US2592406A - Fountain pen of the ball point type - Google Patents

Fountain pen of the ball point type Download PDF

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US2592406A
US2592406A US9157549A US2592406A US 2592406 A US2592406 A US 2592406A US 9157549 A US9157549 A US 9157549A US 2592406 A US2592406 A US 2592406A
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pen
writing
ink
ball
ball point
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William G Faltin
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William G Faltin
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B43WRITING OR DRAWING IMPLEMENTS; BUREAU ACCESSORIES
    • B43KIMPLEMENTS FOR WRITING OR DRAWING
    • B43K7/00Ball-point pens
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B43WRITING OR DRAWING IMPLEMENTS; BUREAU ACCESSORIES
    • B43KIMPLEMENTS FOR WRITING OR DRAWING
    • B43K7/00Ball-point pens
    • B43K7/005Pen barrels

Description

April 8, 1952 w. G. FALTIN FOUNTAIN PEN OF THE BALL POINT TYPE 4 SheetsSheet 1 Filed May 5, 1949 April 8, 1952 w. G. FALTlN FOUNTAIN PEN OF THE BALL POINT TYPE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 5, 1949 April 8, 1952 w. G. FALTlN FOUNTAIN PEN OF THE. BALL POINT TYPE Filed May 5, 1949 INVENTOR. WILLIAM G. FALTI Attorney April 8, 1952 W. G. FALTIN FOUNTAIN PEN OF THE BALL POINT TYPE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 5, 1949 INVENTOR. WILLIAM G. FALTIN,

Aflorney Patented Apr. 8, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 13 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in fountain pens of the so-called ball point type usually employing a paste-like, semi-fluid ink which is stored in an open-ended capillary passage reservoir and which is transferred to paper or other writing surface by means of a freely rotatable ball mounted in its writing tip.

Stated broadly, a principal object of this invention is to provide a fountain pen characterized as aforesaid, which is simple in design and construction and highly efficient in operation.

More particularly, this invention has for an object the provision of a fountain pen of this type that will function properly when it is held in the customary angular writing position in which pencils and standard pens are held, that is, at an angle of about 45", which may of course vary plus or minus, depending upon the individual characteristics of the writer. In ball point pens as presently constructed, the pen must be held in a nearly upright or substantially vertical position for best writing results. If it is held in the customary angular writing position aforesaid, the lower ball-retaining edge of the socket in which the ball is mounted will engage the paper and thus will interfere with the proper functioning of the pen. For example, on the up stroke of the pen, the socket edge is likely to scrape up and remove some of the ink which has been deposited by the ball point, thereby causing breaks and light spots in the written lines and often creating a fuzzy double line. Said edge can also pick up dust particles or fibers of the paper and, when these have accumulated, they will be deposited at frequent intervals during the lateral and down strokes of the pen, thus forming dark blotches and spots, giving the written lines a bad appearance. This disadvantage of present ball point pens is particularly annoying when cheaper grades of paper with a soft surface are used. My pen is so designed that the edge of the socket which holds the ball is maintained in a plane that is substantially parallel to that of the writing surface when the pen is held in the customary angular writing position and therefore will not touch or scrape over the writing surface.

Another object of my invention is to provide a ball point pen in which the writing point is displaced from the longitudinal center line of the pen so as to establish a general disposition of the writing point to pen barrel that is similar to the common pen. Ball point pens in use at the present time have their writing point disposed on the center line of the pen, similar to the disposition of the point of a pencil. Displacement of the writing point above the pen center line provides a more natural writing position as well as one to which the writer has become accustomed through years of actual use of the common pen and the standard fountain pen and also provides better visibility for the writing process.

