US2607501A - Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like - Google Patents

Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like Download PDF

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US2607501A
US2607501A US756905A US75690547A US2607501A US 2607501 A US2607501 A US 2607501A US 756905 A US756905 A US 756905A US 75690547 A US75690547 A US 75690547A US 2607501 A US2607501 A US 2607501A
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Prior art keywords
panels
line
conveyor
bundles
rails
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US756905A
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Jeffrey Alberta
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National Gypsum Co
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National Gypsum Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G57/00Stacking of articles
    • B65G57/02Stacking of articles by adding to the top of the stack
    • B65G57/03Stacking of articles by adding to the top of the stack from above
    • B65G57/04Stacking of articles by adding to the top of the stack from above by suction or magnetic devices
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S414/00Material or article handling
    • Y10S414/10Associated with forming or dispersing groups of intersupporting articles, e.g. stacking patterns
    • Y10S414/102Associated with forming or dispersing groups of intersupporting articles, e.g. stacking patterns including support for group
    • Y10S414/103Vertically shiftable
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S414/00Material or article handling
    • Y10S414/10Associated with forming or dispersing groups of intersupporting articles, e.g. stacking patterns
    • Y10S414/114Adjust to handle articles or groups of different sizes

Description

Aug. 19, 1952 ac. JEFFREY ,501,
APPARATUS FOR STACKING WALLBOARD PANELS AND THE LIKE Filed June 25, 1947 Sheets-Sheet 1 em are I Z a eyJ Aug. 19, 1952 o. c. JEFFREY APPARATUS FOR STACKING WALLBOARD PANEL S AND THE LIKE Filed June 25, 1947 7 Sheets- Sheet 2 INVENTOR.
17ouy/as 'Cfiff'r'ey, deceased, 6y dler-mfiffreg, execufar ATTORNEYS 'Aug. 19, 1952 D. c. JEFFREY APPARATUS FOR STACKING WALLBOARD PANELS AND 'IHE LIKE Filed June 25,-1947 7 She efs-Shpet 3 Aug. 19, 1952 o. c; JEFFREY APPARATUS FOR STACKING WAL-LBOARD PANELS AND THE LIKE 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 25, 1947 Z12 ver10r g, deceased, y ey, 818% 21s C. J5me C 6er-Ta.
Delay Aug. 19, 1952 o. .c. JEFFREY APPARATUS FOR STACKING WALLBOARD PANELS-AND THE LIKE [Filed June 25, 1947 '7 Sheets-Sheet .5
' A 8 19, 1952 D. c. JEFFREY APPARATUS FOR STACKING WALLBOARD PANELS AND THE LjIKE Filed June 25, 1947 '7' Sheets-Sheet Aug. 19, 1952 D. c. JEFFREY 2,607,501
APPARATUS FOR STACKING WALL-BOARD PANELS AND THE LIKE Filed June 25,-1947 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 2 Inf/671%?" .Da /d.; C. \EFfr'e deceased g al6 erfm gff ey, exe a ml /7 5F07 egs Patented Aug. 19, 1952 APPARATUS FOR STACKING WALLBOARD PANELS AND THE LIKE Douglas C. Jeffrey, deceased, late of Akron, N. 35.,
by Alberta Jeffrey, executrix,' Akron, N. Y., assignor to National Gypsum Company, Buffalo, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application June 25, 1947, Serial No. 756,905
13 Claims.
1 This invention relates to apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like, and more particularly to such apparatus adapted to stack bundles of wallboard in a multiplicity of contiguous columns. v I
The principal object is to provide apparatus which receives a continuously movingline of wallboard bundles and automatically stacks the bundles on a transportable supporting struc.
ture into a plurality of contiguous columns.
Another object is to substantially eliminate the manual labor which would otherwise be required to stack the bundles.
Another object of the invention is to provide 7 such stacking apparatus which does not damage the wallboard in stacking the same. I
Another object is to provide such apparatus which is of high capacity and in particular will receive and handle the line of bundles normally discharged from a conventional bundling machine.
Another object'of the invention is'to provide such apparatus which is transportable and can readily be removed to permit the substitution of similar apparatus designed to handle other sizes of wallboard bundles.
Another object is to provide such apparatus which is relatively simple in construction, considering the functions which it performs, and which will stand up under conditions of severe and constant use without getting out of order or requiring adjustment or repair. r
Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description and drawings in which: Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of apparatus embodying the present invention.
Fig. 2 is an end elevational view of the apparatusviewed from the left-hand end of Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is a top plan view thereof.
Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical enlarged transverse sectional view taken generally on line 4--4, Fig. 3.
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 4 and showing a different position of the parts.
Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken generally on line 6 6, Fi 1.
i'ig. '7 'is a fragmentary vertical longitudinal view taken generally on line 'l-I, Fig. 3.
Fig. 8 is a fragmentary vertical transverse sectional view taken generally on line 8-8, Fig. 7.
Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical longitudinal sectional view takenon line 9.9. Fig. 3.
Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken on the line I 0-40, Fig. 1.
Fig. 11 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on line l|ll, Fig. 10.
Fig. 12 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view taken generally on line |2|2, Fig. 3.
Fig. 13 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal sectional view taken on line |3 l 3, Fig. 3. i i
Fig. 14 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical transverse sectional view taken on line l4l4, Fig. 1.
Fig. 15 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view through an elevator forming part of the apparatus and which is adapted to be vertically moved above and below floor level.
.Fig. 16is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 15 and showing the manner in which a skid or transportable supporting structure carrying a load of stacked bundles can be removed from the elevator, this view being on a slightly reduced scale as compared with Fig. 15.
Fig. 17 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical longitudinal sectional view taken on line ll l'l, Fig. 3.
Fig. 18 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical transverse sectional view taken generally on line Ill-I8, Fig. 3.
Fig. 19 is a diagrammatic representation of the electrical wiring and components and the fluid pressure lines and components.
The apparatus embodying the present invention is shown as comprising a frame indicated generally at 20, arranged over a. pit 2|, this pit being preferably rectangular in horizontal crosssection and having operatively arranged therein a vertically movable platform 22. This platform can be withdrawn into the pit 2| and projected upwardly therefrom in any suitable manner, as by a plunger 23 arranged in a, hydraulic cylinder 24 in the bottom of the pit and having a line 25 through which fluid under pressure is introduced formoving the plunger 23 upwardly and having a line 26 through which the fluid in the cylinder 24 is exhausted to permit the plunger 23 to move downwardly.
