US2588632A - Switch - Google Patents

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US2588632A
US2588632A US742578A US74257847A US2588632A US 2588632 A US2588632 A US 2588632A US 742578 A US742578 A US 742578A US 74257847 A US74257847 A US 74257847A US 2588632 A US2588632 A US 2588632A
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switch
housing
contacts
extending
rotor
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US742578A
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Max L Jeffrey
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Max L Jeffrey
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H19/00Switches operated by an operating part which is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof and which is acted upon directly by a solid body external to the switch, e.g. by a hand
    • H01H19/64Encased switches adapted for ganged operation when assembled in a line with identical switches, e.g. stacked switches

Description

March 11, 1952 JEFFREY SWITCH Filed April 19, 1947 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR MAX L JEFFREY March 11, 1952 M. 1.. JEFFREY SWITCH 3 SheefLs-Sheet 2 Filed April 19, 1947 INVENTOR. MAX LJEFFREY M. L. J/EFFREY March 11, 1952 SWITCH 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed April 19, 1947 g INVENTOR MAX L. JEFFREY 0 M Patented Mar. IT, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SWITCH Max L. Jeffrey, Shaker Heights, Ohio Application April I9, 1947, Serial No. 742,578
This invention relates to improvements in switches and switch operating mechanisms and more particularly to quick acting switches of the snap action type.
Although snap action switches have been proposed before and are well known in the art, the snap action, if sufliciently rugged to withstand heavy duty, was cumbersome, complicated and expensive to manufacture.
By the present invention, I have provided an improved snap action switch which is very compact, simple and positive in operation, inexpensive to manufacture and is suitable for the most heavy duty in which such switches may be utilized.
The snap action is also particularly useful in conjunction with a multiple contact circuit breaker and as such will be described in conjuc'tion therewith. It will be appreciated that it is useful for communicating a snap action to other types of circuit breakers, however, and therefore is not limited in its use to the particular type shown and described.
In a multiple circuit, it is essential in many instances that the switch be designed to provide some circuits which are closed while other circuits are open. This makes it necessary, in each such circuit, to design or obtain a switch adapted for that particular use. Eventually, in the case of complicated or multiple ,circuits, it becomes necessary to design special switches for those circuits which are not ordinarily useful except for that particular job. This increases the expense as well as delays the entire installation while the switch is being processed.
By my present invention I have provided a switch where the components are such that they may be added to or subtracted from the assembly to provide a switch for as many circuits as is desired. Furthermore, the components are such that by the mere reversal of certain components thereof, a switch is provided which opens or closes a circuit. Thus a switch is provided which may open or close simultaneously any desired number of circuits without the necessity of special design.
Another advantage of the construction is that, should the load through one section of the switch be more than through another section causing the contacts in the heavy load section to wear, a new section can be substituted quickly and easily, and it is not necessary to otherwise renew the entire switch. Furthermore, one section which wears, due to arcing, more than the other, may have the points dressed down and substituted for another section, where the wear has 4 Claims. (Cl. 200-6) not been so large because of the reduced load. Thus, as time goes on, thesections may be rotated until eventually they are all worn out simultaneously.
Still other advantages of the invention and the invention itself will become more apparent from the following description of an embodiment thereof, which description is illustrated by the accompanying drawings and forms a part of this specification.
