US2661030A - Package binding tool - Google Patents

Package binding tool Download PDF

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US2661030A
US2661030A US65448A US6544848A US2661030A US 2661030 A US2661030 A US 2661030A US 65448 A US65448 A US 65448A US 6544848 A US6544848 A US 6544848A US 2661030 A US2661030 A US 2661030A
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Prior art keywords
binder
magazine
seal
sealing
handle
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US65448A
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George A Crosby
Arvid I Ericsson
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Signode Corp
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Signode Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B13/00Bundling articles
    • B65B13/18Details of, or auxiliary devices used in, bundling machines or bundling tools
    • B65B13/24Securing ends of binding material
    • B65B13/34Securing ends of binding material by applying separate securing members, e.g. deformable clips
    • B65B13/345Hand tools

Description

Dec. 1, 1953 e. A. CROSBY ET AL PACKAGE BINDING TOOL 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 15, 194s Dec. 1, 1953 G. A. CROSBY ET AL 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Dec. 1, 1953 e. A. CROSBY ETAL PACKAGE BINDING TOOL 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 15, 1948 A w?) 1% V Deg. 1, 953 G. A. CROSBY Em 2,661 030 PACKAGE BINDING TOOL Filed Dec. 15, 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Alli.
IIIIIIIHH? Patented Dec. 1, 1953 gimme 2,661,030 PACKAGE BINDING TOOL George A. Crosby, Park Ridge, and Arvid I. Ericsson, Chicago, Ill., assignors to Signode' Steel Strapping Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Delaware Application December 15, 1948, Serial No. 65,448
11 Claims.
Our invention relates to package binding tools.
More specifically it relates to a tool particularly adapted for use in binding relatively soft or fragile packages, which is operable to hold the overlapping ends of a package encircling flexible metallic binder in aligned relation and tension the same to the proper degree, whereupon the tool is operable to place a seal upon the overlapping ends of the package encircling binder loop and deform the same to produce a seal-joint, permanently anchoring together the binder ends, and thereafter the tool is operable through a further stage for transferring a seal from a magazine to the sealing jaws of the tool to condition the tool for another sealing operation.
In the normal operation of a tool of this type, a considerable amount of force must be applied thereto in forming the seal-joint. Heretofore this force was transmitted, through the base of the tool, to the package being bound so that relatively fragile packages might be crushed and soft or easily compressible packages might not afford adequate resistance properly to support the tool, at least not without objectionable distortion. In addition to this disadvantage of the tools of the prior art, difficulty is sometimes encountered with the seal feeding mechanism in that a seal becoming accidentally jammed in the magazine cannot be as readily removed as might be desired. v
The tool of the present invention is constructed in part from a lightweight metal alloy, thus reducing its total weight so that it does not bear as heavily on the package being bound and isless fatiguing to handle. In addition to a conventional operating handleit is provided with a reaction handle against which a. forcemay be exerted when a seal-joint is being formed sufficient to counterbalance the force exerted on the operating handle so that relatively little if any operating force needs be transmitted to the package being bound. Thus the tool is especially adapted for binding relatively soft or fragile packages. Also incorporated in the tool are an improved binder strap aligning lever for holding the overlapping ends of the package binder in proper relation while they are being tensioned, and an improved seal magazine and simplified seal ejector, all of which tend to obviate the disadvantageous features above mentioned which may be more or less inherent in package binding tools as presently manufactured.
Accordingly, an object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved package binding tool which is particularly adaptable for use in binding relatively spft .0 1 fragile packages,
Another object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved package binding tool having an operating handle operable to both tension a package encircling binder and to form a joint in the overlapping ends of the tensioned package-looping binder, and a reaction handle through which a force may be exerted to counterbalance the force exerted on the operating handle during the sealing operation and thereby prevent the operating force from being transmitted to the package being bound.
A further object of the invention is the provision of anew and improved package binding tool incorporating a magazine for the storage of seals used in forming a joint between the overlapping ends of a package encircling binder strap having guide means formed at its outlet and for guiding seals into the sealing mechanism of the tool when the seals are being transferred from the magazine to the sealing mechanism.
A still further object of the invention is the provision of a. new and improved package bindbinding tool having an outlet (in the magazine as above set forth), one wall of which is hinged to permit pivotal movement of the same from seal engaging position so that a seal jammed in the outlet may be readily removed therefrom.
Yet another object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved package binding tool having a magazine as above set forth and an improved ejector for transferring seals from the outlet of the magazine to the sealing mecha= nism of the tool operable through the medium of a camon the operatinghandle of the tool, and an adjustable connection between the cam and ejector for varying the throw of the ejector so that the latter will be held in a position preparatory to transferring a seal until the operating handle has been moved sufliciently to condition the sealing mechanism for receiving a seal.
Still another object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved package binding tool having a binder tensioning mechanism mov-' able into and out of binder engaging position, and an improved binder aligning lever for engaging the edges of the overlapping ends of a package binder to hold the same in aligned relation while they are being tensioned, which lever is adapted to be moved into and out of binder engaging position simultaneously with the movement of the tensioning mechanism into and out of binder engaging position.
A further object of the invention is the provision of a relatively inexpensive lightweight. tool of the class described of generally improved and simplified construction which is positive in operation and simple and easy to manipulate.
Other objects, advantages and capabilities of the invention will become apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:
Fig. 1 is an elevational view of one side of the tool showing in full lines the position of the parts when the tool is at rest and indicating, in dotdash lines, the position of the operating parts at the beginning of a joint forming or sealing operation;
Fig. 2 is an elevational view of the side of the tool opposite that of Fig. 1, showing the parts in the position they assume when a joint is completed;
Fig. 3 is a vertical section of the tool in normal position;
Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a section on the line.5--5 of Fig. 3 and Fig. 6 is a fragmentary front elevation with the base of the tool in section showing the binder alinging lever in inoperative position.
For the purpose of explanation the improved features of the present invention have been shown and will be described as incorporated in a combined binder-tensioning and sealing tool of the same general type. as that set forth in Patents Nos. 2,336,264 and 2,267,612, both issued to John H. Leslie, II.
Referring particularly toFigs. 1, 2 and 3, the tool comprises a main frame A which is adapted to rest upon the package being bound and piv otally supports a binder-tensioning mechanism B and an oscillatable auxiliary frame C. The auxiliary frame carries a sealing or joint forming mechanims D, a seal magazine E and a seal feeding mechanism F for feeding seals from the magazine into the. sealing mechanism. An operating handle G is pivotally secured to the auxiliary frame 0. This handle is adapted to be oscillated through a first range of movement during which the auxiliary frame moves with it for actuating the tensioning mechanism B; then handle G may be pivoted beyond the first range of movement. to bring the sealing mechanism into position over the overlapping ends of the tensioned package-looping binder strap and thereafter it may be forced through a. further or third range of movement to cause the sealing mecha nism D to be actuated to form a. joint uniting the overlapping ends of the package encircling binder loop. Finally the: handle G is returned to effect the feeding of a new seal to the. sealing mechanism D and to return the auxiliary frame C to its normal. or rest position.
