US2558677A - Apparatus for twisting and winding textile fibers - Google Patents

Apparatus for twisting and winding textile fibers Download PDF

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US2558677A
US2558677A US36486A US3648648A US2558677A US 2558677 A US2558677 A US 2558677A US 36486 A US36486 A US 36486A US 3648648 A US3648648 A US 3648648A US 2558677 A US2558677 A US 2558677A
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spindle
cap
bobbin
winding
bundle
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US36486A
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John J Gannon
John J Fiscella
Charles P Powell
Thomas A Bramfitt
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Cluett Peabody and Co Inc
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Cluett Peabody and Co Inc
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01HSPINNING OR TWISTING
    • D01H1/00Spinning or twisting machines in which the product is wound-up continuously
    • D01H1/10Spinning or twisting machines in which the product is wound-up continuously for imparting multiple twist, e.g. two-for-one twisting
    • D01H1/101Spinning or twisting machines in which the product is wound-up continuously for imparting multiple twist, e.g. two-for-one twisting in which multiple twist is imparted at the take-up stations

Description

5, 1951 J. J. GANNQN mm 5? APPARATUS FOR TWISTING map wmnmc TEXTILE FIBERS Filed July 1,1948 I s Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOIE JOHN J. GANNON JOHN J. FISCELLA CHARLES P. POWELL THOMAS F. BRAMFITT June 26, 151
J. J. GANNQN ET AL APPARATUS FOR TWISTING AND WINDING TEXTILE FIBERS Filed July 1, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 3 55 so i INVENTORS JOHN J. GANNON JOHN J. FISCELLA CHARLES R POWELL wfaRAMF I;
June 26, 1951 J. J. GANNON ET AL APPARATUS FOR 'I-WISTING AND WINDING TEXTILE FIBERS 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed July 1, 1948 INVENTORS JOHN J. GANNON JOHN J. FISGELLA BBAMFH'T Aw CHARLES P. PDWELL THOMAS BY j Patented June 26, 1951 APPARATUS FOR- TWISTING AND WINDING TEXTILE FIBERS John J. Gannon, Troy, John J. Fiscella, Menands, Charles P. Powell, Waterford, and Thomas A. Bramfitt, Watervliet, N. Y., assignors to Cluett, Peabody and Company, Inc., Troy, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application July 1, 1948, Serial No. 36,486
9 Claims.
This invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for winding a long, slender bundle of textile fibers on a bobbin to form a package, for also twisting the fibers of the bundle during the winding operation, and which, when desired, may be included in the same handling operation as the drawing of staple fibers.
An object of the invention is to generally improve and simplify methods and apparatus for winding threads, yarns, filaments or bundles of textile fibers on a bobbin to form a package; which enables the winding efiiciently and effectively of either large or small packages; with which the thread, filament, bundle or yarns will be wound with a desired degree of tautness; and with which the winding may take place for relatively long periods with a minimum of attention from an operator or attendant.
Another object of the invention is to provide an improved method and apparatus for imparting at least a 2 for l twist to a yarn, thread, or bundle of textile fibers or filaments, in a rapid, continuous operation, and, in the same operation and handling approximately two twists for'each rotation of the spindle, also winding the twisted thread, roving, yarn or bundle on a bobbin to form a package; with which breakage of the thread, roving, yarn or bundle will be a minimum; which will handle the yarn, roving, thread or bundle at least as rapidly as by previous methods and apparatus for twisting and winding; with which the thread, yarn, roving or bundle may be wound on a bobbin either in helical form with superposed layers, or as frusto-conical layers, superimposed in telescoping or nesting relation: which will have maximum capacity and minimum breakage of the roving, thread, yarns or bundle.
Another object of the invention is to provide improved apparatus for accomplishing each of these objects which will be relatively simple, compact, durable, convenient, inexpensive and of relatively large capacity.
Other objects'and advantages will be apparent from the following description of one embodiment of the invention, and the novel features thereof will be particularly pointed out hereinafter in connection with the appended claims.
