US2567080A - Toothbrush with divergent sweepaction tuft rows - Google Patents

Toothbrush with divergent sweepaction tuft rows Download PDF

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US2567080A
US2567080A US71756846A US2567080A US 2567080 A US2567080 A US 2567080A US 71756846 A US71756846 A US 71756846A US 2567080 A US2567080 A US 2567080A
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tufts
teeth
brush
rows
bristles
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George W Pifer
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George W Pifer
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B9/00Arrangements of the bristles in the brush body
    • A46B9/02Position or arrangement of bristles in relation to surface of the brush body, e.g. inclined, in rows, in groups
    • A46B9/04Arranged like in or for toothbrushes

Description

Sept 4, 1951 G. w. PIPER 2,567,080

TOOTHBRUSH WITH DIVERGENT SWEEP-ACT'ION TUFT ROWS Filed Dec. 20, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 W ,r 1 WwW/WI d yf gy l INVENToR.

650265 uf. P/FE/e Sept. 4, 1951 G. w. lPil-ER TooTHBRUsH WITH DIVERGENT swEEP-ACTI Filed Dec. 20, 1946 INVENTOR. @50H65 IM P/FE/e 5pm, www, rro/e/ve v5 Patented Sept. 4, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TOOTHBRUSH WITH DIVERGENT SWEEP- ACTION TUFT ROWS 2f Claims.

1 This invention is in the held of toothbrushes and as one of its objects provides an improved construction for a brush of this kind by Which brushing of the teeth in a proper and beneficial manner, as distinguished from an improper and harmful manner, will be encouraged and can be more eifecti-vely carried out.

After long study of the problems of oral hygiene, I believe that the most effective and benencial way of brushing the teeth is with a sweeping action carried out first in a direction from gums to teeth and then in the reverse direction, that is, from teeth to gums. The rst mentioned sweeping action serves to eiTecti-vely sweep food particles and other matter from the interproximal spaces or embrasures as well as from the various surfaces and grooves of the teeth themselves. This iirst sweeping action also applies some stimulation to the gums but the second or reverse sweeping action stimulates the gums more effectively and accomplishes this in a manner similar to the action of detergent foods during mastication.

In toothbrushes heretofore pro-posed, a main objective has been to obtain a brush handle of a shape to aord a comfortable grasp and arm motion for the user or to obtain a curved brush head of a shape tot the dental arch. These shapes contribute to and invite a brushing of the teeth with a cross-action which is improper and very often is actually harmful. Moreover, in such previous constructions the bristles of the brush head have usually been closely set with the bristles, or tufts of bristles, projecting from a substantially flat handle portion and presenting a more or less continuous and solidly bristled brush surface.

During use cf a brush having such a solidly bristled working face, an effective sweeping accomplished because the closely set bristles pack up against each other and this causes the working face ofv the brush head to merely slide over the tops of the tooth surfaces without entering the various embrasuresy and grooves and does not enable the brush to accomplish the above menticned gum stimulation. Moreover, where a tooth is missing the tooth surfaces adjacent the space require frequent cleaning but with such a solidly bristled working face the brush head presents a bulky mass of bristles incapable of reaching these surfaces.

The present invention overcomes these objections and difficulties and, as another of its objects, provides an improved toothbrush in which the shape of the head and the arrangement of the bristles thereon will result in a more effective cleaning of the teeth with a proper physiological action, and particularly of the spaces or embrasures between adjacent teeth, as well as of the various grooves and surfaces including those surfaces presented toward spaces left by missing teeth.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an improved toothbrush of this character, in which the bristles are grouped in tufts and the tufts are so disposed that a full lateral flexing of the bristles is obtainable for the accomplishment of a sweeping action which will be particularly effective with respect to the spaces, grooves and surfaces above mentioned.

A further object isi tol provide an improved toothbrush of the character mentioned, in which the bristle tufts are disposed in a relatively openly spaced arrangement so that the above mentioned full lateral flexing can be obtained substantially without interference between, or packing up of, the bristles of adjacent tufts and byv which the drying, cleansing and sterilization of the bristles is greatly facilitated.

Another object is to provide an improved toothbrush in which the bristle tufts are disposed in longitudinal rows and wherein the longitudinal spacing of the tufts is such as to correspond approximately with the normal spacing of the embrasures and grooves of the human teeth so that the tufts of a given row will register substantially with, and fall into, such embrasures and grooves during the above mentioned sweeping action.