The main frame A, which may be, formed from an aluminum alloy casting, is provided with a fiat bottom surface ill for resting on the package which is to be bound and has an integrally formed handle 12 to strengthen the main frame and facilitate the handling of the tool. At its forward end this handle it merges into a wall !4 extending vertically from the base portion of the main frame and a vertical flange I5 spaced from and parallel to the wall M. The auxiliary frame projects into this recess between wall l4 and flange l and is pivoted to the main frame by a bolt [6 which extends through the wall and flange. The flange i5 is also separated from the front portion of the base of the main frame by a longitudinally extending channel I8 between the flange. and the top surface of a laterally extending front foot 22, which foot forms the front.
end of the base of the main frame A. This foot has an opening 24 adjacent the front end thereof into which the outer end of the sealing mechanism D projects when the sealing mechanism is moved to joint-forming position over the overlapping ends of a package encircling binderstrap, as will be later explained.
In the normal use of the tool a binder strap is looped around a package and the tool is placed in position on the package by sliding the front foot 22 laterally under the overlapping ends of the binder loop so that these overlapping ends are positioned in the channel 18 and below the binder-tensioning mechanism B. Ordinarily, the tool is so placed that the anchored end of the binder loop will be on the bottom and will extend to the right, as seen in Fig. 1, while the unsevered and movable end of the binder loop is on top and extends to the left, as seen in Fig. 1.
A hard metal clutch plug 26 (preferably crowned toward the center as best shown in Fig. 3) having a knurled upper surface for engaging the under surface of the bottom overlapping end of the binder strap loop is threaded into the foot 22 so as axially to align with the vertical axis of the tensioning mechanism B when in operative position. This plug, which is threaded for adjustment relative to the tensioning mechanism, may be locked in any adjusted position by a wire lock or other conventional means. During a tensioning operation it holds the bottom overlapped end of the binder loop stationary while the upper overlapping end is moved to the left, as seen in Fig. 1, by the tensioningmechanism B to tighten the loop around the package.
In order to insure the proper alignment of the overlapping ends of the binder strap, a metal guide plug 28 is secured in the side wall 14 of the main frame A adjacent the rear end of the channel It and a front strap guide 30, in the form of a notched plate, is secured on the forward end of the front foot 22 by means of screws 3i countersunk into the plate 30 and threaded into the base N3 of the main frame, as shown most clearly in Fig. 3. The strap ends are held in aligned relation against these rear and front guides, While the binder is being tensioned, by means of an improved binder strap aligning or guiding lever 32, best seen in Fig. 6. Strap guide 30 has a projection or lip 33 which overhangs the inner edge of the strap to prevent undue strap separation in front of the tool.
As shown in Figs. 3 and 6', this strap aligning lever, which extends transversely of the foot 22, is pivotally secured at one end in a slot 34 formed in an upwardly extending lug 36 cast integrally with the base of the main frame A. The lug is located forward of the axis of the tensioning mechanism B so that operation of the latter is not interfered with by the aligning lever 32 and the lever pivots upon a pin 38 which extends horizontally through it and the lug 36. This pin has a head on one end and a cotter pin may be inserted through an opening in the other end where it extends through the lug 36 to prevent the pin from coming out of position.
The bottom surface of the lever 32 forms a straight edge for a portion of its length as indicated at 40 and this straight edge terminates in a depending shoulder 42 and an outwardly extending portion 44 having a bottom edge lying below the plane of the straight edge 49. When the lever 32 is lowered to operative position this. portion 41% enters a slot 46, formed in the top of the foot 22, and while the edge 40 engages the top surface of the upper overlapping binder end, the
means for moving the lever 32 into an out of operative position and for locking it in these positions will be later described.
The auxiliary frame C and tensioning mechanism B are pivoted to main frame A by means of bolt l6 essentially in the manner disclosed in the beforementioned Leslie patents, the tensioning mechanism being secured upon an eccentric portion of the bolt (indicated at 52 in Fig. 3) so that by turning the bolt in a counterclockwise direction the tensioning mechanism is lowered and brought into engagement with the top overlapping strap end over the central portion of the clutch plug 26. And by turning the bolt it in a clockwise direction the tensioning mechanism can be raised out of engagement with the upper binder strap end.
The bolt [6 is normally biased in a counter-v clockwise direction to move the tensioning mechanism to operative position by means of a coil spring enclosed in a housing 54. This construction is fully described in Leslie Patent No. 2,336,- 264 and, therefore, will not be shown or described in detail herein. An actuating handle 58, which has a cam 58 nonrotatably secured on the end of the bolt I6 opposite the spring housing 56, is provided for rotating the bolt in a clockwise direction against the tension of its biasing spring and thereby raise the tensioning mechanism out of operative or strap engaging position. The shank 58 is secured to the bolt It by means of a cap screw 60 threaded into a tapped bore in the bolt IS. The bolt is locked at the limit of its clockwise movement by a latch 62 pivotally secured to the main frame A upon a pin 64 secured in the flange l of the main frame, as shown most clearly in Fig. 1. This latch 62 is normally urged to handle locking position as shown in Fig. 1
by a spring 66 located in a curved opening 58 in the latch and bearing at its lower end against a fixed abutment to be hereinafter described and at its upper end against the upper end of the opening 68 so that the spring urges the latch 62 in a counterclockwise direction. The limit of the movement of-latch 62 in the counterclockwise direction is determined by the engagement of the lower end of the opening 68 with the fixed abutment.
In the raised position of latch 62 a notch 10 in its forward edge is adapted to engage with a pin 12 secured on the inner side of the cam 58 of the handle 56 but only when the latter is turned to the limit of its movement in a clockwise direction to raise the tensioning mechanism to inoperative position. Notch Hi is so formed that it firmly grips the pin 12 and causes latch 62 to lock the handle 56 in this position againstthe tension of the biasing spring acting on bolt It. The latch 62 may, however, be disengaged from the pin 12 to release the handle 56 by the operator pressing downwardly on the outer end of an arm 74 which extends rearwardly from the body of the latch. Thereupon the biasing spring rotates bolt, IS in a clockwise direction and lowers the tensioning mechanism B to operative position and in addition lowers the aligning lever 32 to operative position and locks the same in this position as will now be described.
Along its edge opposite handle 55, the cam 58 is formed with a notch 76 below which the cam projects as a lug 18. Normally, when handle 58 is locked in its extreme clockwise position by latch 62 and the tensioning mecahnism is thereby held out of strap engaging position as shown in Figs. 1 and 6, notch 16 opens rearwardly and substantially horizontally and lug 1-8 engaging lip 48 holds strap aligning lever 32 raised above foot 22. But when the handle 56 is released from latch 62 to enable the tensioning mechanism B to move to operative strap engaging position, the
cam 58 is rotated counterclockwise sufficiently to cause the upper wall of its notch it to engage lip 48 of aligning lever 32 and rotate that lever far enough to depress its depending portion 44 into the slot 46 in forward foot 22. In this position the shoulder 42 of lever 32 engages the edges of the overlapping strap ends to insure that they remain in proper horizontal alignment, as previously explained. A shoulder 80 is also formed on cam 53 at such a location that it engages the top surface of the lip 48 on lever 32 when the handle 56 is rotated to its extreme counterclockwise position and, as a consequence, lever 32 has been depressed into position to close channel It and to align the overlapping strap ends, and thereby the strap aligning lever 32 is locked in closed or strap aligning position as long as the tensioning mechanism is in strap engaging posi- .tion.
