 26 are locked by virtue of their being included between a Wale facing the front and a Wale facing the back of the fabric.
On the other hand, sinker Wale loops 21, 23 and 25 are not locked and would therefore tend to ladder or run upwards from the erstwhile selvage, as shown by loop 25 in sinker Wale 15. In other words, there would be no true or completely run-proof selvage. Hence, according to this invention, strand a will. therefore be fed only to the needles that have been bared, that is, to the needles forming the wales 2, 4, 6 and 8 in Figure l, or' 1, 4, 5 in Figure 3, and oated behind the other wales.
lf knitting should be resumed, starting with strand b and proceeding in regular two-by-two rib formation, it Will be understood that all of the sinker loopswould be locked, thereby forming a true selvage. But if regular two-by-two rib knitting were resumed immediately after strand a was picked up by the needles, as the dialI and cylinder needles then advance totake upv the next strand b, no means Would be present on a conventional cylinder and dial rib knitting machine for holding the original course made by strand a which has been laid outfor loop formation on the bare needles. Then, as the hold on this strand a is slackened by advance of the needles, control of the formation is lost, and in some places the strand will even fall off the needle hooks, while in others it will ride over the hooks of the needles of the opposite bank, causing it to` stray in haphazard manner off some needles While piling up onother needles, thus causing improper or defective knitting, with consequent loss of the selvage binding effect desired.
To control this condition, the course of the fabric made by` strand b will instead be knitted inrib formation on all dial needles and only on those cylinder needles forming wales 1', 5, etc., ofl Figure l, and wales Z, 6, etc., of Figure 3 which were not previously bared. The previously bared cylinder needles which then have only strandy a upon them will remain in inactive or welt position during the course formed by strand b, and willl thereby hold strand a under controly until strand b forms loops i'n all of the other needle Wales, as best seen in Figures 1 andy J' of thev drawings.
Regular two-by-two rib knittingl is thereafterv resumed for the required length or number of coursesy c, d, e, f, etc. The resulting selvage of the fabric shownl in Figure l, when the draw threadv z is removed will appear as shown in Figure 2. It is thus seen that all of the wales are locked against running.
If desired, prior to starting of the regular tWo-by-two rib knitting, but after the courses made by strands a and b have been knitted, various forms of welting known to those skilled in the art may be resorted to for imparting more body to the selvage or for they purpose of attaining other effects in the appearance of the. fabric. It is, of course understood that such variations following the first two courses fall Within the purview of the invention, and likewise, tucking instead of welting or floating, or knitting some of the loops forming the selvage in some instances also comes Within the bounds of this invention.
To those skilled in the art, it will be clear that certainfunctions of the dial and cylinder needle operations on some knittingmachines may be interchanged without departing from the scope of the invention herein disclosed. For example, the dial needles that Were previously bared may remain inactive to keep the initial course under control, while the other `dial needles and all of the cylinder needles are actively knitting instead of the' opposite arrangements as previously described. In that case,
Figures 1, 2 and 3 would illustrate a rear view of the fabric, the onlyy difference being av mere reversal andv no actual change of principle involved.
As shown in Figure 2, the structure of the fabric n includes the wales 1 to 8 and courses a to i, etc., resemble their counterparts in Figure l, but at the lower portion, the draw thread z is merely represented by the reference z as it has been Withdrawn from the fabric.
They selvagesk illustrated in Figures l, 2 and 3 are the simpler forms embodying: the invention, and for most purposes are entirely satisfactory. Obviously, the machines upon which the present novel fabric is produced are not necessarily part of the invention, and thus superfluous to illustrate, for the fabric and its construction and method of making constitute the invention as such in the forms described and suggested hereinbefore.
Manifestly, variations may be resorted to, and parts and features may be modified or used without others within the scope of the appended claims.
Having: now fully described my invention, I claim:
l. In a continuous string formation knitted fabric, having a series of fabric articles, the features including upon the beginning ofv each fabric a selvage formed of at least one course of loops and a course formed of a draw thread interconnecting the selvage with the end of the previous fabric in the string or series, each fabric being a two by two rib knitted fabric having Wales forming frontfribs and wales forming back ribs in the course or courses forming the selvage. independently of racking or shogging to mutually cross with respect to each other.
2. A two by two rib knitted fabric according to claim l, wherein a Wale repeat has the second- Wale upward loops of the rst course. extending up about the bases of the upward loops of the third course, and the draw thread course has loops extending up about the bases of the loops of the first and third upward loops in the secondcourse above the draw thread course.