In the accompanying drawings:
Fig. l is a side elevation, partly in section and partly schematic, of apparatus constructed in accordance with this invention and useful for practicing the method;
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the winding memher and free end of the spindle employed in the same;
Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation of the winding member shown in Fig. 2, at double the scale of Fig. 2, with the section taken approximately centrally and longitudinally in a plane normal to the drawing plane in Fig. 2;
Fig. 4 is a bottom plan of the cap of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the removable part of the spindle at the upper or free end thereof, separated from the cap of Figs. 2 and 3;
Fig. 6 is a face elevation of the winding member at normal scale;
Fig. 7 is a sectional elevation of a part of the same, the section being taken approximately along the line l'l of Fig. 6; and
Fig. 8 is a longitudinal sectional elevation through the twisting and winding mechanism.
In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, and referring first particularly to Fig. l, the invention is illustrated, by way of example, as part of a mechanism for drawing rovings of staple fibers to form a twisted yarn and winding the yarn on a bobbin. For this purpose the drawing mechanism is of a suitable roller type, designated generally at i, which is mounted by a roll stand 2 On a roll beam 3. The beam frame 3 is provided on a suitable main frame e. A creel or bobbin stand 5, is mounted on the upper part of the frame 3, and rotatably supports a plurality of vertically disposed bobbins 6, on which are wound the rovings l and 8 of staple fibers, which are to be drawn and combined into a yarn 9 and then twisted and wound on a bobbin, to form a package. The rovings I and B are unwound from the bobbins 6 and passed together, side by side, through the roller drawing device I, where they are combined and drawn into a yarn 9, which operation frequently is called spinning from double roving. Any number of rovings may be combined in this manner to make each strand of yarn. The roller drawing device I is provided with consecutively arranged pairs of rollers operating at progressively higher speeds, and the rovings pass between the rollers of each pair in succession.
The drawn, combined rovings are conducted as a yarn 9 through a guide or eye I0 carried on a rod ll projecting from the roll beam 3. This is a typical drawing mechanism in common use,
and it has, therefore, been illustrated only rather schematically, since any suitable drawing mechanism may be employed. The drawing rollers are driven by a suitable mechanism (not shown) in the proper speed ratios for the successive pairs,
auaaw with power for driving them obtained from a gear I2 coupled to one of the drawing rollers. The gear l2 meshes with and is driven by a gear |3 which in turn meshes with and is driven by a pinion M.
The pinion M is coupled to a larger gear l5 concentric therewith which meshes with and is driven by a. pinion I 6 which is in turn concentric with and coupled to a gear I! that meshes with a gear |8 fixed on the shaft l9. The gears and pinions l2 to I! are suitably mounted for rotation, but since such driving mechanisms are old and the details thereof may vary considerably, this driving mechanism is shown rather schematically. The shaft I9 is driven from any suitable source of power (not shown) such as an electric motor, and this shaft through the driving connection represented schematically by the meshing gears 2 to l8, will drive the gear l2 at a lower rate than the shaft l9. Any other suitable speed reducing mechanism may be employed between the shaft i9 and the roller drawing mechanism l.
Disposed immediately below and aligned with the guide in is a twisting and winding device designated generally at 29. This mechanism 20, shown in sectional elevation in Fig. 8, is mounted on a support or platform 2| so as to upstand therefrom. Passing upwardly through the support 2| is a spindle 22 which is mounted in a bearing 23 for rotary and vertical sliding movements.
The bearing 23 carries vertically spaced ball bearings 24 and 25, which rotatably support a sleeve 26. This sleeve 26 surrounds the intermediate part of the spindle 22. The bearings 24 and 25 are combined radial and end thrust bearings which by their engagement with shoulders on the sleeve 26 prevent the sleeve from moving vertically, yet the sleeve may rotate about the axis of the spindle and the spindle may move endwise therethrough. A grooved pulley 21 is fixed upon the lower end of the sleeve 26 and is driven by a belt 28, so that the sleeve will be continuously driven. Above the bearing 23 the sleeve 26 is provided with a shoulder 29 or external peripheral flange on which rests a circular plate 30. This plate carries a conduit 3|, which extends from the periphery of the plate 30 to the central aperture of the plate that telescopes over the sleeve 26 and rests on the plate 30.
