US2562049A - Calculating machine - Google Patents

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US2562049A
US2562049A US2562049DA US2562049A US 2562049 A US2562049 A US 2562049A US 2562049D A US2562049D A US 2562049DA US 2562049 A US2562049 A US 2562049A
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06CDIGITAL COMPUTERS IN WHICH ALL THE COMPUTATION IS EFFECTED MECHANICALLY
    • G06C15/00Computing mechanisms; Actuating devices therefor
    • G06C15/04Adding or subtracting devices
    • G06C15/06Adding or subtracting devices having balance totalising; Obtaining sub-total

Description

July 24, 1951 H. L. LAMBERT 2,562,049
CALCULATING MACHINE Filed April s, 1945 s Sheet-Sheet 1 Enventor HARRY L. LAMBERT BYW His (lttomeg July 24, 1951 H. LAMBERT CALCULATING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed'April 5, 1945 Imnentor HARRY L LAMBERT His Gttorneg 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 HARRY L LAMBERT His (Ittorneg July 24, 1951 H. L. LAMBERT CALCULATING MACHINE Filed April 5, 1945 July 24, 1951 H. LAMBERT CALCULATING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed April 5, 1945 N9 mmn w QE 3noentor HARRY L. LAMBERT w m m w .5 M Y B m2 m9 July 24, 1951 H. L. LAMBERT CALCULATING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed April 5, 1945 n00 mOw Inventor HARRY L. LAMBERT His (Ittomeg July 24, 1951 H. L. LAMBERT CALCULATING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed April 5, 1945 Bmaemor HARRY L. LAMBERT h/ 8 o6 0 7. mm :m Now .8 00m@ 2 m6 H i s (Ittorueg July 24, 1951 H. L. LAMBERT CALCULATING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed April 5, 1945 3maentor HARRY LAMBERT BYZ Q M H i s (Ittorneg July 24, 1951 H. L. LAMBERT CALCULATING MACHINE 8 Sheets- Sheet 8 Filed April 5, 1945 Zaiwenkor HARRY L LLQMBEEX H 55 @ttomeg Patented July 24 1951 1 CALCULATING MACHINE Harry L. Lambert, East Rochester, N. Y., assignor, by mesne assignments, to The National Cash Register Company, Dir
of Maryland yton, Ohio, a corporation Application April 3, 1945, Serial No. 586,359
13 Claims.
This invention relates to calculating machines and the like and more particularly to novel control means therefor, for controlling various types of operations for machines of this character.
In many machines of the type shown and described herein, there are provided manually operable devices operable to predetermine the several types of operations through which machines of thi type are adapted to be put, and in some machines such devices are mounted in the machine casing.
To eliminate or remove such manipulative control means from the casing is one of the objects of this invention.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a special novel control bank of keys for determining and controlling the various types of operations, such as add, non-add, subtract, total, and sub-total operations.
Another object is to provide a special mounting for manipulative control means and including a correction key or key release means.
A further object is to provide a novel interlocking means between all of said manipulative con- -trol means and between said means and the trol of said control keys.
Another object is the provision of means operable under control of the add motor bar to cause the machine to make asub-total operation instead of an add operation. i
A further object is the provision of novel'nonadd control means.
A still further object is to provide a special. novel control of the zero stop means during total and sub-total operations. i
Another object is to provide means to cause a special operation of the machine release means during total and sub-total operations. 1
With these and other incidental objects-in view, the invention includes certain novel features of construction and combinations of parts, 'the'essential elements of which are set forth in'appended claims and a preferred formor embodie ma hine its control over the zero stop.
Fig. 4 is a detail view, in enlarged scale, of a part of the totalizer transfer mechanism and adding rack and includes the transfer trip restoring means.
Fig. 5 is a plan view of a portion of the machine with the keyboard removed.
Fig. 6 is a view of the right side of the machine, showing the bank of control keys and a part of the mechanism operated thereby to release the machine and control the totalizer engaging and disengaging mechanism.
Fig. '7 is a plan view showing the totalizer engaging control and a part of the machine release means.
Fig. 8 is a view outside the right side frame of the machine looking toward the left, showing a part .of the totalizer engaging control, subtract control, key release, and machine driving mechanism.
Fig. 9 is a plan view, partly in section, of a portion of the control bank, non-add control, and zero stop control during totaling operations.
Fig. 10 is a detail view ofthe hammer restoring means and ribbon shift pawl for shifting the ribbon from black to red during subtract opera- .tions.
Fig. 11 is a view taken inside the left side frame, showing the machine drive, the machine release mechanism, and part of the subtract control mechanism.
Fig. 12 is a detail of a part of the motor drive.
Fig. 13 shows the interlock between the amount keys and the total keys.
Fig. 14 shows the interlock between the amount keys and the total'keys and a part of the total engaging control mechanism.
Fig. 15 shows the totalizer engaging means, a part of the control therefor, a portion of the zero stop control means, and the machine release for the second machine cycle of a total taking and sub-total taking operation.
Fig. 16 is a detail of the latching device for the totalizer engaging control means.
Fig. 1'7 is an enlarged edge view, partly in section, showing the interlocks between the keys of the control bank and a part of the zero stop controls.
Fig. 18 shows a part of the totalizer engaging mechanism, the restoring means for the rack levers and diverging levers and also the paper feed mechanism and the control. therefor.
Fig. 19 shows the non-add control for the totalizer and also the symbol printing means.
FRAMEWORK AND CASING Most of the mechanism of the machine is mounted. on or between a left side frame 33 (Figs. 2, 5, and 11) and a right side frame 3| (Figs. and 6), which side frames are tied together near their lower edges by cross braces 32 and 33, having cars 34, by means of which they are bolted to the side frames 30 and 3|.
At the rear, the frames 30 and 3| are tied together by a brace 35, having cars 33, by means of which the brace 35 is bolted to the side frames. A tie bar 31, having ears 38, is used to properly space the side frames 3t and 3| near their extreme forward. ends. A bar 39 (Figs. 2 and 5) is also used to properly space the side frames 33 and 3| near their upper front portions. This bar has secured to it a plate Gil, which also acts as a spacer and helps to make the bar 39 rigid.
The machine is enclosed in a cabinet or casing designated generally as 45, which casing consists of a base 43 (Figs. 1 and 2), which is secured to the brace 33 and to the tie bar 31, a left side section 41, a right side section 48, a back plate 49, a front plate 5| and a top plate 3|. The top plate 5| is provided with an opening 52, covered with a glass 53 so that the totalizer may be readable by the operator of the machine.
OPERATING MECHANISM The machine embodying the present invention is of the general type shown and described in the United States Letters Patent to H. C. Peters, Nos. 1,386,021 and 1,386,022, issued August 2, 1921, and 1,646,105, issued October 18, 1927; and also the United States Patent to N. White, No. 1,854,875, granted April 19, 1932.
All of said patents show machines operated by a handle; in other words, they are what are known in the art as hand-operated machines.
However, motors have been developed to operate machines of this type, and the machine shown in the present invention is operated by a con ventional type of higlvspeed electric motor of a type extensively used for the operation of calculating machines, particularly adding machines, where the motor is given successive intermittent operations 01 a definite cycle in order to drive the drive shafts or operating mechanism of the machine for adding and all types of calculating operations which such mechanisms are adapted to perform. Such a motor replaces the usual hand crank which operates similar mechanism in a similar type of calculating mechanism.
The type of motor used in the present application is illustrated generally in the United States Letters Patent to Harry L. Lambert, No. 2,130,350, issued September 20, 1938.
A motor of this general type is indicated by dot-and-dash lines in Fig. 11 and is designated 60. Through proper gearing, this motor Gil operates a shaft 6| in a clockwise direction. Secured to this shaft is a notched disk or clutch member 62 adapted to be engaged by a clutch pawl 33 pivoted on a stud 64 carried by lever 35, which is loosely mounted on the shaft A spring it? normally tends to rock the clutch pawl 53 clockwise, but is prevented from doing so due to the fact that the upper end of the pawl is held against a roller 61 on a lever 38 pivoted on a stud 65 mounted in the frame of the motor 30.
This lever 68, by means to be described herein-- after, is moved clockwise, and, when this occurs. the spring 66 rocks the pawl 33 clockwise, whereupon it engages the motor-driven notched disk 62, previously described.
Since the pawl 63 is pivoted on the lever 65, after engagement of the pawl 63 with the motordriven disk 62, the pawl 63 and the lever 35 are given a complete clockwise rotation about the shaft 6|.
