US2646943A - Tension control device - Google Patents

Tension control device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2646943A
US2646943A US231356A US23135651A US2646943A US 2646943 A US2646943 A US 2646943A US 231356 A US231356 A US 231356A US 23135651 A US23135651 A US 23135651A US 2646943 A US2646943 A US 2646943A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
tension
thread
spindle
collar
discs
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US231356A
Inventor
Lindsay Luther Jackson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
HUGH T OVERTON
Original Assignee
HUGH T OVERTON
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by HUGH T OVERTON filed Critical HUGH T OVERTON
Priority to US231356A priority Critical patent/US2646943A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2646943A publication Critical patent/US2646943A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H59/00Adjusting or controlling tension in filamentary material, e.g. for preventing snarling; Applications of tension indicators
    • B65H59/10Adjusting or controlling tension in filamentary material, e.g. for preventing snarling; Applications of tension indicators by devices acting on running material and not associated with supply or take-up devices
    • B65H59/20Co-operating surfaces mounted for relative movement
    • B65H59/22Co-operating surfaces mounted for relative movement and arranged to apply pressure to material
    • B65H59/24Surfaces movable automatically to compensate for variation in tension
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2701/00Handled material; Storage means
    • B65H2701/30Handled filamentary material
    • B65H2701/31Textiles threads or artificial strands of filaments