The tensioning mechanism B comprises a pair of feed wheels 82 secured on either side of a ratchet wheel 84. This assembly is rotated by an actuating pawl 86 secured in the auxiliary frame C upon a pin 88 extending between and secured against removal from the side walls of the auxiliary frame by any suitable means. The pawl 86 is held in engagement with the teeth 99 on the ratchet wheel 84 by a spring 92. When the auxiliary frame C is rotated in one direction. e. g., clockwise as seen in Fig. 3, the pawl engages in the ratchet teeth 99 and rotates the feed wheels 82 in a clockwise direction, thereby effecting movement of the upper strap end of the binder loop over the lower strap end which is held stationary on the clutch plug 35 in the front foot 22. A holding pawl 531i is pivoted to the main frame A upon a pin 95 extending transversely through the base of the main frame. This pawl engages the teeth of ratchet wheel 34 and prevents reverse rotation of the feed wheels 85 2 during counterclockwise rotation of the auxiliary frame B. The outer end of. this pin 96 extends through the opening SS in the body of latch 62 and thus forms a guide for the movements of the latch and also the abutment against which one end of the spring 66 rests, as previously de scribed.
The auxiliary frame C is provided with an operating handle 9d which is pivotally secured thereto by a shouldered pivot pin liiEi and also with a reaction handle m2 rigidly secured thereto by means of a pair of pins ltd. The operating handle 98 may be cast from an aluminum alloy and has a channel use along its underside in which the reaction handle is adapted to nest, as shown in Fig. 3. The forward end of the operating handle 98 is' formed with a pair of flanges Hi8 spaced sufiiciently so that they straddle the auxiliary frame. The enlarged portion of the shouldered pivot pin I 00 extends through one 7 V flange I08 and theauxiliary frame C and the shoulder thereon abuts against the other flange I08 while the reduced portion extends through this latter flange. A nut III} is threaded on this reduced end to lock the pivot pin in position.
The operating handle 88 may, when desired, be retained to move in unison with both the auxiliary frame C and reaction handle I02. This retention is accomplished by a spring pressed latch H2 which, as shown in Fig. 3, is pivotally carried upon a pin H4 secured in the auxiliary frame C. A notch H5 in latch H2 is engageable over a cross pin H8 which extends between and is fixedly secured in the flanges IEHl on the operating handle. The latch H2 is biased by a spring I29 in a direction to cause notch lit to engage pin III} with considerable pressure but, because of its configuration, the pin can be forced out of the notch and the latch disengaged when a pressure greater than that required to oscillate the auxiliary frame C and operate the tensioning mechanism B is exerted on handle $8. When the latch IE2 is engaged with the pin H8, it holds the handle 93 in fixed relation with the auxiliary frame C and the reaction handle I82, as shown in Figs. 1 and 3, and movements of the operating handle effects like movements in the auxiliary frame and reaction handle. But, when the handie 98 has reached the limit of its first range of movement in a counterclockwise direction to bring the sealing mechanism D down to the over-- lapping strap ends, as shown in dot-dash lines in Fig. 1, further effort exerted on the handle in a counterclockwise direction to actuate the sealing mechanism causes the latch I I2 to become disengaged from the pin H3. The result is that the handle 98 may be pivoted through a second range of counterclockwise movement upon the pivot pin IGEI, and independently of both the auxiliary frame and the reaction handle, to cause the sealing mechanism D to be operated and form a joint in the overlapping ends of the binder strap. Upon its return or clockwise movement from the limit of this second range of movement, the operating handle 88 causes the seal feeding mechanism F to load a, seal in the sealing mechanism D, thereby conditioning the tool for another sealing operation, as will be later explained.
The reaction handle I32 is somewhat shorter in length than the operating handle and is fixedly secured at one end to the auxiliary frame C as before mentioned. On its under side the lever IE2 is provided with a downwardly extending stop lug I22 adapted to engage the top of the main frame A to limit movement of the handles and auxiliary frame in a clockwise direction.
It will be apparent that in the conventionally constructed tensioning and binding tools the force exerted on the operating handle when the latter is moved through its second range of movement to form a joint in the overlapping binder strap ends is transmitted to the package being bound through the base of the tool. This force. which is normally more than required for binder tensioning, may be of such magnitude that anything but relatively heavy and substantial packages will be deformed or crushed by the tool. This disadvantage of binding tools as presently constructed is obviated in the tool of the present invention through the use of the reaction handle IE2. When the operating handle 98 is pivoted in a counterclockwise direction beyond its first range of movement, i. e., from the position shown in dot-dash lines in Fig. 1 to the position shown in Fig. 2 at which point formation of a joint has been completed, the reaction handle and auxiliary frame remain stationary so that the operat ing handle moves away from the reaction handle and a force maybe exerted on the latter by the operator in a clockwise direction to balance or counteract the force exerted on the operating handle 98. These two opposing forces, one toward the package being bound and the other away from it, can be made such by the operator that they substantially counterbalance each other and no appreciable operating force, or at least none of destructive intensity, need be exerted on the package.
The sealing mechanism D for placing a seal over the overlapping ends of a package-encircling binder loop and forming a joint therein is carried on the auxiliary frame C between the wall I 24 thereof and a sealer plate I26 spaced from the wall I24 by a pair of spacers I28, one of which is located on each side of the auxiliary frame adjacent the rear end thereof. The forward end of the sealer plate I26 is fixedly secured in position by a bolt I30 which is threaded into the wall I24 of the auxiliary frame C. The rear end of the sealer plate I26 engages between the upper end of the spacing collars I28 and the underside of the bottom wall of the seal magazine E. This rear end of the assembly is secured together by a pair of screws I32, Fig. 5, one on each side of the auxiliary frame C. These screws have heads seated in counterbored openings in laterally extending bosses I34 onthe upper edge of the auxiliary frame C, and the screws extend through the spacers I28 and the plate I26 and are threaded into laterally extending bosses I38 on the bottom wall of the magazine E aligned with the bosses I 34.
Within the space between the top of the auxiliary frame C and the sealer plate I26 are secured a pair of opposed holding jaws I 33 for preventing buckling of a seal when a joint is being formed, and a pair of opposed sealing jaws are, one pair on each side of the holding jaws, for deforming the seal and overlapping strap ends to form a joint and the actuating mechanism for operating these laws.
Referring to Fig. 5, it will be seen that the sealing and holding jaws have forward inwardly projecting tips I42 and that the sealing jaws I 30 have, rearwardly or inwardly of these tips, crimping lugs I43. The jaws pivot upon fixed fulcrum pins hi4, but the rear ends of the sealing jaws I49 are extended backwardly beyond the rear ends of the holding jaws I38, these rear ends of the holding jaws being fixed with respect to the sealing jaws MI] through the agency of a pair of pins I45 extending between the sealing jaws and through the ends of the holding jaws I 38 so that the latter are fixed with respect to and move with the sealing jaws 3-39. The upper ends of these pins I46 project beyond the top surface of the upper sealing jaws for a purpose which will be described hereinafter. The sealing jaws I iIi are spaced from the holding jaws I38 by a pair of plates I 48, Fig. 3, secured in fixed relation upon the fixed fulcrum pins I4 4. The forward edges of these spacer plates M8 act as an anvil for pressing a seal into position over the overlapping ends of a binder strap loop when the sealing mechanism is moved to joint forming position and assist in preventing buckling of the sealwhen it is deformed in the formation of a joint.