The spindle 22 is provided with a passage 32 from its upper or free end downwardly well below the plate 39, and within this passage 32 is a, tube 33 open at its upper end and at its lower end having an elbow 34 which extends through a vertically elongated slot 35 in one side of the spindle and extending upwardly for a substantial distance from the lower end of the passage 32. This elbow 34 extends into the plate 30 in alignment with the inner end of the conduit 3| so that the passage of the conduit 3| opens into the elbow 34, and through the latter opens into the tube 33 which opens into the passage 32 of the spindle. The elbow serves as a key to cause rotation of the plate 30 with the sleeve 26 and the spindle 22, and the elbow is free to slide along the slot 35 so that the spindle 22 may move vertically while the tube 33 and the plate 36 remain in the same position above the support 2 I.
A pair of combined thrust and radial ball bearings 36 and 31 are secured in endwise, spaced relation upon the upper end of the sleeve 26 and they serve to rotatably support another sleeve or cylinder 38 which is concentric with and spaced from the upper end of the sleeve 26. The lower end of the cylinder 38 has fixed thereon a plate 39, which is disposed face to face with, and spaced slightly above, the plate 39. Coupled to the upper end of the cylinder 38 is an element 40 which telescopes loosely over the part of the spindle 22 which is above the sleeve '26. The periphery of this element 49 is upwardly tapered and convergent as at 4 I, which serves to receive and support the base 42 of a bobbin 43 on which the thread, yarn or bundle of fibers is to be wound. In this instance, the upper or outer face of the base 42 is tapered and upwardly convergent, but this is not necessary since the base may be of any suitable shape depending upon the nature of the layers of thread or yarn which are to be wound thereon. This bobbin may be removed by merely lifting it upwardly over the free end of the spindle, and replaced by a similar but reverse movement.
Secured in the underface of the plate 39 are a plurality of permanent magnets 44, and a similar number of similar permanent magnets 45 are mounted on a plate 46 disposed on the upper face of the bearing 23 and immediately below but spaced slightly from the plate 39 which rotates with the spindle and the sleeve 26. The magnets 45 are arranged in the upper face of the plate 46 with poles arranged opposite to those. of the magnets 44, and the magnetic attraction between the vertically aligned ends of the permanent magnets of opposite polarity is sufficient to hold the plate 39 against rotation with the sleeve 26 and spindle 22. Thus, the bobbin 43 is held against rotation with the spindle 22.
Rotatably mounted on the upper end of the spindle 22 is a winding member shown in Figs. 2 to 4, and 6 to 8, which includes a cap 41 having an aperture or passage 48 in its upper end face. This cap 41 telescopes over and is rotatably supported by the upper end of the spindle above the bobbin 43. For convenience in applying and removing the cap 41 to the spindle, the upper end of the spindle 22 is provided with a short, detachable extension 49 shown separately in Fig. 5 which is tubular from end to end, and which'at its lower end telescopes downwardly within the passage 32 0f the upper end of the spindle. This extension 49 is provided, intermediate of its ends, with an annular collar or flange 50 which rests on the upper end of the main body of the spindle in order to limit movement of the extension down the passage of the spindle. Confined on the upper end of the extension 49 against the flange 59 is the inner race 5| of a ball bearing 52, and the outer race 53 of that bearing is secured snugly within the open face of the chamber of the cap 41, as shown in Fig. 3.
The portion of the extension 49 above the flange 56 is of larger diameter than the portion below flange 50, and this larger portion extends to the upper end of the extension where it is rotatably received within a bearing 54 provided on the interior of the cap 41 and abutting the upper end face of the cap. A thin plate 55 descends over this upward end of this extension 49, against the inner and outer races 5| and 53, and above the plate 55 a sleeve 56 is secured on the enlarged upward end of the extension 49. The sleeve 56 may be a press fit on the extension 49, or may be secured on the extension by a set screw or other suitable means, so that the sleeve 56 will always rotate with the extension. The lower end of the extension 49 either snugly engages with the wall of the passage 32 of the upper end of the spindle 22, or it is keyed thereto, because it is desired that the extension 49 should rotate with the spindle, yet be detachably coupled thereto.
