US2559228A - Electric wall incinerator - Google Patents

Electric wall incinerator Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2559228A
US2559228A US784892A US78489247A US2559228A US 2559228 A US2559228 A US 2559228A US 784892 A US784892 A US 784892A US 78489247 A US78489247 A US 78489247A US 2559228 A US2559228 A US 2559228A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
firebox
depressing
ignition
handle
switch
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US784892A
Inventor
Anton H Riebschlager
Original Assignee
Anton H Riebschlager
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Anton H Riebschlager filed Critical Anton H Riebschlager
Priority to US784892A priority Critical patent/US2559228A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2559228A publication Critical patent/US2559228A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G5/00Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor
    • F23G5/08Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor having supplementary heating
    • F23G5/10Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor having supplementary heating electric

Description

y 3, 1951 A. H. RIEBSCHLAGER 2,559,228
ELECTRIC WALL INCINERATOR Filed Nov. 8, 194'! 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 1
mmvroza: A/v ro/v H 9/55 SCHLA 6B9 July 3, 1951 A. H. RlE BSCHLAGER 2,559,228
ELECTRIC WALL INCINERATOR Filed Nov. 8, 194'? 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.
ATTORNEYS.
Patented July 3, 1951 UNITED STATES FATENT OFFICE ELECTRIC WALL INCINERATOR Anton H. Riebschlager, Fresno, Calif. Application November 8, 1947, Serial No. 784,892
2 Claims.
The present invention relates to incinerators and more particularly to wall incinerators directed to the prompt, sanitary, and convenient disposal of combustible material in relatively small quantities.
The problems of sanitary and convenient disposition of disposable tissue are of quite general human experience. These and other problems and inconveniences are encountered in aggravated form in the disposal of catamenial devices. The inconveniences and embarrassment incident to such disposal are of common knowledge and are testified to by the frequent clogging of plumbing in homes, rest rooms, and other places frequented by the public.
An object of the present invention i to alleviate this frequent clogging of plumbing fixtures and drainage pipes by the provision of an improved means for disposing of catamenial devices, disposable tissue, and other combustible material in relatively small quantities.
Another object is to provide an improved compact incinerator adapted to be received between opposite surfaces of a supporting wall, particularly walls of bathrooms, rest rooms, and the like.
Another object is to provide a wall incinerator suited for use in homes, stores, oflices, and other buildings as well as trains, buses, and other means of conveyance, which readily admit and consumes disposable tissue and the like in sanitary and convenient manner.
Another object is to provide a convenient, eflicient, and sanitary means for disposing of catamenial devices.
Another object is to provide a simple, safe, and effective means adapted to be built into a supporting Wall for disposing of combustible material in relatively small quantities.
Other objects and advantages will become apparent in the further description in the specification.
In the drawings:
Fig. l is a front view of a device of the present invention shown mounted in a fragmentarily il lustrated supporting wall.
Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a device embodying the principles of the present invention, having a faceplate thereof removed to reveal normally concealed features of the present invention.
Fig. 3 is a section taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2.
Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the device, having a portion of the side wall thereof removed to reveal relationships between internal elements of the incinerator and external elements thereof while said elements are in normal position.
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary side elevation of the incinerator illustrating the insertion of catamenial devices into the same.
Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5 but showing the incinerator closed, the catamenial device positioned therein for dehydration and burning, and relative positioning of elements of the invention at the initiation of said dehydration and burning.
Fig. 7 is similar to Figs. 5 and 6 but shows a relationship of elements of the incinerator near the completion of the combustion of the catamential devices.
Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic representation of an electrical circuit employed in the first form of the present invention.
Fig. 9 is a second form of the present invention in which a continuously burning pilot light is employed to dehydrate and ignite combustible material.
Fig. 10 is a fragmentary illustration of a supporting wall showing mounted therein a third form of the present invention.
Referring in greater detail to the drawings:
