US2693800A - Nasal cannula - Google Patents

Nasal cannula Download PDF

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Publication number
US2693800A
US2693800A US22327751A US2693800A US 2693800 A US2693800 A US 2693800A US 22327751 A US22327751 A US 22327751A US 2693800 A US2693800 A US 2693800A
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nostril
tubes
tube
gas
supply
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Caldwell Lyle
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LYLE CALDWELL
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LYLE CALDWELL
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/06Respiratory or anaesthetic masks
    • A61M16/0666Nasal cannulas or tubing

Description

L. CALDWELL NASAL CANNULA Filed April 27, 1951 INVENTOR.

United States Patent Ofiice 2,693,800 Patented Nov. 9, 1954 NASAL CANNULA Lyle Caldwell, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application April 27, 1951, Serial No. 223,277

7 Claims. (Cl. 128-206) The present invention relates generally to therapeutic devices; and is more particularly concerned with a nasal cannula of novel construction for the nasal feeding or administering of a gas, such as oxygen, through the nose of a patient.

That part of the human nose between the nostril openings contains relatively tender tissues, whereas the outside of the nostril openings is less tender. Having this in mind, the present invention contemplates a therapeutic device in the form of a nasal cannula which is so constructed that a minimum of pressure will be applied on the tender tissues in. the nostrils, and the pressure resulting from supporting the device will be applied to the less tender portions of the nostril openings and so distributed as to eliminate pressure on those portions of the nostril opening which result in discomfort to the patient.

A further object is to provide in a device of the hereindescribed type, nasal tubes which are constructed of a relatively soft material, which may be of an elastomeric type of material, so as to minimize the possibility of injury to the nostrils by any movement of the unit which might be caused by the patient rolling over, etc., and yet has sufiicient rigidity and sufiicient diameter to prevent a tickling sensation in the nostril which might cause sneezing.

A still further object is to provide a nasal cannula in which the nostril tubes are retained by novel means against outward tipping from the face, or displacement from the nostrils.

Further objects of the invention will be brought out in the following part of the specification, wherein detailed description is for the purpose of fully disclosing several embodiments of the invention without placing limitations thereon.

Referring to the accompanying drawings, which are for illustrative purposes only:

Fig. 1 is a view illustrating the manner in which a nasal cannula embodying the features of the present invention is applied to the patient;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged view of one construction of the present invention, portions being cut away and sectioned to disclose certain features of construction;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of the same, taken substantially on line 3--3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an elevational view of a modified construction;

Fig. 5 is a transverse sectional view of the same, taken substantially on line 55 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is an elevational view of another modified construction, including adjustable means for positioning the nostril tubes and retaining them against tilting movement;

Fig. 7 is a transverse section, taken substantially on line 7--7 of Fig. 6, showing details of the adjustable arm piece;

Fig. 8 is an elevational view of yet another modified construction;

Fig. 9 is an elevational view of still another modification; and

Fig. 10 is a view showing details of an adjustable securing strap as utilized in the invention.

Proceeding now with a more detailed description of the invention, as shown in Fig. l, the nasal cannula of the present invention broadly comprises a pair of nostril tubes 10 and 11 which are adapted to be inserted in a patients nostrils and retained in operative position by suitable anchor means.

A variety of materials are suitable for constructing the nostril tubes as utilized in the nasal cannula of this invention, and for such purpose the material may consist of a flexible elastomeric material such as rubber or of a plastic such as highly plasticised polyvinyl chlorideacetate.

The type of material used will determine somewhat the dimensions of the tube. It is necessary that the nostril tubes be of suflicient size, i. e. at least inch outside diameter or more and of sufficient Wall thickness to give to such soft flexible material enough body so that movement of the face in talking, eating, etc., will not move these small nasal tubes around readily in the nostrils and create a tickling sensation. For example, a polyvinyl chloride-acetate elastomeric tube of approximately big inch 0. D. and A; inch I. D. is of suitable size for the purpose.

In utilizing soft rubber, such a tube should, for example, be about the same A inch 0. D. with approximately A inch I. D.