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a full size plan view of a switch embodying my invention;
Fig. 2 is a front end elevational view thereof;
Fig. 3 is a section taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a rear elevational view thereof;
Fig. 5 is a vertical medial section through the switch;
Fig. 6 is a side elevational view of one of the levers which go to make up the snap action mechanism;
Figs. 7 and 8 are sections taken on the lines 1-4 and 88 respectively of Fig. 6;
Figs. 9 and 10 are front and side elevational views respectively on another lever which cooperates with the lever shown in Fig. 6 in making up the snap action mechanism;
Figs. 11 and 12 are side and end elevational views of the support for the levers of Figs. 7 and 9;
Figs. 13 and 14. are side and elevational views respectively of a connector coupling for connecting the snap action mechanism and the switch assembly;
Figs. 15 and 16 are front and side elevational views of a switch rotor;
Fig. 17 is a plan view of a contact carrying strip and its contacts;
Fig. 18 is an edge view thereof with part broken away and shown in section;
Fig. 19 is an end elevation of the switch with one of the front plates removed to show the snap action mechanism;
Fig. 20 is a plan view of a switch showing an alternate form of assembly and with certain parts broken away to show a plan view of the snap mechanism;
Fig. 21 is a section taken on the line 2l2l of Fig. 20, with certain of the parts shown in side elevation; and
Fig. 22 is a section taken on the lines 2222 of Fig. 20.
The mechanism about to be described is illustrated as being without a housing. It will be appreciated, however, that a housing is con templated, although there may be cases, where the switch is used in conjunction with other apparatus, where the housing for such apparatus will also house the assembly.
Likewise the switch is operated by a rocking or rotating shaft but no particular means is shown connected to the shaft for effecting such rocking or rotation, since this can be effected in many ways as by an electrically operated solenoid, hydraulically or mechanically.
Briefly, the embodiment of my invention shown contemplates a snap action mechanism whereby a turning movement of a shaft causes a certain amount of kinetic energy to be built up in the mechanism which is released at a predetermined time to cause the quick snap rotary action which is communicated to the movable contacts through a coupling.
The circuit breaker portion of the switch includes pairs of flxed contacts and movable contacts which are moved into and out of engagement therewith. Each set of contacts, for controlling a ingle circuit is housed in a separate housing, and by merely turning one of the housings end for end that circuit can be normally open or closed. There is no limitation on the number of housings and their elements that can be used. Therefore, a switch can be farbricated for any particular job with the same parts, all as will heretofore more clearly appear.
As can best be seen in Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive, the snap action mechanism includes a rectangular base plate It having a pair of outwardly extending bosses H at its upper end. A pair of bosses 52 are also provided spaced from the bottom edge of the plate and the upper bosses. Intermediate the two upper bosses II is a circular boss E3. The bosses l2 are provided with posite sides at its diameter and also' across the outwardly extending pins M for engagement in apertures in a front platel6, and they are also provided with threaded apertures, which together with the threaded aperture in the boss 13 are adapted to receive screws 15 which hold a front plate [6 in position. The pins M enter into holes in the plate and properly locate the same, and the front plate is thus held in spaced parallel relation to the back plate. The front plate is of generally rectangular form being provided with an upwardly extending portion 18 which extends between the bosses H.
The base plate is provided with an opening 2i? in its mid-section, the opening being reinforced by an annular boss 2| on the rear thereof which extends around the opening, the opening through the plate and the boss constituting a bearing for the coupling shown in Figs. 13 and 14.
The coupling comprises a barrel 23 rotatably journalled in the opening 28 and is provided with a projection 24 which extends rearward of the plate and is vertically slotted at 25. The slot provides means .for connection with the switch rotors or tumblers later described.
The coupling is provided with a flange 26 adapted for engagement with the front of the base plate i0 and a circular projection 2'! which provides a bearing surface for the lever' illustrated in Fig. '7. The barrel of the coupling is provided with an axial bore 28 to provide a bear ing for the operating member (Fig. 11) and is slotted horizontally at 29.
The operating member includes a pivot pin 39, adapted to be rotatably journalled in the bore 28 of the coupling, and a cylindrical body rotatably journalled in an opening in the 4 front plate. A flange 32 is provided, which crigages with the back of the front plate and is held thereby in position. The body 3| is provided with longitudinally extending slots 33 which extend the length of the body on opend which projects beyond the front plate, adapted to have an operating member, not shown, secured thereto.