Another object of my invention is to provide a fountain pen of the ball point type, wherein the capillary ink storage tube may also be displaced from the longitudinal center line of the pen and wherein the space inside the barrel which is gained by the off-center mounting of the ink storage tube is utilized for additional ink storage. This is a decided feature of advantage in double-ended ball point pens. In the usual design of double-ended ball point pens, short ink storage tubes must be used due to the fact that the tubes are mounted coaxially with or on the center line of the pen barrel. Therefore, the ink storage tubes cannot extend beyond the middle point of the length of the barrel, as otherwise they would interfere with one another. Since the ink storage tube in my pen may be mounted in an off-center position, the two storage tubes in the double-ended pen may be of the customary full length and arranged side by side without interfering one with the other. One of the storage tubes may feed ink of one color to one tip and the other may feed ink of another color to the tip at the opposite end, or both tubes may feed ink of the same color to both tips. In cases where the same color ink is used in both ink tubes, the second tube and tip may serve as a reserve pen, to be used when the first ink tube runs dry and a replacement cartridge is not immediately available, thus doubling the capacity of the pen. In single-ended pens, this extra space in the barrel may be utilized to store one or more reserve storage tubes or to mount a double or even triple length storage tube, thus giving the pen increased capacity.

Another object of my invention is the provision of a ball point fountain pen whose barrel is formed with finger grip surfaces or areas constituted by flattened or slightly concave areas on the barrel or body of the pen or by built-up sections of the barrel between said grip areas, which areas are so located that they will automatically aid the writer in holding the pen in the correct position in which the edge line or plane of the ball socket is substantially parallel to the writing surface.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a ball point fountain pen characterized by a simple yet thoroughly effective and dependable ink feed, insuring a constant free flow of ink to the ball point thereof.

Other objects and features of advantage of the 3 invention will become apparent from the following detailed description taken with the accompanying drawings showing various physical embodiments selected for the purpose of simple disclosure and not by Way of limitation, in which: Fig. 1 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section taken through one form of writing head or tip of a ball point pen according to the invention, the writing tip being inclined to the writing surface by an angle of approximately 45, as is customary with common pens and standard fountain pens;

Fig. 2 is a section taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Figs. 3, 5 and '7 are views similar to Fig. 1 but illustrating modified forms of writing tip;

Figs. 4, 6 and 8 are sections taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 3, line 6-6 of Fig. 5, and line 8--8 of Fig. 7, respectively, the ball point being omitted for clarity;

Fig. 9 is a broken-away longitudinal section taken through a ball point pen employing the Writing tip illustrated in Fig. 7 and which is characterized by a coaxial disposition of pen barrel, writing tip and ink storage tube;

Fig. 10 is a section taken along line ill-40 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a view similar to Fig. 9 but illustrating a modified pen in which the axis of the writing tip, and hence the writing point, is displaced upwardly from the longitudinal center line of the pen proper;

Fig. 12 is a section taken along line |2l2 of Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a view similar to Fig. 11 but illustrating a further upward displacement of writing point than characterizes the pen illustrated in Fig. 11;

Fig. 14 is illustrative of a ball point pen characterized by the aforesaid upward displacement of writing point from pen center line but employing a sac-form ink reservoir in place of the conventional metal or plastic ink storage tube illustrated in the preceding views;

Fig. 15 is a broken-away longitudinal sectional view of a double-ended ball point pen, illustrating the side-by-side disposition of ink storage tubes made possible by off-setting the axes of the writing tips from the longitudinal center line of the pen;

Fig. 16 is a section taken along line I6l6 of Fig. 15;

Fig. 17 is a longitudinal sectional view of a single-ended ball point pen, with writing point disposed ofi-center with relation to the pen center line and employing a U-shaped or doubleink storage tube giving increased writing capacty;

Fig. 18 is a section taken along line 18-48 of Fig. 17;

Fig. 19 is illustrative of a ball point pen generally as shown in Fig. 14 but utilizing a capillary-passage ink storage tube in place of the sac-form reservoir illustrated in Fig. 14, and a modified writing tip designed to raise the ball point above the top line of the pen barrel; and

Fig. 20 is a side elevation of a ball point fountain pen provided with finger grip areas on the external surface of the barrel thereof which are so located that they automatically aid the Writer in holding the pen in the inclined position in which the edge. line. of the ball socket is substantially parallel tothe writing surface.