The frame 20 is shown as made of skeleton construction from angle irons or the like and as having four vertical corner posts 28 which are adapted to be removably supported on the floor and are shown as held against transverse displacement on the floor by means of pins 29 of any suitable construction. Main longitudinal bars 30 and main transverse bars 31 connect the upper ends of these posts, suitable reinforcing I 'plates being provided to insure rigidity of the structure. Main longitudinal bars 32 connect the posts 28 near their lower ends and a transverse bar 33 connects the lower ends of the posts 28 at the right-hand end'of the frame as viewed in Fig. 1 the opposite or unloading end of the frame beingunprovided with such lower trans verse frame bar.
Conveyor means are provided to receive a line of bundles discharged in end-to-end relation from a conventional bundling machine such as the lath bundling apparatus disclosed in United States Patent No. 1,875,610, issued September 6, 1932. For this purpose a pair of horizontally spaced bars 34 project laterally from the main frame 26 of the apparatus at the right-hand end thereof as viewed in Fig. 3, and these bars are shown as being supported by means of braces 35. These bars 34 jointly carry a plurality of spaced rollers 36 which support the bundles B of wallboard so received in end-to-end relation from the bundling machine, the line of bundles being brought into alinern ent with a guide plate 38 by means of a pair of rubber rollers 39. The guide plate (#8 is arranged at one side of the line of bundles moving over the rollers 36 and the rubber rollers 33 are mounted on the opposite side of this line of, bundles and rotate about vertical axes.
On, entering the main frame 20 of the stacking apparatuathe'leading bundle B is accelerated'inits forward movement to separate it from the succeeding bundlesin the line and to project it into the preliminary zone of operation before the neat succeeding bundle is brought into this zone. For this purpose a belt 41} passes over a drive roller M, a roller 4; arranged in the line of rollers 35, and an idler roller 43, the drive roller 4| being soparrang' ed as to provide. a horizontai sitretch' igin the belt passing over certain of the rollersli-ifi, this upper stretch of the belt.
moving in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig. 4. This belt is moved at a higher rate of speed than the line of; bundles B s pplied to the apparatus by means of an electric motor. 45 which. through a reducer 45 and chain drive 48, d iv s h ft 43 t9. which the d ve ro ler, M R T Ilt the Wir n iagram, Fig. 19, i vill be seen that this motor 45; isunder tse se; i a ma ual sw tch 1-.
In o e o insure. mo ement, of e eadi page. with the ent r tr tb i this. higher speed feed belt iiiya hold-down roll 51% is provided; Th s noi r own 3 1. shownv s be n o re at v of rubber a arr nse positiqnto engage the upper face of thebundles l3 of'wallboarjd in any suitable manner as. by
means offsupporting arms] which can be secureoli'to'the main frame 23 of the apparatus in ny. nam a n A line of rollersjf suitably mounted on the. mainframe 253. receives the bundle B of wallboard so accelerated :by thebelt iil; this line of mnerssz; beingin line with the rollers 36 but being shown as being substantially shorter in axial'length than the rollers 38. Thelendwise movement of the bundle B along the rollers 5113 limitedby an end stop plate 53 whichcan be adjustably mounted on themain frame 29 ofthe apparatus in any suitable manner.
Means are providedfor moving each bundle B so stoppedby the stop plate 53 ina horizontal plane and transversely ofits line of movement along the conveyor rollers S s-land 52 toward tl' e unloadingend ofthe apparatus For thispurpose 'a push plate 54 is arranged above the line of rollers 52 and is mounted for reciprocatory movement in a horizontal plane transversely of the path of the line of bundles B entering the apparatus. In its normal position the inner operative face of this push plate is arranged in line with the inner operative face of the guide plate 38, this guide plate 38 extending'a substantial distance into the main frame 20 of the apparatus as best shown in Fig. 3. To so support this push plate 55 for such reciprocatory movement, this plate is shown as provided on its undersides with slides 55 which are received in slotted rails 56, these rails being suitably carried by the main frame 29 of the apparatus below the line of rollers 52 and projecting outwardly from the end of the frame 211, as best shown in Figs. 1 and 3. The outwardly projecting ends of the rails 56 carry a rock shaft 58, this rock shaft being journaled to extend transversely of the rails 56 and having a crank 59 secured to each end thereof. The free end of each crank 53 is connected by a link 60 with the corresponding end of the push plate 54. The rock shaft 58 can be oscillated in any suitable manner to reciprocate the push plate 54, the rock shaft 5 8' being shown as provided for this purpose with a rock arm 6|. the free'endof which is connected to a piston rod 62' of a piston 63, this piston being shown as ar-. ranged in a pneumatic cylinder 6 The endof: the cylinder 64; opposite that from which the, piston rod 62 projectsis shown as beingpivotallyy secured to the main frame 2;! of the apparatus; as indicated at 65. The cylinder 64' is provided with lines 66 and 68 for alternately introducing; and relieving fluid under pressure from opposite ends of the same to actuate the piston; contained therein.
Each bundle B ismoved bythe push plate 5% toward the unloading end of the apparatus to be slidably received and supported on a pair of retractable rails. 10 extending longitudinally of the apparatus adjacent opposite sides thereof. Each of these retractable rails 'l-fi'is shown as suppo ted On'the inner extremities of a pair of slides H, each of these slides being slidably supported na .Slicleway 1.27 for movement transversely of themain frame 20 of the apparatus. One slideway 12 of each pair of the same is shown as being mountedon the, corresponding corner post 28 naled on each side of the main frame 30 -of the apparatusand has a crank disk 15 fast to each end thereof. Each crank disk is provided with a crank pin 16 extending through a vertical slot 18" provided ina riser 19; fast; to the corresponding slide H. The rock shaft :4 can be oscillated in any suitablemanner. For this purpose the pair of crank disks 15 at the center of the apparatus are each shown as provided with a crank pin 89. each ofmthese crank pins being connected by a shipper rod 81 with one end of a bell crank lever 82; This bell cranklever is shown as pivoted at its center, as indicated at 83, between a pair of? aeomoi:
upper intermediate transverse ,frame bars 84 connecting the central parts of the longitudinal upper frame bars 36. The other. end of the bell fluidpressure mechanism comprising a piston rod 89 pivotally secured to one end of the walking beam 86 an'd'connected to a piston 96 in a cylinder 9|. "The end of the cylinder 9| opposite that froni'l which the piston rod 89 projects is shown as. pivotally' secured to the upper intermediate transverse frame bars 84 as indicated at 92. The
cylinder 9| is provided with lines. 93 and 94 for alternately introducing and relieving fluid under pressure from opposite ends of the same to actuate the piston contained therein.