Definitions

  • This invention relates to improvements in tension control devices of the character used particularly for the automatic control of tension of thread or yarn in textile machines, particularly knitting machines.
  • tension control devices of the character used particularly for the automatic control of tension of thread or yarn in textile machines, particularly knitting machines.
  • Various forms of tension control devices have been proposed heretofore, most of which have been unsatisfactory for one reason or another, but generally because of the complex structures involved, or the lack of adequate maintenance of uniform tension on the thread or yarn.
  • the object of this invention is to overcome the objections to prior tension devices and to improve the construction thereof so as to effect a uniform tension automatically for all diierent threadsor yarns without variations in adjustment ofthe device.
  • Tension discs may be used to apply tension directly to the thread or yarn, and acted on by a spring to vary the tension thereof.
  • a member preferably a lever, is mounted so as to be acted on by the thread after passing through the tension discs, and has means connected therewith to vary the effectiveness of the spring on the discs. It is preferred that a second spring be used, which also acts on the lever in opposition to the first mentioned spring thereon. This structure holds the same tension for all different yarns, applying a uniform tension or drag thereto which opens or closes automatically to accomplish this result.
  • Fig. l is a side elevation of the tension control device
  • Fig. 2 is a top plan View thereof partly in section on the line 2--2 in Fig. 1;
  • Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view therethrough with parts in elevation taken on the line 3--3 in Fig. 1.
  • the invention is shown in an embodiment that may be used for controlling the tension on thread of varying diameters between the cone or bobbin and a textile machine to which it is fed, such as a knitting machine.
  • One embodiment is shown including a supporting frame generally designated at I, which is U-shaped, with upstanding opposite sides 2 and 3, respectively.
  • the frame I may be mounted in suitable relation to the knitting machine for feeding the thread thereto, substantially as illustrated in Fig. 1.
  • the thread is designated generally at T and is normally supplied by a cone or bobbin, generally designated at C.
  • Guide eyes 4 and 5 are provided in the sides 2 and 3 of the frame through which the thread T extends and is drawn in passing from the cone C to the knitting machine.
  • a guide spindle 6 Supported on the frame I in upstanding relation between the side arms 2 and 3 of the frame is a guide spindle 6, which is preferably secured .witln the frame I as by a screw or other fastening slidably mounted loosely on the spindle 6 is a pair of opposed tension discs 8, which may be formed of dished shape in cross section, or of other suitable form, as desired, for applying tension to the thread T that is drawn therebetween around the spindle and yieldably maintain tension on the thread.
  • the discs 8 are retained on the spindle 6 by -a collar 9, secured rigidly in place on the spindle by means of a set screw I0.
  • a helical spring II acts against the uppermost one of the tension discs 8, yieldably maintaining the pressure discs in contact with each other and with the collar 9.
  • the helical spring I I is sleeved over the spindle 6, bearing at its lower end on the pair of discs 8.
  • a collar I2 is slidably mounted loosely on the spindle 6 and is seated upon the upper end of the helical spring II, bearing thereon for varying the tension of the spring, as desired.
  • a second helical spring I3 is sleeved loosely upon the spindle 6, and is interposed between the collar I2 and a collar I4, secured rigidly to the spindle 6 in an adjusted position with respect thereto, as by means of a set screw I5.
  • the collar I4 may be moved lengthwiseof the spindle 6 to vary the tension of the spring I 3, according to the amount of drag desired on the yarn, but ordinarily no further adjusting will be required for different yarns or threads being used.
  • the collar I2 is provided with aligned pins I6 on opposite sides thereof, as shown in Fig. 3. These pins I 5 are engaged by bifurcated end portions II, formed on one end of a lever I8.
  • the lever I8 is pivotally mounted at I9 intermediate its length on the upstanding side arm 3 of the frame I.
  • the outer end portion of the lever I8 is oiset at 28 and is provided with a guide eye 2
  • This device will hold the same tension for all different yarns, providing a uniform tension which will open automatically when the drag develops thereon, or the tension will 'ce increased ii the yarn gets too light.
  • a very sensitive unit is provided to accomplish the desired results of maintairng uniform tension under all conditions, At the same time a very simple mechanism is all that is required to accomplish this result, one easily maintained and installed at low costi.
  • a tension control device for thread comprising a substantially U-shaped support having a pair of spaced arms, each arm of said support having a thread guide eye therein, a spindle mounted on the base o1" said support, a pair of opposed tension discs mounted on the spindle, means for limiting the movement of the discs in one direction, a spring bearing against the opposite side of the pair of discs in opposition to said limiting means, a collar slidably mounted on the spindle and bearing on the spring, pins projecting in opposite directions from the collar, a lever pivotally mounted on one of said arms and having a bifurcated end engaging the pins to vary the tension o the spring, and a thread guide eye connected with the lever in position to receive the thread after passing through the thread guide eyes and the tension discs to vary the tension applied to the thread.
  • a tension control device for thread comprising an arm having a thread guide eye therein, a spindle mounted on the arm, a pair or" opposed tension discs mounted on the spindle, means on the spindle for limiting the movement of the discs in one direction, a spring bearing against the opposite side of the pair of discs in opposition to said limiting means, a collar slidably mounted on the spindle and bearing on the spring, pins projecting in opposite directions from the collar, a lever pivotally mounted on the arm and having a bifurcated end engaging the pins to vary the tension of the spring, and a thread guide eye connected With the lever in position to receive the thread after passing through the tension discs to vary the tension applied to the thread, a second spring sleeved over the spindle and bearing on the collar, and a sec- Aio 4 ond collar mounted on the spindle and secured in an adjusted position with respect thereto for confining the second-mentioned spring.
  • a tension control device for thread comprising an arm, a spindle mounted on the arm, a pair of opposed tension discs mounted on the spindle, means for limiting the movement of the discs in one direction, resilient means bearing against the opposite side of the pair of discs in opposition to said limiting means, a collar slidably mounted on the spindle and bearing on said resilient means, a lever pivotally mounted on the arm, means pivotally connecting one end of said lever with said collar to vary the tension of the resilient means, and a thread guide eye connected with the lever in position to receive the thread after passing through the tension disc to vary the tension applied to the thread, a second resilient means mounted on said spindle and bearing on said collar, and a second collar mounted on said spindle and secured in position with respect thereto for conning said second mentioned resilient means.
  • a tension control device for thread compris-.- ing a frame, an elongated member mounted on said frame, a pair of opposed tension members mounted on said elongated member, means for limiting the movement of said tension members in one direction, means bearing against the opposite side of said tension members in opposition to said limiting means, means slidably mounted on said elongated member and bearing against said second means, means pivotally mounted on said frame and connected with slidable means whereby actuation of said pivoted means moves said slidable means relative to said elongated member to vary the tension of said rst means on said tension members, means on said pivoted means to receive the thread therethrough after passing through said tension members to vary the tension applied to the thread, means on said elongated member bearing on said yslidable means, and means mounted on said elongated member for confining said last named means thereon.
  • a tension control device for thread comprising a frame, an elongated member mounted on said frame, a pair of opposed tension members mounted o n said elongated member, means on the elongated member for limiting the movement of said tension members in one direction, means bearing against the opposite side of said tension members in opposition to said limiting means, means slidably mounted on said elongated member and bearing against s aid second means, means pivotally mounted on said frame and connected with slidable means whereby actuation of said pivoted means moves said slidable means relative to ,said elongated member to vary the tension of said rst means on said tension members, means on said pivoted means to receive the thread therethrough after passing through said tension members to vary the tension applied to the thread, means on said elongated member bearing on said slidable means, and means adjustably mounted on said elongated member for coniining said last named means thereon.