Pivoted on a stud 'I| carried by the lever Elli is a link 12 (Fig. 12) which carries a stud iii, to which are pivoted an arm 14 and an arm 15. The arm '15 is also pivoted on a rear drive shaft 16, which has secured thereto a drive collar 11, to which is secured a driving disk 18.
The arms 14 and T5 are connected. by a strong coil spring 19, which holds a stud on the arm 14 in a notch 8| of the drive disk 13. When the lever 65 is rocked clockwise (Fig. 12) one complete rotation, the link 12 rocks the arms and I5 first counter-clockwise and then clockwise to normal position around the center of the shaft 16. Upon counter-clockwise movement of the arm I4, the stud 80, being held in the notch 8| by the spring 19, turns the drive shaf t 16 counter-clockwise approximately '75 degrees, then, as the arm 14 is restored clockwise to normal, the stud 30, through the notch BI, turns the drive shaft 15 clockwise to its normal position. The spring 19 causes the arms 14 and 15 to move as a unit around the center of the shaft '16 when they are driven by the link 12, the spring 19 creating a flexible drive between the motor 60 and the drive shaft 16.
The reason for this flexible drive is to protect the mechanism of the machine should the shaft 16 or any part of the machine be stopped during the machine operation, due to any cause whatsoever. In such a case-that is, the stopping of the shaft 16-the arm 14 then pivots on the stud 13 as the lever 65 and the link 12 complete their movement, thus disengaging the stud 80 from the notch 8|, whereupon the spring 19 stretches and holds the stud 30 against a surface 32 of the drive disk until the link 12 starts its return movement (to the left inFig. 12), at which times the arms I4 and 15 start their return clockwise movement about the center of the shaft 16, at which time the spring 19 will eventually cause the stud to again be seated in the notch 8| and restore the drive disk 18 to its normal position, shown in Fig. 12, from whatever position it had been stopped in during its counterclockwise movement.
The lever 65 has secured thereto a cam 83, which, as the lever is being rotated clockwise, engages a roller 84 (Fi 11) on the lever 68 and rocks this lever 68 counter-clockwise back to the position shown in Fig, 11, just prior to the time that the upper end of the pawl 63 reaches its home position, whereupon the roller 61 will be in the path of movement of the pawl 63, thus disconnecting the pawl from the notched driving disk 62, which, it will be recalled, is secured to the motor shaft 6|, thus disconnecting the motor drive from the main shaft 16 at the end of the operation of the machine.
It might be well to state here that, as the lever 63 is moved clockwise from the position shown in Fig. 11 by means to be described hereinafter, a stud 85 thereon, through its contact with a finger 83 of an arm 81 pivoted on the stud 6!, rocks this arm clockwise, whereupon an insulating roll 88 thereon closes a motor switch sense '69 which starts the rotation of the motor to its normal position by the cam 83 through its contact withthe roll 84, the stud 65 will move away from the finger 86, since the arm 81 is held by the latch 25.
When the latch 25 releases arm 81 the motor switch is free to open itself and break the circuit so that the motor will not continue to run after the end of theoperation of the machine.
MAIN AND REAR DRIVE SHAFTS The rear drive shaft 16, the driving of which by the motor has just been described, is mounted for oscillation in the side frames 30 and 3I. A main drive shaft I (Figs. 5, 6, '7, and 11) is also supported for oscillation by the side frames 30 and 3| near the center part of the machine.
This main shaft I00 receives its movement from the rear drive shaft 16 by the following described mechanism:
Secured to the rear drive shaft 16 is a drive plate IN, to which is pivoted a link I02, which is also pivoted to a drive plate I03 secured to the main drive shaft I00. In Figs. 6 and 8, the
drive plate I03 is shown in its normal position resting against a flexible bufier I04 carried by a bracket I05 secured'to the right side frame 3|, When the shaft 16 is given its oscillation by the motor first counter-clockwise and then clockwise, as described above, the link I02 drives the plate I03 and the main shaft I00 first counter-clockwise and then clockwise to its normal position.
Secured to the main shaft I00 (Figs. 2 and 5) is an arm I06, to which is connected a strong spring I01, the front end of which is secured to a rod I08 held in notches in the front edges of the side frames 30 and 3I by the spring I01.
This spring I01 helps to restore the shaft I00 and also the shaft in a clockwise direction to their normal positions after said shafts have been rocked counter-clockwise, which counterclockwise ncovement stretches the spring I01 and puts it under considerable tension, so that, as
The drive plate IIBI has a cam surface II4,'
which, as the plate IN is rocked counter-clock- 'wise, rocks the bell crank I09 counter-clockwise and stretches the spring H3 so that it is put the plate [III and consequently the shaft 16 and also the main shaft I00 definitely to their home positions. g V I The drive plate I03 has thereon a hub I I5 with a driving section II6, which is adapted to be inserted into a notch in the hub of a handle such as that shown in the above-mentioned Peters and White patents, should it be desiredto operate the machine by hand directly from the main shaft I00. However, in order to do this, it is necessary to disconnect the link 12 from the driving lever 65, .so that it will not be necessary to pull the motor around with the shaft I6 when the machine is being operated by hand directly by the oscillation or rocking of the shaft I00 by the handle.
No handle has been shown in this present application, but one is shown in each of the abovementioned White and Peters patents, and therefore it does not in any way affect the invention disclosed herein.
KEYBOARD The machine embodying the present invention is provided with a keyboard having eight banks or rows of amount keys and a single bank of control keys. However, it is not intended to limit the invention to a machine having only eight banks of amount keys, because the number of banks of amount keys may vary without in any way affecting the invention.
Amount keyboard Since the amount keyboard is quite similar to that which has been fully illustrated and described in the above-mentioned Peters patents, it is not thought necessary to go into a complete detailed description of the same herein, and therefore it will be but briefly described.
The amount keys I20 are depressibly mounted in a removable keyboard of the type shown in the above-mentioned patents. This keyboard consists of a top plate IZI, a bottom plate I22 (Figs. 2 and 8), a left side plate I23, and a right side plate I24. These plates are tied together by a front cross bar I25 and a rear cross bar I26, so that the above-mentioned plates and two bars form a unit structure which can be readily removed from the machine.
The keyboard unit mentioned above is mounted on adjustable trunnions I21 (Figs. 2 and 8) by means of slots in the side plates I23 and I24,
' and at the front the side plates are notched to under a considerable amount of tension, and
therefore, as the plate IIlI is rocked clockwise to its normal position as it nears the completion of its movement, the spring II3 has a tendency to cause the roller. I I I to be forced into the notch 7 H2 of the plate IOI, so that, if the parts should become sluggish, then the spring II3 will return surround a rod I29.
board in position after it has been assembled in .the" machine on the trunnions I21 and the rod 429.
pressed, another key in the same bank may be depressed, which will release the first depressed 'key; which of course must occur prior to the time the machine is released. This type of key .is very old and well known in the art. Each key I20 is *provided with the usual restoring spring I3I. Associated with each bank of keys is a rod I32 (Figs. 2 and 3) supported by the vfront and rear bars I25 and I26, upon which is pivoted azero stop I33 carrying the usual bar I34 associated with all keys in the row, so that the depre een of any key in the row will rock the zero stop" I33 counter-clockwise (Fig. 3) to move it A pair of latches I30, piv- -oted on the side frames 30 and 3|, hold the keyinto an ineffective position relative to the differential mechanism to be described hereinafter.
As shown in Figs. 2 and 13, the zero stop bar I34 has an ear I35, which is pivoted on the rod I32. The usual retaining bar I36 (Figs. 2 and 13) is also pivoted on the rod I32 to cooperate with the keys in the bank adjacent to the bank shown in Fig. 2. A torsion spring I3! operates on the zero stop bar I34 and the retaining bar I36 to hold them at all times against the sides of the keystems.
The usual locking bar or detent I38 (Figs. 2 and 3) is provided for each bank of keys, which in the well-known manner is moved over a projection I39 on the depressed key by means of a spring-pressed bar I40 after the machine has been released.
At the beginning of an operation of the machinethat is, immediately after the motor has been released to drive the machine-the lockin detents I38 (Figs. 2 and 3) for each bank of keys are rocked to positively lock all keys in either their depressed or undepressed positions until they are released near the end of the operation at the proper time. The locking detents, as mentioned above, are moved by the bar I40 (Fig. 8), which is held in the position shown herein by a lever I4I pivoted on a, stud I42 carried by the right side plate I24 of the key bank. A spring I43 normally holds the lever I4I against a roller I 44 carried by the operating plate I03. When the plate I03 is rocked counter-clockwise in the manner described previously, the roller I44 is lowered, and consequently the spring I43 will rock the lever I4I clockwise, whereupon a spring (not shown) will move the bar I40 to rock the locking detents I38 to lock all keys in their depressed and undepressed positions.