The bundles B are guided in their movement along the retractable rails 16 and for this pu'r-' posea guide plate-95 is arranged above each retractable rail '19 and; extends longitudinally thereof. Means are provided to move each guide plate '95 upwardly and outwardly to an inopera tive'position. For this purpose each guide plate 95 is fastened to the free ends of a pairof arm's 96, the opposite ends of which can be pivotally' secured to the main frame 20 of the apparatus in any suitable manner, as indicated at 98. I t
In order to so swing" the guide'plates 95 upwardly and'outwardly to an inoperative position,
a shaft '99. is shown as arranged longitudinally along each side of the apparatus above the arms 96 andjournale'd on'the main frame .26 of the apparatus. Each of these shafts 99 carries'a pair ofdisks'IOU, each of which has a crank pin IGI connected by a chain I02 with the free end of the corresponding arm 96, as best shown in Fig. 12. The shafts 99 are interconnected adjacent the feed end of the apparatus by an adjustable cross chain l03 so as to rotate in opposite directions. One of the shafts 99 adjacent the unload- Y ing end'of the apparatus is provided with a hand wheel I64 and also a ratchet wheel I05 which cooperates with a releasible pawl I96 for holding the guide plates 95 in the elevated inoperative position shown by dott'ed'lines in Fig. 12. The
pawl I66 is shown as being operated by an eccentrio hand lever'I98.
It is essential that each bundleB be correctly alined with the guide plates 95before beingpushed onto the retr'actable'rails I9 bythe push plate 54. j This alinement is primarily effected by the sto'p'pla'te 53 against which the accelerating belt 40 pushes the leading and of each bundle B. However, to insure proper registry of the bundles B so stopped by the stop plate 53 with the guide plate 95, it is desirable to prevent the bundle B from rebounding from thestop plate 53.
'Toprevent retrograde movement of the bundles B after. engaging the stop plate 53, a depressible backstop I09 ismounted for vertical movement in a bracket IID carried by the main frame 20 of the apparatus, as best shown in Fig. 5.. This back stop is shown as arranged betweenthe adjacent end rollers at the lines of rollers 36 and 52. and is formed to provided an inclined face III perm'itting forward movement of the bundles B thereover and an abrupt stop face I I2 which prevents reverse movement of the bundle relative thereto. This backstop can be mounted for verticallfiiovement in any suitable manner, as by means .of. a pair. .of depending. posts I I3. vslidingly mounted for. vertical. movement in the .1 bracket H0 and oneof which :can.be,.-provided..with:.a
helical tension; spring '.;.I I4. normally urging. theback stop, I 0.9, into an elevated positionin the. path ofthe passingwline ofwallboard: 4Afterapredetermined number of the bundles Bhave accumulated on the retractable railsflll... these. rails are retractedso as. to release the. bundles, and permit. them toixdrop as; a unitary.
group. These bundles are received; by.a *transw poratable supporting structure in the. form l of .a skid [I5 which isremovably arranged on the ele-r. vator platform .22- In orderto insure pr per positioning of thisskid II5 upon the platform 22... an abutmentplate-l I6 is preferably provided on. this platform; An empty, skid, I I5. can be placed. upon the. platform. 22 and; the loaded skid, re: movedfrom this platformin .any suitable mane ner {as by meansof the truck, hoist I I8 shown in broken lines in Fig. 16.; In placing the, skid: on
andremoving it from the platform 22,,the;p1at.;.
form is brought to floor level asshownin this Thevarious mechanisms of the stackingqape paratus as. above described are Synchronized. in
their operation so that a continuous line. of wall-, boardbundles is received from the bundling mag chine and .stacked upon the skid I I5; Referring.v
again to the line .of-Wallboard bundles l3 moved by the accelerating belt 40 against the stop late 5.3..
it will belwted, upon reference to Figs. 3 and that when the leading end of each bundle B strikes the stop platejfi italso strikes and moves atrip lever, 129 which extends through; an Open ing I-2I in the stop plate 53 and is normallymaim tainedin theprojected positionshown inFig; 3 by a spring,l 22. This trip lever I26, when actu.
ated by the advance end of each'bundle, Bthrows;
thearm I23 of a normally open magnetic hold ing switch I24, this switch being of thetype that v remains closed .as long as current is flowing through it. Referring to the diagram, Fig. 19,. this normally open magnetic holding switch is arranged across the sides I25 and .I26 of the main power line and in series with a normally closed reversing switch I28 and a solenoid; valve I29.
This solenoidvalve is so constructed that when energized itpermits the. flow vof fluid from a line der 64 and opens the line 66 from the opposite I36 to the line 68 leading to one end of the cylin end. of-this cylinder to an exhaust or return line I3-I.- Whende-energized, this solenoid valve I29 comiects the pressure line I39 with the cylinder line. 66 and opensthe cylinder line 68 to the re; turn or exhaustline I3I.
Since .the reversing switch; I26 is normally.
closed it will be seen thatwhen theadvance end of the ,bundleB strikingthelever I29 closesthenormally open magnetic holding switch I-2 4, the
solenoid valve I29. is energized to admit fluid under pressure through the line 68 to the closed end of the cylinder64and thereby drive its piston 63 and piston rod 62 outwardly, the fluid on the opposite side of the. pistonbeing relieved through aline 66 to permit this movement. This ,move-, mentj-ofgthepiston rod 62, as best shown in Fig. 7, advances, the push plate 54, this movement being effected through the linkage comprising the rockarm 6|, rock shaft 58, crank arm 59;
and link ,60. This advancing movement of the push plate 54 pushes thestopped bundle B horizontally onto the adjacent ends of the retractable rails I0. The advancing movement of thepush plate 54 continues until the normally closed stop fast to the shaft I36.
engages the arm I43 of a normall y'open magnetic push plate. 54, the rock shaft: is provided "with an arm I32 which, at the extreme end of the forward stroke of the push plate 54, engages and moves the arm I33 of this normally closed stopswitch, asbest shown in Fig. 1?. When this normally closed stop switch I28 is so opened by the arm I32 it d'e-energ'izesthe normallyopen magnetic holding switch I24, so" as to permit this switch to resume its open condition, and also deenergizes the solenoid valve I29. energization of the solenoidvalve the pressuresupply line I30 is connected with the line 66 of the cylinder 64 and the line 68 of this. cylinder is connected to the exhaust or return line I'3I, and hence it will be seen. that the piston 63 and its piston rod 62 will be moved in reverse direction to retract the push plate 54 to its normal retracted position illustrated in Fig. '3 in which its operative face is. in line with the operative face of the guide plate 38 so that the next sueceeding bundle can be advanced along the rollers 52 by the accelerating belt 40 into a positionpposite the operative side of the push plate 54.