3. A two by two rib knitted fabric according to claim l, wherein a Wale repeat has the thread of the tirst course above the draw thread course including upwardly extending loopsy individually extending up about the base of the loops of the secondv Wale of the third course and about the basey of the *loop of the fourth Wale of the secondi course, and wherein the draw thread is formed into a course of upward loops extending individually up about the bases ofthe loops forming the first and third Wales of thesecondE course with the first loop ofthe draw thread extending over upon the front of the fabric andthe second loop extending upon the rear of the fabric.
4. A two by two rib knitted: fabric knitted in string formation, said` fabricbeing knittedv in frontand rear wales in palrs and having a selvage including a lrst courseformed with a th-readwith individual loopsextending up about the bases of the second loopv of the Wale repeat of the third course and al second course having upward'` loops extending individually `up about the bases of thev loops of the first', third'fand fourth: loops of the third: course, the rst course having an upward loop lin the fourthl Wale extending up about the base of they thirdvloop of the second courseA in the fourth Wale.
5. two by two rib knitted fabric according to claim 4', whererntfa draw thread connects the fabric with another following the same` in ythe stringV formation andl includes a series ofi'loops inl a course connected to the beginning of the next fabricl inthe series and individually extend'- ing up about the first and third Wales in th'efabric as found inthe second course-at the Abases of the loops therein.
`6. A two by two rib knitted fabric with a selvage having a binder strand initiating vone wale of each of' the pairs of Wales forming consecutively the front and back ribs and floatingv across the other wales followed by a'4 course knitted in all the back wales andonly in those front wales which have not been initiated by 'the binder strand, followed by courses in which 'the wales are knitted' in two by two rib formation.
7. A selvaged two' byf two rib knitted fabric consisting of an initial course starting one needle Wale only of each pair of needle` wales forming consecutively the front and back ribs andifloatin'g' across the other wal'es, followed by a courseknitted in' all the 'walesof one face andl only thoseV Wales' ofthe other face notA started' by theI `initial courses, and' floated behind the wales in which it is` not knitted, followed' by courses knitted in all the Wales-in two by two" rib formation, the strand' of said:
initial course binding the initial sinker loop between said one needle Wale and its adjoining needle Wale forming a pair in each of said pairs.
8. A selvaged two by two rib knitted fabric having an initial strand starting in rib formation loops of one Wale of each of the pairs of wales forming the front and back ribs respectively and lloating across the other Wales, followed by a course knitted in all of the wales forming the ribs of one face and only those wales of the ribs of the other face which have not been started by the initial strand and floating behind the others, followed by courses of two by two knitting, said initial strand binding the initial sinker loops between said one Wale and the Wale adjacent forming the pair, in each of said pairs, against running upwardly from the selvage.
9. A two by two rib knitted fabric with a selvage having an initial course starting loops of one Wale, as the right hand Wale, of the pairs of wales forming the front ribs and starting loops of one Wale, of the same hand, of the pairs of wales forming the back ribs, and lloating across the other wales, followed by a course knitted in all the back wales and only in those front wales which have not been started by the strand of the initial course, followed by courses in which the wales are knitted in two by two rib formation.
10. A two by two rib knitted fabric with a selvage having Jan initial course starting loops of one Wale, as the left` hand Wale, of the pairs of Wales forming the front ribs, and starting loops of one Wale, of the opposite hand, of the pairs of wales forming the back ribs, and lloating across the other wales, followed by a course knitted in all the back wales and only in those front wales which have not been started by the strand of the initial course, and followed by courses in which the wales are knitted in two by two rib formation.
1l. A two by two knitted fabric with a selvage consisting of a binder course initiating one Wale only of each of the pairs of wales forming respectively the front and back ribs and oating across the other wales, followed by a course knitted in all the back wales and only in 'those front wales which have not been initiated by the rst course and followed by courses in which the wales are knitted in regular two by two rib formation, said binder course being drawn tighter but rendered yieldable under stress in Wearing by those loops of the second and third courses with which it is interknitted.
l2. A series of selvaged two by two rib knitted articles knitted in string formation and joined one to the following by a draw-thread knitted in one Wale of each pair of wales forming consecutively the front and rear ribs, each article starting with a course which initiates the other Wales of said pairs and floats past the wales knitted by the draw-thread, followed by a course knitted in all the wales of one face and only in those wales of the other face which have been knitted by the draw-thread and floated behind the others, followed by the required number of courses of a two by two knitting and ending in courses forming a downwardly run-resisting welt wherein the wales to be initiated by the starting course of the following article are discontinued.
13. A series of selvaged two by two rib knitted tubular articles knitted in string formation and joined one to the following by a draw-thread knitted on one Wale of each pair of Wales forming consecutively the front and rear ribs, each article starting with a course which initiates the other wales of said pairs and floats past the Wales knitted by the draw-thread, followed by a course knitted in all the wales of one face and only in those wales of the other face which have been knitted by the draw-thread and floated behind the others, followed by the required number of courses of two by two knitting and ending in courses forming a downwardly run-resistant welt wherein the Wales to be initiated by the starting course of the following article are discontinued.