Landscapes

  • Sewing Machines And Sewing (AREA)

Description

v July 2s, 1953 L. J. LINDSAY TENSION CONTROL DEVICE Filed June 1:5, 1951 jg INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Patented July 28, 1953 TENSION CONTROL DEVICE Luther Jackson Lindsay, Knoxville, Tenn., assignor of one-half to Hugh T. Overton, Knoxville, Tenn.
Application June 13, 1951, Serial No. 231,356
Claims.
This invention relates to improvements in tension control devices of the character used particularly for the automatic control of tension of thread or yarn in textile machines, particularly knitting machines. n V Various forms of tension control devices have been proposed heretofore, most of which have been unsatisfactory for one reason or another, but generally because of the complex structures involved, or the lack of adequate maintenance of uniform tension on the thread or yarn.
The object of this invention is to overcome the objections to prior tension devices and to improve the construction thereof so as to efect a uniform tension automatically for all diierent threadsor yarns without variations in adjustment ofthe device.
This object may be accomplished according to one embodiment of the invention by providing tension means to act on the thread or yarn under resilient tension, and additional means controlled by the thread or yarn and acted on by separate resilient means to vary the effect of the rst mentioned resilient means on the tension applying means. Tension discs may be used to apply tension directly to the thread or yarn, and acted on by a spring to vary the tension thereof. A member, preferably a lever, is mounted so as to be acted on by the thread after passing through the tension discs, and has means connected therewith to vary the effectiveness of the spring on the discs. It is preferred that a second spring be used, which also acts on the lever in opposition to the first mentioned spring thereon. This structure holds the same tension for all different yarns, applying a uniform tension or drag thereto which opens or closes automatically to accomplish this result.
This embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:
Fig. l is a side elevation of the tension control device;
Fig. 2 is a top plan View thereof partly in section on the line 2--2 in Fig. 1; and
Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view therethrough with parts in elevation taken on the line 3--3 in Fig. 1.
The invention is shown in an embodiment that may be used for controlling the tension on thread of varying diameters between the cone or bobbin and a textile machine to which it is fed, such as a knitting machine. One embodiment is shown including a supporting frame generally designated at I, which is U-shaped, with upstanding opposite sides 2 and 3, respectively. The frame I may be mounted in suitable relation to the knitting machine for feeding the thread thereto, substantially as illustrated in Fig. 1. The thread is designated generally at T and is normally supplied by a cone or bobbin, generally designated at C. Guide eyes 4 and 5 are provided in the sides 2 and 3 of the frame through which the thread T extends and is drawn in passing from the cone C to the knitting machine.
Supported on the frame I in upstanding relation between the side arms 2 and 3 of the frame is a guide spindle 6, which is preferably secured .witln the frame I as by a screw or other fastening slidably mounted loosely on the spindle 6 is a pair of opposed tension discs 8, which may be formed of dished shape in cross section, or of other suitable form, as desired, for applying tension to the thread T that is drawn therebetween around the spindle and yieldably maintain tension on the thread. The discs 8 are retained on the spindle 6 by -a collar 9, secured rigidly in place on the spindle by means of a set screw I0. A helical spring II acts against the uppermost one of the tension discs 8, yieldably maintaining the pressure discs in contact with each other and with the collar 9.
The helical spring I I is sleeved over the spindle 6, bearing at its lower end on the pair of discs 8. A collar I2 is slidably mounted loosely on the spindle 6 and is seated upon the upper end of the helical spring II, bearing thereon for varying the tension of the spring, as desired. A second helical spring I3 is sleeved loosely upon the spindle 6, and is interposed between the collar I2 and a collar I4, secured rigidly to the spindle 6 in an adjusted position with respect thereto, as by means of a set screw I5. The collar I4 may be moved lengthwiseof the spindle 6 to vary the tension of the spring I 3, according to the amount of drag desired on the yarn, but ordinarily no further adjusting will be required for different yarns or threads being used.
The collar I2 is provided with aligned pins I6 on opposite sides thereof, as shown in Fig. 3. These pins I 5 are engaged by bifurcated end portions II, formed on one end of a lever I8. The lever I8 is pivotally mounted at I9 intermediate its length on the upstanding side arm 3 of the frame I.
The outer end portion of the lever I8 is oiset at 28 and is provided with a guide eye 2| xed therein, as shown in Figs. l and 2, for guiding the yarn therethrough, whereby the thread or yarn T acts on the outer end portion of the lever I8, to vary the position of the lever and thereby vary the tension according to the drag that develops in the thread.
In the operation of the control device it will be apparent that the thread or yarn T is drawn from the cone or bobbin C and passes through the stationary eyes 4 and 5, between the tension discs '8 and through the eye 2l of the lever I8, thence to the knitting or other textile machine to which the control device may be applied. So long as the yarn and the drag remain uniform, the lever I8 will remain in the same position,