As each wallboard bundle B is pushed by the ing edge of the foremostbundle reachesthe ends of these-retractable rails'IIl at the unloading end of the apparatus. Upon reference to Figs 8, 9'
and 10, it will be noted that when the last or sixth bundle B of the line is being pushed onto the retractable rails 10- the leading edge of thefirst'or foremost bundle B of this line strikes and moves a trip lever I35 which is fast to a small cross shaft I36 suitably journalled on oneof the. retractable rails I0 atthe unloading end of the apparatus. This trip lever I3 normally projects up through a slot I38 in this retractable rail HI and is yeildingly held in this upwardly projected position by a counterweight arm- I39 The counterweight arm holding switch I'4I, this-switchbeing of the type that remains closed as long as current is flowing through it. The trip lever I35, when depressedby the advance edge of the foremost bundle B ot the line ofbundles advancing along: the retract'- able rails ID, moves the counterweightarm I 39 to throw the arm I40 of the normally open magnetic holding switch I4I to closethis switch. The normally 1 open magnetic holding switch is mounted on the same retractable rail- Ill which carries the triplever I35.
Referring to the diagram, Fig; 19, this normallt open magnetic holding switch I lI is arranged across thesides I25 and I26 of the main power line and in'series with a normally closed revers- 7 ing switch I42 and a' solenoid valve I43. This,
solenoid valve is so constructed thatwhen eneror opening this stop switch at the end of the forward stroke of the Upon the de- 8 mally open magnetic holding swt'ch' I M, the sole"- noid valve I43 is energized toadmit fluid-under pressure through the 1ine-94 to the correspond-' ing end of the cylinder BI and thereby'retract' its piston 9d and piston rod 89,- the fluid on the opposite side of the piston beingrelieved through line 93 to permit this movement. This move ment of the piston rod 89, as best shown in Figs.
2 and i2, retracts the retractable rails 10,- thisv movement being effected through the linkage comprising the walking beam 85, adjustable links 85, bell crank levers 82, shipper rods 81, disks ":5, crank pins 16; and slides H; which carry these retractable rails I0. When the retractable rails III are so retracted, the full line of bundles B contained on these retractable rails drops. onto the skid I I5 as a unitary group or layer, these. bundles i buildingup layer by layer on this skid until the same is fully loaded.
tion to receive the next. bundle B from the. push. plate 54'. For this purpose one of the disks 15; as bestshown in Figs. 7 and '8, has a'reversing lug Hi5 secured thereto. As the retractable-rails 70 approach their fully retracted position (Fig. 12), this reversing lug I strikes the arm ms oi'the normally closed reversing switch I42 and opens this switch; When. this normally closed reversing switch I42 is so opened by the reversing lug I45, it opens the circuit through the'n'or mally openmagnetic holding switch MI and also tie-energizes the solenoid valve I43. Upon de-v energization of the. solenoid valve I43, the pressure line I30 is connected with the line 93 of the cylinder 9| and the. line 94 of this cylinder is connected to the exhaust or return line I, and
inoperative position shown in Fig-1'2; To this end a manual switch I4?! is shunted across the normally open magnetic: holding switch I41" and re versing switch I42", as best showninFig; I9.
manual switch I41. is of any suitable type jtoree" Q main either open or' closed until manually'op'erated and is illustrated in land 19: as; being gized it permits the flowof fluid 'fr'omthe line I36 to the line 94 leading-to one end of the cylinder EH and opens the line 9-3- from theopposite end of this cylinder to an exhaust or return line I4'4". Since at thisti'me the reversingswitch I42 is closed, it will beseen that when the advance edgeof the foremost bundleB of. the line of these bundles advancing along the retractable railsw strikes the triplever I35 and closes the norof the double pushbutton type. This. switchiMI is, of course, normally open and is only closed or remove the skid from the platform"' to replace 22.
' As each layer-of bundles B is so dropped upon' the skid H5 supported by the elevator platform 2t, the elevator platform is lowered a; distance equal to the thickness of this layerso' that each", layer is dropped from the retractable railslfl For this purpose, as best.
an equal distance. shown in Figs. 1' and 13, a bell crank lever" I50.
is pivoted on the main frame 2 0' of the apparatus in any suitable manner so that one of'its' arms projects generally horizontally into th-egpath of the layerof bundles B being dropped-'from 'the" retra'ctablerails 19 The bell crank lever I50 shown as being arranged to engage one exposed-- endof' the last or sixth bundle of each line or layer of bundles released by the retractable rails" hence it will be seen that the piston and its I0. The other arm of this bell crank leverengages and operates the arm II of a normally open switch I 52.
Referring to the diagram, Fig. 19, this normally open switch is arranged across the sides I25 and I26 of the main power line and in series with a normally closed solenoid valve I53. This solenoid valve is in the return line 26 from the plunger cylinder 24 supporting the plunger 23 of the elevator, and it will therefore be seen that when the switch I 52 is closed the solenoid valve I 53 is opened so as to permit the plunger 23 and platform 22 to lower. Accordingly, when a layer of bundles B is released by the retractable rails I0, the last or sixth bundle of this layer strikes the bell crank lever I50 thereby to close the switch I52 and energize the normally closed solenoid valve I53. Energization of the normally closed solenoid valve I53 opens this valve and permits fluid to escape from the, plunger cylinder 24 and permits the elevator platform 22.to lower. The bell crank lever I50 is so disposed that the falling layer of bundles B engages the next proceeding layer of bundles before the side of the last or sixth bundle disengages the operating arm of the bell crank lever I50. Accordingly, the lowering of the platform 22 is gradual and continuous, this lowering continuing until the arm of the bell crank lever I50 is freed by the last or sixth bundle B, thereby permitting the bell crank lever I 50 to return to its normally projecting position and also the switch arm I 5I to return to its normally open position as shown in Fig. 1.
Any suitable means can be provided for elevating the platform 22, such means being preferably under manual control and being shown as comprising a manual switch I55 arranged across the sides I25 and I26 of the main power line, as best shown in Fig. 19, and in series with a normally closed solenoid valve I56. This solenoid valve is arranged in the line 25 supplying operating fluid under pressure to the plunger cylinder 24 and it will therefore be seen that to raise the platform 22 the operator closes the manual switch I55 thereby to energize the normally closed solenoid valve I56 and admit fluid under pressure to the plunger cylinder 24. The operator keeps the manual switch I55 closed, thus raising the plunger 23 and platform 22 until the desired elevation of this platform is obtained. During this operation the solenoid valve I53 is in its normally closed position and accordingly fluid cannot escape through the line 26 while fluid is so being supplied by the supply line 25.- It will be noted that raising the platform 22 with a fully loaded skidthereon will not close the normally open switch I52. Thus, even with a fully loaded skid II5 on the platform 22, as the platform 22 is raised the last or sixth vertical stack of bundles on this skid merely swings the bell crank lever I50 away from the switch arm I 5| of the normally open switch I52 and. hence during this rising movement of the platform 22 the switch I52 is not actuated.