There is an interlocking means controlled by the bar I40 to prevent the drive shafts I6 and I from operating shortly after their initial movements, in case any amount key I20 is only partially depressed. This means comprises a lever 90 (Fig. 8) pivoted on the side frame 3| by a screw stud 9|. An arm 92 of the lever 90 is normally held against the roller I44 by a spring 93, and a finger 94 of the lever is just above a lug 95 on the bar I40. When a key I20 is fully depressed, the lug 95 moves out from under the finger 94, and, when the roller I44 is moved down by the plate I03, spring 93 moves the lever 90 counter-clockwise, whereupon the finger moves down alongside the lug 95, and at the same time a node 96 on the lever is moved out of the path of a block 91 on the plate I03. The plate I03 can then make its full counter-clockwise movement. When the finger 94 is down alongside the lug 95, the depressed keys are also prevented from be ing released. The roller I44, upon return clockwise of the plate I03, rocks the lever 90 to raise the finger 94 above the lug 95, and then the bar I40 can be restored to normal position by the lever I4I contacting the end of the bar, which is beveled for that purpose.
The left end of the lever I4I carries the usual by-pass pawl I45, which cooperates with a stud I46 on a key release lever I4'I, which has a bail I48 pivoted to the side plates I23 and I24 of the key frame. This bail I46 is forked to project between the bars I34 of the zero stop pawls I33 and the retaining detents I36, so that, when the arm I41 is rocked clockwise by the pawl I45, the zero stops I33 will be moved counter-clockwise (Figs. 3 and Y13) and the retaining detent bars I36 will be moved clockwise, so that any key which has been depressed during the operation of the machine will be released.
The pawl I45, being attached to the lever I4I, by-passes the stud I46 as the lever MI is moved clockwise by the spring I43 when the roller I44 is moved downwardly. Near the end of the operation, as the roller I44 rises as the drive plate I03 is rocked clockwise to its normal position, the roller I44 contacts the lever MI and rocks it counter-clockwise, whereupon the pawl I45, through its contact with the stud I46, rocks the key release lever I41 and its associated bail I48 to release all depressed keys near the end of the operation of the machine.
Repeat mechanism At times it may be desirable to have repeat operations, and therefore the machineis provided with the usual repeat lever I49 (Figs. 1 and 8), which is pivoted on a stud I50 carried by the right side plate I24, as shown in Fig. 8. Secured to the repeat lever I49 is the usual alining plate I5I, which cooperates with a stud I52 in a springdrav/n arm I53 pivoted on the stud I42.
When it is desired to prevent the release of any depressed key I20 by the lever I4I at the end of the operation of the machine, the repeat lever I49 (Fig. 8) is moved clockwise, whereupon a surface I54 of the alining plate I5I is moved directly above a stud I55 on the lever I4I, so that, when the roller I44 is moved out of the path of the lever IN, the spring I43 will move the lever I4I a shorter distance than usual because the stud I55 will contact thesurface I54 of the allning plate I5I, which holds the by-pass pawl I45 below the stud I46. Consequently, when the lever MI is rocked counter-clockwise by the roller I44 near the end of the operation of the machine, the pawl I45 being below the stud I46, there will be no movement of the key release lever I41 and its bail I46, and therefore any key which has beendepressed at the beginning of the operation of the machine will remain depressed for a subsequent operation of the machine whenever the repeat lever I49 has been moved clockwise from that position, shown in Fig. 8.
Control key bank As mentioned above, the machine is provided with a special control bank, which in the presentinvention is mounted to the right of the regular keyboard and on the outside of the righthand side frame 3I, so that the keys and bars of this special control bank project through the right side 48 of the machine casing.
All of the keys or bars of this special control bank are motorized keys; that is, when depressed they will operate mechanism to release the motor so that the machine will go through its operation without the necessity of depressing a. special motor bar. This is true in connection with all keys except the correction key.
Referring now to Figs. 1 and 6, the keys of this control bank are as follows: a correction key I60, marked C, is the first key in the bank. Next, there is a bar I6I having thereon a plus sign near its top, and at the front end of the bar are the words Sub total. The next key I62 is a subtract key and is marked with a subtract sign. Key I63 is the non-add key and is so marked. Key I64 is the total key and bears the inscription Total.
All of these keys I60 to I64 are provided with keystems I65 to I69, respectively, which have slots to surround studs "0 mounted in a key frame "I supported on two studs ,I12 carried by the right side frame "3|. By means of the studs I 10, all of the keys I60 'to I64 inclusive are guided and supported on the special key frame I1I. Each of the keys has the usual restoring spring I13.
1 Correction key The correction key I60 carries a stud I14, which rocks the key release lever I41 and its associated bail I40, thus releasing any and all keys which have been depressed, if this key 160 is depressed before any of the keys I6I to I64 inclusive.
Key interlocks As a matter of fact, the key I60 cannot be depressed after the depression of any one of the keys I6I to I64, due to a plate I19 (Fig. 6),which cooperates with a stud I80 in the correction key stem I65. There is a stud I80 in the key stems I66, I61, and I68, which cooperate with plates IBI, I82, and I83. what is known in the art as a crowding key lock, thus preventing the depression of any one of the keys I60 to I64when any other one of them has been fully depressed. These crowding key lock plates I19, ISI, I82, and I83 are slidably mounted on studs I84 carried by the key fram I1I.
Pivoted on the left-hand one of the studs I84,
which supports the plate I83, is an arm I85 having a slot surrounding the stud I80 on the total key stem I69. The arm I85 also has an extension I81, which carries a stud I86, which cooperates with the plate I83 in the same manner that the studs I80 of the key stems I65 to I68 cooperate with associated plates, I19, I8I, or I82. words, when the total key I64 is depressed, the arm I85 is rocked clockwise, whereupon the stud I06 moves the plate I83 to the left and at the same time moves the plates I82, I 8|, and I19 to the left, so that none of the keys I60 to I63 inelusive can be depressed whenever the key I64 is depressed. For example, whenthe subtract key I62 is depressed, its stud I86 forces itself between the two plates I8I and I82, thus forcing the plate I83 to the right to prevent depression of the key I64. The plate I82 prevents depression of the key I63, the plate I8I prevents depression of the key I6I, and the plate I19 prevents depression of the key I60. Thus, it can be seen that, when any of the keys I60 to I64 is depressed, its associated stud I80 controls the operation of the crowding key lock plates I19 to I83, so that only one of the keys I60 to I64 may be depressed for any one single operation of the machine.
Motor release I94 (Fig. which is pivoted on a screwstud The upper arm of the bell crank I The plates I19 to I83 form In other mounted in the brace 32." j A spring I96, stretched between the lever I94 and a studon the brace '32, holds a right arm I91 of the'lever I94 against the side of a lug I98 (Fig. 15') on an arm I99 pivoted on a stud 200.carried by the key frame I1 I. The armI91 is guided by a' slot'20I, in the right side frame 3 I, as shown in Fig; 8. The arm I99 is also held upwardly against the bottom side of the arm I91 by a'spring 202, stretched'betw'een a flange 203 of the arm I99 and a stud carried by the key frame I1I. V I
The spring I96 also tends to rock the lever 68 clockwise to release the clutch pawl 63 and at the same time, through the stud 85, tends to rock the contact roller arm' 8681 clockwis to close the motor switch 89.
Whenever the arm I99 is rockedclockwise (Fig. 6), the lug I98 is moved below the path of the arm I91 of the lever I94, whereupon the spring I96 rocks the lever I9'4-andthe, arm I91 counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 5, which moves the link I92 toward the front of the machine (to the left as viewed in Fig. ;11),' thus rocking the lever 68 to release the clutch pawl 63 to the action of itsspring 66 and at the same time, through the stud 85, rocks the arm 81 clockwise, whereupon the roller 88 closes the motor switch 89 to release the motor for operation, so that the shaft 6| maybe rotated, and, through the mechanism shown in Figs. 11 and 12,,drivesthe rear drive shaft 16 in the manner previously described.
During the clockwise movement of the lever in the mannerpreviously described, it will be recalled that its cam 83, by contacting the roller 84 ofthe lever 68, rocksthe'lever 68 counter-- clockwise back to normal position, which at. the same time moves the link I92 to the right, as viewed in Fig. 11, thus rocking the lever I94 and the arm I91 clockwise to, bring thearm I91 into the position shownin Figs6 and 15, wherein it lies to the left of the lug I98 on the arm I99, in which position it is locked, as the spring 202 will rock the arm I99 counter-clockwise just as soon as the arm I91 moves to the left (Fig. 15) off the top of the lug I98, the parts then being intheir normal positions.