Movement from the operating member is transmitted'to the connecting member by a snap mechanism supported in part by the two members and in part by the front and back plate.v
This mechanism includes the two levers of Figs. 6 to 8 inclusive and Figs. 9 and 10. The lever of Fig. 9 is provided with a ring shaped body 40 having inwardly extending tongues 4| adapted to engage in the side slots 33 of the operating member.
Extending upwardly from the body is a neck 42 which carries'on its end a head 43 having two slanting cam faces M. This lever is adapted to be swung together with the operating member, the ring id being disposed on the body of the operating member, with the tongues 4| ex tending into the slots 33.
The second lever, as best shown in Figs. 6 to 8 inclusive includes two spaced apart members adapted to be disposed on opposite sides of the first lever. The one part includes a ring shaped body 5!! which is rotatably journalled on the body 3! of the operating member adjacent the rear of the flange 32. It likewise has a neck 52 extending upward and which carries a head 53 on its end. The other part of the member is of the same conformation, except that the ring 50 is provided with inwardly extending tongues 54 and is adapted to be disposed over the part 21 of the connector member with the tongues 54 engaged in the slot 29. The two portions of the second lever are held together in spaced relation by pins 56 the ends 51 of which are of reduced cross section and extend through openings in the heads 53 and are headed over to hold the same in place.
The head 53 is of generally T shape, the extremities extending downward. The mid portion 59 is arcuate and is provided with two steps or notches fill equally spaced from the center and spaced from the end, for engagement with pawls as will later appear.
It will thus be seen that the first lever 4044 is fixed on the operating member 3l33 and the second lever Eli-$9 straddles the first lever, rotates freely on operating member but has a driving connection with the connector 2329.
Spring means is provided for transmitting movement from the first lever to the second lever and hence from the operating member to the coupling member and comprises a C-shaped spring 62 of appreciable width, the ends of which engage with all of the neck 42 and 52 of the two levers. It will thus be seen that the movement from one lever to the other is transmitted through the spring and that should either one of the levers meet with any resistance which would tend to pressure is built up at which time the lever is released, and the spring, the ends of which are pressed against the misaligned necks, snaps the two levers into alignment.
The bosses H are provided with downwardly extending portions 65 in which are disposed pins 66 extending outward from the plate and on which are journalled pawls which include a body 61 of generally rectangular form, the ends of which are bifurcated at 68 to provide a yoke in which a roller 69 is disposed on a pin I0 extending through the arms of the yoke.
The roller 69 extends between the spaced' apart head portions 53 of the lever 50-50 while the body 61 is of sufficient width to bridge these portions. Helical springs 'II are provided for urging the pawls toward the surfaces 50 and notches 60, having one end seated in a recess I2 in the pawl and the other end in engagement with the slanting surface IS on the boss I I.
In operation the two levers are normally held in alignment by the spring 62 which, as stated, engages with the necks. The lever 40-44 is swung when the coupling 33 is rotated but the lever 5I53 is held against movement by one of the pawls 67, the end of which engages in one of the notches 60 on the periphery of the T shaped head. The result is that although the center lever is moved, the outside leverstands still and the necks on the two levers which are then swung out of alignment force the ends of the spring I52 apart. The further out of alignment the two levers move, the greater the tension built up in the spring.
As the lever -44 is swung farther, one of the cam faces 44 eventually engages the roll-er B9 on the pawl forcing the pawl upward against the pressure of the spring II. The pawl is thus eventually forced out of engagement with the notch 60 and releases the outside lever -53. At this time the spring which has had the ends pushed apart and is exerting considerable pressure against the misaligned necks of the two levers, snaps the two levers quickly into alignment. The outside lever then swings to the opposite position to that shown in Fig. 2 and the other paWl is engaged in the other notch 60.
The spring 62 can be a single C-shaped spring, or it can consist of several springs placed on top of each other. Springs may be added or removed or stiffer springs may be substituted to provide substantially any tension desired.
The tongues 54 on the outside lever being engaged in the notches 29 of the coupling 23-28 which is journalled in the base plate, the coupling is quickly rotated, which movement is communicated to the switch rotor or rotors.