The rear ends of the sealing jaws are pivotally secured to one end of a pair of jaw actuating 9 links I50 by means of fulcrum pins I52. These ends of the jaws embrace the ends of the links to which they are secured and the portion of the pins I52 passing through the links I50 is of en larged diameter relative to the ends which engage in the ends of the jaws I40 so that these pins As previously indicated, the sealing jaws I48 are actuated to form a joint during the course of the second range of counterclockwise movement of the operating handle 98 when the latter pivots with respect to' the auxiliary frame C. This actuation is efiected through an operating link I80 secured at one of its ends upon a drive pin I62 extending through the upper ends of the flanges I08 on the operating handle 98. The other end of the link I60 is engaged in a vertical slot I64 in crosshead I58 and pivotally secured thereto by an eccentric pin I68. This pin is engaged and locked in position by a set screw I68 threaded into an opening in the link. Slidable upon the top side of the sealer plate I28 adjacent its forward end is a cutter blade I10. This blade has a tapered and hardened CLllh ting edge I12 which is moved into engagement with the upper overlapping end of a binder strap and scores the same while a joint is being former so that the binder may be easily broken along this score line by bending it back and forth a few times. At its rear end the cutter blade has cutwardly extending wings I14, Fig. 4, with transverse sockets I16 formed therein, and the blade is secured in position in a channel I18 between the bottom of the magazine E and the top of the sealer plate I28 with the sockets I19 engaged over the upper extremities of the pins I48 so that the outward and downward movement of these pins during the actuation of the sealing mechanism to form a joint will be translated into down ward movement of the blade.
'When the operating handle 98 is pivoted through its second range of counterclockwise movement from the position shown in dot-dash lines in Fig. l to the position shown in Fig. 2, the link I60 moves the crosshead I56 downwardly from the position shown in Fig. and the links I 58' cause the rear ends of the two pairs of sealing jaws I46 to separate, thereby moving the faces I I42.of these jaws toward each other and causing the scoring blade I18 to move downwardly and score the binder strap. The links I58 exert a toggle action on the jaws, thereby greatly increasing the force exerted thereon so that a rela tively small movement of the crossheadi56 causes the jaws I 40 to bend a seal around the strap ends and as the crosshead moves further down the faces of the jaws deform the seal and overlapping strap ends to form a permanent joint therein.
After a joint has been formedand during the course of the return of the handle 98 from joint forming position to the position shown in dotdash lines in Fig. l, the crosshead I56 is moved upwardly by the link I60 and draws the upper ends of the links I50 upwardly, thuspulling the rear ends'of the jaws I40 toward each other and causing the jawst'o pivot upon pins I44 so that the faces I42 of. the jaws separate. 1 At the same time the scoring; blade I is retracted. Before 10 the operating handle 98 is fully returned from its second range of movement to the position shown in dot-dash lines in Fig. 1, the faces of the sealing jaws I40 have separated sufficiently to release the binder so that the sealing mechanism can be moved away from its'joint forming position.
. In general, the seal magazine is a box-like structure open at both ends and is preferably cast from aluminum alloy. It has a bottom wall I80, side walls I82 and I84, Fig. 4, a top wall I86, and an open outlet end I88. The inner surfaces of these walls arev machined to form smooth uideways for a follower I which is slidable therein and engages against the top seal in a stack of seals I92 carried in the magazine. This follower I90 is normally urged toward the lower or outlet end of the magazine by a spring I94 housed in a hollow boss I96 projecting outwardly from the side wall I84 near the magazine outlet I88. The spring is wound on a spindle I98 extending into the boss I96 and one of its ends is secured to the spindle I98 while the other end is, drawn out of thehousing I96 and secured to the follower I90 so that a pull toward the magazine outlet is exerted by the spring on the follower I90. As a result the seals in the magazine are urged toward the outlet end I 88.
. These seals 200 which are made from easily deformable sheet metal are generally channel shaped in cross section, as indicated in Fig. 5, but the sides or flanges 202 fiare outwardly slightly from the back so that the seals may be stacked in nested relation, but the backs of adjacent seals will be held in slightly spaced relation with respect to each other, as shown in Fig. 4. This permits the forwardmost seal in the stack I92 to be stripped therefrom by movement in an endwise direction without disturbing other seals in the stack. Thus, when the feeding mechanism is actuated in a feeding direction it moves only the foremost seal in the stack I92 in an endwise direction so that the seals may be fed one at a time by the feeding mechanism.
Occasionally a seal may become jammed in the outlet of the magazine. Heretofore such jammed seals were difiicult to remove. A feature of the tool of the present invention is the means provided for the removal of jammed seals. Referring to Figs. 1 and 4, it will be seen that the side wall I82 of the magazine E terminates short of the outlet end I88 of the magazine. This open portion of the wall is closed by a trap door 204 pivotally secured upon a pin 206 having its opposite ends seated in openings in the bosses 208 and 2H) formed on the top and bottom walls respectively of the magazine. A spring 2 I2 is wound on this pin 206 and has one end engaged against the side wall I82 of the magazine and the other end engaged against the side of the trap door 204 so thatthe latter is urged to closed position by this spring. Adjacent its lower inner edge the door 204 is provided with a longitudinally extending ledge 2I4. A similar ledge 2I6 oppositely disposed to the first is formed in a removable guide 2 I 8 secured to the fixed wall I84 of the magazine by a pair of countersunk screws 22 0 These ledges 2 I4 and 2I6 project inwardly toward each other sufilciently so that the edges of the side walls 202 of the foremost seal in the magazine engage the ledges. Thus, the ledges act as a stop to prevent the seals from being expelled from the magazine by the spring pressed follower I90 and in addition act as guideways for guiding a 'sealfor movement in an endwise diaceipeo i l rection into the jaws of the sealing mechanism D. The ledges 2 I4 and 2 I6 are of course properly positioned so that a seal is correctly guided into the sealing mechanism.
Should a seal accidentally become jammed in the outlet, the trap door 204 may be pivoted outwardly on the pin 2% against the tension of the spring 2I2 a sufficient distance to disengage the ledge 2% from the edge of the forward seal in the stack. Ordinarily, the jammed seal may then be readily removed from the magazine'by sliding it out in a lateral direction. While this is being done, the stack I92 is held in the magazine against the ledge 2I6 on the fixed wall of the magazine so that the entire stack is not expelled from the magazine when the door 204 is pivoted outwardly. To facilitate pivoting of the door 284 a handle 222 is provided thereon extending upwardly from the door. This may be pressed inwardly when it 'is desired to open thedoo'r.
In addition to the advantages above'de'scribed the pivoted door also permits the magazine to be loaded by inserting a stack ofseals from the forward oroutlet end of the magazine without the necessity for removing the follower therefrom. The door 204 is merely held in open positionanda stack of seals Hi2 inserted in the magazine "and forced backwardly until the edge of the last seal in the stack is in position to engage upon theledge 2 IS. The stack is then held in positionand the door 2134 released to bring the ledge '2 I4 'into engagement with the opposite edge of the foremost seal.