Operation While it is believed that the operation of the apparatus is clear from the above description, the operation is briefly summarized as follows:
Assuming the platform 22 to be empty and at floor level (Fig. 16), the operator first places the empty skid II5 upon this platform, using the hoist truck H8 for this purpose, in such a position that the inner end of the skid is against the vertical plate II6 (Fig. on this platform so as to properly aline the skid for receiving the successive layers of bundles B dropped thereon. The operator then removes the hoist truck'II8 and closes the switch I55 (Fig. 19), thereby energizing the normally closed solenoid valve I56. The opening of this valve permits iluid under pressure to flow through the supply line 25 to the plunger cylinder 24, this fluid under pressure thereby raising the plunger 23 and platform 22. The operator holds the switch closed until the platform 22 is elevated a substantial distance above ground level and immediately below the bell crank lever I50, as shownin Figs. 1, 2 and .13; this establishing the distance which the layers of. bundles are dropped onto the skid I I5.
The operator then starts the bundling machine (not shown),and also closes the switch 41 (Fig. 19), for the motor 45. The motor 45 (Fig. 3), through the reducer 46, chain drive 48 and shaft 49, drives the drive roller .4I (Fig. 4) so as to drive the upper stretch 44 of the accelerating belt 40 in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig. 4. Accordingly, the leading bundle B in the line of bundles fed endwise by the bundling machine (not shown) onto the rollers 36 is engaged by the upper stretch 44 of the accelerating belt 40, the leading bundle B being accelerated in its movement toseparate it from succeeding bundles and moved endwise onto the rollers 52 and against the end plate 53. It will be noted that the backstop I09- is depressed by the leading bundle B passing thereover and released approximately when the advance end of the leading bundle engages the stop plate 53, this release of the backstop I09 permitting it to rise and dispose its stop face I I2 in abutting relation with the trailing end of the leading bundle and thus preventing retrograde movement of the leading bundle.
The line of bundles B so advancing endwise on the rollers 36 are held in proper alinement by the guide plate 38 (Fig. 3) against which the bundles are urged by the rubber rollers 39. The bundles advancing endwise against the stop plates 53' are held in proper alinement on the rollers 52 by the push plate 54 which at this time has its operative face in alinement with the operative face of the guide plate '38.
The advance end of each bundleB striking the stop plate 53 also strikes the trip lever I20 which is normally maintained in the projected position This triplever I20, when so shown in Fig. 3. actuated by the advance end of each bundle B throws the arm I23 (Fig. 6) of the normally open magnetic holding switch I 24 (Fig. 19), thereby to close this normally open magnetic holding switch I 24,1 this normally open magnetic holding switch remaining closed until its circuit is broken at another point. The closing of the normally open magnetic holding switch I24 permits current to flow through the solenoid valve I29, thev energization of which permits fluid under pressure to flow from the supply line I30 into the line 68 to the cylinder 64 and also permits fluid to escape from the opposite end of the cylinder 64 through the line 66 to the exhaust line I3I. Accordingly, the piston 63 in the cylinder 64 is driven to the left as viewed in Fig. 19 so as to project its piston rod 62. 7'
This outward movement of the piston rod 62 (Figs. '7 and 4) through the rock arm 6|, rock shaft 58, crank 59 and link 60, moves the push plate 54 to the left as viewed in Fig. 7, this push plate being advanced along the horizontal rails 56 which guide the same to move in a horizontal plane. This movement of the push plate counterclockwise (Fig. 1'?) so as to engage and move the arm I33 of the normally closed reversing switch I28 and opening this switch (Fig. 19') de-energizes the magnetic holding switch I24; so as to permit this magnetic holding switch I24 to resume its normally open position, and also de-energizes the solenoid valve I29. Deenergization of this solenoid valve I29 reverses the relation of its inlet and outlet lines so that fluid under pressure is now admitted to the line 65 from the supply line I39 and the line 68 is connected; to the exhaust or return line I3I. Accordingly, the piston 63 and its piston rod 62 are moved to the right as viewed in Fig. 19 so as to retract the piston rod 62. Retraction of the piston rod 62 (Figs. 7 and 4.) eifects a reversal or retracting movement of the push plate 54 through the linkage comprising the rock arm 6|, rock shaft 58, crank 59 and link 60. This re verse movement of the push plate 54 continues until the piston 63 (Fig. 19). reaches the end of the cylinder 64, in which position the operative face of the push plate 54 is in alinement with the operative face of the guide plate 33 (Fig. 3).
This reciprocation of the push plate 55 by the piston is rapid and is synchronized with the spmd of the accelerating belt 40 so that the cycle of operation of the push plate 54 occurs before the next succeeding bundle is accelerated by the accelerating belt 48 into a position to be acted upon by the push plate 55. The lateral displacement by the push plate 54 of the succeeding bundles continues until a given number of bundles are arranged abreast of each other on the retractable rails II). In the present showing, the retractable rails I9 are designed to accommodate six bundles. As the sixth bundle is pushed onto the retractable rails '10 by the. push plate 54, the leading end of the first of the line of bundles on the retractable rails engages and depresses'the trip lever I35 (Figs. 3 and 9). This movement of the trip lever I35 through its counterweight arm I39 (Fig. 11) actuates the switch arm I40 to close the normally open magnetic holding switch MI, thereby to close this normally open magnetic holding switch I4I which remains closed until its circuit is broken at another point. The closing of the normally open magnetic holding switch IGI (Fig. 19) permits current to flow through the solenoid valve I43, the energization of which permits. fluid under pressure to flow from the supply line I30 into the line 94 to the cylinder 9|, and also permits fluid to escape from the closed end of the cylinder 9I through theline 93 to the exhaust line I64. Accordingly, the piston 90 is driven toward the closed end of the cylinder to retract its piston rod 89. This retracting movement of the piston rod 89 through the walking beam 86 (Figs. 2 and 12), adjustable links 85, bell crank levers 82, and shipperrods 8|, rotates the disks 15 on the rock shaft I l and moves the crank pins 16 outwardly and upwardly. This movement of these crank pins 76 moves the slides II in the slideways 'IZ outwardly so as to withdraw the retractable rails T!) from their supporting position under the marginal portions of the full line of bundles B supported by these rails. This permits the full line of bundles B supported by these rails to drop or fallas pal-unitary group upon the skid I I5 arranged .therebel'ow andforming the first layer been so .dropped' on the skid H5 by this retraction. of? the retractable rails III; the rails are immediat'ely projected into their operative position to receive the next bundle B from the push plate 54. For. this purpose, during the final retractingmovementof. the retractable rails it, the rever-sing lug.M5(Fig. 8) on one of the crank disks I5 stril'res the arm IE6 of the normally closed reversing switch. IQZ- (Fig. 19), and opens. the switch; This opening of the normally closed reversing, switch I42 opens the. circuit through the closed magnetic holding switch I II, so as to permit this magnetic holding switch to resume its normal open. condition and also. de-energizes the solenoid valve I43. Upon de-energization of the solenoid valve I43 the pressure line I3!) is con- 'nected with the line 93 of the cylinder ill and.