The, means for rocking the arm I99 clockwise in the manner just described, to release the machine for operationunder control of the keys I 6I, I62, I63, and I64,will now be described, referring to Fig. 6.
When the add and sub-total bar I6I is depressed, a finger 2I6 thereon engages a stud 2II onthe arm I99, and continued depression of the bar I6I, through the finger 2I0 and the stud 2I I,
rocks the arm I99 clockwise to release the arm I91 from the lug I98 for the purposedescribed previously. g
. Whenever the machine is being used for adding operations, the bar I6I is depressed and immediately released, whereupon the machine is driven through one complete cycle of operation by the motor 60.
However, when it is desiredto make a sub-total operation following an item-enteringoperation, there is means, to be described hereinafter, which will cause the machine to go through two complete machine cycles following the item-entering cycle, to complete the sub-total operation when the bar I6I is depressed and held depressed until after theitem-entering. cycle hasbeen completed. This will cause the machine to take a sub-total from the totalizer to be described hereinafter and toprint that sub-totallon atape which will also bedescribed later, Y
attach In other words, if a series of items is to be eri tered and it is desired to obtain the sub-total therefrom, as each item is set up on the keyboard by depression of. the amount keys I20 and the bar I6I is depressed to release the motor for each item, each of the several items will be successively added into the totalizer. When the last item is about to be entered, the operator sets this item up on the keyboard and depresses the key I6I, hold ing it depressed through the cycle of operation wherein the amount, according to that represented by the depressed keys, is added into the totalizer, which causes an immediate two-machine-cycle operation of the machine, which, due to other mechanism to be described hereinafter, under control of this key I6I will cause the subtotal of the several items to be printed from the totallzer.
When it is desired to release the machine for a subtract operation-that is, to have an amount set upon the keyboard subtracted from the total.- izer.the operator depresses the subtract key I62: The key stem I61 of thiskey has a finger 212, which also lies above the stud 2| I of the arm I99, and consequently, when the key I62 is depressed, the finger 2I2, by its contact with the stud 2| I, rocks the arm I99 clockwise to remove the lug I98 thereof from the path of the arm I91, so that the spring I96 may rock the lever I94 counter-clockwise (Fig. 5) to release the machine for, in this particular case, a subtract operation. The means for causing an amount set up on the keyboard to be subtracted will be described hereinafter.
The means for rocking the arm I99 to release the machine for operation upon depression of the Non-Add key I63 comprises the following mechanism: Pivoted on a stud 2I-3 (Fig. 6), carried by the key frame IN, is a lever 2 I4 having a finger 2I5, which normally lies on top of the stud 2II of the arm I99. Pivoted to the lever 2 I4 is a link 2I6, which in turn is pivoted to a bell crank 2I1 pivoted on a stud 2I8 mounted in the frame I1I. The key stem I68 of the Non-Add key I63 has a stud 2I9 in such a position that, when theNon- Add key I63 is depressed, the stud 219 will contact and rock the bell crank 2I1' counter-clockwise, whereupon the link 2I6 rocks the lever 2 I4 counter-clockwise, and the finger 2I5, by its con tact with the stud 2| I, rocks the arm I99'to move the lug I98 out of the path of the arm I91, so that the motor 60 may be released to operate the machine in the manner described above.
The means for rocking the arm I99-under control of the Total key I64 will now be described. Pivoted on the stud 2I8 is a lever 229, which is pivoted to an arm 22I of the lever 2I4; The key stem I69 of the Total key I64 has a finger 222 carrying a stud 223. When the Total key I64 is de pressed, the stud 223 contacts and rocks the lever 229 clockwise, which in turn, through its con-- nection with the lever 2I4, rocks the lever 2I4 counter-clockwise, whereupon the finger 2I5, by its contact with the stud 2| I, rocks the arm I99 clockwise to release the motor for operation in the manner described previously.
It might be well to state here that, whenever the Total key I64 is depressed, the machine will automatically make two machinecycles to complete a total-taking operation, the first machine cycle being a so-called idle cycle to restore to nor;- mal position any tripped transfer devices in the, totalizer.
In order to have the machine then released'for the second successive machine cycle without again depressing the key I64, the machineis pro vised with a means for. r'etainingthe arm I as de-' pressed; so that the arm I91 will not become latched behind the lug I98 when the cam 83 restores the lever 68 (Fig. 11) at the end of the first. machine cycle of the operation, which, it will be recalled, moves the link I92 to the right and at the sam time rocks the lever I94 and the arm I91 clockwise (Fig. 5) to bring the arm. I91 into such position that the spring 292- may rock the arm I99 counter-clockwise to again latch the arm. rat in the position shown. However, since the arm. I99, is retained inits depressed positionby means to bedescribed hereinafter, the rocking of the lever I94 and the arm- I91- clockwise by the cam 83 through the lever 68 ismerely an idle opera.- tion, and consequently the spring I96 will again immediately rock said lever I94 and arm I91 counter-clockwise (Fig. 5) to cause the motor 69 to drive the machine through an immediate sec.- ond machine cycle.
Interlock amount keys and total key To prevent the total key I64 from being depressed while any oneof the amount keys I20 is depressed, there is provided an interlocking mechanism which will now be described with particular reference to Figs. 6, 13, 14, and 17.
Secured to the key frame I1I is a bracket 23I, on which is pivoted an arm 232 held in the position shown in Fig. 17 by a light torsion spring 233, which is wound around a post 234 on the bracket 23I and which has one end overlying the arm 232 and also bent down, so that the general tendency of the spring 233 is to hold the arm in the position shown in Fig. 17, wherein a node 235 thereon is held against a flange 236 of a bar 231 slidably mounted in the rear of the keyboard frame and being guided by the side plates I23 and I24. Thisbar 231 extends all the way across the keyboard, and adjacent each of the bars I34 of the zero stops I33 there is a flange 238 (Fig. 13) in such a position that, whenever the zero stop I33 of any particular bank is rocked, the bar231 will bemoved to the right, as viewed in Fig. 13, by the bar I34 on the zero stop I33. This-will occur whenever a key is-depresse'd inany key bank. In'other words, the first key depressed, regardless of the denominational bank in which it is de-' pressed, or regardless of the significant value of that key,- will move the bar 231 to the right, as viewed in Fig. 13.
When this occurs, the flange 236 of the bar 231 (Fig. 17), by its contactwith the node 235 of the arm 232, will rock the arm 232 clockwise against the action of the spring 233 and positiona bent-over finger 23S thereon immediately below theextension I81 of the arm I85, which, it will be recalled, is connected by a slot 'to the pin I89 of the total key stem IE9, and consequently, when this bent-over finger 239 of the arm 232 has been moved'beneath the extension I81 of the arm I85, iltubecomes impossible to depress the total key Conversely, when the total key I64 has been de-- pressed, the extension I81 of the arm I prevents clockwise movement of the arm 232, thus locking the zero stops I33 against movement from their normal position and preventing depression of the'amount keys.
Control key locks Associated withthe keys I6I, I62, I63, and'I64 (Figs. 6 and 17) is a device for locking the de-, pressed one of said keys in its depressed position until near the end of the operation of the machine, and at the same time preventing depres-- by the key frame I1 I. The lower end of the lever,-
252 straddles the arm I91 of the motor release lever I94. Whenever this arm I91 is moved to the right, as viewed in Fig. 6,,it rocks the lever 252 counter-clockwise, thus moving the slide 25Ilt0 the left, whereupon the stud I60 of the depressed key I6I, I62, or I63 is engaged by the horizontal section of a bayonet slot 254 of the slide 250, thus locking whichever one of the keys I6 I, I62, or I63 in its depressed position. At the same time, the section of the slide 256 above the horizontal portion of the bayonet slot 254 is moved beneath the studs I86 of whichever one of the keys I6I, I 62, or I63 is not depressed, thus preventing their depression while another one of those keys is depressed.
This mechanism also functions in connection with the total. key I64 through the stud I86, which is locked by the horizontal portion of a bayonet slot 255 in the right end of the slide 250.
When the lever I94 is rocked clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 5, the arm I91 is again moved back into the position shown here, whereupon it rocks the lever 252 clockwise, thus moving the interlooking or looking slide 256 back to the position shown in Fig. 5, wherein any one of the keys I6I to I64 may be depressed, so that the studs I86 and I85 may be moved downwardly into the vertical sections of the bayonet slots 254 and 255, respectively, to release the machine for operation in the manner described previously.
DIFFERENTIAL MECHANISM The differential mechanism shown in the present application is substantially the same as'that shown in the above-mentioned Peters Patents Nos. 1,386,021 and 1,386,022 and the White Pat ent No. 1,854,875, the White patent showing the subtracting control of the differential mechanism.