The seal ejector actuator for operating the ejector which strips seals from the stack I92 and moves them into the sealing mechanism comprises a generally L-shaped-aluminum alloy cast ing 224 which is pivotally secured intermediate its ends to a pair of lugs 225 upstanding from the top wall I86 of the magazine adjacent the rear end thereof. This actuator pivots upon a pin 228 and is normally urged in a seal ejecting direction to the position shown in Figs. 1 and 3 by a relatively heavy-spring 232 coiled upon the pin 223. One end or this spring bears against the top wall I86 of the magazine while the other end bears against the horizontal portion of the ejector actuator 22 and exerts a force thereon tendingto move thesame to the position shown in Figs. land 3.
The ejector proper comprises an elongated blade 23:3 pivotally secured at one end upon a pm 236 carried in-a head 238 on the tip of an arm 2G0 forming part of the ejector actuator zz. The blade 23% is slightly bowed and'is provided with a stripper tip 2W bent inwardly at a slight angle to insure its engagement with the edge of the body of the foremost seal 290 in the 'inagazine E. A tension spring 2 14 coiled'about the pin 23% and having its opposite ends engaged with the arm 24c and the blade '23s urgesthe latter in a direction to bring the stripper tip into engagement with the end of a stop screw 2% thread ed into the end'of the top wallof the magazine centrally thereof. This screw 2% projects sufficiently so that the stripper tip 2 32 engaging thereon will be located directly opposite the edge of the body of the foremost seal in the magazine when the ejector actuator draws the ejector blade outwardly to a preparatory position for ejecting a seal from the magazine, as shown in Fig. 2.
The ejector actuator is rotated to this position by means of a sector shaped cam 248 which engages with an adjustable stop screw 250 threaded in the end of a bellc'rank arm 252 formed integrally withthe actuator. This screw may be locked in a desired position of adjustment by a lock nut 25-4. The cam 248 is secured upon the outer reduced end of the operating handle pivot pin Hill with the axis of its curved edge coinciding With the axis of the pin I06, and it is locked against rotation by the pin I62 which passes through the earn 243 and the flanges Its of the operating handle and connects the operating link 60 to the handle 9%. Thus, it will be seen that the cam 243 and operating handle 98- pivot together when the handle is moved about pin I08.
When the operating handle 98 is moved through its first range of movement the auxiliary frame C oscillates with it, as previously explained, and the cam 248 remains in fixed position with respect to the ejector actuator 22-45. However, when the operating handle is actuated further and enters upon its second range of movement, the cam 243, being fixedly secured to the operating handle, pivots with this handle. It is so fixed with relation to the tip of screw 25!? that upon initiation of movement of the operating handle 88 into its second range of movement a straight radial face 256 on the cam is moved into engagement with the tip of the screw 259. As movement of the handlefiil is continued this face is moved in a clockwise direction, as seen in Fig. 2, and exerts a force on the tip of screw 25-5 tending to rotate the ejector actuator in counterclockwise direction upon the pin 22% against the tension of spring 232. This movement of the ejector actuator continues until the handle 98 and cam M3 are advanced sufficiently to bring the curved peripheral edge 253 of the cam 248 into engagement with the tip of screw 250. At this time the ejector actuator hasbeen rotated sufilcientl-y to carry the stripper tip 252 of the ejector blade 23:"; to a position opposite'the edge of the back of the forward seal in the magazine E. During further advancing movement of the operating handle the curved peripheral edge 258 of the earn 2% rides upon the tip of the screw, but since this surface is concentric With the pivotalaxis of the earn 2% no further movement of the ejector actuating mechanism occurs and it is held stationary with the ejector in cocked position until return movement of the handle has progressed sufiiciently to again bring the straight radial face 256 of the cam opposite the tip of screw 256. As return movement of the handle 93 is continued, the spring 232 acting on the actuator it l'pivots the same so that the stripper tip 24-2 of the ejector blade 23% is brought into engagement with the edge of the last seal in the magazine and moves this seal out of the magazine until its lower edge engages the top surface of the partly opened upper sealing jaws I40. When returnm'ovement of the handleQB has progressed to the point where the working faces of the jaws Mil open sufiiciently to receive the flared edges of a seal 2M therebetween, the partly ejected seal is suddenly propelled or snapped into position in the jaws by the action of spring "232 gages in and eXtends a cr'ossthe channel in the last seal'inthe magazine when such-a'movement has been completed, thus-'tending to aid in holdmg :seals inthe-mag-azine against accidental re- Briefly reviewing the operation of the tool, it
inovement of the tool or of the overlapping strap a result of the torque exerted on the bolt by the spring housed in cap 54. This rotation of the bolt I6 lowers the feed wheels 82 into contact with the upper of the overlapping strap portions. At the same time rotation of the cam 58 of handle 56 releases the aligning lever 32 so that its straight edge 40 engages the top surface of the upper of the overlapping stra portions and the shoulder 42 engages the outer edges of both strap ends. The aligning lever 32 is locked in this position by the shoulder 80 on the cam 58 of the actuating handle 56 engaging the top of lug 43 on the aligning lever.
The tool is now in condition to tension the binder loop and this is accomplished by oscillating the operating handle 99 through an are which extends upwardly, as a maximum, to an approximate vertical, as shown in dot-dash lines in Fig. l. The auxiliary frame C is oscillated with the operating handle 98 through this first range of movement because the latch I I 2 remains engaged with the fixed cross pin H8. These oscillatory movements of handle 98 causes the actuating pawl 85 to rotate the feed wheels 82 step-by-step to move the upper binder end past the lower binder end and thereby tension the binder. During these operations the magazine E, sealing mechanism D and the reaction handle I02 oscillate with the auxiliary frame and the operating handle but perform no function.
When the desired tension in the binder loop is attained the handle 98 is swung in a counterclockwise direction to the upper limit of its first range of movement indicated in Fig. l to carry the sealing jaws I40 into overlapping relation with the portion of the overlapping ends of the binder loopinwhich the joint is to be made, as indicated by the dot-dash lines of Fig. 1. This brings the seal 200 which was fed into position between the jaws in the, previous operation into a position where it partly encircles the overlapping strap ends.
Upon further movement of the operating handle 98 in counterclockwise direction the latch I I 2 becomesdisconnected from the cross. pin H8 and the handle 98 pivots upon the pin I as an axis instead of the shaft 50 because the auxiliary frame C can move no further.
Since the reaction handle I02 is fixed to the auxiliary frame it also remains stationaryand as operating handle 98 pivots upon pin I00, it moves away from the reaction handle I02 so that the latter may be grasped by the operator and during the continued movement of the operating handle 98 in a counterclockwise direction a force may be exerted on this reaction handle I02 opposing the force exerted on the operating handle 98 so as to counterbalance the force applied toform the joint, andrelieve the package being bound of operating force communicated thereto by the tool, such as is normally present when a conventional tool is used. This further move-i ment of the operating handle 98, through the link I 50, crosshead I56 and links I50 actuates the sealing jaws I40 to deform the seal 200 and the overlapping strap ends to form a joint.