As previously stated, the snap action mechanism is adapted to move the switch rotors to quickly open or close the contacts. Preferably, each rotor is disposed in a separate housing, and the housings may be secured together with the rotor in one housing in interlocking engagement with the other to thus enable all of the rotors to be operated in unison.
Each of the housings may be comprised of a suitable insulating material, preferably such as can be readily molded and is not subject to distortion or deformation in the presence of heat.
As best shown in Figs. 3 and 4, each housing has a body or side wall l5 in which a recess I6 is formed, the recess being of suitable conformation to house the rotor ll which is capable of limited movement therein. The one end of the recess is closed by a wall I8 which is apertured at I9 to provide a bearing surface for the hub of the rotor.
Terminal strips 8I are provided having one end disposed in recesses 8I', opening to the exterior of the housing, and extending through the wall to the interior as indicated at 82. The interiorly extending part of the strip is backed by a boss 83 on the housing, and carries a fixed contact 84, the strip being so arranged that the contact is in the path of travel of the movable contact carried by the rotor. If desired, the terminal strips 8| may be secured in the housing during the molding operation.
The end of the strip in the recess may be provided with one or more terminal screws 85. The base plate I0 is provided with rearwardly extending bosses 87, one of which is opposite to the post I3, and the other two are disposed at the lower end of the plate adjacent opposite corners. The bosses are provided with threaded openings for the reception of screws 88 which extend through fiber tubes I30 disposed in openings 89 in the housings. Thus a series of housings may be secured to the base plate I0.
The rotors which carry the movable contacts each comprise a hub 80 of cylindrical form, which, as stated, is journalled in the wall of the housing and is provided with a tongue 90 on one end adapted to extend into and engage the walls of the slot 25 of the coupling 23-29 to provide an operating connection therebetween or, as will later appear, the tongue may engage in the slot of another rotor.
It should be noted, as can best be seen in Fig, 5, that the bearing surface does not extend entirely through the wall but terminates substantially half way through the wall.
The other end of the hub extends outward and is likewise provided with a surface which engages with the wall of the aperture of the adjacent section so that each rotor has a bearing in two adjacent sections.
It will thus be seen that each of the discrete housings cooperates withthe other housing and that one housing acts as a closing wall for the other housing. It will also appear that in a case where all the housings face in the same direction, the last housing would be open and its rotor unsupported if it were not for the fact that the housing can also be closed by a single plate which has an opening 96 in which the hub of the rotor is journalled. This is shown clearly in Fig. 5 where the plate 95 is utilized to provide a wall between the second and third sections, or in Figs. 20 and 21 where the plates are used to separate the housings.
At this point it should be noted that in some instances it may be desirable to make each of the housings in two parts, in which event the wall portion I8 of the housing "I5 would be open on both sides and only comprise the parts extending from the wall. This is shown clearly in Figs. 20 and 21.
Each rotor is also provided with a pair of curved arms 98 which extend outwardly from diametrically opposite sides of the hub and are provided with flat faces 99, Figs. 15 and 16 having circular bosses I00 which extend in opposite directions and toward a horizontal line through the diameter of the hub but spaced therefrom. The hub is formed with a slot I02 which extends transversely of the hub along the horizontal diameter thereof and the walls I03 of which diverge slightly from the center of the hub toward the periphery.
A contact carrying strip is provided for the hub and includes a flat bar I05, adapted to rotate freely in the slot I02 and capable of relative movement between the walls thereof. The mid section of the bar is provided with a tongue I06 adapted to extend into and having a bearing in a circular recess I in the axis of the rotor hub and opening in the bottom of the slot I02;
The ends of the contact strip are enlarged at I08 and have secured therein in any suitable manner, as' by riveting, the contacts I00, Figs. 17 and 18. Preferably, the shanks of the contacts extend through the portions I08 and are headed over at IIO to provide a boss for retaining a helical spring III in place, the other end of the spring being disposed on the boss I00. Thus, the springs tend to hold the contact strip rotated in a counter clockwise position as shown in Fig. 3 with the sides of the strip in engagement with'the walls I03 on opposite sides of the axis of the rotor.