thereby allowing the spring II to apply a uniform pressure on the tension discs 8 and the yarn that passes therebetween. If more drag develops due to a variation in the yarny or for any other reason, a pressure will be applied, tending to pull downward on the outer end portion of the lever I8. This in turn will act through the bifurcated end portions. I' at the inner end of the lever to lift the collar I2 and relieve the pressure on the spring II, thereby providing less pressure by this spring on the discs The amount of pressure applied by the collar I2 on the spring II may be varied also by the tension of the spring I3, which latter is set for the desired tension by adjusting the collar I4 acting thereon. The collar It then may be se? cured in place on the spindle 6 by the set screw I5, according to the amount of drag required, after which no further adjustment of this collar I i will be required for a normal use of the ten- Asion device.
This device will hold the same tension for all different yarns, providing a uniform tension which will open automatically when the drag develops thereon, or the tension will 'ce increased ii the yarn gets too light. Thus a very sensitive unit is provided to accomplish the desired results of maintairng uniform tension under all conditions, At the same time a very simple mechanism is all that is required to accomplish this result, one easily maintained and installed at low costi.
While the invention has been illustrated and described in one embodiment, it is recognized that variations and changes may be made therein Without departing from the invention as set forth in the claims.
I claim:
1. A tension control device for thread comprising a substantially U-shaped support having a pair of spaced arms, each arm of said support having a thread guide eye therein, a spindle mounted on the base o1" said support, a pair of opposed tension discs mounted on the spindle, means for limiting the movement of the discs in one direction, a spring bearing against the opposite side of the pair of discs in opposition to said limiting means, a collar slidably mounted on the spindle and bearing on the spring, pins projecting in opposite directions from the collar, a lever pivotally mounted on one of said arms and having a bifurcated end engaging the pins to vary the tension o the spring, and a thread guide eye connected with the lever in position to receive the thread after passing through the thread guide eyes and the tension discs to vary the tension applied to the thread.
2. A tension control device for thread comprising an arm having a thread guide eye therein, a spindle mounted on the arm, a pair or" opposed tension discs mounted on the spindle, means on the spindle for limiting the movement of the discs in one direction, a spring bearing against the opposite side of the pair of discs in opposition to said limiting means, a collar slidably mounted on the spindle and bearing on the spring, pins projecting in opposite directions from the collar, a lever pivotally mounted on the arm and having a bifurcated end engaging the pins to vary the tension of the spring, and a thread guide eye connected With the lever in position to receive the thread after passing through the tension discs to vary the tension applied to the thread, a second spring sleeved over the spindle and bearing on the collar, and a sec- Aio 4 ond collar mounted on the spindle and secured in an adjusted position with respect thereto for confining the second-mentioned spring.
3. A tension control device for thread comprising an arm, a spindle mounted on the arm, a pair of opposed tension discs mounted on the spindle, means for limiting the movement of the discs in one direction, resilient means bearing against the opposite side of the pair of discs in opposition to said limiting means, a collar slidably mounted on the spindle and bearing on said resilient means, a lever pivotally mounted on the arm, means pivotally connecting one end of said lever with said collar to vary the tension of the resilient means, and a thread guide eye connected with the lever in position to receive the thread after passing through the tension disc to vary the tension applied to the thread, a second resilient means mounted on said spindle and bearing on said collar, and a second collar mounted on said spindle and secured in position with respect thereto for conning said second mentioned resilient means.`
4. A tension control device for thread compris-.- ing a frame, an elongated member mounted on said frame, a pair of opposed tension members mounted on said elongated member, means for limiting the movement of said tension members in one direction, means bearing against the opposite side of said tension members in opposition to said limiting means, means slidably mounted on said elongated member and bearing against said second means, means pivotally mounted on said frame and connected with slidable means whereby actuation of said pivoted means moves said slidable means relative to said elongated member to vary the tension of said rst means on said tension members, means on said pivoted means to receive the thread therethrough after passing through said tension members to vary the tension applied to the thread, means on said elongated member bearing on said yslidable means, and means mounted on said elongated member for confining said last named means thereon.
5. A tension control device for thread comprising a frame, an elongated member mounted on said frame, a pair of opposed tension members mounted o n said elongated member, means on the elongated member for limiting the movement of said tension members in one direction, means bearing against the opposite side of said tension members in opposition to said limiting means, means slidably mounted on said elongated member and bearing against s aid second means, means pivotally mounted on said frame and connected with slidable means whereby actuation of said pivoted means moves said slidable means relative to ,said elongated member to vary the tension of said rst means on said tension members, means on said pivoted means to receive the thread therethrough after passing through said tension members to vary the tension applied to the thread, means on said elongated member bearing on said slidable means, and means adjustably mounted on said elongated member for coniining said last named means thereon.
LUTHER JACKSON LINDSAY.
References Cited in the file 0f this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number
US231356A 1951-06-13 1951-06-13 Tension control device Expired - Lifetime US2646943A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US231356A US2646943A (en) 1951-06-13 1951-06-13 Tension control device