. During the sealingoperation the ejector blade 2341 irgredfio the ret a ed Pos ti n shown in '14 Fig. 2 as previously explained and it is held in this position until the operating handle 98 has been pivoted through a suflicient angle in a return direction from the limit of its second range of movement to rotate the cam 248 backwardly far enough to bring its flat radially extending face 256 into line with the tip of screw 250, whereupon the ejector actuator 224 is released for return movement by its spring 232. On the return of the ejector actuator the stripper tip 242 of'the ejector blade 234 engages the edge of the forward seal in the magazine and this seal i moved in an endwise direction along the ledges 2| 4 and H5 toward the sealing jaws I40 until its lower end engages the upper surface of the partly opened sealing jaws. The return movement of the handle 98 does not open the sealing jaws suificiently to receive the seal until the handle has almost completed its return from the second range of movement. During this time the ejector continues to press upon the seal due to the action of spring 232 on the ejector actuator 224. As a result at the instant the jaws I40 open sufficiently to receive a seal, the seal is suddenly snapped into position in the jaws. This will occur just prior to the end of the return movement of the operating handle 98 at which time the latch Il2 engages the fixed pin IE8. Thus the operator, if he desires so to do, may hold the reaction handle I02 and apply force to the same opposing and counterbalancing the force required to return the operating handle 98 to the position of the fixed relation with the auxiliary frame until just prior to the time that return movement is completed. The handles and auxiliary frame C may then be oscillated until the stop lug I22 engages upon the top of handle I2 formed on the main frame I0.
To release the tool from the bound binder loop the handle 56 is rotated in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 1, until the pin 12 on the shank 58 engages in the notch 10 in the latch 62. The handle 55 is then released and is held in retracted position by the latch 62. Rotation of the handle 56 as above described rotates the bolt I0 in a direction to cause the eccentrically mounted feed wheels 82 thereon to be raised from the binder ends. At the same time the lug It on the cam 58 of handle 55 engages the lug 40 on aligning lever 32 and lifts this lever sufiflciently to release the overlapping binder ends and open channel I8. The tool may then be removed from the package by sliding the same laterally until the foot 22 becomes disengaged from under the bound loop. Since the seal was fed to the sealing mechanism during the return movement of the handle, the
tool when removed from a package is in condition for a new sealing operation.
Having thus illustrated and explained the nature and an embodiment of our invention, what we claim and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is as follows:
1. In a package binding tool of the type having a main frame adapted to rest upon a package to be bound and pivotally supporting a binder tensioning mechanism and an auxiliary frame carrying sealing jaws, and an operating handle pivotable with said auxiliary frame through a first range of movement for operating said tensioning mechanism to tension the binder encircling the package being bound and pivotable in the same plane and away from main frame and. with respect to the auxiliary frame through a second range of movement for operating said sealing jaws to form a joint in the overlapping ends of the binder, the improvement which comprises a reaction handle fixedly secured to said auxiliary frame and pivoting with said auxiliary frame and operating handle through the first range of movement thereof and separable from said operating handle when said operating handle pivots with respect to said auxiliary frame, said reaction handle being adapted to, have a plied thereto a force in opposition to and counterbalancing the force exerted on the operating handle throughout the second range of movement of the latter to relieve the package being bound of the pressure exerted upon the operatinghandle, and means for releasably locking said operating handle and auxiliary frame together for movement through the first range of movement aforesaid, said means comprising a pin carried by said operating handie, a latch member pivoted on said auxiliary frame and having a notch therein, said pin being adapted to engage in said notch, and a spring biasing said latch member to pin engaging position, said pin being released from said latch notch when a force in excess of a predetermined maximum is exerted on said operating handle to allow the latter to pivot with respect to said auxiliary frame and reaction handle through the second range, of movement.
2. In a package binding tool having a main framev adapted to rest upon a package to be bound and pivotally supporting a binder tensioning mechanism for tensioning a e encircling binder and an auxiliary frame can ying a sealing mechanism for placing a seal over and joining the overlapping ends of the package binder and a seal feeding mechanism, the combination comprising, a magazine for storing. a stack of seals, an outlet at one end of said magazine, a movable trap door in one wall of said magazine at said outlet, a follower for urging seals toward said outlet, guide means formed in said outlet for holding said seals in said magazine against the pressure exerted thereon by l follower, said guide means being adapted to guide seals one at a time from the bottom of the stack for endwise movement into said sealing mechanism to permit automatic loading of the same by said feeding mechanism when said tool is use, at least a portion of said guide means being secured to said trap door and said trap door being adapted to be moved to open position to remove at least a portion of the support for the seal to be fed if the seal to be fed becomes jammed in said magazine to permit manual withdrawal of the same therefrom.
3. In a package binding tool having a main frame adaptedto rest upon a package to be bound pivotally supporting a binder tensioning mechanism for tensioning a package encircling binder and an auxiliary frame ca rying a sealing mechanism for placing a seal over and joining the overlapping ends of the package binder and aseal feeding mechanism, the combination comprising a magazine for storing a stack of seals, an outlet at one end of said magazine, a follower for urging seals toward said outlet, a pivoted trapdoor form-- ing one wall of said magazine at outlet, guide means forme. in said trap door and the opposing wall of said outlet for holding said seals in said magazine against the pressure exerted thereon by said follower, said guide means being adapted to guide seals one at a time from the bottom of the stack for endwise movement into said sealing mechanism to permit automatic feeding of the same by said feeding mechanism when said tool is in use, said trap door being adapted to be moved to: disengagethe guide means thereon from the 16 last seal in the stack if said feeding mechanism becomes jammed to permit manual withdrawal of the jammed seal from said magazine.
4. In a package binding tool having a main frame adapted to rest upon a package to be bound pivotally supporting a binder tensioning mechanism for tensioning a package encircling binder and an auxiliary frame carrying a sealing mechanism for placing a seal over and joining the overlapping ends of the package binder and a seal feeding mechanism, the combination comprising a magazine for storing a stack of seals, an outlet at one end of said magazine, a follower for urging seals toward. said outlet, a pivoted trap door forming one wall of said magazine at said outlet, guide means formed in said trap door and the opposing wall of said magazine for holding said seals in said magazine against the pressure exerted thereon by said follower, said guide means being adapted to guide seals one at a time from the bottom of the stack for endwise movement into said sealing mechanism to permit automatic feeding of the by said feeding mechanism when said tool is in use, said trap door being adapted to be moved to disengage the guide means thereon from the last seal in-the stack if said feeding mechanism becomes jammed to permit manual withdrawal of the jammed seal from said magazine, and resilient means for urging the trap door to ion the guide means thereon in sealing engaging position.
5. In a package binding tool having a main frame adapted to rest upon a package to be bound pivotally supporting a binder tensioning mechanism for tensioning a package encircling binder and an auxiliary frame carrying a sealing mechanism for placing a channel shaped seal over and joining the overlapping ends of the package binder and a seal feeding mechanism, the combination comprising a magazine secured to said auxiliary frame for storing a stack of. said channel shaped seals in nested relation, an'outlet at one, end of said magazine, a follower for urging seals toward said outlet, a pivoted trap door forming one wall of said magazine at said outlet, longitudinally extending ledges formed in said trap door and the opposing wall of said outlet adapted to engage the flanged edges of the last seal in said stack to retain the same in said magazine against the pressure exerted thereon by said follower, said ledges being adapted to guide seals one at a time from the bottom of the stack for endwise movement into said sealing mechanism to permit automatic feeding of the same by said feeding mechanism when said tool is in use, said trap door being adapted to be pivoted to disengage the ledge therein from the last seal in said stack if said feeding mechanism becomes jammed topermit manual withdrawal of the jammed seal from said magazine.