In Fig. l, a supporting wall, in which the device of the present invention is mounted, is indicated generally at H]. The wall preferably has sufiicient thicknes to receive and conceal the device of the present invention except for portions thereof shown in full line in Fig. 1, and presently more fully described. In its most popular size, the device of the present invention is adapted to be received by a wall of conventional frame building. Such buildings are usually framed with two by four studs, usually 3% inches thick, and provide suflicient room for the device of the present invention.
A substantially erect firebox II, is shown in Figs. 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7, having a front wall I2, a rear wall 43, and oppositely disposed side walls 14 and I5 respectively. The rear wall and side walls are provided with insulation shields l6 of asbestos or other suitable material. To be received by a wall of a frame building havin 3 inch studs, the overall thickness of the firebox from the front of the front wall to the rear of the insulation of the rear wall is preferably slightly less than 3 inches. Attention is called to the conventional spacing of studs 18 inches from center to center in walls of typical frame buildings which provides ample space for the firebox of the present invention which may be of any suitable width for the purpose and may be mounted between the studs in spaced relation thereto. Such mounting is conveniently accomplished by means of ears I! laterally ex- .wardly disposed the firebox.
tended from the lower end portion of the firebox as by screwing or bolting the ears to a transverse brace interconnecting adjacent studs in a supporting wall, such as a fire stop is of Fig; 1.
An ash collecting drawer i9 is slideably proprovided in the lower end portion of the firebox and is preferably of a structure conveniently removed for the dumping of ashes collected therein. The drawer is provided with a handle 28 for purposes of convenience and has a plurality of air openings 2i formed therethrough to feed combustion occuring in the firebox, as will presently be more fully explained.
The upper end portion of the firebox ii is preferably constricted as at 22 and provided with a vent pipe 23 extending upwardly therefrom for venting to the atmosphere.
A substantially rectangular opening 30 is provided in the front wall E2 of the firebox near the upper end portion thereof. The opening is of a size and shape adapted to receive catamenial devices and smaller articles but not sufficiently large to invite the burning of large quantities of combustible material in the incinerator. The opening is normally closed by means of a door 3| pivotally mounted in the firebox near the upper edge of the opening for pivotal movement inwardly and upwardly of the firebox. The door is preferably provided with flanges 32 extended therefrom and overlaying the front wall in- The fianges provide improved seating of the door in sealing relation to the opening.
A dehydrating and ignition element 35 is provided in a substantially horizontal position within the firebox at a level below the opening 3B and intermediate said opening and the ash drawer IS. The ignition element conveniently takes the form of an electrical heating element, as shown in Fig. 3. The ignition element is mounted in any convenient manner as by winding a wire of electrical conducting but resisting material on clay cores 36 which preferably are in spaced arrangement so that ashes may readily fall therethrough.
A depressing or follow-up member 38 is pivotally mounted in the firebox as at 39, at a position intermediate the ignition element 35 and the opening 3?! for pivotal movement between a position overlaying the ignition element, as shown in Fig. i, and a substantially erect position adjacent the rear wall 13, as shown in dotted line in Fig. 5. The member 33 functions as a depressing means for urging combustible material downwardly in continuous contact with the ignition element until consumed. The depressing member is preferably formed of arms 4i extended from the pivotal mounting 39 and a transverse element il interconnecting the extended end portions of the arms and providing additional weight tending to urge the member downwardly. The depressing member is of an open structure impeding combustion of any combustible material in the incinerator to a minimum extent while urging said material downwardly toward the ignition element. To funnel combustible material downwardly onto the ignition element, fianges 42 are mounted on the side walls l4 and I and extended downwardly and inwardly therefrom.
As previously mentioned, the door 3i is pivotally mounted in the firebox near the upper edge of the opening is for pivotal movement inwardly and upwardly of the firebox. A handle 43 is provided at the side M of the firebox in controlling relation to the door and other elements of the present invention presently more fully described. Controlled interconnection of the handle and the door Si is conveniently accomplished by journaling a rod i l transversely in the firebox adjacent the upper edge of the opening. The door is fixedly mounted on the rod, as shown in Figs. 5, 6, and 7. The handle is mounted in fixed radial relation to the rod intermediate its end portions, as by squaring the rod where it extends beyond the firebox, form ing an opening in the handle of complementary configuration to the squared end of the rod, and securing the handle in fitted relation to said end portion of the rod. Thus depressing of the handle serves to open the door and release of the handle results in the closing of the door because of the weight thereof. The handle as is outwardly extended from the wall from the mounting 44 and also inwardly extended from said mounting. To the end of providing more positive closing of the door, a helical tension spring 45 is interconnected to the inwardly extended end portion of the handle and a position on the firebox downwardly and forwardly disposed thereto, as at 46. Opening of the door puts the spring under increased pressure which results in a positive closing of the door upon release of the handle and effective sealing of the opening 353.