The cap 41 is provided with diametrically opposed but aligned bearing openings 51 in the side wall of the cap opposite the sleeve 56. A winding arm 58 is bifurcated atone end, so as to provide arms or branches 58a and 58b which straddle or partially embrace the cap 41. The free ends of the branches 58a and 58b have inturned, axially aligned, bearing ends 59 and 66 that extend through the bearing openings 51 of the cap, into the chamber within the cap and approximately, radially toward the longitudinal axis of the sleeve 56. Rotatably confined on the inner end of the bearing end 59 is a brake shoe 6| having a brake or friction lining 62 on a face thereof engaging the periphery of the sleeve 56. The shoe 6| and the lining 62 have for this purpose concave faces towards the sleeve 56, so that the shoe and lining will generally conform to the curved surface of the sleeve 56. This shoe 6| extends less than half way around the sleeve 56.
The manner in which the shoe 6| is rotatably confined on the inner end of the bearing end 59 is not material, but it is shown as being threaded on a reduced threaded end of the bearing end 59. The. inner end of the bearing end 66 similarly has rotatably confined thereon a brake shoe 63, which extends approximately half way around the sleeve 56 and has a concave face toward the sleeve 56 which mounts a friction lining 64 that bears against the periphery of the sleeve 56. The branches 58a and 58b are sprung apart in order to insert them into the bearing openings 51 in the cap, and are still under flexing stress when the shoe linings 62 and 64 are in contact with the sleeve 56. The arm 58 is thus free to rock or swing about the ends 59 and 66. The exterior side wall of the cap 41 is cylindrical and the bearing openings 51 are aligned and at an approximate diameter of the outer periphery of the cap.
A cam member 65 is secured to the branch 581), a short distance from the bearing end 66 of that branch, and the engagement of the free end of this cam 65 with the outer periphery of the cap will limit or control the movement of the shoe 63 towards the spindle axis. If the arm 58 swings from the full line to the dash line position in Fig. 2, it will be noted that the cam 65 moves from the full line to the dash line position, and in the dash line position the cam will allow the branch 58b to move inwardly to the maximum extent. This is shown in Fig. 6 where the branch 58b is released, so that the shoe lining 64 may bear on the sleeve 56 with the full flexing pressure of the stress in branch 58b. This exerts maximum friction pressure on the sleeve 56, and gives maximum frictional, rotary driving torque on the cap.
The shoe lining 62 remains in contact with the sleeve 56 with substantially the same pressure throughout all of the swinging movements of the arm 58. When the arm 58 moves nearer the spindle 22, such as from the dash line position in Fig. 2 to the full line position, the cam 65 will ride up the curvature of the periphery of the cap, during which the branch 58b will be cammed at its free end away from the spindle, and will thus carry the shoe lining 64 out of engagement with the sleeve 56. This decreases the frictional torque tending to rotate cap 41 with the spindle. From the foregoing it will be observed that the frictional driving torque on the cap will vary with the angular position of the arm 68 about the axis of the bearing ends 59 and 66. At the free end of the arm 58, or at a substantial distance from the cap 41, the arm is provided with an eye 66, see Fig. 7, and this eye 66 is on the inside face of the arm 56 so that it will ride against the bobbin or layers of yarn or threads as shown in Fig. 1.
As the yarns or fibers are built up in layers on the bobbin, or the eye is further from the axis of the bobbin, the arm 58 will be cammed outwardly, as shown in Fig. 1, which will release some of the frictional driving torque on the cap 41. The yarn, thread, filament or bundle of fibers designated by the reference 9 in Fig. 1, is conducted from adjacent or beyond the cap 41 past the bobbin to the outer end of the conduit 3|, then along this conduit 3| and into the tube passage 33, and upwardly through the spindle assage'32, thence along the passage of the extension 49 and through the opening 48 in the cap 41, then over the edge of the cap and along the arm 58 to and through the eye 66 and then to the bobbin.