the line 9.4. of the cylinderis connected to the exhaust or return line I44 and hence it will be seen thatthe piston S10 is. moved to extend its piston rod. 8.9 from. the cylinder SI This extending movement of the piston rod. 89 (Figs. 2 and 12), through the linkage. comprising the walking beam 85, adjustable. links 85, bell crank levers 82, shipper rods. 81-, disks I5. and rock shaft M causes the. crank .pins to swing downwardly and inwardly. This moves the slidesv II carrying the retractable. rails IQ inwardly so as to return these retractable rails '10 to their normally inwardly projected position illustrated in Fig. 2, thereby to return these retractable rails to their operative position to receive successive bundles advanced. thereon-by the push plate 54.
As each layer of bunches B is so deposited upon the. skid! I5, the elevator platform 22 is lowered a distance equal to the thickness of this layer. This is accomplished by the exposed longitudinal endof the last or sixth bundle of each layer engaging. and holding the bell crank lever I50 (Figs. 1, 3 and 13), this bell crank lever being arranged immediately below theretractable rails 70 so that eachlayer of bundles B comes to rest on the skid II5 before the side of the last or sixth bundle disengages. the operating arm of this bell crank lever. This bell crank lever is thereby moved and held so as to move the switch arm I5I and hold the normally open switch I52 in its closed position. The closing of the switch I52 (Fig. 19) permits current to flow through and energizes the normally closed solenoid valve I53, thereby opening the solenoid valve and permitting fluid to escape from the plungers cylinder 24 through the lineZfi and permitting the elevator platform 22 to lower. The lowering of the platform 22 continues until the last or sixth bundle of the dropped layer of bundles disengages the bell crank lever I58, this permitting the bell crank lever to resume its normal position projecting in the path of the next succeeding layer of bundles to be dropped. When the bell crank lever so returns to its normal position, the switch I52 opens to de-energize the normally closed solenoid valve I53 (Fig. 19), thereby closing the solenoid valve and preventing further escape of the fluid from the plunger cylinder 24 through the line Hand retaining the platform 22 at. anelevation lower bya distance correspondingto the. thickness or" the layer of bundles deposited on the skid. This depositing of successivev layers of bundles B upon the skid H5 and the step-by-step lowering of the platform 22 continues until a full load of bundles has been de- -the outwardly retracted .shown in Fig. 12.
posited on the skid. It-will be noted that these bundles are deposited in six contiguous columns or stacks (Fig.- 16).
When a full load of bundles has been deposited upon the skid II5, the operator stops the bundler (not shown) thereby to cut off the line of bundles being:fed'to the apparatus and discontinuing the automatic operations above described. The operator then throws the switch I41 to its closed position, this closing a circuit through the solenoid valve I43 (Fig. 19). The'closing of this solenoid valve I43 permits fluid to flow from the supply line I30 through line 94 to one end of the cylinder 9| and permits fluid to escape from the opposite closed end of the cylinder 9| through the line 93 to the exhaust or return line I44.
This retracts the piston rod 89 and, through the linkage comprising the walking beam 86 (Figs. 2 and 12), adjustable links 85, bell crank levers 82, shipper rods BI, disks I5 and rock shafts I4, moves the crank 'pins I6 outwardly and upwardly. This moves'the slides II outwardly thereby to move the retractable rails I carried thereby to inoperative position The operator then turns the hand wheel I 04 in a clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 2, thus turning the two shafts 99 which are crossconnected by the chains I03. This rotation of these shafts 99 (Fig. 12) winds up the chains I02 so as to lift the guide plates 95 carried by the arms 96, these arms 96 swinging about their pivotal connections 98 with the main frame of the apparatus. These guide plates 95 and their supporting arms are moved to the approximate posiplatform the" operator closes the manual switch I55 so as to energize the normally closed solenoid valve I56 (Fig. 19). Energization of this solenoid valve permits fluid to flow into the line 25 and bottom of the plunger cylinder 24 thereby to elevate the plunger 23 and platform 22 carried thereby. It will be noted that the solenoid valve I53 is closed at this time so that fluid cannot escape from the plunger cylinder 24 while fluid is being admitted through line 25. When the platform 22 reaches floor level the operator opens the switch I55 so as to de energize the solenoid valve I56 and cut off the flow of fluid to the plunger cylinder 24. v
- The operator then places the hoist truck II8 under the loaded skid II5, lifts this skid and removes'it from the platform 22. The operator then replaces'an empty skid II upon the platform 22, placing this skid against the plate II6 as previously described.
The operator then closes the switch I55 (Fig. 19') so as to energize the normally closed solenoid valve I56. This permits fluid to flow from the supply line through the line 25 to the bottom of the plunger cylinder 24 and thereby elevate theplunger23 and elevator platform 22 carried thereby, This energization of the solenoid valve I55 is continued until the platform is raised to approximately the level shown in Figs. 1 and 2, this position being such that the upper surface of the skid'I I5 is immediately below the bell crank lever I (Fig. 13) and hence in position to be properly actuated by the first layer of bundles B falling upon the skid.
The operator then swings the hand lever I08 from the full to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 18, this camming the pawl I 06 free from the ratchet Wheel I05 and permitting the guide plates 95 to be lowered from the broken line position to the full line position shown in Fig 12. After into the closed end of the cylinder 9I, this solenoid valve also permitting fluid to be relieved from the opposite end of this cylinder through the line 94 and exhaust or return line I44. Introduction of fluid to the closed end of the cylinder 9| extends the piston rod 89 and returns the retractable rails to their inwardly projected operative position shown in Fig. 2 in the manner previously described.
The apparatus has now been restored to the condition originally assumed and the cycle of operation is repeated.
It will be noted that the apparatus can be moved by first lifting the pins 29 (Figs. 1 and 2) and placing the apparatus on a hoist truck or the like to transport the apparatus to another location. This is an important feature of the invention since in the manufacture of wallboard different sizes of wallboard are run at different times and by having the entire apparatus portable another similar apparatus can readily be installed in its place to handle a different size wallboard.