A translating arm i? is pivotally mounted on the side wall it of the firebox ll below the handle, as by a pivot bolt it. The translating arm is provided with a plurality of openings 49 arranged in a pattern longitudinally thereof. The plurality of openings provide adjustable interconnecting of the door 3! and the depressing member 38, as presently more fully described.
The pivotal mounting 39 of the depressing member is extended outwardly through the side wall M. A switch plate 50 is fixedly mounted on the pivotal mounting 39 to pivot therewith relative to the firebox and thus to maintain constant angular relation with the depressing member 38, as shown in Figs. 4, 5, and 6. A bracket stop Si is secured to the firebox H, as by welding, and extended therefrom below the switch plate. The stop functions as a rest for the switch plate and as a stop limiting downward movement of said switch plate. The stop is positioned to limit downward pivotal movement of the switch plate and thus of the depressing member to a position for the member short of contact with the ignition element.
The inner end portion of the handle is preferably bifurcated. A push-pull rod 52 is pivotally connected to the bifurcated end portion of the handle and to the translating arm 57 by being bent outwardly and extended through an opening 49 thereof. The push-pull rod is conveniently maintained in handle and translating arm engagement by means of spring clips 53 engaged in annular grooves formed in its push-pull rod. It will be clearly apparent that cotter keys, screwthreaded means, or other arrangements may be employed to maintain the engagement noted.
The switch plate 551 preferably has a slot 54 formed therein radially related to the pivotal mounting 39. It is apparent in Figs. 2, 4, 5, and 6 that depressing of the handle :33 serves pivotally to elevate the translating arm 5?. The pivotal elevation is communicated to the switch plate 50 by means of a T rod 55 upwardly extended through the elongated opening 5 3 of the switch plate, the cross arm of the T rod underlaying the switch plate, and pivotal connection of the upper end of the T rod to the translating arm by extension through an opening 49 thereof. The T rod is thus slideably associated with the switch plate providing positive pivotal elevation thereof upon depressing of the handle 43 and permitting the switch plate to return freely and independently to its original position upon release of the handle. The upper end of the T rod is maintained in translating arm engagement as by a spring clip 53, already described.
An electrical switch 51 is mounted longitudinally on the switch plate, as by means of an adjustable bracket 58. The switch is preferably responsive to attitude, a mercury switch of conventional form being admirably suited to the purpose. The switch is adjustably positioned by its bracket 58 to maintain an attitude relative the switch plate 50 causing the switch to close when the depressing member 3 8, with which its switch plate is pivotally mounted, is elevated, as shown in Fig. 5, and to open, when the depressing member is returned to normal position, as shown in Figs. 4 and '7. The ignition element 35 and the switch 51 are connected in electrical series, as shown in Fig. 8, with any suitable source of electrical energy 59 by means of conducting Wires 60. The source of electrical energy may conveniently take the form of an electrical lighting circuit of the building in which the incinerator is mounted. To provide indication of the activated and non-activated conditions of the ignition element, a warning light Si is wired in electrical series with said ignition element and the switch.
The incinerator of the present invention is given a finished appearance by mounting a facing plate 52 in concealing relation to all of the incinerator except the handle 43, the door 3|, the ash drawer l9, which are externally accessible, and the pilot light 6! which is externally visible. The facing plate is preferabl secured by cap screws 63 extended therethrough and screwthreadedly engaged to the firebox. To accommodate pivotal movement of the handle, an elongated slot 54 is formed in the facing plate.
Operation Referring to Figs. 4, 5, 6, and 7 in the sequence given, the operation of the present device is clearly apparent and is briefly summarized as follows:
In Fig. 4 the elements of the incinerator are shown in so-called normal position, the door 31 in sealing relation to the opening 30, the depressing member 36 in its downward position overlaying the ignition element 35, and the switch 51 opened by its attitude resulting from the down ward positioning of the switch plate 50.