Another object is to provide an improved toothbrush of the character mentioned, in which the longitudinal rows include a central row and two outside rows, and wherein the tufts of the central row are located opposite the spaces of the outside rows so that when the tufts of an outside row are engaged in the embrasures and/ or grooves of the teeth, the tufts of the central row will be so located and constrained that they will effectively sweep the side faces of the teeth.

Yet another object is to provide an improved toothbrush construction of this character, in which the tufts of the central row are located opposite the spaces of the outside rows and rise to a higher elevation than the tufts of the outside rows.

A further object is to provide an improved toothbrush of the character mentioned, in which the longitudinal rows of bristle tufts include a central row and diverging outside rows located on opposite sides of the central row and inclined away from such central row. Y

As another important object this invention provides an improved toothbrush of the character mentioned, in which the handle is of a novel shape affording a good grasp and one which will encourage the user to hold the brush in a position to effectively accomplish the recommended sweeping action.

Yet another object is to provide an improved toothbrush in which the portion of the handle at the base of the bristles is constructed with oppositely sloping surfaces forming a shed from which toothpaste or the like can be easily washed so as to prevent an accumulation of such material at this point.

The invention also provides an improved brush construction of this kind, in which the longitudinal rows of tufts include a central row extending along the ridge of the shed and two outside rows located on opposite sides of the central row and projecting from the oppositely inclined surfaces.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description and the accompanying sheet of drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a toothbrush embodying the improved construction;

Fig. 2 is a top plan View thereof;

Figs. 3 and 4 are transverse sectional views taken through the head of the brush on lines 3 3 and 4 4, respectively, of Fig. 2;

Figs. 5, 6 and 7 are sectional views taken through the handle at longitudinally spaced points as represented by lines 5, 6 5 and 7 7, respectively, of Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a partial longitudinal sectional view on a somewhat larger scale and taken through a portion of the head as indicated by line 8 8 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 9 is a partial side elevation of the head on a somewhat larger scale than shown in Fig. l;

Fig. 10 is a perspective view of a diagrammatic nature, showing the improved brush being used to clean the upper anterior teeth and illustrating the manner in which the bristle tufts cooperate with a group of teeth;

Fig. l1 is a partial plan view of a diagrammatic nature further illustrating the use of the improved brush and the cooperation of the bristle tufts with another group of teeth;

Fig. 12 is a diagrammatic sectional View taken transversely of the row of teeth of Fig. 11 as indicated by line |2 |2 and further illustrating the effective sweeping action accomplished with the improved brush;

Fig. 13 is" a similar transverse sectional View but showing the brush being used to clean the top surfaces and occlusal recesses of the teeth of the molar group;

Fig. 14 is a partial plan view showing the brush being used on the facial side of the lower anterior Fig. 15 is a vertical sectional View showing the brush being used on the lingual side of the lower anterior teeth;

Fig. 16 is a similar view for the lingual side of the upper anterior teeth;

Fig. 17 is a plan View with the brush head in section, further illustrating the use of the brush on the lingual side of the anterior teeth;

Fig. 18 is a side elevation showing the action of the brush in cleaning the mesial and distal surface portions of a tooth where an adjacent tooth 1s missing; and

Fig. 19 is a side elevation showing a modified form of the brush in which the tops of the tufts of thecentral row are recessed or concavetom surface 29.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the improved toothbrush comprises an elongated rigid body 25 formed of molded plastic or other suitable material and having integrally connected substantially aligned handle and head portions 25a and 25h. The handle `portion 25a is of substantially circular cross section throughout its length and, at a point adjacent its rear end, has a portion 26 Yof maximum diameter affording a good grip for the manipulation of the toothbrush in the manner hereinafter described in detail. The portion 26 of maximum diameter is connected with the head 25h by a portion 21 having a relatively long taper enlarging in a direction away from the head and merging smoothly with the maximum diameter portion. The handle also includes a rear end portion 28 having a relatively short reverse taper and terminating in a rounded tip 28a.