Before proceeding with a detailed description of the improved forms of Writing heads or tips illustrated in Figs. 1-8 of the drawings, reference is had to Fig. 9 which, except for the ball 4 and socket end of the writing tip, may be taken as illustrative of conventional ball point pen construction. The illustrative pen includes a writing head or tip l0 provided at one end with a socket mounting a ball type writing point II,

a pen barrel l2, and a capillary-passage ink storage tube l3. The barrel I2 is shown to be of the screw-on type, being threaded on to a cylindrical formation provided at the other end of the writing tip, but it may be of the push-on type, in which case the cylindrical end formation is devoid of threads. The ink storage tube I3 is adapted to be telescoped on a feed tube [4 extending rearwardly from the writing tip and shown to be formed integral therewith. Ink from the storage tube 13 flows to the ball point ll through a longitudinal feed passage i5 provided by an end-to-end bore in the Writing tip, the passage establishing communication between the ink storage tube I3 and the ball socket through a passage end section [6 which has somewhat smaller diameter than the bore proper. The ink storage tube [3 is open at one end, as is conventional, and communicates with atmosphere through an opening I! in the wall of the barrel 12.

It will be observed that in the illustrated pen the axis of the ink feed passage l5, [6, which may be considered as the axis of the writing tip 10, and the axis of the storage tube I3 as well, coincide with the longitudinal center line of the pen, as is customary. In use, ink flows by capillary action from the storage tube 13 through the feed passage I5, I6 to the ball point II, by which it is transferred to the writing surface. To replace a spent cartridge, usually comprising a unitary ink storage tube and new writing tip with its ball point, the barrel is unscrewed from the tip of the spent cartridge and a fresh cartridge is operatively related to the barrel, whereupon ink flows to the ball point of the new tip, as before.

As is well known, it is standard practice in con ventional ball point pens to form the socket for the ball point H so that the line of the ball-retaining edge thereof is at a right angle to the axis of the tip and hence of the pen as a whole. Accordingly, in use of the standard ball point pen, it must be held nearly upright for proper functioning, because if held in the customary angular writing position of about 45, in which pencils and standard fountain pens are held, the peripheral portion of the socket edge nearest the surface will scrape thereon and interfere with the writing process.

This disadvantage of the prior ball point pens is overcome according to the present invention by disposing the ball retaining edge of the socket in a plane which is parallel to the writing surface when the pen is held in the customary angular writing position, i. e. at an angle of approximately 45 to said surface, so that it cannot scrape against the writing surface. Referring to Fig. 1, illustrating one form of improved writing tip achieving this desirable feature, it will be seen that whereas the axis of the socket cavity [8 coincides with the axis of the feed passages l5, l6 and hence with the axis of the writing tip as a whole, the plane or line of the ball-retaining edge 20 of the socket is inclined to the axis of the writing tip by an angle of approximately 45. Hence, when the pen is held at an angle of about 45 more or less, the socket edge 20 throughout its full periphery is disposed parallel to the writing surface indicated by the horizontal line A.

Accordingly, there is no likelihood of any portion of the socket edge scraping against the writing surface and thereby interfering with the proper functioning of the pen when the latter is held in the customary angular writing position, as was the case with prior ball point pens.

In the Fig. 1 form of writing tip, the bottom wall of the socket cavity is at a right angle to the axis of the ink passage I5, l6, and said passage opens through the central portion of said bottom wall. If the opening between feed passage l6 and cavity I8 were full-circular, the ball point could seat against the full circular edge of the opening and block oil flow of ink to the cavity. To prevent this undesirable condition, the opening through the bottom Wall of the cavity is formed triangular, such being simply accomplished by broaching the end of the passage IE to triangular shape, whereby to form a short-length triangular conduit 2| (Fig. 2) between feed passage proper and socket cavity. The sides of the triangular opening thus provide angular seating edges for the ball point, and the angles permit free flow of ink to the cavity. It will also be observed that the cavity I8 is generally part-spherical and enlarged relative to the diameter of the ball point, thus to provide an appreciable well or chamber encircling the same, which insures that the ball point is at all times coated with ink.