There is one differential unit associated with each of the banks of amount keys I20, and, since they are all substantially the same except for minor differences which will be pointed out hereinafter, it is thought sufficient to describe one. unit of this differential mechanism, which is shown in side elevation in Fig. 2. However, the complete assemblage of the differential mechanism is shown in Fig. 5 in plan view; that is, there is one unit shown for each of the amount banks of keys I26 which are shown in Fig. l.
. Each of the differential units consists mainly of adifferentially adjustable lever carrying an actuating rack for the totalizer pinion associated with that particular denominational order; a differentially adjustable diverging lever for controlling printing mechanism to be described hereinafter; a stop bar pivotally mounted on the diverging lever and adapted to control its movement; a coupling device adapted to couple the differentially adjustable lever and the diverging lever for movement in unison during adding operations; 9, subtract and control device to control the, coupling device whereby the differentially adjustable lever moves one distance and. the
diverging lever moves a different distance (complementary one to the other to the eomplement This slide 250 carries a stud '14 of, ten); during subtract operations; and a positively operated restoring bail which cooperates with the differentially adjustable lever and the diverging lever to restore them to their normal positions to cause the amount set up on the keyboard tobe either added to or subtracted from,
as the case may be, the totalizer, to be described here na t "Differential mechanism-adding Pivotally mounted upon a shaft 260 (Figs. 2 and-5) supportedby the side frames 30 and 3| isan: actuating lever 26I. The actuating lever 26I (see also Fig. 4) carries at its upper end the usual totalizer actuating rack 262, a stop plate 263, and a carrying spring 264. The rack 262 has two studs 265, which are free to slide in the usual 1 slots in the actuating lever 26I to provide a relative movement between the lever 26I and the rack 262 when it is necessary to make a carry or transfer in the totalizer, to be described hereinafter.
Projecting forwardly from the lever 26I and integral therewith is an arm 26 6 having a slot 261,
into which projects a pin 268 carried by an arm 269- pivotally mounted on a shaft 210 supported by the side frames 36 and 3 I.
Pi-voted on the shaft 266 adjacent the rack lever 26I is a diverging lever 21I having a rearwardly extending arm 212, which is connected to a printer mechanism to be described hereinafter.
The diverging lever 21I also has a forwardly extending arm 213 having a slot 214, into which projects the previously described pin 268. This pin 268 normally acts, during adding operations,
- totaling operations, and sub-totaling operations, to couple the actuating rack lever 26I to the diverging lever 21I so that they will move in unison. Pivoted on a stud 215, carried by the diverging lever 21I, is the usual stop bar 216, which projects forwardly beneath all of the amount keys I20 in its associated bank and is guided near its front end in a slot in the tie plate 39. The stop her 216 is also in alinement with the zero stop pawl'l33, as shown in Fig. 3. The stop bar 216 is provided with the usual stop shoulders 211 to cooperate with the stems of the amount keys I26, so that a spring 216, attached to the stop -bar 216, may differentially position the stop bar under control of the depressed key in the bank associated with said bar. depressed, then the forward end of the stop bar 216 contacts the zero stop I33, which remains in the position shown in Fig. 3 when no key in its associated bank is depressed.
' When the stop bar 216 is moved forwardly or to the left, as shown in Fig. 2, by its spring 218 differentially as determined by the key I26, which is depressed, the diverging lever 2' is rocked counter-clockwise, whereby the arm 212 thereof of the key.l20, which has been depressed.
Normally the actuating lever 26I and the diverging lever 21I are held in the positions shown] by restoring bar 28I, which is secured to an lli l ll ls i izl.anci n a m ig- 8? 96 1 When no key in a bank isof which are secured to the shaft 260. The arm 203 has an integral arm 284, to which is pivoted a driving pitman 205, the rear or right end of which, as viewed in Fig. 18, is slotted to surround a collar on the shaft 15. This pitman 285 carries a roller 286, held by a spring 280 in contact with a cam 281 secured to the drive shaft 16. The spring 288 is connected to the arm land to a hook (not shown) connected to the shaft 16.
As has been previously described, it will be recalled that the shaft 16 receives first a counterclockwise movement and then a clockwise movement to its normal position. During the counterclockwise movement of the shaft 16, the cam 281 is moved likewise, and the spring 200' causesthe roller 2895' toiollow a surface 289 of the cam 281, thus rocking the arms 233 and 282 counter-clockwise to move the bail 2BI to the left, as viewed in Fig. 2, whereupon the spring 218 may move the diverging lever 21I and the actuating lever 26I counter-clockwise different distances, depending upon the value of the key I20 depressed in that particular bank.
To insure that the arms 2B2 andv 283 get their full counter-clockwise movement, the pitman 205 has a, roller 230, which is contacted by a surface 29I of the cam 281 should the spring 263 fail to rock the arms 203 and 282 their fullest extent counter-clockwise.
The timing of the rocking of these arms 282 and 203 is so arranged that it occurs immediately after the totalizer, to be described hereinafter, is disengaged from the actuating racks 262.
As the drive shaft 16 is restored clockwise to its normal position, the cam 281, through the: pitman 285, rocks the arms 282 and 283 clockwise to their normal positions, as shown in Figs. 2 and 18, whereupon the bail 2BI positively restores to normal position any and all of the diverging levers HI and actuating levers 26I which have been differentially positioned under control of depressed keys in their associated banks. 1
The bail 28I carries the usual alinin bar 232,- having the usual alining notches (not shown herein but shown in the above-mentioned Peters Patent No. 1,386,021).
In the machine shown embodying the present invention, as illustrated in Fig. 1, there are eight banks of amount keys, and therefore there are eight complete sets of differential units, each unit including the diilerentially adjustable rack lever 26I and its rack 262 and transfer mechanism, the erentially adjustable diverging lever 21I, and the stop bar 216.
Therefore, from the above description it can be clearly seen that, when the rack levers 26I, their racks 262, and the diverging lever 21I are. rotated counter-clockwise different distances, depending upon the value of the keys I20 depressed. in the rows associated with the particular differential unit, the printing bars, to be described hereinafter, will be differentially positioned by the arms 212, after which the printing hammers, to be described hereinafter, are released to cause the amount so set up by the arms 212 to be printed upon the tape around the platen of the printing mechanism.
Now, when the restoring bail 28I is moved clockwise back to its normal position by the pitman 285 (Fig. 18), the rear edge of said bail contacts all of the differentially adjustable rack levers 26I that have been moved out of their normal positi'onsunder control of depressed keys,
levers 21 I, which have been likewise differentially moved, and restores them to their normal positions. The arms 212 of the diverging levers restore the printing bars to their normal positions. and, during the clockwise movement of the rack levers 2H to normal position, the racks 232 add into their associated totalizer wheels the amounts corresponding to the values of the keys which have been depressed.
TOTALIZER The totalizer in the machine embodying the present. invention is substantially the same as that shown in the above-mentioned Peters and White patents, and therefore it has not been thought necessary to go into a full detailed description or illustration of the same in this application. For a full description of the totalizer and the carry or transfer mechanism associated therewith, reference may be had to the abovementioned Peters and White patents.
In the present invention, the totaiizer includes a totalizer Wheel 300 for each of the denominational orders of amount keys I20. This wheel 300 is turnably mounted on a totalizer shaft 30I. Secured to each of the totalizer wheels 300 is a pinion 302 normally in mesh with its associated actuating rack 252, as shown in Fig. 2.
The totalizer wheels 300, the pinion 302, and the shaft 30I are supported by a frame consisting of a pair of arms 303 and 304 (Figs. 2, 5, and 15) connected together at their front ends by a rod 305 pivotally mounted on the trunnions I21 (Fig. 2) and I28 (Fig. 8), which have been described previously. To make the totalizer frame more rigid, there is another connecting rod 306, which is secured to the pair of arms 303 and 304.
This frame, consisting of the arms 303 and 304 and the rods 365 and 336, is mounted for rocking movement on the trunnions I21 and I28 by means to be described hereinafter. Normally it is in such a position that the pinions 302 are in engagement with the racks 262, as shown in Fig. 2. The reading characters on the totalizer wheels 300.are visible through an opening in a plate 301, which is carried by the arms 303 and 304 so as to rock with the totalizer frame.
The usual aliner 308 is rigidly mounted on rods 309 and 3I0, carried by the machine side frames 30' and 3|, and is in such a position that, when the frame arms 303 and 304 are rocked to disengage the pinions 302 from the racks 262, said pinions will automatically engage the aliner 300', there being one for each denominational order of the totalizer, to properly aline the pinions and totalizer wheels 360 while they are disengaged from the actuating racks 262.