The door 3! is opened by depressing the outwardly extended end portion of the handle 43, as by an operator 65, a catamenial device 65, or other combustible material, is inserted through the opening 3% The depressing of the handle having served to pivot the depressing member upwardly, the incinerator is preconditioned for the reception of the catamenial device for burning by upward pivoting of the member 38 and the activation of the ignition element 35 in response to closing of the switch 51. The upward pivotal movement of the depressing member 38 tips the switch plate upwardly and the switch 51 rearwardly, closing the switch and completing the electrical circuit shown in Fig. 8. As shown in Fig. 6, the catamenial device upon insertion descends in the firebox I I to the flanges 42 or even to the ignition element itself. In such positions the catamenial device is in intimate proximity to the ignition element. Upon release of the handle 43, the door 3| is closed by gravity and by urging of the spring 45 and seals the opening 30. Downward pivotal movement of the depressing member is initially precluded by the catamenial device against which it is rested.
The ignition element having been activated as described, is brought to a high temperature. The heat generated by the ignition element causes a convectional current of warm dry air to rise through the firebox II and to be exhausted through the vent pipe 23, the openings 2| in the ash drawer l9 admitting fresh air for the feeding of such convectional movement. This movement of warm dry air rapidly dehydrates the catamenial device or any other combustible material that may be positioned in the firebox in a moist condition. Continued activation of the ignition element serves to ignite the catamenial device and to consume the same by combustion, the gases of combustion raising through the firebox also to be exhausted through the vent pipe.
As the catamenial device $5 is burned, the depressing member 38 rested thereon continues to urge it downwardly toward the ignition element, as shown in Fig. 7, assuring a continuous burning action until the device is consumed. Upon completion of the consumption of said catamenial. device, the depressing member gravitationally returns to position shown in Fig. pivoting the switch plate downwardly and opening the switch 57. Thus upon completion of its function of consuming the catamenial device, the ignition element is inactivated and no subsequent waste of electrical energy occurs.
Second form of the present invention A second form of the present invention is shown in Fig. 9 comprising a firebox 10 an ash drawer ll, an inserting opening 72 formed in the firebox, a pivotally mounted door 13 in sealing relation to the opening, a depressing member M.
' and other elements duplicating the corresponding elements of the first form of the invention already described and thus at this point not further discussed. In the second form, however, the switch 57 is omitted. For the ignition element shown in the first form of the present invention, a gas pilot light i5 is substituted. The pilot light is connected by a conduit '18 to any suitable source of combustible gas, not shown, and preferably is continuous burning. In this form of the present invention, the operation is the same as that heretofore described but with this exception, the pilot light provides a continuous source of dehydrating and igniting heat and no mechanism for interrupting the same is provided.
When the pilot light 15 is employed, it is found advantageous to provide a grill Ti to support combustible material. The grill is preferably supported in a substantially horizontal position just above the pilot light as by brackets 78 riveted to the firebox ill or secured thereto in any other suitable manner, as by welding.
Third form In Fig. 10 a third form of the present invention is illustrated, wherein the incinerator of either the first form or second form, but without an ash drawer, is incorporated in a vent pipe 89 of the type normally employed in venting plumbing fixtures. For clarity of illustration the vent pipe is shown positioned between adjacent studs 8! and extending from a sewer 82 below a fioor 83 upwardly for venting purposes. A firebox 84 of the type previously described is formed in an enlarged section of the vent pipe and is provided with an ignition element either of the type 35 or 75 and elements appurtenant thereto already described. A facing plate 85, similar to facing plate is provided for the third form having an opening 36 formed therein through which a door 81, similar to the doors 3| and 13 already described, is conveniently accessible. A handle 88 is extended from the firebox 84 of a form and arrangement similar to the handle 43 for opening the door and for raising a depressing member, such as 38, already described and not again shown or described at this point. The absence of an ash drawer of the type 19 or 73 is to be noted. The firebox is preferably open at its lower end and ashes resulting from the burning of combustible material in the forebox are permitted to fall downwardly through the lower portion of the vent pipe into the sewer 82 to be carried away by sewage flow therethrough.