Referring to the modified writing tip illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4, here the axis of the socket cavity "3a is inclined to the axis of the feed passage I5, l6 by the same angle of approximately 45, which the socket edge 20 bears to the feed passage axis. This results in the bottom wall 22 of the socket being disposed parallel to the line of the socket edge 20. As in the Fig. 1 form of tip, the opening between said passage and the socket cavity is provided by a triangularly shaped conduit 2 la similar to the triangular conduit 2| previously described.

Considering the modified form of writing tip illustrated in Figs. and 6, the bottom wall 22 of the socket cavity is inclined to the axis of the feed passage, as in the Fig. 3 form of writing tip. However, advantage is taken of the elongated opening 23 (Fig. 6) resulting upon angular intersection of the relatively small-diameter feed passage IS with the bottom wall of the cavity. The two lpng sides. of the illustratively oval-shaped Opening provide effective seating edges for the ball point, leaving the ends of the opening unobstructed for the free flow of ink from the feed passage l5, [6 to the socket cavity- In addition to providing free flow of ink, the oval-shaped opening is of advantage in. that it eliminates the broaching operation required with the Figs. 1 and 3 forms of writing, tips.

According to the Fig. '1 form of writing tip, such also makes use of the oval-shape of thefeed opening to cavity as described. Additionally, the bottom wall of the cavity is annularly recessed about said opening, as by forming the cavity deeper in its outer or peripheral portion than in its central portion through which the feed passage opens. Such recessing. not only gives increased capacity of the ink chamber provided by the cavity, but also results in the formation of spaced lips 24, 24a (Fig. 8) which provide ball seats extending along the sides only of the opening and leave the ends thereof unobstructed for free. flow of ink from feed passage i5, It to the socket cavity.

It will be observed that in the variant forms of writing tip illustrated in- Figs. 3, 5 and 7 the cirline of the pen barrel Ho.

cular ball-retaining socket edge is disposed parallel to the writing surface when the pen is heldin the customary angular= writing position of about 45 from said surface, as with the Fig. 1 form of writing tip. While in all of the illustrated formsv of writing tip the cavity of the ball socket is enlarged with respect to the ball so as to provide an ink chamber of substantial capacity surrounding the ball, it will be understood that such a special ink chamber is not necessary provided the ball is mounted in the tip with just the right amount of tightness or looseness as permits the ink to seep through'between the ball. and the wall of the socket.

' Although any one of the above described Writing tips may be employed in the pen illustrated in Fig. 9 which was earlier described, the writing tip employed therein and in succeeding figures which illustrate the pen as a whole is preferably that shown in Fig. '7 because of the free flow of ink to ball point characterizing this form of ball socket construction.

As distinguished from the coaxial relationship of the writing tip, ink storage tube and pen barrel of the pen illustrated in Fig. 9, the modified pen'illustrated in Fig. ll is characterized by an upward displacement or ofisetting of the 001m inon axis of writing tip la and ink. storage tube [So from the longitudinal center line of the pen barrel lZa. Such results in raising the writing point (ball ll) above the center line of the pen barrel so as to establish a general disposition of the writing point to pen barrel that is similar to the common pen and to the standard fountain pen as well. The illustrated upward offsetting of the writing point thus provides for a natural writing position to which the writer has become accustomed through actual use of the common pen and the standard fountain pen and also provides better visibility during the writing process. J