The head 25h constitutes a forward continuation of the round handle 25a and has a corresponding substantially semicircular back or bot- The upper surface of the head is in the form of a shed dened by oppositely sloping surfaces 30 and 3| and having a longitudinal central ridge 32. In Figs. 1-4, inclusive, the faces 3|] and 3| which dene the shed are shown as being substantially flat faces and have an appropriate angle of slope such as that provided by the obtuse angle 33, which in this instance, is an angle of approximately one hundred and forty degrees. The angle of slope for the faces 33 and 3| can be varied and can be either greater than or less than the angle here shown. The shed formed by the faces 30 and 3| extends for the full length of the bristled portion of the head as shown in Figs. l and 2.

The head 2512 has bristles B'projecting from the upper side thereof and which bristles are grouped into tufts as hereinafter explained. It is important in the sweeping action for which this improved toothbrush is intended, that the bristles have a good resilient flexibility and anysuitable form of bristle having this characteristic can be used. The bristles B can be of natural hair or can be fibers made of a suitable synthetic material. such as nylon. The tufts of bristles can be mounted on the head 25h by having their lower ends extend into recesses formed therein. The tufts canbe retained in the recesses by molding the head around the tufts or by means of stapling or any other suitable connecting means.

The tufts in which the bristles B are grouped comprise'a central row 36 extending longitudi nally of the head 2512 and two outside rows 31 and 38 disposed on opposite sides of the central row. The central row 36 extends along the longitudinal ridge 32 of the shed and the tufts thereof are provided in suitable number, such as the six longitudinal spaced individual tufts 36a shown in this instance. The rows 31 and 38 project outwardly from the sloping shed faces 30 and 3| respectively and extend therefrom in substantially perpendicular relation. The rows 31 and 38 comprise4 a suitable number of longitudinally spaced individual tufts 31a and 38a such as the ve tufts shown in this instance for each of these rows. The rows 31 and 38 thus extend outwardly from the head 25h in divergng relation on opposite sides of the central row 36 and are inclined away from this central row. The outside rows are here shown as being inclined away from the central row at equal angles and, in this instance, the angle of inclination relative to the central row is approximately twenty degrees. The inclination. of the outside. rows can be varied and can be greater or less than the angle just mentioned. I

The longitudinal spacing of the individual tufts 31a and 38a ofr the outside rows is another important characteristic ofthe improved brush and is such that it corresponds approximately with the spacing of the interproximal' embrasures of the anterior teeth of the human body and.r also with the spacing ofthe interproximal embrasures and buccal grooves of the molar teeth. This-spacing of the bristle tufts in relation to the embrasures of the anterior teeth is illustrated in Fig. of the drawings. It will, also be noted from Fig. 2 of the drawings that the tufts of the outside rows 31 and 38 are in alignment transversely of the head h. In Fig. 10 a group of upper anterior teeth All are shown having interproximal embrasures di between the pairs of adjacent teeth. As shown in this View the longitudinal spacing of the bristle tufts 31a and 38a of the outside rows is such that these tuftsv will register with, and fall into, the interproximal embrasures di when the brush is swept over these teeth in the direction of their longitudinal axes in carrying out the cleaning operation hereinafter described.

The location and longitudinal spacing of. the tufts 36a of the central rows 313 is also an im portant characteristic of the improved brush and, as shown in Fig. 2, the tufts of the central rows are located in staggered relation to the tufts. of. the outside rows, that is to say, the tuftsy 36a are located substantially opposite the spaces between adjacent tufts of the outside rows. This location for the tufts of the central row causes these tufts to have a spacing which corresponds approximately with the spacing of the longitudinal axes of the anterior teeth 4c and suchthat when the tufts of an outside row are in register with or extend into the interproximal embrasures lil, the tufts 36a will be iny position to engage and sweep the front surfaces4 of the teeth 43 as shown in Fig. l0.

The location and spacing just described above for the tufts of the central row 36- and the tufts of the outside rows 31 and 33 also bears a definite relationship to characteristics of teeth of the bicuspid and molar grou-p; as is illustrated in Fig. ll. This View shows the improved brush being used to perform a: cleaning operation on a pair of molars C12 and an adjacent pair of bicuspid teeth e3. It is characteristic of the molars e2 that they have so-called buccal grooves 4'4 thereon which are so located that these buccal grooves and the interproximal embrasures 45 represent substantially equally spaced indentations and the spacing of these in'dentations corresponds roughly with the spacing of the embrasures a! of' the anterior teeth. When the brush is used on a. group of teeth comprising molars, or molars @.2 and bicuspids d3 as shown in Fig. 1l, the tufts 31a of an outside row will register with and fall into the buccal grooves M and the interproxim'al embrasures 45 while theV tufts 33a of the central row will be in position te sweepingly engage the side faces 43 of these teeth.