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US231356A US2646943A (en) 1951-06-13 1951-06-13 Tension control device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2646943A true US2646943A (en) 1953-07-28

Family

ID=22868885

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US231356A Expired - Lifetime US2646943A (en) 1951-06-13 1951-06-13 Tension control device

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2646943A (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2907535A (en) * 1958-01-02 1959-10-06 Lindly & Company Inc Yarn tensioning device
US2912185A (en) * 1957-04-11 1959-11-10 Stop Motion Devices Corp Adjustable tension regulator for yarn
US2981497A (en) * 1956-09-17 1961-04-25 Steinhof Apparatefab Karl Thread tensioner
US3264812A (en) * 1962-02-26 1966-08-09 Scragg & Sons Apparatus for twisting yarn
US3383072A (en) * 1965-11-26 1968-05-14 Heberlein & Co Ag Tension control system
US4209881A (en) * 1978-03-21 1980-07-01 Phillips Petroleum Company Knitting intermittently drawn yarns
US4396095A (en) * 1981-09-08 1983-08-02 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Lift line tension limiter
US4548369A (en) * 1984-05-03 1985-10-22 Maschinenfabrik Benninger Ag Thread tensioning apparatus for warp creel
US4901942A (en) * 1986-09-03 1990-02-20 Norddeutsche Faserwerke Gmbh Warping mill and disk thread brake
US5050816A (en) * 1990-03-14 1991-09-24 Belmont Textile Machinery Co., Inc. Strand tension controller
DE19538312A1 (en) * 1995-10-14 1997-04-17 Stoll & Co H Thread control device for flat knitting machines