Whereas the ink feed passage of the writing tip of the pen illustrated in Fig. 11 extends straightway for its full length, the small-diameter feed passage [6?) of the writing point of the pen illustrated in Fig. 13 (corresponding gen erally to the feed passage it of Fig. 9) is upwardly'inclined from the axis of the writing point illb which may be here taken as the axis of the rear end of the tip to which the ink storage tube connects. It will be observed that in the Fig. 13 construction the ink storage tube. is internally seated in an enlarged bore provided in the writing tip rather than being mounted externally upon a feed tube such as the feed tube M (.Fig. 9) forming a part thereof. The described inclination of feed tube IBZ) to writing tip axis results in a further upward displacement of writing point H from the pen center line than is possible with the Fig. 11 form of pen.

The ink storage tubes l3, lSa and [3b employed in the presently described forms of pens are usually made of metal or plastic and are bf the open-ended capillary-passage type. However, such storage tubes may be replaced by a closed rubber sac or bulb form of ink reservoir against the entire surface of which atmospheric pressure is effective. The use of the rubber form of reservoir in place of the capillary-passage storage tube is illustrated in Fig. l l, wherein a storage sac 13a is slip-fitted on to the feed tube. l'cof the writing tip lilo. Here the tip feed passage extends straightway, but its axis and that of the tip as a whole is inclined to the axis or center However, the flexibility of the rubber making up the sac l3c permits the same to bend or flex along its length whereby it may readily accommodate itself within the pen barrel despite the inclination of the tip and its feed tube Me. The rubber sac form of ink storage device may store the paste-like, semi-fluid ink usually employed as the writing medium in ball point pens, or it may contain the standard liquid fountain pen ink.

It is also possible to employ the extreme offsetting of writing point with respect to pen barrel center line characterizing the Fig. 14 form of pen, with metal or plastic ink storage tubes, for which reference is had to Fig. 19. In this view, the writing tip llld corresponds to the tip Inc of Fig. 14, in that its axis is inclined to the pen barrel center line, and a capillary-passage ink storage tube l3d of the metal or plastic type is employed, being bent along its length so that it may be accommodated within the barrel as shown. Here the inclination of writing tip axis to pen barrel center line is such as to raise the ball point somewhat above the top line of the pen barrel, as the latter is seen in Fig. 19. The aforesaid offsetting and/or inclination of writing tip axis, and hence of Writing point, from the longitudinal center line of the pen barrel provides extra space within the barrel which is of particular advantage in double-ended ball point pens. In the usual design thereof, ink storage tubes must be employed having a length not exceeding one-half the interior length of the barrel; otherwise the tubes would interfere with each other. The offsetting of the axes of the writing tips of double-ended pens to opposite sides of the pen center line permits the use of full-length ink storage tubes, as indicated in Fig. 15, wherein the ink storage tube 34 and coaxially related writing tip 35 for one writing point 3| is disposed to one side of the center line of the pen barrel 32, and the ink storage tube 35 and coaxially related writing tip 31 for the opposite writing point 3| a is disposed to the opposite side of the center line. It will be observed that the offsetting is adequate to provide sideby-side relationship of the ink storage tubes 34, 36, so that each may extend substantially the full length of the pen barrel. Said ink storage tubes may supply inks of different color to the opposite writing points or they may supply the same color ink to both the points, in which latter case one storage tube and writing point may be employed as a reserve for the other, which is used regularly until exhausted.

In single-ended fountain pens employing the offsetting of writing point and/or ink storage tubes from the pen barrel center line, the extra space within the barrel may be employed to store one or more reserve ink storage tubes, which may be substituted for the one in use when the latter becomes exhausted. Or such extra space may be utilized to mount a double or even a triple ink storage tube, of which a double ink storage tube .44 is illustrated in Fig. 17, being associated with a writing tip of the inclined passage type shown in Fig. 13. Such a tube is formed extra long initially and is bent to U-shape, the open-ended leg thereof being accommodated within the bar- 'rel as shown.