The lower end of the spindle 22 is supported i" in a housing 61 by means of a suitable anti-friction or ball bearing 68 which is both a radial and thrust bearing. The housing 61 rides upon a roller 69, Fig. 1, which is provided on the end of a lever 16 that is hinged at 1| on the frame 4. Intermediate of its ends the lever 16 carries an-- other roller 12, which is rotatable on a pin 13 that is carried by the lever 16, and the roller 12 rides upon the periphery of a cam 14. The cam 14 is fixed on a shaft 15, also rotatable on the frame 4, and also fixed on the shaft 15 for rotation therewith is a Worm wheel 16 which meshes with and is driven from a worm screw 11. The screw 11 is provided on a short shaft 18, which is also rotatably supported in the frame 4 and carries a bevel gear 19 that meshes with a bevel gear 86.
The gear 86 is fixed to a sprocket wheel or pulley .81 which is rotatably supported by the frame 4 and is driven by a chain or belt 82 from a sprocket wheel or pulley 83. The wheel or pulley 83 is coupled to and rotates with the gear 13 of the speed reduction mechanism that drives the drawing mechanism from the main shaft 19. Thus, during the operation of the device, the cam wheel 14 will be slowly rotated and this will raise and lower the lever 16 and through it slowly raise and lower the spindle 22. At the same time the spindle is rotated at a relatively high speed by the belt 28 which passes around the pulley 21 and which is fixed on the sleeve 26. This belt 28 is driven from a pulley 84 which is fixed on the shaft l9.
In the operation of this device, and with the parts assembled as shown in Fig. 1, a bobbin 43 is mounted on the spindle and the rovings 1 and 8 are passed through the drawing mechanism where they are drawn and combined into a single yarn 9. This yarn passes downwardly from above the upper end of the spindle 22 to the rotating plate 24, then into and along conduit 3| to the spindle 22. The yarn then passes through the elbow 34 and then upwardly through the spindle and the cap 41, then over the side of the cap and downwardly along theinside of the winding arm 58 to the eye 66, and after passing through this eye, it is connected to the bobbin. When the shaft 19 rotates it will cause the spindle 22 to rotate at a relatively high rate of speed, and
auae'n will operate thedrawing mechanism at a lower rate. At the same time the spindle 22 slowly rises and falls and in doing so, it elevates and lowers the cap 41 and winding arm 58. The bobbin, while rotatably mounted on the spindle, remains stationary by reason of the attraction between the magnet 44 and 45. The friction shoes and the cap will cause a rotary torque on the cap tending to rotate the winding arm il about the spindle and bobbin, and wind the yarn on the bobbin. At the same time the winding arm is elevated and lowered so that the yarn will be wound by progressive turns in layers on the bobbin.
If the yarn being wound on the bobbin is wound in layers of relatively large diameter, the winding arm 58 will be in one of its outer positions, one of which is shown in Fig. l, and the cam 65 will release the movable friction shoe, whereupon the stress in the branch 58b will apply the brake lining 64 to the sleeve 56 and provide a greater turning torque which tends to wind the yarn on the bobbin. When the layers of yarn being wound are of smaller diameter, the windin arm 58 will move inwardly from the Fig. 1 position, during which the cam 65 on the winding. arm will ride on the cap periphery and force the brake lining 64 out of engagement with the sleeve 56. This reduces the turning torque on the cap and the winding arm, since less turning torque is necessary when the layers on the bobbin are of smaller diameter.
Ordinarily the weight of the spindle and the housing 61 are suflicient to lower the spindle when the lever is lowered, but in order to insure prompt lowering of the spindle, the housing 61 may have on opposite sides, lugs 85 from which links 86 depend and carry at their lower ends a cross bar 81. The cross bar 81 supports a weight 88 of a size to give the desired downward pull on the spindle.
The term bundle of textile fibers as used herein, in the absence of a direct generic term, is intended to include rovings, yarns threads, a plurality of filament fibers brought together side by side as a group and all long slender groups of textile fibers, either spun or filament. When the invention is used in connection with drawing mechanism, as a single handling operation,,then the bundle is a roving or yarn of staple fibers.
It will be. understood that various changes in the details, materials, and arrangements of parts which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature of the invention, may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.