The tufts of the central and outsiderows of the brush head 25h may each comprise agroup of the bristles B in suitable number such that each tuft is in the form of a substantially circular shaft or bundle of individual fibers or bristles and the bristles constituting each j tuft have a slightly spreading or diverging relation in a'direction extending away from the head. The. tops of the tufts are pointed. and have a substantially conical shape as indicated at 41A in the drawings and this preferably applies to the tufts. of the central row 36v as well as to the outside rows4 31 and 38. The pointed ends or tops provided for the tufts 31a and 38a. of the outside rows facilitates the entrance of these tufts into the grooves and einbrasures as shown in Figs. 10 and 1l. The pointed tops of the tufts 36a of the central row enables these tufts to readily enter the occlusal recesses Q8 of the molar teeth d2 when the brush is being used to clean the tops thereof as shown in Fig. 13.

It will be observed from Figs. 3 and 4 that since the tufts of the central row 36 rise from the ridge 32 of the head 25h they extend to a higher elevation than the outside rows 31 and 38 whose tuftsrise from the sloping surfaces 39 and 3l and extend in diverging relation. Because of this fact the working face of the bristle group is convexly curved transversely of the brush and this is a desirable characteristic for carrying out the cleaning operation with the sweeping action hereinafter described.

As mentioned in the early part of this speciflcation the recommended manner of brushing the teeth is with a sweeping action carried out in a direction rst from gums to teeth and then in the reverse direction, that is, from teeth to gums. This sweeping action is accomplished by a combined rotary and translatory movement of the brush handle 25a as represented by the arrows 50 and 5l of Figs. 1U and l2. Thus with the brush held in a position relative to the teeth, as shown in these views, the sweeping action is accomplished by moving the brush with a translatory movement as representedv by the arrow 5D and simultaneously rotating the brush about its longitudinal axis as represented by the curved arrow 5I. The result of these combined motions is a sweeping action by which the tufts of the outside row 38 are made to fall into the interproximal embrasures 4l of Fig. 10, or into the bucca1 grooves 44 and embrasures 45 for Fig. 12, and to reach into and sweep through these ernbrasures and grooves. At the same time that the tufts of the outside row are sweeping through the embrasures and grooves the tufts of the central row 36 perform a sweeping action on the side faces of the teeth.

When this sweeping movement of the brush is carried through in a direction from teeth to gums the tufts of the outside rows 31 and 38 sweep through the wedge-shaped embrasures 4l and 45- in succession in a direction to dislodge food particles and debris which may have become wedged in these embrasures. In addition to dislodging material from the embrasures this sweeping movement, and also the reverse sweeping movement, causes the tufts to reach into the embrasures and apply a stimulating action to the papillae portion of the gums lying between the teeth and at the bottoms of the embrasures.

Another important characteristic of the imn proved brush is that with the location and spacing above described for the bristle tufts ci the central and outside rows, it will be observedthat all of the tufts are in an openly spaced relation so that the bristles of each tuft will be capable of a full and free lateral flexing during the recommended sweeping movement without having the bristles of one tuft interfere with or pack up against the bristles of another tuft. That the bristles of each individual tuft are capable of such a free lateral flexing is apparent in Fig. 2 from which it will be seen that when lateral flexing of a tuft of the central row 36 occurs, such tuft will be accommodated by the spaces between the tufts of the outside rows. Similarly, when a tuft of one of the outside rows is flexed laterally inwardly such tuft is accommodated by a space of the central row.

The ability of the tufts of the central and outside rows to flex in this manner without interference from the tufts of an adjacent row also results in part from the fact that outside rows extend in diverging relation and are inclined away from the central row, as explained above. The divergent relation of the outside rows of tufts also increases the effectiveness of the sweeping action during the cleaning operation because it increases the eifective width of the working surface of the bristle group and permits the tufts of the respective rows to accomplish their individual cleaning functions in succession during the sweeping movement.