To assist the writer in finding, and holding the pen in the correct position in which the line of the ball-retaining edge of the socket is substantially parallel to the writing surface, the external surface of the barrel may be provided with suitable finger grip surfaces or areas indicating correct finger position on the barrel. Referring to Fig. 20, a flattened or concave area 50 is formed on the external surface of the barrel for engagement by the thumb of the writer. A similar fiattened or concave area 5i is provided on the upper periphery of the barrel in position to be engaged by the index finger of the writer. And a similar flat or concave area 52 is provided on the side of the barrel opposite that containing the area 50, in position to be engaged by the middle finger. While three such finger contact areas have been illustrated, one or two thereof may be ample for the intended purpose, instead of all three. The aforesaid contact area or areas may also be formed by built-up sections of the barrel between the grip or contact areas. Such area or areas provide tactual indication of the proper position in which the pen is to be gripped and held to insure its best functioning and at the same time give a natural feel to the pen, thus rendering the writing process easier and less arduous.

In each of the illustrated forms of the invention, the writing tip is shown to be of the type which is either pushed or screwed in from the front end of the barrel. However, by constructing the pen barrel in two sections as illustrated in Figs. 14 and 1'7, taken with minor redesign of the writing tip and front section, the tip may be mounted by inserting it from the rear of the front barrel section, the rear section then being applied to close the barrel. A pen employing such a modified writing tip mounting gives all of the advantages of the illustrated pens and is of especial advantage in the case of pens of the retractable type, wherein the writing tip retracts into the barrel when the pen is not in use.

Without further analysis, it will be appreciated that the writing tip and pen constructions described above achieve the objects of the invention set forth in the foregoing. Moreover, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the precise construction or constructions illustrated, as it is susceptible of being incorporated in still other structurally modified forms falling within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a fountain pen of the ball point type, a writing tip, a barrel and an ink reservoir operatively mounted on one end thereof, said writing tip having an end-to-end ink feed passage extending between the reservoir and the cavity of a ball socket provided in the other end thereof, a ball type writing point mounted in said cavity for free rotation and being retained therein by the edge of the socket, the axis of the cavity being inclined to the axis of the feed passage by an angle such that the bottom wall of the cavity intersects the feed passage at an acute angle thereby to provide an elongated opening between said feed passage and said cavity, and that the line of said ball-retaining edge is disposed substantially parallel to the writing surface when the pen is held in the customary angular writing position.

2. In a fountain pen of the ball point type, a writing tip, a barrel and an ink reservoir operatively mounted on one end thereof, said writing tip having an end-to-end ink feed passage extending between said reservoir and a ball cavity formed in its other end which terminates in a circular edge, a ball type writing point retained in said cavity by the circular edge, the bottom wall of the cavity intersecting the feed passage at an acute angle thereby to provide an ovalshaped opening between cavity and feed passage, the longitudinal sides of said opening providing a seat for the ball, and said ball-retaining edge being contained in a plane which is substantially parallel to said bottom wall whereby said edge is maintained out of contact with the writing surface when the pen is held in the customary angular writing position.

3. A fountain pen of the ball point type as set forth in claim 1, wherein the axis of the writing tip is displaced upwardly from the longitudinal center line of the pen whereby to raise the writing point above said center line.

4. A fountain pen of the ball point type as set forth in claim 1, wherein the axis of the writing tip is disposed above and extends parallel to the longitudinal center line of the pen whereby to raise the writing point above said center line.

5. A fountain pen of the ball point type as set forth in claim 1, wherein the axis of the ink feed passage is inclined upwardly of the longitudinal center line of the pen whereby to raise the writing point above said center line.

6. A fountain pen of the ball point type as set forth in claim 1, wherein the axis of the writing tip is inclined to the longitudinal center line of the pen.

7. A fountain pen of the ball point type as set forth in claim 1, wherein the axis of the writing tip is inclined to the longitudinal center line of the pen, and wherein the ink reservoir comprises a capillary-passage ink storage tube bent along its length to be accommodated within the barrel.