It is obvious that the apparatus embodying the present invention can be used to stack individual wallboard panels as well as bundles of such panels as heretofore illustrated and described. Accordingly, the expression wallboard panels and the like as used in the accompanying claims is meant to include both individual wallboard panels as well as bundles thereof, and all other types of panels which are relatively large and heavy and difficult to handle manually. I From the foregoing it will be seen that the present invention provides an apparatus for automatically stacking wallboard or the like and which accomplishes the many objects heretofore set forth. It is intended, of course, that this invention should not be limited to the specific embodiments disclosed herein, since modifications may be made, and it is contemplated, therefore, by the appended claims to cover any such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.
I claim:
1. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a, plurality of contiguous columns, comprising a conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels, support means arranged adjacent said conveyor to movably receive from said conveyor and support in a horizontal plane a plurality of said panels in side by side relation and movable to release any panels supported thereby, a second conveyor successively trans ferring individual panels from said first conveyor to said support means whereby successive panels so transferred to said support means move pre- 15 ceding panels along said upport means in a horizontal plane, and means actuated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined number of said panels on said support means and moving said support means to release said predetermined number of panels and permit them to fall by veyor to movably receive from said conveyor and support in a horizontalplane coplanar with said first mentioned horizontal plane a plurality of said panel in side by side relation and movable to release any panels supported thereb a second conveyor movable in a horizontal plane and successively transferring individual panels from said first conveyor to said support means whereby successive panels so transferred to said support means move preceding panels along said support means and remain in said coplanar horizontal plane while being transferred by said second conveyor, and means moving said support meansto release the panels supported thereby when a predetermined number of said panels have accumulated thereon to permit said predetermined number of said panels to fall by gravity as a unitary group.
3. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of contiguous columns, comprising-a conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels in a horizontal plane, a horizontal support means arranged adjacent said conveyor to movably receive from said conveyor and support in a horizontal plane coplanar with said first mentioned horizontal plane a plurality of said panels in side by side relation and movable to release any panels supported thereby, a second conveyor intermittently movable in a horizontal plane and in a direction transverse of the direction of movement of said panels on said first conveyor to successively transfer individual panels from said first conveyor to said support means whereby successive panels so transferred to said support means move preceding panels along said support means and remain in said coplanar hori- 4. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of columns, comprising, a conveyora-dapted to convey a succession of said panels, a pair of spaced horizontal retractable rails arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receivea plurality of said panels from said conveyor and to engage said panels along their marginal portions, a second conveyor successively transferring said panels from said first conveyor to said rails, and means for retracting said rails to release the panels supported thereby when a predetermined number of said panels have accumulated thereon to permit said predetermined number of 'saidpanels to fall by gravity as a unitary group.
' 5. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the'like in a plurality of columns, comprising a conveyoradapted to convey a succession of said panelsj'a pairj of horizontally spaced horizontal retractablerails-arranged adjacent said conveyor l6 and adapted to slidingly receive a plurality of said panels from said conveyor and to engage the underside of said panels along their marginal portions, a guide plate associated with each of said rails to maintain the alinement-of said panels in their sliding movement along said rails, a second conveyor successively transferring said panels from said first conveyor to said rails, and means actuated in response to the accumulation of apredetermined number of said panels on said rails for retracting'and returning said rails to release said predetermined number of said panels and to permit them to fall by gravity as a unitary group.
6. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of columns, comprising a horizontal conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels, a horizontal support arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receive successively a plurality of said panels from said conveyor, a pusher independent of said support and arranged adjacent one side of said conveyor and reciprocable horizontally across said conveyor toward and from said support, power actuated means synchronized with the movement of said panels along said conveyor and arranged to reciprocate said pusher to successively transfer said panels from said conveyor to said support, and means actuated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined number of said panels on said support to move said support to release said predetermined number of panels.
'7. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of columns, comprising a horizontal conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels, a, horizontal support arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receive successively a plurality of said panels from said conveyor, a pusher arranged adjacent one side of said conveyor and reciprocable horizontally across aid conveyor toward and from said support, means for separating the leading one of said succession of panels from succeeding panels therein, means stopping the forward movement of said leading panel on said conveyor opposite the operative side of said pusher, power operated means actuated in response to the stopping of said leading panel and arranged to reciprocate said pusher to transfer said leading panel from said conveyor to said support, and means actuated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined number of said panels on said support to move said support to release said predetermined number of panels.
8. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of columns, comprising a horizontal conveyor adapted to convey a 5110-7 cession of said panels, a horizontal support arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receive successively a plurality of said panels from said conveyor, a, pusher arranged adjacent one side of said conveyor and reciprocable horizontally across said conveyor toward and from said support, means'for separating the leading one of said succession of panels from succeeding panels therein, a stop engageable by said leading panel to stop the same in a position opposite the operative side of said pusher, means preventing retrograde movement of said leading panel after engaging said stop, power actuated means arranged to reciprocate said pusher to transfer said leading panel from said conveyor to said support, and means actuated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined number of said panels on said support to move said support to release said predetermined number of panels.
9. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of columns, comprising a horizontal conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels, a horizontal support arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receive successively a plurality of said panels from said conveyor. a pusher arranged adjacent one side of said conveyor and reciprocable horizontally across said conveyor toward and from said support, means accelerating the leading one of said succession of panels to separate it from succeeding panels therein, means stopping the forward movement of said leading panel on said conveyor opposite the operative side of said pusher,
power actuated means arranged to reciprocate said pusher to transfer said leading panel from said conveyor to said support, and means actuated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined number of said panels on said support to move said support to release said predetermined number of panels.
10. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of columns, comprising a horizontal conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels, guide means adjacent one side of said conveyor and guiding said panels in their movement along said conveyor, a horizontal support arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receive a plurality of said panels in side by side relation from said conveyor, a
pusher arranged adjacent said one side of said conveyor and reciprocable horizontally acros said conveyor toward and from said sup-port, means for separating the leading one of said succession of panels from succeeding panels therein, means stopping the forward movement of said leading panel on said conveyor opposite the operative side of said pusher and in line with said support, power actuated means arranged to reciprocate said pusher to successively transfer said panels from said conveyor to said support, and means actuated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined number of said panels on said support to move said support to release said predetermined number of panels.
11. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of columns, comprising a horizontal conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels, guide means associated with said conveyor for guiding said panels in their movement along said conveyor and including a stationary guide plate adjacent one side of said conveyor, a pair of spaced horizontal retractable rails arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receive a plurality of said panels in side by side relation from said conveyor and to engage said panels along their marginal portions, a push plate arranged adjacent one side of said conveyor in alinement with said guide plate and reciprocable toward and from said rails, means accelerating the leading one of said succession of panels to separate it from succeeding panels therein, a stop plate adjacent one of said rails and engageable by said leading panel to stop the same in a position opposite the operative side of said push plate, means preventing retrograde movement of said leading panel after engaging said stop, means reciprocating said push plate to transfer said leading panel from said conveyor to said rails, and means for retracting said rails to release the panels supported there- I a horizontal conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels, guide means associated with said conveyor for guiding said panels in their movement along said conveyor and including a stationary guide plate adjacent one side of said conveyor, a pair of spaced horizontal retractable rails arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receive a plurality of said panels in side by side relation from said conveyor and to engage said panels along their marginal portions, a push plate arranged adjacent one side of said conveyor in alinement with said guide plate and reciprocable toward and from said rails, means accelerating the leading one of said succession of panels to separate it from succeeding panels therein, a stop plate adjacent one of said rails and engageable by said lea-ding panel to stop the same in a position opposite the operative side of said push plate, means preventing retrograde movement of said leading panel after engaging said stop, means actuated in response to the engagement of said leading panel with said stop plate and reciprocating said push plate to transfer said leading panel from said conveyor to said rails, and means actuated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined number of said panels on said rails and retracting said rails to release said predetermined number of panels and permit them to fall by gravity.
13. Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like in a plurality of columns, comprising a horizontal conveyor adapted to convey a succession of said panels, guide means associated with said conveyor for guiding said panels in their movement along said conveyor and including a stationary guide plate adjacent one side of said conveyor, a pair of spaced horizontal retractable rails arranged adjacent said conveyor and adapted to receive a plurality of said panels in side by side relation from said conveyor and to engage said panels along their marginal portions, a push plate arranged adjacent one side of said conveyor in alinement with said guide plate and reciprocable toward and from said rails, means accelerating the leading one of said succession of panels to separate it from succeeding panel therein, a stop plate adjacent one of said rails and engageable by said leading panel to stop the same in a position opposite the operative side of said push plate, means preventing retrograde movement of said leading panel after engaging said stop, means actuated in response to the engagement of said leading panel with said stop plate and reciprocating said push plate to transfer said leading panel from said conveyor to said rails, and means actuated in response to the movement of said leading panel along said rails and retracting said rails to release a, predetermined number of said panels accumulated on said rails and permit them to fall by gravity.
ALBERTA JEFFREY, Executria: of the Estate of Douglas C. Jeffrey,
Deceased.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 983,892 Graham Feb. 14, 1911 2,065,674 Fay Dec. 29, 1936 2,165,918 Black July 11, 1939 2,228,887 Peterson Jan. 14, 1941' 2,234,990 Todhunter Mar. 18, 1941 2,396,090 Curtis Mar. 5, 1946
US756905A 1947-06-25 1947-06-25 Apparatus for stacking wallboard panels and the like Expired - Lifetime US2607501A (en)

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Cited By (10)

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US2878947A (en) * 1955-06-13 1959-03-24 Thrasher Elbridge Weldon Lumber stacker
DE1117493B (en) * 1952-12-29 1961-11-16 Fmc Corp Box stacking machine
US3380598A (en) * 1966-04-11 1968-04-30 Clayton J. Marschhausen Retractable board holder for printing presses
US3385457A (en) * 1966-05-03 1968-05-28 Daniel L. Zinn Stacking aligner mechanism
US3393812A (en) * 1965-10-23 1968-07-23 Clary Corp Lumber stacking machine
US3410424A (en) * 1967-02-27 1968-11-12 George F. Rooney Jr. Rack for holding a stack of printed sheets
US3429459A (en) * 1966-10-21 1969-02-25 Dakon Adams Co Palletizer
US3521770A (en) * 1967-09-05 1970-07-28 Tahka Ab Oy Method for forming a bundle of sawn or planed boards or planks,sorted as to length
US3554388A (en) * 1968-09-20 1971-01-12 American Hoist & Derrick Co Object stacker
US6092978A (en) * 1997-03-12 2000-07-25 Fishchersips, Inc. Alignment device used to manufacture a plurality of structural insulated panels

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US983892A (en) * 1909-08-27 1911-02-14 Orleans Dry Kiln & Stacker Co Lumber-stacker.
US2065674A (en) * 1932-08-13 1936-12-29 Moore Dry Kiln Company Apparatus for tiering, feeding, and loading materials
US2165918A (en) * 1938-03-19 1939-07-11 Robertson Co H H Metal sheet piling apparatus
US2228887A (en) * 1938-04-28 1941-01-14 Harbor Plywood Corp Stacker and unloader
US2234990A (en) * 1939-06-16 1941-03-18 William J Todhunter Assembling and piling unit
US2396090A (en) * 1944-07-26 1946-03-05 Dwight C Curtis Means and method for handling and stacking railroad ties and the like

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US983892A (en) * 1909-08-27 1911-02-14 Orleans Dry Kiln & Stacker Co Lumber-stacker.
US2065674A (en) * 1932-08-13 1936-12-29 Moore Dry Kiln Company Apparatus for tiering, feeding, and loading materials
US2165918A (en) * 1938-03-19 1939-07-11 Robertson Co H H Metal sheet piling apparatus
US2228887A (en) * 1938-04-28 1941-01-14 Harbor Plywood Corp Stacker and unloader
US2234990A (en) * 1939-06-16 1941-03-18 William J Todhunter Assembling and piling unit
US2396090A (en) * 1944-07-26 1946-03-05 Dwight C Curtis Means and method for handling and stacking railroad ties and the like

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1117493B (en) * 1952-12-29 1961-11-16 Fmc Corp Box stacking machine
US2878947A (en) * 1955-06-13 1959-03-24 Thrasher Elbridge Weldon Lumber stacker
US3393812A (en) * 1965-10-23 1968-07-23 Clary Corp Lumber stacking machine
US3380598A (en) * 1966-04-11 1968-04-30 Clayton J. Marschhausen Retractable board holder for printing presses
US3385457A (en) * 1966-05-03 1968-05-28 Daniel L. Zinn Stacking aligner mechanism
US3429459A (en) * 1966-10-21 1969-02-25 Dakon Adams Co Palletizer
US3410424A (en) * 1967-02-27 1968-11-12 George F. Rooney Jr. Rack for holding a stack of printed sheets
US3521770A (en) * 1967-09-05 1970-07-28 Tahka Ab Oy Method for forming a bundle of sawn or planed boards or planks,sorted as to length
US3554388A (en) * 1968-09-20 1971-01-12 American Hoist & Derrick Co Object stacker
US6092978A (en) * 1997-03-12 2000-07-25 Fishchersips, Inc. Alignment device used to manufacture a plurality of structural insulated panels

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