In cleaning the tops of the molar teeth 42 as shown in Fig. 13, the diverging relation of the outside rows 31 and 33 enables the tufts thereof to engage the top surfaces 53 while the tufts of the central row engage in the occlusal recesses 48. During this cleaning operation the brush is held with its axis extending in the direction of the row of teeth and the brush head is moved back and forth along the tops of the teeth in the direction of its axis. By this movement of the brush the tufts of the central row 36 will be made to traverse the occlusal recesses 48 while the tufts of the outside rows 31 and 38 will sweep the top surfaces 53.

Fig. 14 shows the brush being used on the facial side of the lower anterior teeth 56 during which the same type of sweeping action is employed as that described above in connection with Fig. 10.

Figs. 15, 16 and 17 show the brush being used on the lingual side of the anterior teeth, Fig. 15 showing the brush applied to the lower anterior teeth and Fig. 16 to the upper anterior teeth. In using the brush on the lingual side of the anterior teeth, it is held in an inclined position as shown in Figs. 15 and 16 and is reciprocated in the direction of its axis so as to cause the tufts of the outside rows 31 and 38 to straddle a tooth 51 and to engage in the interproximal embrasures 53 at opposite edges thereof. At the same time the tufts of the central row 35 will engage and sweep over the side face of the tooth l on the lingual side of this tooth, as is illustrated in Fig. 17. During this cleaning operation the bristles of the respective tufts will be capable of free flexing because of the openly spaced relation of the tufts and an effective stimulation of the gums will also be obtained.

Fig. 18 illustrates the use of the brush in cleaning portions of a tooth 59 which are presented towards an intervening space 6l] where a toothis missing. In this cleaning operation the tufts of the central row will sweep across the distal surface portion of the tooth 59, that is to say, the surface portion at the junction with the gum Bl and the bristle tufts of the outside row will effectively clean the mesial surface portion 62. Because of the converging shape of an individual tooth, as is here represented for the tooth 59, the gingival third of the tooth surface is diicult to reach and clean but with this improved brush the diverging and freely flexing bristle tufts will effectively reach and clean these portions of the tooth.

In the foregoing explanation of the sweeping action for which this improved toothbrush is adapted, the tufts of the outside rows are described as falling into the interproximal embrasures While the tufts of the central row sweep the surfaces of the teeth. It is obvious, however, that at times during the cleaning operation the tufts of the central row will fall into the interproximal embrasures and when this occurs the tufts of the outside rows will be in position to sweep the surfaces of the teeth. Y

Fig. 19 shows a toothbrush 63 embodying the main features and principles above described for the brush 25 but in which the tops of the bristle tufts 64 of the central row are concavely recessed as indicated at B5. This shape for the tops of the tufts of the central row enables them to spread and more readily conform to the convex curvature of the tooth surfaces which are engaged by these tufts during the cleaning operation. In other respects the brush 63 is similar to the brush 25 and is intended to be used in substantially the same manner.

From the foregoing description and the accompanying drawings it will now be readily understood that this invention provides an improved toothbrush which is a distinct departure from toothbrushes heretofore proposed but which will effectively accomplish a desired cleaning of the teeth and stimulation of the gums in a proper manner. It will also be seen that the construction and arrangement of the bristle tufts provides for an extreme flexibility of the bristles by which the desired sweeping action can be accomplished for an effective cleaning of the various embrasures, grooves and surfaces of the teeth.

Although the improved toothbrush and its recommended manner of use has been illustrated and described herein in considerable detail, it will be understood of course that the invention is not to be regarded as correspondingly limited in scope but includes all changes and modifications coming Within the terms of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A toothbrush comprising an elongated body having connected and longitudinally aligned head and handle portions, and a group of resiliently exible bristles carried by said head portion and projecting from one side thereof, said bristles being grouped into tufts which are disposed in relatively openly spaced relation and in rows extending longitudinally of said head portion and consisting of only a central row and two outside rows disposed respectively on opposite sides of the central row, said outside rows extending outwardly from said head in diverging relation and being inclined away from said central row and the tufts of said outside rows being in staggered relation to the tufts of said central row by being disposed opposite the spaces between the tufts of said central row, the flexibility of said bristles and said openly spaced and staggered relation of said tufts permitting a free lateral flexing of the tufts of one row for the accomplishment of an eifective sweeping action Without interference from or packing against the tufts of an adjacent row, the tops of the tufts of said outside rows being pointed and the tops of the tufts of said central row being concave.