When the contacts are closed, as shown in Fig. 4 upon the rotary contact meeting the fixed contact, further rotary movement of the contact strip is prevented, but the rotor may continue its rotation relative to the strip which pivots about the tongue I06, the springs III compressing and the 'sides of the strip moving away from the walls I03. Thus, in the contact closed position the contacts are held in spring pressed engagement with the fixed contacts.
It will be noted from Figs. 1 and 3 that the snap action mechanism is in its left hand position, and that to operate it the operating member 3033 must be moved in a clockwise direction. This movement is communicated to the rotor which is also moved clockwise as viewed from the right end of Fig. 1 or counter clockwise as viewed in Fig. 3 to cause the closing of the contacts.
This is true of the first and second sections of the switch as viewed in Fig. 1, but it will also be noted that the third and fourth sections are turned around; that is, turned end for end so that they face in the opposite directions to those of sections one and two. In this case, the plate 95 is disposed between the two sections, and as can be seen in Fig. 5, since the hubs of the rotors, which have slots I20, which align with the tongues 90 on the opposite end and are normally disposed for engagement with the tongues on the adjacent rotor (Fig. 5) are toward each other, a coupling member I2I in the form of a flat rectangular bar, which may also be of insulating material, is disposed in both slots I20 of the adjacent rotors connecting them together.
The remaining or end section is also turned around. Therefore, the tongue and groove connection therebetween is provided.
It will be seen therefore that sections one and two have the contacts open, and that sections three and four (Fig. 4) have the contacts closed. Therefore, when the snap action mechanism is operated, the open contacts close, and the closed contacts open.
It will be appreciated that by this arrangement any number of sections can be built up to provide a single contact for the desired circuit, and wherein simultaneous opening and closing of circuitsis attained.
I have described the sections as being held together with a screw 8-8 which extends through aligned openings in the discrete sections. There is also shown a fiber tube I30 which is first inserted in the openings and subsequently the screw extends through the tube. This construction increases the di-electric path and prevents arcingto the bolt.
In Figs. 20 and 21 I have shown a three-section switch wherein the side wall sections are separated from the end walls.
In this case the contact carrying strips 8| are somewhat narrower than in the other design and are secured in place during the molding. In all other respects, however, it is the same as that of Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive.
As can best be seen in Fig. 19, the ends of the lever 50-60, at the limit of their movement are closely spaced to the top surface of the lower bosses I2.
This spacing is maintained by the springs I II on the contacts which in the closed position are under compression. The end of the lever may contact with the bosses I2 limiting the movement and removing strain from the rotors in event that the operating member has a tendency to over travel, causing a further relative movement of the snap action levers. It will be apparent that considerable over travel is allowable because of this construction without undesirably afiecting the operation.
It will therefore be clear that the snap action switch is small, rugged, simple and economical to manufacture, and that it takes up a minimum of space allowing a compact assembly to be made. It is also apparent how the switch assembly per se is versatile, enabling a few standard parts to be used and allow the fabrication of a switch which can control a great variety 0 circuits. 7
Having thus described my invention, I am aware that numerous and extensive departures may be made therefrom without departing from the spirit or scope of my invention.
I claim:
1. A plurality of identical housing members, each having a chamber formed therein, opening through one side of the housing, a wall for each chamber formed with an aperture therein, identical contact rotors each including a barrel and arms extending from opposite sides thereof, said barrels being rotatably journaled in said apertures and being formed with tongues on one of their ends and grooves in the other ends, contact carrying bars loosely carried by the barrels and having contacts on their ends, spring means disposed between said arms and said contact bars, fixed contact carrying members supported by said housing members and having contacts disposed in said chambers adapted for engagement by the movable contacts, means to hold said housings in juxtaposed relation to each other and the tongues in one rotor adapted to enter into the grooves in one of the other rotors to provide drive means between the separate rotors, said housing members together with their rotors being reversible, to provide for assembling a unit of housings and rotors wherein the contacts in some housings are opened while the contacts in others are closed simultaneously, and a separator strip interposed between the housings wherein the grooved ends of the barrels are toward each other and connector means extending between said grooves and guided by said separator strip.