Other plastic materials'could be employed in place of the vinyl copolymer, but such material should be of the non-rigid or elastomeric type. One advantage in the use of plastic material over rubber is that a visual examination of the unit will at all times show whether any dirt or obstruction exists to the flow of gas. The length of the nostril tubes depends on the person using the device, but in general these tubes should be in the range between inch and 1 inch long with about inch as the average length most desirable.

In the construction shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the nostril tubes are provided with transverse passages 12 in each case intermediate the tube ends. A gas supply tube 13 is passed through the passages 12, and the engaged wall surfaces of the nostril tubes and gas supply tube are bonded so as to hold the nostril tubes in spaced apart parallel relation with the nostril entering ends above the gas supply tube and the opposite ends projecting below the gas supply tube. Communicating ports 14 are provided in the gas supply tube to form a flow connection in each case with the upper end of each nostril tube.

Ordinarily the lower projecting ends of the nasal cannula as thus far described above will hold the nostril tubes against tilting. It may be desirable in some cases because of unusual facial characteristics to provide additional means to prevent tilting movements of the nostril tubes, when the device is in a position of use as shown in Fig. 1 with portions 13a and 13b of the gas supply tube being carried back over the ears of the patient. For such purpose, the lowermost ends of the nostril tubes are each provided with an end plug 15 which may or may not have a right-angled deflected end portion 16 which is adapted to bear against the adjacent faceportion of the patient lying below the nose, so as to assist positioning and retaining the associated nostril tube in a position of use.

The arrangement shown in Figs. 4 and 5 is in general similar to the arrangement of Figs. 2 and 3, except that the nostril tubes 10 and 11 are constructed as a part of a U-shaped integral assembly in which the bridging portion is flattened to bring "opposite sides 17 and 18 together so as to form a rigid bridging portion 19. This bridging portion is disposed on the opposite side of the gas supply tube 13 from the nostril tubes, and serves to more rigidly retain the nostril tubes in position. The bridging portion 19 also serves to prevent tilting of the nostril tubes much in the same manner as the previously described plusg 15.

In the arrangement shown in Fig. 6, the nostril tubes, instead of extending on both sides of the gas supply tube 13 are set into an opening 20 in each case in the gas supply tube and bonded around its periphery to the gas supply tube wall. In this construction, the nostril tubes provide parallel extension projections or nipples which extend from one side only of the gas supply tube. In this construction, it will be noted that there is no tube portion extending on the opposite side of the gas supply tube for retaining the nostril tubes against tilting movement. In order to provide for adjustable positioning of the nostril tubes, small arm pieces 21-21 are positioned on opposite sides of the nostril tubes, these arm pieces having in each case an opening 22 for receiving the therethrough. The arm piece may, with be circumferentially shifted about the and retain the gas supply tube this connection, gas supply tube so as to accommodate nostril tubes against tilting movement. The arm pieces may, if desired, be lightened by providing additional openings 23 therein. The arm pieces may also be adjusted lengthwise of the gas supply tube with which it is associated, thus enabling positioning of these arm pieces at different locations so that the device may be confortably adapted to difierent persons.

Another construction which may be utilized in practising the present invention is shown in Fig. 8, wherein a single length of tubing is deformed into a U-shaped piece in which the end portions are utilized for the nostril tubes. Since the piece of tubing is of flexible nature, the tubing is retained in deformed U-shaped position by means of an elongate strip 24 of flexible material, this strip having end slits 25-25 for the aflixing of a suitable cord or retaining band which may be passed around the patients head. In this arrangement, instead of utilizing the gas supply tube 13 as securing means for the nasal cannula, the gas supply tube 13 is inthis case connetcted directly into the bridging portion of the U-shaped assembly so as to feed directly into the nostril tubes. Between the nostril tubes, the strip 24 may be provided with an edge notch 26 for accommodating the associated portions of the patients nose and to enable insertion of the nostril tubes the desired distance into the patients nostrils.

Another arrangement utilizing a single deformed tube to provide the U-shaped assembly having nostril tube endportions is shown in Fig. 9. In this arrangement, however, instead of utilizing external means for holding the deformed tube in its U-shaped position, an internal member 27 is placed in the bridging portion. This member may be a curved length of wire or other means which has suflicient rigidity to retain the deformed tube in its U-shape. By utilizing a material of a malleable characteristic such as aluminum, the wire may be bent to adjust the spacing between the nostril tubes. In this case, instead of connecting the gas supply tube 13 into the bridging portion as in the case of Fig. 8, the gas supply tube is severed and the respective ends connected into the legportions of the U-shaped tube assembly, the connected ends being bonded to prevent leakage.