We claim:
1. In a winding and twisting apparatus, a feeding device for feeding a bundle of textile fibers endwiseat a selected rate, a tubular, upright spindle, means for rotating said spindle about its longitudinal axis, a conduit attached to and extending outwardly from said spindle in an approximately radial direction, and having the inner end of its passage opening into the passage of said spindle, a cap rotatably mounted on the upper end of said spindle and having an aperture in its end aligned with the upper end of the passage of said spindle, a winding arm hinged to the cap for rocking upon a horizontal axis adjacent to the upper end of the spindle, and extending along one side of said spindle, a bobbin support rotatably mounted on said spindle below said can and along the side of which said am extends, means for holding said bobbin support from rotation with said spindle, a winding eye on said arm along said bobbin for guiding said bundle to said bobbin from said cap, and a guide for said bundle of fibers in approximately axial alignment with the axis of said spindle and above said spindle, for directing the bundle towards said spindle in approximate axial alignment therewith whereby when said spindle is rotated and said bundle passes through said guide, to the outer end of said conduit, through said conduit to. said spindle, upwardly through the spindle passage and cap, then over the cap and through said eye to said bobbin, the bundle will be twisted and wound on said bobbin.
2. In a winding and twisting apparatus a support, a tubular spindle, rotatably mounted on said support and projecting therefrom, means for rotating said spindle, about its longitudinal axis, on said support, an open ended conduit carried by and rotating with said spindle extending generally radially therefrom, and at its inner end opening into the adjacent part of the spindle passage, an element surrounding and rotatably mounted on said spindle between said conduit and its free end and formed for rotatably and removably mounting a bobbin thereon, a cap rotatably mounted on the free end of said spindle and having an aperture aligned with the spindle passage, a winding arm articulately connected to said cap close to the free end of the spindle for movement about a horizontal axis, rotating therewith, extending in a direction lengthwise along one side of said \element and movable towards and from, said spindle, a guide eye on said winding arm in the portion along any bobbin on said element, and means for holding said element against rotation with said spindle, whereby when a bundle of fibers is fed endwise towards the free end of the spindle in approximate axial alignment therewith, to the outer end of said conduit, then along the conduit to the spindle.-then along the spindle passage to the free end of the spindle and through the cap aperture, and then over the side of the cap and through said guide eye to a bobbin on said element, the rotation of said spindle will give the bundle a two for one twist and wind it on said bobbin.
3. In a winding and twisting apparatus a support, a tubular spindle, rotatably mounted on said support and projecting therefrom, means for rotating said spindle, about its longitudinal axis, on said support, an open ended conduit carried by and rotating with said spindle extending generally radially therefrom, and at its inner end opening into the adjacent part of the spindle passage, an element surrounding and rotatably mounted on said spindle between said conduit and its free end and formed for rotatably and removably mounting a bobbin thereon, a cap rotatably mounted on the free end of said spindle and having an aperture aligned with the spindle passage, a winding arm articulately connected to said cap close to the free end of the spindle, rotating therewith, extending in a direction lengthwise along one side of said element and movable towards and from, said spindle, a guide eye on said winding arm in the portion along any bobbin on said element, and
means for holding said element against rotation with said spindle, whereby when a bundle-of fibers is fed endwise towards the free end of the spindle approximate axial alignment therewith, to the outer end of said conduit, then along the conduit to the spindle, then along the spindle passage to the free end of the spindle and through the cap aperture, and then over the side of the cap and through said guide eye to a bobbin on said element, the rotation of said spindle will give the bundle a two for one twist and wind it on said bobbin, said winding arm being bifurcated at the end attached to said cap, the arms of the bifurcation having aligned angular ends extending toward each other, hinged in apertures in opposite sides of the cap and entering the interior of the cap approximately radially thereof. a friction shoe rotatably confined on one of said angular ends within the cap, bearing on said spindle and shiftable towards and from the spindle when that end is moved in said radial directions.