The direction of addition in the totalizer shown herein is in a counter-clockwise direction, as will be readily observed from the previous description of the differential mechanism.
In other words,when the differential rack 252' is moved to the left under the control of its spring 218, the totalizer pinions 302 at that time are disengaged from the racks 262. After the racks have been set, the pinions 302 are again. engaged therewith, and the restoring bail 28I restores the racks 262 through their supporting.
levers 2, thus causing the amount to be positively added into the totalizer wheels 300. It is thought that the above description of the totalizer will be sufiicient in view of the illustration and description in the Peters and White patents and also contacts the edges of the diverging 7s abovementioned.
amen
Transfer or carry mechanism Whenever one of the totalizer Wheels 300 pass-es through zero, a carry or transfer mechanism is put into effect, which is fully illustrated and described in the above-mentioned Peters patent, so that thewheel 3030f next higher denominational order will beadvanced one step. The transfer -.mechanism will be briefly described. The stop plate 263 is secured to the rack 262' and normally contacts a lip 3-I I of a transfer lever 3| 2, as shown in Figs. 2 and 4.
This transfer lever. 3 I 2 has a bail 3 I 3, by means of which said lever 3.I2 is pivoted on a rod 3I4 carried by the severalaliners 368. A spring 3I5,
connected to the lever 3I2 and to a latch 3I6,
holds the lever 3I2 up against a flange 3 I 7 on the latch 3 I 6'. This latch 3 I 6 has a bail 3I8, by means of which said latch is pivoted on a rod 3I9 carriedby the aliners 308.
The forward endof the transfer lever 3I2 has a flange-329 inthe path of movement of a transfer cam 32I secured to. the left side of the totalizer wheel 300.
When the totalizer wheel 300 passes from 9 to 0, its transfer cam 32'I, as it is turning counterclockwise (Fig. 4), contacts the flange 323 and rocks the. lever. 3 I 2-counter-clockwise, thus lowering. the lip 3-I I' out of the path of the plate 263, :and, at the same time, the spring 3I5 rocks the latch 3 I 6 counter-clockwise, whereupon the flange 3H is moved above a. shoulder 322 of the lever 3I2 to latch thelever in its tripped position. As
the lip-3l I is lowered, the spring 264 moves the actuating rack 262, associated with the wheel 300 of next higher order, one step to turn in a transfer or carry. This one step of movement of. the rack262 iscontrolled' by contact of the end of the plate 263 with a shoulder 323 formed up on the lip 3i I.
As will be describedhereinafter, the totalizer is disengaged from the racks 262' at the very beginning of the machine operation by rocking the frame 303-304 counter-celockwise. When this occurs, all tripped latches 3 l 6 are restored to normal positions by the rear ends of partition plates 324, which main line with and contact a finger 325 on each ofthe tripped latches 3I6, and. rock said latches clockwise. When'the totalizer is disengaged from'theracks 262', they are immediately .movediforwardly, as described above, whereupon the stop plates 263'are moved from above the lips 3| I.
rock the tripped transfer levers 3I2 clockwise to normal to positionthe shoulders 322 behind the flanges 3II of the latches 3I6 and also to position the lips 3 directly behind the stop plates 263.
The racks 262 are now in proper positions either to add into or to subtract from the totalizer Wheels 330 any amount set up on the keyboard.
SUBTRACTING MECHANISM Therefore the springs 3I5, being ten sloned by the restoring of the tripped latches 3 I 6,
18 330 turn in thesame direction for subtracting a number therefrom astheydofor adding anumber thereto. The entire control for subtracting is through. the differentialmechanism,and this control. will. now bedescribed. Since the subtracting devices for eachdifferential are substantially thesame, the subtracting device for one differential unit will. be described inv detail;
Secured. to eachof the stop bars 216 (Fig. 2) is a bar 323i having a gooseneck 332: carrying a pin 333', whichprojects beneath the stop bar 216, as clearly shown inFig. 5. Secured to. each of the arms 269 by a sleeve or hub connection is a subtract stop arm 333 adapted-to cooperate with the pin amann-er tobe described hereinafter. A. spring 335 connects the subtract stop arm 334 with its associated diverging lever 21 I.
As shown in Fig. 5, thestop arm 334 is normally out of the path ofthe pin 333, and consequently, when the. arm 269 and is associated stoparm 33 3 are rocked clockwise in adding operations, as has been previously. described, the arm 33.4passes by the pin 333'when this arm 334 is rockeddifferent distances under control of the stop bar 216. During adding operations, this is merely an idle movement of the stop arm 334. 4
However, during subtraction operations, this arm 3331s moved to the right (Fig. 5) by means to be descrlbed-hereinaftenw put it in the path of. travel of the pin 333. In. other words, all of the arms 334, their associated arms 269 and the shaft 213 are movedto the right. This movement of the arms 269 dlsengages their studs 238 from the arms 273 of the diverging levers 21 I.
The arm 33 associatedwith the units order is normally set to the-complement of ten with respect to the pin 333, whereby displacement of .the rack lever 26 I will always be to the tens complement ofzero or the tens: complement of any number set up by the units keys I20. All the rest of the stop arms 334 are normally set to the complement of nine with respect to the pins 333 in their associated denominational orders, whereby displacement of their associated rack levers 26.! will be to the nines complement of zero'or the nines complement of any number set up by the associated bank of keys I29. This simply means that, when nothing is subtracted from the units order, ten will be added thereto and cause a transfer or carry into the next higher denominational order, with'the following result: If 30 is subtracted from zero, 10 will be added into the units order, and 6. or the nines complement. of 3 will be added in the tens order, sothat the tens totalizer wheel will show not 6 but 7, due to a carry from the units order over into the tens order. Each of the higher denominational wheels will show 9, because all of the arms 334 above the units ordercause. their rack levers 26I to be displaced-nine steps when nothing is subtracted, and therefore 9 will be added to these wheels 30!], thus showing the tens complement of the number on the. totalizer' wheels 30!). In other words, when 30 is. subtracted from nothing,
. the totalizer will show 99999970, which repre sents the tens complement of 30.
Assuming that the denominational order in Fig; 2 is other than theunits order, to subtract 3 from this denominational unit, the operator depresses the 3 key I20and then depresses the subtract key I62, which; by means to be described hereinafter; will cause the shaft 210 and the arm-334 to be moved so that the arm 334 will be in thepath of the pin 333. Now, when the bail 28I is; moved to the left in the manner :previously described, the stop bar 216 will move to the left and the diverging lever 21I will be moved with it a distance of three steps, under control of the 3 key, which has been depressed,
because this key will control the stopping of the stop bar 216 and consequently of the diverging lever 21I, whereupon the type bar will be set to have 3 printed therefrom. However, since the coupling pin 268 has been disengaged from the slot 214 in the diverging lever arm 213, the arm 269 and the stop arm 334 will be rocked in a clockwise direction under the influence of a spring 335, connected to the arm 334 and the diverging lever 21I, until the stop arm 334 con- .tacts the pin 333, which in this particular instance is six steps of movement, or the nines complement of 3. Since the coupling pin 268 is still in engagement with the slot 261 of the arm 266 on the rack lever 26I, said rack lever will be .rocked counter-clockwise six steps under the control of the pin 333 and arm 334 associated .with the stop bar 216, which has been set three pling pin 260 from the diverging lever arm 213,
and at the same time move the stop arm 334 into the path of the subtract control pin 333, will now be described. To shift the shaft 210, it is necessary to rock it clockwise, and this rocking of the shaft 210 is also under the control of the subtract key I62.
Pivotally mounted upon the shaft 210 (Figs. and 8) is a bell crank 340 carrying a roller 34I cooperating with a finger 342 of a lever 343 pivoted upon a screw stud 344 secured to the right side frame 3|. The lever 343 carries a roller 345 normally resting in a notch 346 of the drive plate I03. During each operation of the machine, whether it be an add operation or a subtract operation, the operating plate I03 rocks the lever 343 clockwise, causing the roller 345 to ride on a surface 341 of the drive plate I03, with the result that the finger 342, through the roller 34I, rocks the bell crank 340 clockwise. A spring 348 maintains the roller 34I against the finger 342. When the drive plate I03 returns to its normal position, so that the roller 345 is opposite the notch 346, the spring 340 rocks the bell crank 340 counter-clockwise, thus rocking the lever 343 counter-clockwise to position the roller 345 back into the notch 346.