8. A fountain pen of the ball point type as set forth in claim 1, wherein the axis of the writing tip is displaced upwardly from the longitudinal center line of the pen, and wherein the ink reservoir comprises a capillary-passage ink storage tube having U-shape.

9. A fountain pen of the ball point type as set forth in claim 2, wherein the axis of the ink feed passage coincides with the longitudinal center line of the pen.

10. In a fountain pen of the ball point type having a freely rotatable ball point mounted in a socket provided in the outer end of a writing tip to which ink is supplied from an ink reservoir associated with the other end of the tip through a feed passage extending therethrough, said socket consisting of a cavity having a substantially transverse bottom wall which intersects the feed passage, a generally part-spherical side wall and a restricted opening through which the ball point protrudes and which is defined by an inturned circular edge serving to retain the ball point in the cavity, both said bottom wall and the line of said edge being inclined by an angle of less than 90 to the axis of the feed passage, the aforesaid inclination of the bottom wall to the feed passage resulting in the opening formed by intersection of said bottom wall and said feed passage having elongated and hence non-circular shape.

11. In a fountain pen of the ball point type having a freely rotatable ball point mounted in a socket provided in the outer end of a writing tip to which ink is supplied from an ink reservoir associated with the other end of the tip through a feed passage extending therethrough, said socket consisting of a cavity having a substantially transverse bottom wall which intersects the feed passage, 2. generally part-spherical side wall and a restricted opening through which the ball point protrudes and which is defined by an inturned circular edge serving to retain the ball point in the cavity, both said bottom wall and the line of said edge being inclined by an angle of less than to the axis of the feed passage, the aforesaid inclination of the bottom wall to the feed passage providing an elongated opening therebetween, said opening having two substantially straight sides which provide seating edges for the ball.

12. In a fountain pen of the ball point type having a freely rotatable ball point mounted in a socket provided in the outer end of a writing tip to which ink is supplied from, an ink reservoir associated with the other end of the tip through a feed passage extending therethrough, said socket consisting of a cavity having a transverse bottom wall, a generally part-spherical side wall and a restricted opening through which the ball point protrudes and which is defined by an inturned circular edge serving to retain the ball point in the cavity, said bottom wall and the line of said edge being inclined to the axis of the feed passage by an angle of less than 90, said feed passage opening into the cavity through substantially the center of the bottom wall through an opening which is oval-shaped by virtue of the inclination of the bottom wall to the axis of the feed passage, the sides of said opening providing spaced seating edges for the ball point, and the ends of the opening providing for the flow of ink to the cavity past the ball.

13. In a fountain pen of the ball point type having a freely rotatable ball point mounted in a socket provided in the outer end of a writing tip to which ink is supplied from an ink reservoir associated with the other end of the tip through a feed passage extending therethrough, said socket consisting of a cavity having a transverse bottom wall, a generally part-spherical side wall of larger radius than that of the ball point whereby to provide an ink well encircling the ball and a restricted opening through which the ball point protrudes and which is defined by an inturned circular edge serving to retain the ball point in the cavity, the axis of the cavity and the line of said edge being inclined to the pen center line by supplemental angles, respectively, the feed passage opening into the ball cavity through an opening in the cavity bottom wall which is oval-shaped by virtue of the inclination of cavity to pen center line, the longitudinal side edges of said bottom wall opening providing a ball seat and the ends of said opening providing for the unobstructed flow of ink from the feed passage to the cavity.