4. In a winding and twisting apparatus of the 2 for 1 type in which a tubular spindle removably mounts a bobbin, and a bundle of fibers to be twisted is whirled as a balloon about the axis of the spindle with the bundle extending through the passage of the spindle to the free end thereof, beyond the bobbin, and then wound on the bobbin, that improvement in the winding part thereof which comprises an element within said balloon relatively rotatable about the spindle and removably mounting a bobbin concentrically thereon, means for holding said element against rotation with the spindle, a cap rotatably mounted on the free end of the spindle and having an aperture aligned with the passage of the spindle and through which the bundle of fibers extends in leaving the spindle passage and said balloon, a winding arm carried by the cap and extending along a bobbin mounted on said element, said arm being movable at its free end towards and from the spindle and having a winding eye through which the bundle of fiber passes from said cap to the bobbin, means yieldingly urging said cap for rotation about the spindle axis to wind the bundle of fibers on said bobbin, and said spindle being relatively movable endwise through the bobbin and element to carry said cap in directions lengthwise of the spindle axis and thereby move the said winding eye back and forth along the side of the bobbin so as to wind the bundle of fibers on the bobbin in progressive turns and superposed layers.
5. In a winding and twisting apparatus of the 2 for 1 type in which a tubular spindle removably mounts a bobbin, and a bundle of fibers to be twisted is whirled as a balloon about the axis of the spindle with the bundle extending through the passage of the spindle to the free end thereof, beyond the bobbin, and then wound on the bobbin, that improvement in the winding part thereof which comprises an element within said balloon relatively rotatable about the spindle and removably mounting a bobbin concentrically thereon, means for holding said element against rotation with the spindle, a cap rotatably mounted on the free end of the spindle and having an aperture aligned with the passage of the spindle and through which the bundle of fibers extends in leaving the spindle passage and said balloon, a winding arm carried by the cap and extending along a bobbin mounted on said element, said arm being movable at its free end towards and from the spindle and having a winding eye through which the bundle of fiber passes from said cap to the bobbin, means yieldingly urging said cap for rotation about the spindle axis to wind the bundle of fibers on said bobbin, said winding arm being bifurcated at the end attached to said cap with the branches of the bifurcation terminating in inturned and aligned angular bearing ends extending toward each other said cap having apertures in opposite sides through which said bearing ends extend to the interior of the cap and which provide rocking bearings for the winding arm, a friction shoe rotatably confined on. the inner end of each of said bearing ends within the cap and bearing on such 'spindle, said shoes being resiliently urged againstsaid spindle by the flexing stresses in said branches of the bifurcation.
6. In a winding and twisting apparatus of the '2 for 1 type in which a tubular spindle removably mounts a bobbin, and a bundle of fibers to be twisted is whirled as a balloon about the axis of, the spindle with the bundle extending through the passage of the spindle to the free end thereof, beyond the bobbin, and then wound on the bobbin, that improvement in the windin part thereof which comprises an element within said balloon relatively rotatable about the spindle and removably mounting a bobbin concentrically thereon, means for holding said element against rotation with the spindle, a cap rotatably mounted on the free end of the spindle and having an aperture aligned with the passage of the spindle and through which the bundle of fibers extends in leaving the spindle passage and said balloon, a winding arm carried by the cap and extending along a bobbin mounted on said element, said arm being movable at its free end towards and from the spindle and having a winding eye through which the bundle of fiber passes from said cap to the bobbin, means yieldingly urging said cap for rotation about the spindle axis to wind the bundle of fibers on said bobbin, winding arm being bifurcated at the end attached to said cap with the branches of the bifurcation terminating in inturned and aligned angular bearing ends extending toward each other, said cap having apertures in opposite sides through which said bearing ends extend to the interior of the cap and which provide rocking bearings for the winding arm, a friction shoe rotatably confined on the inner end of each of said bearing ends within the cap and bearing on such spindle, said shoes being resiliently urged against said spindle by the flexing stresses in said branches of the bifurcation, one of the branches of the bifurcation having a portion bearing on the outer periphery of the cap, and
said outer cap periphery being generally cylindrical, whereas as said winding arm at its free end rocks toward the bobbin, said one branch of the bifurcation will be cammed outwardly of the cap to retract the friction shoe carried on its bearing end from contact with said spindle.