This bell crank 340 carries a stud 350, upon which is pivoted a latch 35I, having a finger 352 held against a stud 353 of a lever 354, pivoted on the stud I42, by a spring 355 connected to a pin on the bell crank. 340 and a flange 356 on the latch 35I. A spring 351 holds a roller 358 on the lever 354 normally in the position shown in Fig. 8 in contact with the under side of a finger 359 on the subtract key stem I61. Secured to the shaft 210 is an arm 360 having a shoulder 36I adapted to cooperate with the flange 356 of the latch 35I.
When it is desired to subtract the number set up on the keyboard, the operator depresses the subtract key I62, whereupon the finger 359 thereof, by its, contact with the roller 356, rocks the lever 354 clockwise, thus removing the pin 353 from the finger 352 of the latch 35I, whereupon the spring 355 rocks the latch 35I counter-clockwise, moving the flange 356 beneath the shoulder 36I of the arm 366. Consequently, when the bell crank 346 i rocked clockwise by the drive plate I03 in a manner previously described, the arm 360 and the shaft 210 will likewise receive this clockwise movement.
When the arm 360 is coupled to the bell crank 340 in the manner just described, to rock the shaft 210, an arm 362 (Fig. 11), secured to the left end of the shaft 210, also receives this clockwise movement. This arm 362 carries a roller 363 engaging a cam slot 364 (Fig. 5) in a bracket 365 secured to the left side frame 30. This cam slot 364 is of such a shape that, when the arm 362 is rocked clockwise, the cam slot 364 will cause the shaft 210 and all the parts thereon to be shifted to the right, as viewed in Fig. 5, for the purpose of bringing the stop arms 334 in the paths of movement of the pins 333 and for the purpose of uncouplin the rack levers 26I from the diverging levers 21I.
Whenever the arm 360 is coupled to the bell crank 340 by the subtract latch 35I, there is provided a means to restore these parts to their normal positions at the end of the subtract operation of the machine. This means includes a stud 366 (Fig. 8) carried by the arm 360, which is engaged by a lever 361 pivoted on the screw stud 344. This lever 361 is held against the stud 366 by a spring 368 and has a roller 366 normally resting in a notch 310 in the drive plate I03.
When the drive plate I03 is rocked counterclockwise, a surface 31I between the notches 310 and 346 is such as to permit the stud 366 to rock the lever 361 counter-clockwise, while the arm 360 is being rotated clockwise by the latch 35I.
The surface 341 being nearer the center I00 than is the surface 31I, the lever 361 can be rocked still farther counter-clockwise as the arm 360 continues its full clockwise movement. Near the end of the operation, when the drive plate I03 is restored to normal position, the cam surface 31I rocks the lever 361 clockwise, whereupon it, through the stud 366, positively rocks the arm 360 counter-clockwise to its normal position. Assistthis movement is a spring 312 (Fig. 11) connected to an arm 313, which is fast on the left end of the shaft 210. This arm 313 carries a stop plate 314 adapted to strike a rubber bumper 315 carried by a bracket 316 on the side frame 30. This rubber bumper 315 absorbs the shock of the subtracting mechanism when it is restored to its home position, and at the same time reduces the noise.
From the above description it will be very clear that, whenever the subtract key I62 is depressed to subtract an amount set up on the amount keys I20, the latch 35I is released so as to couple the arm 360 to the driven bell crank 340 to cause the subtract stop arms 334 to control the differential mechanism whereby the amount on the keyboard will be subtracted from the totalizer by a process of complementary addition.
TOTALIZER ENGAGING MECHANISM As has been previously stated, the totalizer pinions 302 are normally in engagement with the actuating racks 262, as shown in Fig. 2.
During adding operations, the first thing that happens is that the totalizer is disengaged from the actuators,- the actuators are differentially gnaw 21 positioned, the totalizer is. then engaged therewith, and the. actuatorslare positively restored to their normal positions to add into the/totalizer the. amount corresponding to the value. of the keys depressed.
,1. However, as has been mentioned. above, when subtracting, the complementary amount is added .into the totalizer undercontrol of the mechanism described under the. heading of Subtracting mechanism.
During total-taking operations, the machine is put through twomachine. cycles, the first.,-cyc1e being for the purpose of restoring any tripped transfer devices that. might have been tripped during the preceding operatitm.v of the machine,
and then, during the second cycle, the, totalizer is left engaged withthe actuating. racks while the racks are moved counter-clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 2, so that the amount that was onthe totalizer, will betaken therefrom inthe manner described in theabove-mentioned Peters Patent .No, 1,386 ,02l, and the totalizer is then disengaged with the racks while the racks are restored to their normal positions, thus putting back into the totalizer the amount that was taken therefrom. The means for accomplishing the above results will be described under the various headings.
* Firstwill be described the general totalizer engaging and disengaging mechanism. Referrin particularly to Figs. 15 and 18, the arm 394 of the'totalizer frame has an integral arm 385 carrying a roller 383; which projects into a. cam slot 391 of a totalizer engaging lever 38B pivotally mounted on a stud 389 supported by the right side frame 31. Pivoted on the stud 389 adjacent the totalizer engaging lever 388 is a lever 399 having a pin 391 contacting a surface 392 of an arm 393 of the lever 398.
' The upper end of the lever 399 carries a stud 394, upon which is pivoted a couplin pawl 395 heldin engagement with a stud 386 on the arm 393by a spring 391.
The lower end of the lever 399 has a stud 398 engaged by a notched pitman 399, which in turn is pivoted to the upper end of a bell crank 499 pivoted on a stud 491 mounted in the right side frame3l.
The pitman 399 is held in engagement with the stud 398 against the action of a spring 492, by arm 493 of a bellcrank 494 pivoted on a stud 495 carried by the side frame 31. A spring 496 holds the arm 493 in contact with a stud 491 of'an arm 498 integral with the pitman 399.
The bell crank 499 also carries a stud 499, which cooperates with a shoulder 419 of a toggle link 411 pivoted at 412 to a toggle arm 413 secured to the rear drive shaft 16. This toggle arm 413 is also connected by a stud 414 to the pre--' viously mentioneddrive plate I91 (Fig. 8) and has a spring 4l5connected thereto, which holds the link 411 against the stud 499. Itwill be recalled that the shaft 16 receives first a counter-clockwise movement and then a clockwise movement to its normal position.
When the shaft ismoved' counter-clockwise, the
toggle arm 413 moves likewise, carryin with it the-toggle link 411, until the'shoulder419 contacts'thestud 499 and rocks the bell crank 499 counter-clckwise until the center of the pivot 412 passes to the left of a line from thecenter of the stud 499 to the center of the shaft 16.
"The counter-clockwise movement of the bell crank 499 moves the-pitman 399-to the left and rocks the lever 399 clockwise, whereupon the pin 391, through its engagement with the arm 393, rocks thearm 393 and engaging lever 389 clockwise, and the cam, slot 391, through the roller 386, rocks the totalizer frame 393-494 counterclockwise to disengage the totalizer pinions 392 fromthe actuator racks 292.
After this disengagement of the totalizer from the racks 262, the racks are differentially positioned in the manner described previously. After they have been so positioned, and prior to their restoration to normal positions, the left side of. the toggle link 41 1, as viewed in Fig. 15, strikes a stud 415 carriedby an arm 411 integral with thebell crank 49 9. i
Thisoccurs as the toggle arm 413 nears the-end ofv itscounter-clockwise movement. As it about reaches the end of its counter-clockwise move- .inent, a shoulder 418 of the toggle link 411 is positioned beneath the stud 419 by the spring 4.15,..after which the clockwise movement of the toggle arm 413. toits normal position begins, whereuponthe shoulder 418, by its contact with the stud 4.16, rocks the arm 411 and-consequently the bell crank. 499 clockwise, thus moving the pitman 399 to the right, which rocks the lever 399 counter-clockwise to its normal position, whereupon the coupling pawl 395, through its engagementwith the pin 396, rocks the engaging lever 388. counter-clockwise to its normal position, andthe cam slot 381 rocks the totalizer frame. 39.3394. clockwise to again engage the .totalizer pinions 392 with the actuator racks 262'. After this'engagement, the racks 262 are restored to, their normal positions in a clockwise direction (Fig. 2) by the restoring bail'28l in a manner previously described, whereupon the amount which was set upon the keyboard is entered into the totalizer.
To positively insure that the engaging and disengaging lever ,389is restored counter-clockwise to its full normal position, this lever carries a stud 419', which is normally in the position shown inFig. 15. At the beginning of the counter clockwise movement of the shaft 19, it will be recalled, the main drive shaft 199 is rocked counter-clockwise, whereupon an arm 429, secured to the main drive shaft I99, is moved counter-clockwise away from the stud 419 to allow the lever 38% to be rocked clockwise in the manner previously described. As the shaft 199 is restored clockwise to its normal position, the arm 429 contacts the stud 419 if the coupling pawl 395 should fail to rock the lever 398 counterclockwise to its full normal position, and positively restores said lever 398 to its normal position.