6. In a package binding tool of the type having a main frame adapted to rest upon a package to be bound and pivotally supporting 'a binder tensioning mechanism and an auxiliary frame carrying sealing jaws, and an operating handle movable with said auxiliary frame through a first range of movement for pivoting said auxiliary frame and simultaneously operating said tensioning mechanism to tension a package, encircling binder and through a second range of movement in the same plane and away from said main frame for swinging said auxiliary frame and sealing jaws into sealing position and thereafter relative to said auxiliary frame for operating said sealing jawsto form a joint in the overlapping ends or the hinder, the improvement which comprises a reaction handle for applying a force to said auxiliary frame throughout the second range of movement of said operating handle counterbalancing the force exerted on the latter and thereby relieving the package being bound of the pres sure exerted upon the operating handle while a joint is being formed, said reaction handle being fixed rigidly to said auxiliary frame and positioned to lie against said operating handle during the first range of movement of said operating handle but separating said operating handle when said operating handle moves relative to said auxiliary frame, and releasable latching means including'a spring biased latch member pivoted to said auxiliary frame and a pin carried by said operating handle and engageable therewith for securing said two handles in fixed relation during the first range of movement.
7. In a package binding tool for tensioning a package encircling binder having a main frame adapted to rest upon a package to be bound, a binder tensioning mechanism eccentrically secured upon a shaft rotatably journaled with. respect to said main frame and normally biased to urge the binder tensioning mechanism to binder engaging position, a transversely extending lever pivoted adjacent one of its ends to the main frame and cooperating therewith to form a guide for overlapping end portions of the binder in one 2.
position to hold them in aligned relation during a tensioning operation, and means secured to the shaft for rotating the shaft to move the tensioning mechanism out of binder engaging position, the improvement which comprises a lip on the free end of the aligning lever and projecting angularly therefrom and rearwardly of the tool, and a lug on the means for rotating the shaft and movable therewith to engage the lip to move the lever out of binder aligning position when the tensioning mechanism is moved out of binder engaging position. Y
8. In a package binding tool for tensioning a package encircling binder having a main frame adapted to rest upon a package to be bound, a binder tensioning mechanism eccentrically secured upon a shaft rotatably journaled with respect to said main frame and normally biased to urge the binder tensioning mechanism to binder engaging position, a transversely extending lever pivoted adjacent one of its ends to the main frame and cooperating therewith to form a guide for overlapping end portions of the binder in one position to hold them in aligned relation during a tensioning operation, and means secured to the shaft for rotating the shaft to move the tensioning mechanism out of binder engaging position, the improvement which comprises a lip on the free end of the aligning lever and projecting angularly therefrom and rearwardly of the tool, a lug on the means for rotating the shaft and movable therewith to engage the lip to move the lever out of binder aligning position when the tensioning mechanism is moved out of binder engaging position, and a shoulder on the means for rotating the shaft and movable therewith to engage the lip to lock the lever in binding aligning position when the tensioning mechanism is moved to binder engaging position.
9. In a package binding tool having a main frame for resting on the package to be bound pivotally supporting a binder tensioning mechanism and an auxiliary frame carrying a sealing mechanism of the type including pivoted sealing jaws for joining together the overlapping end of 18 a package binder and movable with the auxiliary frame from a position removed from the binder to a joint forming position, a single operating handle for moving the auxiliary frame and the sealing mechanism to joint-forming position and for actuating the sealing mechanism to engage the seal over the overlapping ends of the binder and the jaws to deform the same for forming a joint therein, and a magazine on the auxiliary frame for the storage of seals used in joining the ends of the binder and having an outlet adjacent the sealing mechanism jaws through which seals may be transferred from the magazine to the jaws,-
the improvement which comprises an ejector blade at the magazine outlet adapted to engage the outermost seal in the magazine and movable in a first direction to transfer the seal from the magazine to the sealing mechanism, a bell crank lever pivotally mounted on the magazine and having a first arm pivotally connected to said ejector blade, a spring acting between said lever and a fixed part of the magazine for biasing said lever in such direction as to move said ejector blade in the seal transferring direction, a cam engagealole with a second arm of said lever rotatably mounted on the magazine and connected to the operating handle for rotation in one direction, while the operating handle is closing the sealing mechanism jaws to form a joint in the overlapping ends of the binder, for moving said lever against the force of said biasing spring to move said ejector blade in a second direction to a position preparatory to transferring a seal from the magazine, said cam being formed to remain in engagement with said lever until the joint has been formed and return movement-of the operating handle has been initiated and while in said engagement locking said ejector blade in said second position, and said cam also being formed so that when it is rotated in a second directionit releases said lever during retractionof the operating handle and before the sealing mechanism jaws have been separated sufiiciently to receive the'seal, whereby a seal is snapped into position in the sealing mechanism under the force of said biasing spring.
10. In a package binding tool having a main frame for resting on the package to be bound pivotally supporting a binder tensioning mechanism and an auxiliary frame carrying a sealing mechanism of the type including pivoted sealing jaws for joining together the overlapping ends of a package binder and movable with the auxiliary frame from a position removed from the binder to a joint forming position, a single operating handle for moving the auxiliary frame and the sealing mechanism to joint-forming position and for actuating the sealing mechanism to engage the seal over the overlapping ends of the binder and the jaws to deform the same for forming a joint therein, and a magazine on the auxiliary frame for the storage of seals used in joining the ends of the binder and having an outlet adjacent the sealing mechanism jaws through which seals may be transferred from the magazine to the jaws, the improvement which comprises an ejector blade at the magazine outlet adapted to engage the outermost seal in the magazine and movable in a first direction to transfer the seal from the magazine to the sealing mechanism, a bell crank lever pivotally mounted on the magaand having a first arm pivotally connected to said ejector blade, a first spring acting between said lever arm and said ejector blade pivotally to bias the latter toward the magazine, a second spring acting between saidlever andanxedpart' of the magazine for'biasing said lever in'suc-h d1 rection as. to move said ejector'bla'de in" the seal transferring direction, a cam' engageable'with a secondarm oi said; lever rotatably' mounted on the magazine: and connected to the operating handle for rotation in one:- direction, while the operating handle is-closing'the sealing mechanism jaws to form arjoint 'in'the'overlappingends' of'the binder for moving said lever againstthe force OfSaidYSBCOIId biasingspring to move said ejector bladein a second direction to a position preparatory'to transferring'asealfromthermagazine, said cam beingiformed toremain in engage 11181113" with said 1 second lever-arm until the joint" has" been formed; and return movement" of the operating handle has been initiated-Sand" While in said engagement locking said ejector blade insaid position, and said'cam' also being'formed' so that when it is rotated in a second directionit' releases said lever during retraction of the operaing'handle and before the' sealing mechanism jaws have been separatedsuffi'ciently toreceive the seal, whereby aseal is snapped'intdposition in the sealing mechanism under-the forceof said second biasing spring.