In the arrangements such as disclosed in Figs. 2, 4, 6, and 9, it will be observed that the gas supply tube 13 performs a dual function of not only supplying gas to the nostril tubes, but also serves as the retaining medium for holding the device in a position of use. After passing the portions 13a and 13b of the-gas supply tube over the ears of the patient, these portions may be connected back of the patients head or under the patients chin by means of an elastic strip 28, as shown in Fig. 10. The ends of this strip are adjustably connected to the portions 13a and 13b, respectively. As shown, the end of the elastic strip is passed through a cylindrical member 29, looped around the associated por- 'tion of the gas supply tube and carried back through the cylindrical member, the end being tied with a knot 30 which prevents reversed withdrawal of the free end of the strip back through the cylindrical member. However, by sliding the cylindrical member along the main strand of the elastic strip, the loop may be loosened so as to permit positioning the connection along the associated tube portion 13:: or 13b at any desired location.

Various other modifications may suggest themselves to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of my invention, and, hence, I do not wish to be restricted to these specific forms shown or uses mentioned, except to the extent indicated in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A therapeutic device for feeding a gas into a patients nostrils, comprising: a pair of flexible nostril tubes, each having a transverse passage between its ends; a gas supply tube extending through the passages of said nostril tubes; means bonding the engaged walls of said tubes with the nostril tubes lying substantially in the same plane in spaced apart relation; flow passages respectively connecting said supply tube with said nostril tubes; and a plug member in a similar end of each nostril tube, having an outer end deflected at an angle to the plane of said nostril tubes.

2. A therapeutic device for feeding a gas into a patients nostrils, comprising: a pair of flexible nostril tubes, each having a transverse passage between its ends; a one-piece gas supply tube extending through the passages of said nostril tubes; means bonding the engaged walls of said tubes with the nostril tubes lying substantially in the same plane in spaced apart parallel relation and with portions of each nostril tube extending on opposite sides of the gas supply tube; and flow passages respectively connecting said supply tube with said nostril tubes.

3. A therapeutic device for feeding gas into a patients nostrils, comprising: conduit means of flexible material defining a continuous passage between its ends and including end portions adapted to be carried along the respective sides of the patients head for connection with a source of gas supply; a pair of nostril tubes of flexible material adapted for insertion into the patients nostrils, said tubes being integrally bonded to and supported by said conduit means in spaced apart relation to provide a permanently connected assembly in which the conduit forms an interconnecting flexible bridge between the nostril tubes; and flow passages respectively connecting said nostril tubes with said conduit means so as to receive gas therefrom.

4. A therapeutic device for feeding gas into a patients nostrils, comprising: conduit means of flexible material defining a continuous passage between its ends and including end portions adapted to be carried along the respective sides of the patientshead for connection with a source of gas supply; a pair of spaced nostril tubes of flexible material adapted for insertion in the patients nostrils, said tubes each being bonded to and supported by said conduit means to form a permanently connected assembly; flow passages respectively connecting said nostril tubes with said conduit means so as to receive gas therefrom; and means projecting from said conduit means in a direction opposite said nostril tubes adapted to engage the adjacent face portion of the patient and oppose tilting movement of said nostril tubes.

1 5. A therapeutic device according to claim 4 wherein the projecting means is a U-shaped portion extending between the secured ends of said nozzle tubes.

6. A therapeutic device according to claim 4, wherein the projecting means is a U-shaped portion extending between the secured ends of said nozzle tubes, and including an internal stiffening member positioned within the U-shaped portion.