2. A toothbrush comprising a handle, and a bristle-carrying head connected with said handle, the bristles of said head being grouped into tufts and the tufts being disposed in rows so as to consist of a central row and two outside rows, said outside rows extending outwardly from said head in diverging relation and being inclined away from said central row, the tops of the tufts of said outside rows being tapered and pointed and the tops of the tufts of said central row being concave.

GEORGE W. PIFER.

REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Maher Apr. 28, 1903 Number Number Number 15 171,048 451,728 647,642

10 Name Date Green July 18, 1911 Chandler Oct. 29, 1912 Barnes Apr. 22, 1913 Farrar Dec. 15, 1914 Craig Jan. 21, 1919 Church Mar. 10, 1931 Abelson Oct. 10, 1933 McIntyre Jan. 9, 1934 Hertzberg Feb. 3, 1942 Kisky June 19, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Canada Apr. 28, 1903 Germany Nov. 3, 1927 France Nov. 27, 1928

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Cited By (20)

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US3087223A (en) * 1961-10-30 1963-04-30 Marshall F Raw Brush device for napped or pile fabrics
DE2752118A1 (en) * 1977-11-22 1979-05-23 G R P Ges Fuer Rationelle Psyc Tooth brush with brush support at angle to stem - has handle reducing in size conically in direction of support and with small recess on back
US4776054A (en) * 1987-03-04 1988-10-11 Samuel Rauch Toothbrush
US5046213A (en) * 1990-03-29 1991-09-10 Colgate-Palmolive Company Plaque removing toothbrush
US5224763A (en) * 1991-12-30 1993-07-06 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of fastening bristle tufts to bristle carrier
US5335389A (en) * 1990-03-29 1994-08-09 Colgate-Palmolive Company Plaque removing toothbrush
US5341537A (en) * 1990-03-29 1994-08-30 Colgate-Palmolive Company Plaque removing toothbrush
US5345647A (en) * 1993-07-12 1994-09-13 Liu Hung Hsi Toothbrush
US5392483A (en) * 1994-07-07 1995-02-28 Chesebrough-Pond's Usa Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc. Multi-level bristle tuft toothbrush
US5444889A (en) * 1993-04-29 1995-08-29 Chesebrough-Pond's Usa Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc. Toothbrush assembly
US5500975A (en) * 1994-04-15 1996-03-26 Taihei Kogyo Co., Ltd. Toothbrush
US5511275A (en) * 1990-06-19 1996-04-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Toothbrush exhibiting three-dimensional bristle profile and end rounded bristles for improved interproximal cleaning without increasing gum irritation
US5926897A (en) * 1994-12-01 1999-07-27 The Procter & Gamble Company Toothbrush having bristles for interproximal cleaning
US6289546B1 (en) 1999-03-29 2001-09-18 Stephen D. Harada Toothbrush and method of fabricating same
US20080100126A1 (en) * 2005-04-08 2008-05-01 Young-Jun Kwon Method of Manufacturing Toothbrush With Needle-Shaped Bristles, and Toothbrush Manufactured by the Same
US20130333130A1 (en) * 2008-06-20 2013-12-19 Colgate-Palmolive Company Oral care implement having tissue cleaning elements with directional cleaning
GB2472515B (en) * 2009-08-06 2014-02-19 Mcneil Ppc Inc Bristle configuration
US8943634B2 (en) 2011-05-02 2015-02-03 Water Pik, Inc. Mechanically-driven, sonic toothbrush system
US9468511B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-10-18 Water Pik, Inc. Electronic toothbrush with vibration dampening
US9987109B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-06-05 Water Pik, Inc. Mechanically-driven, sonic toothbrush and water flosser

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FR647642A (en) * 1928-01-24 1928-11-27 bristle toothbrush sheathed rubber
US1796001A (en) * 1929-04-23 1931-03-10 Lloyd E Church Toothbrush
US1929530A (en) * 1931-08-11 1933-10-10 Abelson Martin Toothbrush
US1943225A (en) * 1933-05-01 1934-01-09 Harold W Mcintyre Toothbrush
US2272151A (en) * 1941-06-19 1942-02-03 Hertzberg Dorothy Hairbrush
US2378641A (en) * 1943-12-23 1945-06-19 Kisky Christian Toothbrush