11. In a package binding tool having a main frame for resting on the package to be bound pivotally supporting a binder tensionin'g mechanism and an auxiliary frame'carryinga sealing mechanism'of the type including pivoted sealing jaws for joining together the overlapping ends' of a package binder and movable with th'eauxiliary frame from a position removedfrom the binder to a joint forming position, a single operating handle for moving the auxiliary frame and the sealing mechanism to joint-forming position and for actuating the sealingrmechanism to engage the-seal'over the overlappingendsof the binder and the jawsto deform the same-iorforming "j a joint-therein, and a" magazine on the -auxiliary frame-for thexstorageeof'"seals usedinjoining-the ends of "the-binder and having? an: outlet adj acent" the sealingimechanismfljaws through" which sealszmav be" transferredr'from the-magazine to the jaws, the improvement which. comprises an ejector blade at:the magazine eoutlet adapted to engage the outermost seal in the-' magazine and movable ina first direction toxtransfer the seal fromthemagazin'e to thesea-lingmechanism; a-
bell crank lever pivotally mounted on themagazineiand'having a first arm pivotally connected to said ejector blade, a spring acting between said lever-and'a fiiied part of the magazine for biasing said lever in'such' direction as to move said ejector bladein the-seal transferring direction, said lever having a; second'arm' carrying an adjustable cam contacting member which may be adjusted to vary the throw of said lever, a cam engageable with said contacting member rotatably mounted on themagazineandiconnected to the operating handlefar rotation in one direction, while the operatinghandle-is closing the; sealing: mecha nismjawsito'formta joint inthe overlapping ends of thesbin'der; for. moving 'saidzlever against the forcezofsaidbiasing spring to moveisaid ejector blade imaaseconzj-directionto a positionipreparatory to transferringaseal from the magazine, said-camzbeing formed to remain in engagement withizsaidw cam. contacting member until the joint has been formed and return movement of the operatinghandle hasbeen initiated and while in said... engagement locking said ejector blade in said second position, and said cam also being formed so that when it is rotated in a second direction it releases said lever during'retraction of the operating handle and before the sealing mechanism jaws have been separated sufficiently toreceive" the seal, whereby a seal is snapped into position in thesealing mechanism .under the force OfSaid biasing spring,
GEORGE A. CROSBY. ARVID I. ERICSSON.
ReferencesCited inthe file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,374,518 Harvey -Aug. 30, 1932 1,996,202. Harvey Apr. 2, 1935 2,113,757 Bletso et a1 .Apr. 12,1938 2,182,004-i Spencer -Dec. 5, 1939 2,267,612- Leslie ,Dec. 23, 194.1 2,283,947 Eraemassing May 26, 1945-3 2,298;658 Spencer iOct.v 13, 1942 2,336,264 Leslie Dec. 7, 1943 2,375,769 Childress et a1 May 15, 1945 2,497,313 Leslie Feb. 14, 1950
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Cited By (11)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2813441A (en) * 1953-12-03 1957-11-19 Borbe Hoop iron tightening and clamping device
US2862527A (en) * 1952-07-17 1958-12-02 Rebichon Juliette Machine for binding parcels
US3021876A (en) * 1956-08-30 1962-02-20 Acme Steel Co Strapping tool
US3028885A (en) * 1958-06-02 1962-04-10 Signode Steel Strapping Co Power strap tensioning tool
US3032075A (en) * 1957-11-21 1962-05-01 Acme Steel Co Strapping tool
US3103955A (en) * 1960-08-17 1963-09-17 Signode Steel Strapping Co Strapping machine
US3198218A (en) * 1960-12-05 1965-08-03 Signode Corp Strapping tool
US3249131A (en) * 1959-09-24 1966-05-03 Signode Corp Power strap tensioning tool
US3284049A (en) * 1965-03-31 1966-11-08 Signode Corp Feed wheel drive mechanism for strapping tools
US3411551A (en) * 1965-03-17 1968-11-19 Interlake Steel Corp Manual strapping tool
US9221567B2 (en) 2012-01-25 2015-12-29 Southern Bracing Systems Enterprises, Llc Systems, methods, and devices for tensioning straps

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US1996202A (en) * 1934-01-10 1935-04-02 Leo M Harvey Tying machine
US2113757A (en) * 1935-01-21 1938-04-12 American Steel & Wire Co Box band stretching and sealing tool
US2182004A (en) * 1937-08-11 1939-12-05 Leechgrip Company Strap tensioning and sealing device
US2267612A (en) * 1939-02-10 1941-12-23 Signode Steel Strapping Co Package binding tool
US2283947A (en) * 1935-03-20 1942-05-26 Praemassing Adolf Device for the production of metal band joints
US2298658A (en) * 1939-07-15 1942-10-13 Leechgrip Company Strap tensioning and sealing device
US2336264A (en) * 1941-06-06 1943-12-07 Signode Steel Strapping Co Package binding tool
US2375769A (en) * 1939-12-21 1945-05-15 Acme Steel Co Strap stretching and sealing apparatus
US2497313A (en) * 1943-12-15 1950-02-14 Signode Steel Strapping Co Package binding tool

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1874518A (en) * 1929-05-01 1932-08-30 Leo M Harvey Tie forming mechanism
US1996202A (en) * 1934-01-10 1935-04-02 Leo M Harvey Tying machine
US2113757A (en) * 1935-01-21 1938-04-12 American Steel & Wire Co Box band stretching and sealing tool
US2283947A (en) * 1935-03-20 1942-05-26 Praemassing Adolf Device for the production of metal band joints
US2182004A (en) * 1937-08-11 1939-12-05 Leechgrip Company Strap tensioning and sealing device
US2267612A (en) * 1939-02-10 1941-12-23 Signode Steel Strapping Co Package binding tool
US2298658A (en) * 1939-07-15 1942-10-13 Leechgrip Company Strap tensioning and sealing device
US2375769A (en) * 1939-12-21 1945-05-15 Acme Steel Co Strap stretching and sealing apparatus
US2336264A (en) * 1941-06-06 1943-12-07 Signode Steel Strapping Co Package binding tool
US2497313A (en) * 1943-12-15 1950-02-14 Signode Steel Strapping Co Package binding tool

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2862527A (en) * 1952-07-17 1958-12-02 Rebichon Juliette Machine for binding parcels
US2813441A (en) * 1953-12-03 1957-11-19 Borbe Hoop iron tightening and clamping device
US3021876A (en) * 1956-08-30 1962-02-20 Acme Steel Co Strapping tool
US3032075A (en) * 1957-11-21 1962-05-01 Acme Steel Co Strapping tool
US3028885A (en) * 1958-06-02 1962-04-10 Signode Steel Strapping Co Power strap tensioning tool
US3249131A (en) * 1959-09-24 1966-05-03 Signode Corp Power strap tensioning tool
US3103955A (en) * 1960-08-17 1963-09-17 Signode Steel Strapping Co Strapping machine
US3198218A (en) * 1960-12-05 1965-08-03 Signode Corp Strapping tool
US3411551A (en) * 1965-03-17 1968-11-19 Interlake Steel Corp Manual strapping tool
US3284049A (en) * 1965-03-31 1966-11-08 Signode Corp Feed wheel drive mechanism for strapping tools
US9221567B2 (en) 2012-01-25 2015-12-29 Southern Bracing Systems Enterprises, Llc Systems, methods, and devices for tensioning straps
US9428290B2 (en) 2012-01-25 2016-08-30 Southern Bracing Systems Enterprises, Llc Systems, methods, and devices for tensioning straps

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