7. A therapeutic device according to claim 4, wherein the projecting means comprises an arm piece carried by said conduit means,v and mounted for adjustable positioning circumferentially thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS France Jan. 18, 1934

US2693800A 1951-04-27 1951-04-27 Nasal cannula Expired - Lifetime US2693800A (en)

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Cited By (56)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2735432A (en) * 1956-02-21 hudson
US2868199A (en) * 1955-05-20 1959-01-13 Charles H Hudson Cannula
US3172407A (en) * 1961-09-29 1965-03-09 Baxter Don Inc Gas administration apparatus
US3393677A (en) * 1965-12-27 1968-07-23 Echard Alonzo Inhaling mask
US3513844A (en) * 1968-04-30 1970-05-26 Metro Hospital Supply Co Inc Adjustable nonrestrictive nasal cannula
US3643660A (en) * 1969-11-21 1972-02-22 Allan C Hudson Nasal cannula
US3754552A (en) * 1971-06-08 1973-08-28 Sandoz Ag Flexible nasal cannula
US4278082A (en) * 1979-05-11 1981-07-14 Blackmer Richard H Adjustable nasal cannula
US4367735A (en) * 1979-12-31 1983-01-11 Novametrix Medical Systems, Inc. Nasal cannula
US4454880A (en) * 1982-05-12 1984-06-19 Rudolph Muto Nasal hood with open-bottom mixing chamber
US4660555A (en) * 1984-09-21 1987-04-28 Payton Hugh W Oxygen delivery and administration system
US4774946A (en) * 1983-11-28 1988-10-04 Ackrad Laboratories, Inc. Nasal and endotracheal tube apparatus
EP0933094A3 (en) * 1998-01-29 1999-12-29 Oridion Medical, Ltd. Oral/nasal cannula
EP0960629A3 (en) * 1998-05-26 2000-08-23 Datex-Ohmeda Inc. High concentration NO pulse delivery device
WO2000064521A1 (en) * 1999-04-27 2000-11-02 Loma Linda University Medical Center Device and method for the administration of oxygen
US6238377B1 (en) * 1997-01-27 2001-05-29 Jin-Zhou Liu Nasal-nasopharyngeal cleaning system
EP1292350A1 (en) * 2000-06-19 2003-03-19 Australian Centre for Advanced Medical Technology, Ltd. Mask
US20040016432A1 (en) * 2001-02-06 2004-01-29 Harald Genger Anti-snoring device, method for reducing snoring, and a nasal air cannula
US6684882B1 (en) * 2002-03-15 2004-02-03 Kenneth R. Morine Respirator
US20040045552A1 (en) * 1997-04-29 2004-03-11 Curti James N. Nasal cannula
US6763832B1 (en) 1999-04-27 2004-07-20 Loma Linda University Medical Center Device and method for the administration of oxygen
US6805126B2 (en) * 1998-12-01 2004-10-19 Edward P. Dutkiewicz Oxygen delivery and gas sensing nasal cannula system
US6863069B2 (en) * 2000-03-13 2005-03-08 Innomed Technologies, Inc. Nasal ventilation interface
EP1694193A2 (en) * 2003-12-05 2006-08-30 Salter Labs Nasal and oral cannula supplying, sampling and/or detecting device
US20060266361A1 (en) * 2005-05-31 2006-11-30 Shara Hernandez Ventilation interface
US20070272247A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2007-11-29 Oridion Medical Ltd. Oral nasal cannula
US20080275357A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2008-11-06 Ron Porat Oral/nasal cannula
US7614401B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2009-11-10 Paul S. Thompson Nasal cannula assembly
US7640932B2 (en) 1997-04-29 2010-01-05 Salter Labs Nasal cannula for acquiring breathing information
US20100113956A1 (en) * 1997-04-29 2010-05-06 Salter Labs Nasal cannula for acquiring breathing information
US20100113955A1 (en) * 2008-10-30 2010-05-06 Joshua Lewis Colman Oral-nasal cannula system enabling co2 and breath flow measurement
US20100204603A1 (en) * 2007-09-25 2010-08-12 Oridion Medical (1987) Ltd. Airway tube
US20110146685A1 (en) * 2008-05-12 2011-06-23 Olivia Marie Allan Patient interface and aspects thereof
US8136527B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2012-03-20 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
JP2012526592A (en) * 2009-05-12 2012-11-01 フィッシャー アンド ペイケル ヘルスケア リミテッド Patient interface and its aspects
US20120305001A1 (en) * 2009-12-23 2012-12-06 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Interface
US8381729B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2013-02-26 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for minimally invasive respiratory support
US8418694B2 (en) 2003-08-11 2013-04-16 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Systems, methods and apparatus for respiratory support of a patient
US8567399B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2013-10-29 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for providing inspiratory and expiratory flow relief during ventilation therapy
US8677999B2 (en) 2008-08-22 2014-03-25 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for providing mechanical ventilation with an open airway interface
US8770193B2 (en) 2008-04-18 2014-07-08 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and controlling ventilator functions
US8776793B2 (en) 2008-04-18 2014-07-15 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and controlling ventilator functions
US8925545B2 (en) 2004-02-04 2015-01-06 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for treating sleep apnea
US8939152B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2015-01-27 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for humidifying a respiratory tract
US8955518B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2015-02-17 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for improving ventilation in a lung area
US8985099B2 (en) 2006-05-18 2015-03-24 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Tracheostoma spacer, tracheotomy method, and device for inserting a tracheostoma spacer
US9132250B2 (en) 2009-09-03 2015-09-15 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with an entrainment port and/or pressure feature
US9180270B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2015-11-10 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive open ventilation with gas delivery nozzles within an outer tube
US9320866B2 (en) 2006-07-14 2016-04-26 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9333315B2 (en) 2004-02-23 2016-05-10 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
USD777316S1 (en) 2014-03-07 2017-01-24 Seven Dreamers Laboratories, Inc. Nasal airway tube
US9561339B2 (en) 2009-11-18 2017-02-07 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Nasal interface
US9561338B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2017-02-07 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9884160B2 (en) 2004-04-02 2018-02-06 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9901700B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2018-02-27 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Nasal pillows for a patient interface
US9962512B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2018-05-08 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with a free space nozzle feature