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DE451728C (en) * 1927-11-03 Cornelius Gordijn Jr Brush with a voided for receiving an antiseptic Buerstenkoerper
US726716A (en) * 1903-01-22 1903-04-28 David F Maher Brush.
US998500A (en) * 1910-10-10 1911-07-18 George Felix Green Brush.
US1042393A (en) * 1910-12-12 1912-10-29 Daniel L Chandler Holder for bristles of brushes.
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FR647642A (en) * 1928-01-24 1928-11-27 bristle toothbrush sheathed rubber
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US1943225A (en) * 1933-05-01 1934-01-09 Harold W Mcintyre Toothbrush
US2272151A (en) * 1941-06-19 1942-02-03 Hertzberg Dorothy Hairbrush
US2378641A (en) * 1943-12-23 1945-06-19 Kisky Christian Toothbrush

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3087223A (en) * 1961-10-30 1963-04-30 Marshall F Raw Brush device for napped or pile fabrics
DE2752118A1 (en) * 1977-11-22 1979-05-23 G R P Ges Fuer Rationelle Psyc Tooth brush with brush support at angle to stem - has handle reducing in size conically in direction of support and with small recess on back
US4776054A (en) * 1987-03-04 1988-10-11 Samuel Rauch Toothbrush
US5446940A (en) * 1990-03-29 1995-09-05 Colgate-Palmolive Company Toothbrush
US5046213A (en) * 1990-03-29 1991-09-10 Colgate-Palmolive Company Plaque removing toothbrush
US5335389A (en) * 1990-03-29 1994-08-09 Colgate-Palmolive Company Plaque removing toothbrush
US5341537A (en) * 1990-03-29 1994-08-30 Colgate-Palmolive Company Plaque removing toothbrush
US5511275A (en) * 1990-06-19 1996-04-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Toothbrush exhibiting three-dimensional bristle profile and end rounded bristles for improved interproximal cleaning without increasing gum irritation
US5224763A (en) * 1991-12-30 1993-07-06 The Procter & Gamble Company Method of fastening bristle tufts to bristle carrier
US5444889A (en) * 1993-04-29 1995-08-29 Chesebrough-Pond's Usa Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc. Toothbrush assembly
US5345647A (en) * 1993-07-12 1994-09-13 Liu Hung Hsi Toothbrush
US5500975A (en) * 1994-04-15 1996-03-26 Taihei Kogyo Co., Ltd. Toothbrush
US5392483A (en) * 1994-07-07 1995-02-28 Chesebrough-Pond's Usa Co., Division Of Conopco, Inc. Multi-level bristle tuft toothbrush
US6178583B1 (en) 1994-12-01 2001-01-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Toothbrush having bristles for interproximal cleaning
US5926897A (en) * 1994-12-01 1999-07-27 The Procter & Gamble Company Toothbrush having bristles for interproximal cleaning
US6289546B1 (en) 1999-03-29 2001-09-18 Stephen D. Harada Toothbrush and method of fabricating same
US8029069B2 (en) * 2005-04-08 2011-10-04 Young-Jun Kwon Method of manufacturing toothbrush with needle-shaped bristles, and toothbrush manufactured by the same
US20080100126A1 (en) * 2005-04-08 2008-05-01 Young-Jun Kwon Method of Manufacturing Toothbrush With Needle-Shaped Bristles, and Toothbrush Manufactured by the Same
US20130333130A1 (en) * 2008-06-20 2013-12-19 Colgate-Palmolive Company Oral care implement having tissue cleaning elements with directional cleaning
US8806693B2 (en) * 2008-06-20 2014-08-19 Colgate-Palmolive Company Oral care implement having tissue cleaning elements with directional cleaning
GB2472515B (en) * 2009-08-06 2014-02-19 Mcneil Ppc Inc Bristle configuration
US8943634B2 (en) 2011-05-02 2015-02-03 Water Pik, Inc. Mechanically-driven, sonic toothbrush system
US9144477B2 (en) 2011-05-02 2015-09-29 Water Pik, Inc. Mechanically-driven, sonic toothbrush system
US9468511B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-10-18 Water Pik, Inc. Electronic toothbrush with vibration dampening
US9987109B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-06-05 Water Pik, Inc. Mechanically-driven, sonic toothbrush and water flosser

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