2. An apparatus of the class described including identical housing members, fixed contacts carried thereby and extending inwardly from the walls of the housing, end walls for said housings separating the separate housings and formed with rotor supporting openings therein, rotors comprising a body portion having axially located bearing bosses extending into said openings in said end Walls and formed with transversely extending slots, contact members for said rotors each including a bar loosely journalled in said slots and having contacts on its ends arranged to be moved into engagement with the fixed contacts, said rotors being formed with tongue and groove means for connecting the rotors in adjacent housings to each other, said housings and rotors thereby being reversible end for end with respect to an adjacent housing rotor unit to selectively provide for simultaneous opening and closing of said contacts upon rotation of the rotors.
3. An apparatus of the class described including a housing, fixed contacts carried by said housing on opposite sides thereof and extending in-- warclly, a contact rotor for cooperative engagement with the fixed contacts comprising a body portion having axially aligned trunnions on opposite ends thereof rotatably supported in the housing and formed with a slot extending transversely through the axis of the body, the walls of which diverge from each other from the axis outward, arms on said rotor extending trangentially from the opposite sides of the rotor body in opposite directions and in spaced relation to a center line through said slot, a contact carrying member loosely disposed in said slot and extending outward opposite to each of said arms, and spring means interposed between each arm and the opposite end of the contact bar for holding said bar resiliently against opposite sides of said slot on opposite sides of said axis.
4. An apparatus of the class described including a housing, fixed contacts carried by said housing on opposite sides thereof and extending inwardly, a contact rotor for cooperative engagement with the fixed contacts comprising a body portion having axially aligned trunnions on opposite ends thereof rotatably supported in the housing and formed with a slot extending transversely through the axis of the body the walls of which diverge from each other from the axis outward, arms on said rotor extending tangentially from the opposite sides of the rotor body in opposite directions and in spaced relation to center line through said slot, a contact carrying member loosely disposed in said slot and extending outward opposite to each of said arms, and spring means interposed between each arm and the opposite end of the contact bar for holding said bar resiliently against opposite sides of said slot on opposite sides of said axis, said slot having an axially aligned opening and a means on said contact bar journalled in said opening.
MAX L. JEFFREY.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the
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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2648555A (en) * 1950-11-18 1953-08-11 Globe Union Inc Coupling for ganged rotatably controlled units
US2651697A (en) * 1951-09-15 1953-09-08 Gen Patent Corp Switch mechanism for coin selectors of the gravity-feed type
US2684412A (en) * 1951-01-02 1954-07-20 Naimer Hubert Cam-controlled switch
US2798907A (en) * 1953-04-21 1957-07-09 Castelco Great Britain Ltd Electric switches
US2912527A (en) * 1956-04-23 1959-11-10 Naimer Hubert Cam-controlled electrical switch consisting of axially aligned units
US3041420A (en) * 1958-09-29 1962-06-26 Crouse Hinds Co Plug and receptacle unit
DE1140261B (en) * 1959-11-03 1962-11-29 Siemens Ag Bridge contact arrangement for electrical switchgear