As viewed in Fig. 15, it can be seen that this arm 429 is-just contacting the stud 419 in the normal positions of the parts, and therefore, if the coupling pawl 395 fully restores the lever 39:8 counter-clockwise, then the arm 429 has no work to do during adding operations except to" hold the lever 389 in its normal position once it is restored to that position by the coupling pawl 395.
the side frame 3|.
vtuators.
aseaom 23 To assist in maintaining the totalizer engaging and disengaging lever 388, and consequently the totalizer, in their various positions of adjustment, the lever 388 carries a stud 43l, upon which is :pivoted an alining pawl 432 having notches 433 and 434 cooperating with a stud 435 carried by A spring 436 normally holds the notch 433 in engagement with the stud 435 when the totalizer is in engagement with the ac- When the lever 386 is rocked clockwise to disengage the totalizer from the actuators in the manner described above, the notch 433 is cammed off of the stud 435, and the notch 434 engages the stud to hold the totalizer in its disengaged position while the actuator racks 262 are being differentially adjusted prior to adding.
When the lever 388 is moved counter-clockwise to its normal position, the pawl 432 is pulled to the right, as viewed in Fig. 15, into the position shown, wherein the notch 433 again engages the stud 435.
There is also an alining device associated with the arm M1 and the bell crank 400. The arm 4|1 has notches 431 and 438, and, in the normal positions of the parts, as shown in Fig. 15, a stud 439, carried by an arm 440 pivoted on a stud I carried by the side frame 3|, is held in engagement with the notch 431 by a torsion spring 442, to hold the bell crank 400 and the arm M1 in their normal positions. When the bell crank 400 and the arm 4|1 are rocked counter-clockwise, the arm 44!] is rocked so that the stud 439 will bob from the notch 431 into the upper notch 436 to hold the bell crank and the arm M1 in their moved position, which is the position in which the totalizer is disengaged from the actuators, and will retain it in that position until the shoulder 4|8 of the toggle link 4 contacts the stud MB of the arm M1 and rocks said arm clockwise back to its normal position, at which time the stud 439 will again be engaged with the alining notch 431 of said arm. From the above description it will be very clear how the totalizer is moved into engagement with and disengaged from the actuator racks 262 for the purpose of adding.
When subtracting, the totalizer is disengaged from and engaged with the actuator racks 262 in exactly the same manner and by exactly the same means as has just been described for adding operations.
For total-taking operations-that is, for taking the total from the totalizer and leaving it clear at the end of the operation of the machine there is provided special mechanism for controlling the time of the engaging and disengaging of the totalizer by the engaging lever 388, under control of the total key |64.
Totalizing control of totalizer engaging mechanism For a total-taking operation, it is necessary, as above mentioned, that the machine be put through two machine cycles, the first of which is to restore to normal any tripped transfer devices which may have been tripped during the last preceding adding or subtracting operation. This first machine cycle is often referred to as an idle cycle.
In many machines on the market, this first cycle is made by operating the so-called touch bar, or motor release bar, wherein the machine genes through an idle operation, after which it is necessary for the operator to then depress the total key to make a total.
However, in the present invention, all that it is necessary for the operator to do is to depress the total key 54, and the machine will automatically perform a two machine cycle operation.
Depression of the total key I64 releases the machine, and the totalizer, being normally in engagement with the actuator racks 262, as has been previously described, is first disengaged from the racks 262 on the regular adding time and is then later engaged with the racks 262 on adding time. All of this happens during the first machine cycle of the operation, during which time any of the previously tripped transfer devices are restored to their normal positions during the very first part of this operation.
During this first machine cycle, the actuating levers 26| and the diverging levers 21| are prevented from being moved in a counter-clockwise direction beyond the zero position due to the fact that the zero stops I33 (Fig. 3) are retained in their normal positions, thus preventing any indexing movement of the stop bars 216 and consequently of the actuating levers 26| and the diverging levers 21|.
It is during this first machine cycle of the operation that the automatic means comes into effect for automatically releasing the machine for the second cycle of the operation, which will be a totalizing cycle to clear the totalizer and print the amount taken therefrom. It might be stated here that, near the end of the first or idle cycle, the total key I64 is released and restored to its normal position, and this is the reason for the automatic releasing of the machine for the sec- 0nd or clearing cycle of the total-taking operation. Otherwise it would be necessary to depress the total key I64 again. The means for releasing the machine for operation upon depression of the total key I64 will now be described.
It will be recalled that, to release the machine for operation, it is necessary to rock the lever I99 clockwise to allow the counter-clockwise movement of the arm I91 (Fig. 5) under the action of its spring I96, all of which has been fully de-, scribed in the early part of this application.
When the total key I64 is depressed, its stud 223 contacts and rocks the lever 229 clockwise, which in turn rocks the lever 22| counter-clockwise, whereupon its finger 2|5, through the stud 2| rocks the lever I99 clockwise to release the arm I91 for movement toward the right (Fig. 6) to close the motor switch in the manner previously described.
During this operation, as above mentioned, since none of the keys I20 are depressed, the zero stops I33 are permitted to remain in their normal positions, so that, after the totalizer is disengaged from the racks 262, the springs 218 on the stop bars cannot move the stop bars 216 forwardly beyond their zero-positions, as they do during adding operations.
During this first cycle, the pitman 399 (Fig. 15) is moved first to the left and then to the right, in the manner previously described, by the toggle link 4| and the toggle arm M3 to first disengage the totalizer from the actuator racks and then engage it with the actuator racks.
Also, during this first machine cycle of the total-taking operation, the following mechanism comes into play or operation, so that the machine will be automatically released for the second machine cycle of a total-taking operation, during which second machine cycle, and as above stated,
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Cited By (4)

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US2730039A (en) * 1956-01-10 werner
US2760722A (en) * 1956-08-28 Two-total credit balance adding
US2792176A (en) * 1951-09-20 1957-05-14 Victor Adding Machine Co Motor switch operating mechanism for calculating machines
US2800074A (en) * 1957-07-23 imprinting control mechanism in listing machines

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US1813037A (en) * 1931-07-07 Rack controlling means for calculating machines
US1986137A (en) * 1926-08-26 1935-01-01 Brunsviga Maschinenwerke Grimme Natalis & Co Ag Adding machine
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US2034062A (en) * 1932-02-01 1936-03-17 United Shoe Machinery Corp Driving mechanism
US2068579A (en) * 1932-02-27 1937-01-19 George B Ingersoll Control mechanism for clutches
US2121683A (en) * 1936-12-29 1938-06-21 Gardner Company Calculating machine
US2221686A (en) * 1937-04-30 1940-11-12 Monroe Caleulating Machine Com Calculating machine
US2308292A (en) * 1939-04-28 1943-01-12 Underwood Elliott Fisher Co Computing machine
US2320399A (en) * 1943-06-01 Computing machine
US2330689A (en) * 1941-11-29 1943-09-28 Monroe Calculating Machine Register
US2361002A (en) * 1944-10-24 Computing machine

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2361002A (en) * 1944-10-24 Computing machine
US1580492A (en) * 1926-04-13 Assigitob
US1813037A (en) * 1931-07-07 Rack controlling means for calculating machines
US2320399A (en) * 1943-06-01 Computing machine
US978168A (en) * 1910-05-06 1910-12-13 Burroughs Adding Machine Co Adding-machine.
US1986137A (en) * 1926-08-26 1935-01-01 Brunsviga Maschinenwerke Grimme Natalis & Co Ag Adding machine
US2034062A (en) * 1932-02-01 1936-03-17 United Shoe Machinery Corp Driving mechanism
US2068579A (en) * 1932-02-27 1937-01-19 George B Ingersoll Control mechanism for clutches
US2017641A (en) * 1933-12-30 1935-10-15 Victor Adding Machine Co Safety driving mechanism and current breaker therefor
US2121683A (en) * 1936-12-29 1938-06-21 Gardner Company Calculating machine
US2221686A (en) * 1937-04-30 1940-11-12 Monroe Caleulating Machine Com Calculating machine
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US2330689A (en) * 1941-11-29 1943-09-28 Monroe Calculating Machine Register

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2730039A (en) * 1956-01-10 werner
US2760722A (en) * 1956-08-28 Two-total credit balance adding
US2800074A (en) * 1957-07-23 imprinting control mechanism in listing machines
US2792176A (en) * 1951-09-20 1957-05-14 Victor Adding Machine Co Motor switch operating mechanism for calculating machines

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