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US2208633A (en) * 1937-07-19 1940-07-23 Air Reduction Anesthetizing apparatus
US2245969A (en) * 1939-11-27 1941-06-17 Francisco Charles Henry Nasal inhaler
GB618570A (en) * 1946-11-05 1949-02-23 British Oyxgen Company Ltd Improvements in or relating to nasal inhalation apparatus

Patent Citations (4)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR762087A (en) * 1932-12-28 1934-04-03 Inhaler
US2208633A (en) * 1937-07-19 1940-07-23 Air Reduction Anesthetizing apparatus
US2245969A (en) * 1939-11-27 1941-06-17 Francisco Charles Henry Nasal inhaler
GB618570A (en) * 1946-11-05 1949-02-23 British Oyxgen Company Ltd Improvements in or relating to nasal inhalation apparatus

Cited By (76)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2735432A (en) * 1956-02-21 hudson
US2868199A (en) * 1955-05-20 1959-01-13 Charles H Hudson Cannula
US3172407A (en) * 1961-09-29 1965-03-09 Baxter Don Inc Gas administration apparatus
US3393677A (en) * 1965-12-27 1968-07-23 Echard Alonzo Inhaling mask
US3513844A (en) * 1968-04-30 1970-05-26 Metro Hospital Supply Co Inc Adjustable nonrestrictive nasal cannula
US3643660A (en) * 1969-11-21 1972-02-22 Allan C Hudson Nasal cannula
US3754552A (en) * 1971-06-08 1973-08-28 Sandoz Ag Flexible nasal cannula
US4278082A (en) * 1979-05-11 1981-07-14 Blackmer Richard H Adjustable nasal cannula
US4367735A (en) * 1979-12-31 1983-01-11 Novametrix Medical Systems, Inc. Nasal cannula
US4454880A (en) * 1982-05-12 1984-06-19 Rudolph Muto Nasal hood with open-bottom mixing chamber
US4774946A (en) * 1983-11-28 1988-10-04 Ackrad Laboratories, Inc. Nasal and endotracheal tube apparatus
US4660555A (en) * 1984-09-21 1987-04-28 Payton Hugh W Oxygen delivery and administration system
US6238377B1 (en) * 1997-01-27 2001-05-29 Jin-Zhou Liu Nasal-nasopharyngeal cleaning system
US6736792B1 (en) 1997-01-27 2004-05-18 James Zhou Liu Nasal-nasopharyngeal-cleaning system
US7640932B2 (en) 1997-04-29 2010-01-05 Salter Labs Nasal cannula for acquiring breathing information
US20040045552A1 (en) * 1997-04-29 2004-03-11 Curti James N. Nasal cannula
US20100113956A1 (en) * 1997-04-29 2010-05-06 Salter Labs Nasal cannula for acquiring breathing information
US6422240B1 (en) * 1998-01-29 2002-07-23 Oridion Medical Ltd. Oral/nasal cannula
EP0933094A3 (en) * 1998-01-29 1999-12-29 Oridion Medical, Ltd. Oral/nasal cannula
EP0960629A3 (en) * 1998-05-26 2000-08-23 Datex-Ohmeda Inc. High concentration NO pulse delivery device
US6805126B2 (en) * 1998-12-01 2004-10-19 Edward P. Dutkiewicz Oxygen delivery and gas sensing nasal cannula system
WO2000064521A1 (en) * 1999-04-27 2000-11-02 Loma Linda University Medical Center Device and method for the administration of oxygen
US6763832B1 (en) 1999-04-27 2004-07-20 Loma Linda University Medical Center Device and method for the administration of oxygen
US6863069B2 (en) * 2000-03-13 2005-03-08 Innomed Technologies, Inc. Nasal ventilation interface
US7201169B2 (en) 2000-06-19 2007-04-10 Australian Centre For Advanced Medical Technology Ltd. Mask
US20030172936A1 (en) * 2000-06-19 2003-09-18 Paul Wilkie Mask
EP1292350A4 (en) * 2000-06-19 2006-05-24 Au Ct Advanced Med Technology Mask
EP1292350A1 (en) * 2000-06-19 2003-03-19 Australian Centre for Advanced Medical Technology, Ltd. Mask