The incinerators of the present invention are compact and are conveniently built between opposite surfaces of walls such as those delineating bathrooms, rest rooms, and the like. The incinerators are safe to employ in that they are insulated from adjacent structure and are of a capacity adapted to receive only relatively small quantities of combustible material. The structures are simple but eiTective in operation. The incinerators provide efficient and sanitary means for disposing of catamenial devices and the like, 1
thus obviating present known embarrassment, inconvenience, and difiiculty incident to the disposal thereof. The provision of incinerators of the present invention in the walls of public rest rooms and the like have been found materially to reduce and in many instances completely to eliminate clogging of plumbing fixtures and drains incident to the disposal of such devices therein.
Although I have herein shown and described my invention in what I have conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of my invention, which is not to be limited to the details disclosed herein, but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent devices.
Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. A wall incinerator comprising a substantially erect firebox built into a supporting wall and insulated therefrom, having an opening accessible from externally of the wall through a wall of the firebox near the upper end portion of said firebox, a door fitted in closing relation to the opening and pivotally mounted in the firebox, a vent for the firebox, an electrical ignition element provided in the lower portion of the firebox, a depressing member pivotally mounted in the firebox at a, level between the ignition element and the opening for movement between a position overlaying the ignition element and a substantially erect position adjacent a wall of the firebox, an externally accessible handle pivotally mounted on the firebox in unitary relation with the door for opening and closing the same, an electrical switch operably connected to the depressing member whereby upward pivotal movement of the member closes the switch and return of the member to original position opens said switch, an energizing circuit for the ignition means including the switch and a source of electrical energy, and lever means interconnecting the handle and the depressing member whereby manipulation of the handle to open the door pivots the depressin member upwardly to receive combustible material between said member and the ignition means closing the switch, and whereby, upon release of the handle, the door is closed and the depressing member is rested upon the combustible material and returned to original position upon consumption of said material.
2. A wall incinerator comprising a substantially erect firebox having a front wall, a rear wall, and side walls interconnecting said front and rear walls in spaced relation adapted to fit between opposite surfaces of a supporting wall and to be concealed thereby, said front wall having an externally accessible opening provided in the upper portion thereof; a door fitted in closing relation to the opening and pivotally mounted on the front Wall of the firebox; a spring urging the door into closing relation to the opening; a vent for the firebox; an electrical ignition element provided in the lower end portion of the firebox; an ash tray removably positioned in the firebox below the ignition element; a depressing member mounted on the rear wall of the firebox at a level between the ignition element and the opening in the front wall for pivotal movement between a position overlaying the ignition element and a substantially erect position adjacent the rear wall; stops borne by the firebox limiting downward pivotal movement of the depressing member to a position short of contact with the ignition element; a handle pivotally mounted on the side wall externally of the firebox and having controlling connection with the door for opening and closing the same; an electrical switch borne by the side wall on which the handle is mounted and operably connected to the depressing member whereby upward pivotal movement of the member closes the switch and return of the member to downward position opens the switch; an energizing circuit for the ignition means including the switch and a source of electrical energy; and lever means interconnecting the handle and the depressing member whereby manipulation of the handle to open the door simultaneously pivots the depressing member upwardly to receive combustible material between said depressing member and the ignition means resulting in closing of the switch and whereby, upon release of the handle, the door is closed by the spring, the depressing member is rested upon the combustible material and pivoted downwardly as the combustible material is consumed until substantially all thereof is consumed at which position of the depressing member the switch is opened.
ANTON H. RIEBSCHLAGER.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,235,918 Nieberding Aug. 7, 1917 1,545,497 Kener July 14, 1925 1,697,524 Epstein Jan. 1, 1929 2,376,938 Potter May 29, 1945
US784892A 1947-11-08 1947-11-08 Electric wall incinerator Expired - Lifetime US2559228A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US784892A US2559228A (en) 1947-11-08 1947-11-08 Electric wall incinerator