14. A series of selvaged two by two rib knitted articles knitted in string formation and joined one to the following by a draw-thread, wherein at the end of each article one Wale of each of the pairs of Wales forming consecutively the front and back ribs is welted for several courses, while alternate courses of said several courses are knitted in the other Wale of a pair in the pairs forming the front ribs and intermediate courses of the said several courses are knitted in the other Wale of a pair in the pairs forming the back ribs to form a downwardly run-resistant welt after which the loops of said other Wales are cast olf and discontinued, followed by a course knitted in the remaining wales in both the front and back ribs, followed by said draw-thread knitted loosely in same remaining wales in front and back ribs, followed by the course formed by the initial strand of the selvage of the next following article, said initial strand initiating resumption of knitting of the discontinued wales of front and back ribs and floating past the others, followed by a course knitted in all the Wales of the ribs on one face and only those Wales of the ribs of the other face which have been knitted by the draw-thread and floating behind the others, followed by the required number of two by two rib knitted courses.
l5. A series of two by two rib knitted articles each having a selvage comprising a starting course initiating knitting in one Wale of each pair of Wales forming consecutively the front and back ribs, followed by a course knitted in all the wales of the ribs forming one face and only those wales of the ribs of the other face which were not initiated by the starting course, and floating behind the others, followed by the required number of two by two rib knitted courses, ending with a group of courses forming a welt providing a downwardly run-resistant portion wherein the loop of each of said one Wale of each pair is cast-off and discontinued prior to resumption of knitting in the next following article, each of said articles being joined one to the following by a draw-thread knitted in the Wales which have not been discontinued.
16. The method of knitting a two by two rib knitted fabric with a selvage consisting of drawing a binder strand on one needle of each pair of needles knitting the front and back ribs respectively, and lloating behind the other needles by causing them to remain inactive, said one needle of each pair having previously been bared, followed by knitting a course on all the needles of one bed and only on those needles of the other bed which did not take the binder strand and iloating behind the others by causing them to be inactive, followed by knitting the required courses of two by two rib by causing all the needles to operate in two by two rib formation.
l7. The method of knitting a selvaged two by two rib knitted fabric on a rib knitting machine consisting of drawing a binder strand in tight formation on one needle of each pair of needles knitting the front and back ribs consecutively and floating behind the others, said one needle of each pair having previously been bared, followed by knitting a course on all the needles of one bed and only those needles of the other bed which did not take the binder strand and floating behind the others, followed by knitting the required number of courses of two by two rib, the two courses following the drawing of the binder strand acting to further tighten the binder strand in those wales where knitting was initiated by said binder strand, and the tension of the said wales of said two courses yielding to render the binder strand yieldable under stress in wearing.
18. The method of knitting a series of selvaged two by two rib knitted articles in string formation each article being joined to the next following by a draw-thread knitted on one needle of each pair of needles knitting respectively the front and back ribs, consisting of feeding in tight rib formation the initial course of the article which initiates knitting on the other needles of said pairs and floats behind the needles holding the draw-thread stitches, followed by knitting a course on all the needles of one bed and only on those needles of the other bed which have knitted the draw-thread, followed by knitting the required number courses of two by two rib, followed at the end by knitting several courses to form a downwardly run-resistant welt in which the needles on which knitting is to be resumed by the initial course of the next following article are bared by shedding their loops, followed by knitting the draw-thread on those needles which have not been bared, followed by repeating these operations in the same order.
19. The method of knitting a series of selvaged two by two rib knitted articles in string formation, on a circular rib knitting machine, each article being joined to the next following by a draw-thread knitted on one needle of each pair of needles knitting respectively the front and back ribs, consisting of feeding in tight rib formation the initial course of the article which initiates knitting on the other needles of said pairs and iloats behind the needles holding the draw-thread stitches, followed by knitting a course masones on; all ther needlesof one bedA and. only oir the needlest of' the-other bed which have. knitted the. drawLthread, followed by knitting the required. number of courses of two. by two rib, followed' at the: end `byknitting several courses to form a downwardly run-resistant welt after which the needles on which knitting-is to.` be. resumed `byv the initial course of the next following article arebared/by shedding their. loops, followed by knitting the draw-thread `on those needles which have not been. bared, followed. by repeating these operations in the same order.