US7080645B2 (en) * 2001-02-06 2006-07-25 Seleon Gmbh Anti-snoring device, method for reducing snoring, and a nasal air cannula
US20040016432A1 (en) * 2001-02-06 2004-01-29 Harald Genger Anti-snoring device, method for reducing snoring, and a nasal air cannula
US6684882B1 (en) * 2002-03-15 2004-02-03 Kenneth R. Morine Respirator
US8955518B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2015-02-17 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for improving ventilation in a lung area
US8381729B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2013-02-26 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for minimally invasive respiratory support
US7614401B2 (en) 2003-08-06 2009-11-10 Paul S. Thompson Nasal cannula assembly
US8418694B2 (en) 2003-08-11 2013-04-16 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Systems, methods and apparatus for respiratory support of a patient
US8136527B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2012-03-20 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
US8573219B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2013-11-05 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
EP1694193A2 (en) * 2003-12-05 2006-08-30 Salter Labs Nasal and oral cannula supplying, sampling and/or detecting device
EP1694193A4 (en) * 2003-12-05 2011-09-07 Salter Labs Nasal and oral cannula supplying, sampling and/or detecting device
US8925545B2 (en) 2004-02-04 2015-01-06 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for treating sleep apnea
US9550038B2 (en) 2004-02-23 2017-01-24 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9339622B2 (en) 2004-02-23 2016-05-17 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9539405B2 (en) 2004-02-23 2017-01-10 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9333315B2 (en) 2004-02-23 2016-05-10 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9974914B2 (en) 2004-02-23 2018-05-22 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9884160B2 (en) 2004-04-02 2018-02-06 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US20080275357A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2008-11-06 Ron Porat Oral/nasal cannula
US7559327B2 (en) * 2005-05-31 2009-07-14 Respcare, Inc. Ventilation interface
US20060266361A1 (en) * 2005-05-31 2006-11-30 Shara Hernandez Ventilation interface
US20070272247A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2007-11-29 Oridion Medical Ltd. Oral nasal cannula
US8985099B2 (en) 2006-05-18 2015-03-24 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Tracheostoma spacer, tracheotomy method, and device for inserting a tracheostoma spacer
US9320866B2 (en) 2006-07-14 2016-04-26 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9517317B2 (en) 2006-07-14 2016-12-13 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US9675773B2 (en) * 2007-09-25 2017-06-13 Oridion Medical (1987) Ltd. Airway tube
US20100204603A1 (en) * 2007-09-25 2010-08-12 Oridion Medical (1987) Ltd. Airway tube
US8567399B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2013-10-29 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for providing inspiratory and expiratory flow relief during ventilation therapy
US8776793B2 (en) 2008-04-18 2014-07-15 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and controlling ventilator functions
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