US3071674A (en) * 1957-11-28 1963-01-01 Hubert L Naimer Assembly of axially aligned components
US3170047A (en) * 1961-02-01 1965-02-16 Acton Lab Inc Encapsulated rotary switches
US3248491A (en) * 1962-05-30 1966-04-26 Int Standard Electric Corp Slider switch construction with interfitting shaft members
US3251956A (en) * 1963-04-09 1966-05-17 Gemco Electric Co Electric switch
US3260803A (en) * 1963-07-10 1966-07-12 Moroishi Mitsuru Segmental rotary gang switch with segmented splined cam shafts
DE102013208373A1 (en) * 2012-08-29 2014-03-06 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Rotor for an electric switch

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1777877A (en) * 1928-03-22 1930-10-07 Diehl Mfg Co Snap switch
US1877557A (en) * 1930-12-08 1932-09-13 Delta Star Electric Co Unit type multistage auxiliary switch
US2009383A (en) * 1934-11-01 1935-07-30 Gen Electric Transformer tap-changing apparatus
US2202698A (en) * 1938-10-21 1940-05-28 Gen Electric Electric switch
US2262306A (en) * 1940-09-03 1941-11-11 Pacific Electric Mfg Corp Auxiliary circuit controlling switch
US2319503A (en) * 1941-10-23 1943-05-18 Allen Bradley Co Multiposition switch
US2395572A (en) * 1944-11-13 1946-02-26 Cutler Hammer Inc Rotary electric switch
US2417200A (en) * 1944-08-10 1947-03-11 Allied Control Co Switch
US2421983A (en) * 1944-07-07 1947-06-10 Arrow Hart & Hegeman Electric Rotary selector switch

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1777877A (en) * 1928-03-22 1930-10-07 Diehl Mfg Co Snap switch
US1877557A (en) * 1930-12-08 1932-09-13 Delta Star Electric Co Unit type multistage auxiliary switch
US2009383A (en) * 1934-11-01 1935-07-30 Gen Electric Transformer tap-changing apparatus
US2202698A (en) * 1938-10-21 1940-05-28 Gen Electric Electric switch
US2262306A (en) * 1940-09-03 1941-11-11 Pacific Electric Mfg Corp Auxiliary circuit controlling switch
US2319503A (en) * 1941-10-23 1943-05-18 Allen Bradley Co Multiposition switch
US2421983A (en) * 1944-07-07 1947-06-10 Arrow Hart & Hegeman Electric Rotary selector switch
US2417200A (en) * 1944-08-10 1947-03-11 Allied Control Co Switch
US2395572A (en) * 1944-11-13 1946-02-26 Cutler Hammer Inc Rotary electric switch

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2648555A (en) * 1950-11-18 1953-08-11 Globe Union Inc Coupling for ganged rotatably controlled units
US2684412A (en) * 1951-01-02 1954-07-20 Naimer Hubert Cam-controlled switch
US2651697A (en) * 1951-09-15 1953-09-08 Gen Patent Corp Switch mechanism for coin selectors of the gravity-feed type
US2798907A (en) * 1953-04-21 1957-07-09 Castelco Great Britain Ltd Electric switches
US2912527A (en) * 1956-04-23 1959-11-10 Naimer Hubert Cam-controlled electrical switch consisting of axially aligned units
US3071674A (en) * 1957-11-28 1963-01-01 Hubert L Naimer Assembly of axially aligned components
US3041420A (en) * 1958-09-29 1962-06-26 Crouse Hinds Co Plug and receptacle unit
DE1140261B (en) * 1959-11-03 1962-11-29 Siemens Ag Bridge contact arrangement for electrical switchgear
US3170047A (en) * 1961-02-01 1965-02-16 Acton Lab Inc Encapsulated rotary switches
US3248491A (en) * 1962-05-30 1966-04-26 Int Standard Electric Corp Slider switch construction with interfitting shaft members
US3251956A (en) * 1963-04-09 1966-05-17 Gemco Electric Co Electric switch
US3260803A (en) * 1963-07-10 1966-07-12 Moroishi Mitsuru Segmental rotary gang switch with segmented splined cam shafts
DE102013208373A1 (en) * 2012-08-29 2014-03-06 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Rotor for an electric switch
US9299518B2 (en) 2012-08-29 2016-03-29 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Rotor for an electric switch

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