20. rl`her method of knitting a ser-ies of'selyaged two, by two, rib knitted tubular. articlesin string. formation, on a circular cylinder and diall ribknitting mach-ine,- each article being joined to the next following by adraw-thread knitted on one needle of each pair'of needles knitting respectively the front and back ribs,` consisting` of` feeding in-` rib formation the initial course of the article which initiates knitting on 'the other needlesof said pairsandifloats behindI the needles holding the draw-thread stitches, followed by knitting a course on all the needles of one bank and only on the; needles of the other bank which have knitted the draw-thread, followed by knitting the requirednumber of courses of two by two rib, followed at the end by knitting several courses to form a downwardly run-resistant' welt in. which thel needles on which knitting is to beA resumed by the initial course of the next following article arebared by shedding their loops, followed by knitting the drawth-read on' those needles which have not beerr bared,v followed by repeating these operations in the same order.
211, The method of knitting a selvaged two= by two rib knitted article in string formation, one needle of each of the pairs of needles knitting the front andI back ribs having suspended therefrom. previously knittedl similar articles by means of a draw-thread, the other needles being bare, consisting of initiating knitting on all the bare needles in the first course whiley floating behind the other needles, followed by knitting a course on all the needles forming the ribs of one bed and only those needles having the draw-thread loops thereon in thel other bed, followed by knitting the required courses of two by two rib knitting, followed by knitting a complement of courses to form a run-resistant welt during which the needles, on which wales are to be re-initiated in the next following articles, are bared, followed by a course of knitting on the continuing wales, followed by a draw-thread course knitted on the said continuing wales and repeating these steps.
22.A 'lhetmethod'ofA knitting'a selvaged t'wo-fby twoA rib knitted article in strong formation, one needle of each of the pairs of needles knitting the frontand backrib's having suspended therefrom previously knitted similar articles by means of a draw-thread, the other needlesbeing bare, consisting of initiating knitting on all the bare needles in the rst course. while-floating behindthe other needles, followed by knitting" a. course on all the needles forming the ribs of one bed and only those needles having' the draw-thread loopsvthereon in. the other bed', followed by the required courses of' two by two rib knitting',- followed by knitting-a complementof courses toi form a run-resist-v ant welt, followed by knitting a course iny two by twol rib formation, followedvby knitting a draw-thread course two by two rib formation, followed by shedding the loops from thoseneedles of each of the pairs of needles knitting the front and back ribswhich are to be reinitiated in the next following articles andy repeating these steps.
.231. The method of knitting aselvaged' twoby two rib knitted fabric in string formation on a cylinder and dialrib knitting machine (withou-t racking the dial or' cylinder inl relation to each other), each article being joined to the next following by a draw-thread knitted on one needle of each pair of needles kni-ttingy respectively the front andA back ribs, consisting of feeding in rib vformation the initiall course of thev article which initiates knitting on -the bared other needles of" said pairs and floats behind the needles holding the ldraw-thread stitches, followed by knitting a course on all the needles of one bed andI only onthose' needles of the: other -bed which have knitted the drawthread, followed by'v knitting the'y requirednumber of courses of two by twok rib, followed at they end byknitting'v several courses. to form` a downwardly run-resistant welt after which the needles on which knitting is to beresumed by the initial course of the next following article are -baredf by shedding their loops, followed by knitting the drawthread onthose needles whichA have not -been bared, fol'- lowed by repeating these operations in the same order.
References Cited inthe tile` of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Dat
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2791108A (en) * 1953-05-14 1957-05-07 Thomas B Walker Shogging-attachment apparatus for knitting two-by-two ribbed-top hose on automatic-transfer circular knitting machines
US2854832A (en) * 1955-01-17 1958-10-07 Joseph L Morris Method of forming an edge and knitting swiss ribs on knitted fabrics without racking
US3046768A (en) * 1958-07-25 1962-07-31 Sdruzeni Podniku Textilniho St Two by two rib knit fabric
US4038840A (en) * 1974-05-16 1977-08-02 Castello Leo J Method of collar fabrication

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US2286805A (en) * 1940-06-04 1942-06-16 Wildt & Co Ltd Circular knitting machine

Patent Citations (1)

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US2286805A (en) * 1940-06-04 1942-06-16 Wildt & Co Ltd Circular knitting machine

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2791108A (en) * 1953-05-14 1957-05-07 Thomas B Walker Shogging-attachment apparatus for knitting two-by-two ribbed-top hose on automatic-transfer circular knitting machines
US2854832A (en) * 1955-01-17 1958-10-07 Joseph L Morris Method of forming an edge and knitting swiss ribs on knitted fabrics without racking
US3046768A (en) * 1958-07-25 1962-07-31 Sdruzeni Podniku Textilniho St Two by two rib knit fabric
US4038840A (en) * 1974-05-16 1977-08-02 Castello Leo J Method of collar fabrication

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