7. In a winding and twisting apparatus of the type having a rotatable, tubular spindle, a bobbin support telescoping over said spindle and held against full rotation therewith, said spindle being also relatively movable endwise through said bobbin support, a cap rotatably mounted on the end of said spindle and having an aperture aligned with the spindle passage, a winding arm having spaced branches embracing said cap, said cap having a generally cylindrical periphery and apertures in diametrically opposite sides thereof, said branches having inturned, aligned, bearing ends extending through said cap apertures to the interior of the cap and providing a rocking hinge between said winding arm and the cap, a shoe rotatably confined on the inner end of each inturned bearing end, and
bearing on the spindle, one of said branches having eccentrically of its inturned bearing end a cam part riding on the periphery of the cap, and as the winding arm rocks on its hinge connection to the cap. the cam part will cause movement of the friction shoe attached to said one branch into and out of contact with the spindle, and a thread guide carried by said member at a substantial distance from said cap.
8. In a winding and twisting apparatus, an element for removably mounting a bobbin, a spindle extending axially through said mounting and rotatable and slidable through said element,
'a cap rotatable on the free end of such spindle and i'rictionally urged to rotate with the spindle, a winding arm hinged to the cap for rocking on a horizontal axis, the hinged arm extending along one side of said element and at a distance from the cap having a winding eye, whereby when a bundle of textile fibers is passed from adjacent the cap along said winding member, through said eye to a bobbin on said element, and the spindle is rotated, the frictional drive on the cap by the spindle will wind the bundle of fibers on the bobbin at the rate at which the bundle is conducted toward the cap.
9. A winding device comprising a relatively stationary element for removably mounting a bobbin telescopingly thereover, a spindle extending axially through said element and mounted for rotation and endwise movement through said element and a bobbin carried on said element, a winding member carried by the free end of the spindle for endwise movement therewith and yieldingly rotated therefrom about the axis of said spindle, said member including a part rotatably mounted on the free end of the spindle and an arm hinged at the upper end of the spindle to said part with its hinge axis approximately radial to said spindle and extending in a direction lengthwise 01' the spindle to swing at its free end towards and from said spindle, said hinged arm having a thread guide in the portion along the bobbin, and means for moving said spindle back and forth endwise whereby when said spindle is rotated and moved back and forth endwise, and 'a bundle of fibers is conducted from adjacent the .end of the spindle through said thread guide and to a bobbin on said element, said bundle will be wound in progressive turns and superposed layers on said bobbin.
JOHN J. GANNON. JOHN J. FISCELLA. CHARLES P. POWELL. THOMAS A. BRAMFI'I'I.
, asr'nnaucns CITED $5 The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS
US36486A 1948-07-01 1948-07-01 Apparatus for twisting and winding textile fibers Expired - Lifetime US2558677A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1040950B (en) * 1954-07-19 1958-10-09 Deering Miliken Res Corp Double wire spinning device
DE1233756B (en) * 1961-06-29 1967-02-02 Mackie & Sons Ltd J Double wire spinning device
DE1270998B (en) * 1961-06-29 1968-06-20 Mackie & Sons Ltd J Two-for-one twisting spindle
US3406510A (en) * 1965-04-07 1968-10-22 Keyser Johann Jacob Method and apparatus for use in connection with prespinning, spinning and twisting

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1399332A (en) * 1920-12-21 1921-12-06 Leon W Campbell Flier for roving-frames and other like textile apparatus
FR872986A (en) * 1940-06-11 1942-06-25 Glanzstoff Ag Double twist twist spindle

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1399332A (en) * 1920-12-21 1921-12-06 Leon W Campbell Flier for roving-frames and other like textile apparatus
FR872986A (en) * 1940-06-11 1942-06-25 Glanzstoff Ag Double twist twist spindle

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1040950B (en) * 1954-07-19 1958-10-09 Deering Miliken Res Corp Double wire spinning device
DE1233756B (en) * 1961-06-29 1967-02-02 Mackie & Sons Ltd J Double wire spinning device
DE1270998B (en) * 1961-06-29 1968-06-20 Mackie & Sons Ltd J Two-for-one twisting spindle
US3406510A (en) * 1965-04-07 1968-10-22 Keyser Johann Jacob Method and apparatus for use in connection with prespinning, spinning and twisting

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