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1435495A (en) * 1921-09-27 1922-11-14 Albert M Pigeon Yarn-tension device
US2217561A (en) * 1938-09-30 1940-10-08 Courtaulds Ltd Winding machine
US2320264A (en) * 1938-10-01 1943-05-25 Sr Penrose E Chapman Wire tensioning device

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1435495A (en) * 1921-09-27 1922-11-14 Albert M Pigeon Yarn-tension device
US2217561A (en) * 1938-09-30 1940-10-08 Courtaulds Ltd Winding machine
US2320264A (en) * 1938-10-01 1943-05-25 Sr Penrose E Chapman Wire tensioning device

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2981497A (en) * 1956-09-17 1961-04-25 Steinhof Apparatefab Karl Thread tensioner
DE1181855B (en) * 1956-09-17 1964-11-19 Karl Steinhof App Fabrik Thread tensioner
US2912185A (en) * 1957-04-11 1959-11-10 Stop Motion Devices Corp Adjustable tension regulator for yarn
US2907535A (en) * 1958-01-02 1959-10-06 Lindly & Company Inc Yarn tensioning device
US3264812A (en) * 1962-02-26 1966-08-09 Scragg & Sons Apparatus for twisting yarn
US3383072A (en) * 1965-11-26 1968-05-14 Heberlein & Co Ag Tension control system
US4209881A (en) * 1978-03-21 1980-07-01 Phillips Petroleum Company Knitting intermittently drawn yarns
US4396095A (en) * 1981-09-08 1983-08-02 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Lift line tension limiter
US4548369A (en) * 1984-05-03 1985-10-22 Maschinenfabrik Benninger Ag Thread tensioning apparatus for warp creel
JPS60239536A (en) * 1984-05-03 1985-11-28 マシネンフアブリーク ベニンゲル アクテイーン ゲゼルシヤフト Yarn tensioning controller for warp yarn creel
US4901942A (en) * 1986-09-03 1990-02-20 Norddeutsche Faserwerke Gmbh Warping mill and disk thread brake
US5050816A (en) * 1990-03-14 1991-09-24 Belmont Textile Machinery Co., Inc. Strand tension controller
DE19538312A1 (en) * 1995-10-14 1997-04-17 Stoll & Co H Thread control device for flat knitting machines
DE19538312B4 (en) * 1995-10-14 2004-09-02 H. Stoll Gmbh & Co. Thread control device for flat knitting machines

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2646943A (en) Tension control device
US2209839A (en) Thread control device
US2317921A (en) Process and apparatus for handling elastic filamentary material
US2581142A (en) Yarn tensioning device
US1596095A (en) Thread-tension device
US2999654A (en) Unwinding device
US1884183A (en) Tension device for coil winding machines and the like
US2523854A (en) Manufacture of staple yarn from continuous filaments
US2478927A (en) Thread brake for double twisters
US2240153A (en) Adjustable yarn tension device
US2745610A (en) Thread tension regulating means for reeling machines and the like
US2023515A (en) Thread feeding mechanism
US2706883A (en) Thread trapping means
US2597044A (en) Yarn tension control device
US2525997A (en) Yarn conditioning device
US2528171A (en) Twist controller for thread
US2283912A (en) Tension device for winding and like machines
US1977068A (en) Yarn control means
US1422240A (en) Tension device for spooling machines
US2741443A (en) Yarn tension regulator
US2457450A (en) Yarn tensioning device
US2104810A (en) Means for twisting yarn
US2552150A (en) Apparatus for controlling yarn tension
US2303353A (en) Device for use in winding rayon
US2630982A (en) Tension control for full fashion hosiery machines