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US784892A US2559228A (en) 1947-11-08 1947-11-08 Electric wall incinerator

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2559228A true US2559228A (en) 1951-07-03

Family

ID=25133849

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US784892A Expired - Lifetime US2559228A (en) 1947-11-08 1947-11-08 Electric wall incinerator

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2559228A (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2716386A (en) * 1952-08-18 1955-08-30 Smart Avon Automatic incinerator
US2763760A (en) * 1953-08-24 1956-09-18 Buckle Ernest Percy Incinerator
US2771533A (en) * 1953-09-03 1956-11-20 Gen Dynamics Corp Waste disposal device

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1235918A (en) * 1914-08-27 1917-08-07 Frank A Nieberding Incinerator.
US1545497A (en) * 1924-02-12 1925-07-14 Jr Edward Kener Automatic shut-off mechanism for incinerator valves
US1697524A (en) * 1926-12-23 1929-01-01 Duo Tor Mfg Company Incinerator
US2376938A (en) * 1942-01-28 1945-05-29 Potter Charles Austin Destructor

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1235918A (en) * 1914-08-27 1917-08-07 Frank A Nieberding Incinerator.
US1545497A (en) * 1924-02-12 1925-07-14 Jr Edward Kener Automatic shut-off mechanism for incinerator valves
US1697524A (en) * 1926-12-23 1929-01-01 Duo Tor Mfg Company Incinerator
US2376938A (en) * 1942-01-28 1945-05-29 Potter Charles Austin Destructor

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2716386A (en) * 1952-08-18 1955-08-30 Smart Avon Automatic incinerator
US2763760A (en) * 1953-08-24 1956-09-18 Buckle Ernest Percy Incinerator
US2771533A (en) * 1953-09-03 1956-11-20 Gen Dynamics Corp Waste disposal device

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4112913A (en) Free standing heating unit
US3491382A (en) Toilet stool ventilating means
US5983885A (en) Natural draft automatic feed pellet stove
US3020559A (en) Incinerator toilet
SE9602867L (en) Carrying device
US2845882A (en) Incineration apparatus and method
US2375318A (en) Draft device
US2564713A (en) Coal coking and burning magazine stove
US2598067A (en) Kitchen cabinet incinerator
KR910015826A (en) Large burner with home burner bin and exhaust ducting
CA1144832A (en) Boilers
US3320907A (en) Disposal unit and method
US3896509A (en) Ventilating system for bathrooms
US3319588A (en) Total disposal unit and method
US4259941A (en) Fireplace construction for mobile homes
US6363542B1 (en) Toilet ventilator
US5339752A (en) Livestock incinerator
US1769880A (en) Incinerator
US3633220A (en) Electric toilet
US3837012A (en) Incinerating toilet
US2279578A (en) Latrine
KR100679316B1 (en) A firewood boiler
CN205245234U (en) Energy -concerving and environment -protective return air stove
US3033191A (en) Broiling apparatus
CN100483023C (en) Embedded lamp