WILLIAM G. FALTIN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 555,763 Fessenden Mar. 3, 1896 628,690 Burton July 11, 1899 1,391,267 Nelson Sept. 20, 1921 2,265,055 Biro Dec. 2, 1941 2,425,198 Moore Aug. 5, 1947 2,518,770 Gibbs Aug. 15, 1950 2,519,341 Barstow Aug. 22, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 800,851 France May 1'1, 1936

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US3192904A (en) * 1961-11-09 1965-07-06 Frank T Johmann Writing instrument
DE1213297B (en) * 1957-06-12 1966-03-24 Faber Castell A W pen
US4198172A (en) * 1978-04-20 1980-04-15 Tri-Chem de Puerto Rico, Inc. Angled ball tip for viscous fluids
US4225256A (en) * 1977-03-12 1980-09-30 Montblanc-Simplo Gmbh Pen nib with slit for liquid inks
US5520473A (en) * 1992-06-26 1996-05-28 The Gillette Company Ball point pen
WO1997022482A1 (en) * 1995-12-15 1997-06-26 The Gillette Company Marking instruments
US5988921A (en) * 1998-03-12 1999-11-23 Medhin; Michael S. Pen for left handed writer
US6039493A (en) * 1996-10-08 2000-03-21 The Gillette Company Ball point pen
US6062759A (en) * 1997-09-25 2000-05-16 The Gillette Company Writing instrument
USRE38440E1 (en) 1997-09-25 2004-02-24 Berol Corporation Writing instrument
US6860667B2 (en) 2001-11-14 2005-03-01 William Dowst Writing instrument with biased rotatable assembly
US7195415B1 (en) 1999-01-18 2007-03-27 Senator Gmbh & Co Kgaa Writing instrument with variably inclinable tip
US20070110507A1 (en) * 2003-05-27 2007-05-17 Hiroshi Inoue Tip unit for liquid applicator, method for producing the same, and liquid applicator having the tip unit

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US1391267A (en) * 1920-05-07 1921-09-20 Norman H A Nelson Fountain-pen
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US2425198A (en) * 1945-06-12 1947-08-05 Premium Merchandising Corp Fountain pen
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Cited By (18)

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US2971494A (en) * 1955-10-03 1961-02-14 Paper Mate Mfg Compny Tandem writing implement
US2909291A (en) * 1955-10-10 1959-10-20 James L Gibson Draft gear for railroad car
DE1156000B (en) * 1956-11-30 1963-10-17 Kaweco Badische Fuellfederfabr arranged ballpoint pen with an acute angle to the mine Halterlaengsachse
DE1213297B (en) * 1957-06-12 1966-03-24 Faber Castell A W pen
DE1149637B (en) * 1957-07-19 1963-05-30 Faber Castell A W pen
US3192904A (en) * 1961-11-09 1965-07-06 Frank T Johmann Writing instrument
US4225256A (en) * 1977-03-12 1980-09-30 Montblanc-Simplo Gmbh Pen nib with slit for liquid inks
US4198172A (en) * 1978-04-20 1980-04-15 Tri-Chem de Puerto Rico, Inc. Angled ball tip for viscous fluids
US5520473A (en) * 1992-06-26 1996-05-28 The Gillette Company Ball point pen
WO1997022482A1 (en) * 1995-12-15 1997-06-26 The Gillette Company Marking instruments
US6039493A (en) * 1996-10-08 2000-03-21 The Gillette Company Ball point pen
US6062759A (en) * 1997-09-25 2000-05-16 The Gillette Company Writing instrument
USRE38440E1 (en) 1997-09-25 2004-02-24 Berol Corporation Writing instrument
US5988921A (en) * 1998-03-12 1999-11-23 Medhin; Michael S. Pen for left handed writer
US7195415B1 (en) 1999-01-18 2007-03-27 Senator Gmbh & Co Kgaa Writing instrument with variably inclinable tip
US6860667B2 (en) 2001-11-14 2005-03-01 William Dowst Writing instrument with biased rotatable assembly
US20070110507A1 (en) * 2003-05-27 2007-05-17 Hiroshi Inoue Tip unit for liquid applicator, method for producing the same, and liquid applicator having the tip unit
US7914222B2 (en) * 2003-05-27 2011-03-29 Sakura Color Products Corporation Tip unit for liquid applicator, method for producing the same, and liquid applicator having the tip unit

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