US2550893A - Apparatus for forming designs in knitted or woven fabrics of synthetic polyamide fibe - Google Patents

Apparatus for forming designs in knitted or woven fabrics of synthetic polyamide fibe Download PDF

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US2550893A
US2550893A US788852A US78885247A US2550893A US 2550893 A US2550893 A US 2550893A US 788852 A US788852 A US 788852A US 78885247 A US78885247 A US 78885247A US 2550893 A US2550893 A US 2550893A
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fabric
pins
members
holes
plate
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US788852A
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Frank G Weisbecker
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Perforations Inc
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Perforations Inc
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06HMARKING, INSPECTING, SEAMING OR SEVERING TEXTILE MATERIALS
    • D06H1/00Marking textile materials; Marking in combination with metering or inspecting
    • D06H1/003Marking textile materials; Marking in combination with metering or inspecting by passing a needle through the layers, e.g. with a marking fluid flowing through the needle
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S264/00Plastic and nonmetallic article shaping or treating: processes
    • Y10S264/70Processes for forming screens or perforating articles

Description

y 1, 1951 F G. WEISBECKER 2,550,893
APPARATUS FOR FORMING DESIGNS IN KNITTED OR WOVEN FABRICS OF SYNTHETIC POLYAMIDE FIBERS Filed Nov. 29, 1947 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 I I lL/[Il/ II/ II 4.? 2a 6 3 I KQ i 33 I Ii. 34 7 1 26 2 OIJ Fran/i G weisgc/fer M y 1951 F. G. WEISBECKER 2,550,893
APPARATUS FoR FORMING DESIGNS IN KNITTED 0R WOVEN FABRICS 0F SYNTHETIC POLYAMIDE FIBERS Filed Nov. 29, 1947 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 i E :i: 45%
ME 1 0 b I Fran/1f 6. M/e'isec/z'er May 1, 1951 G. WEISBECKER 2,550,893
APPARATUS FOR MING DESIGNS IN KNITTED OR WOVEN FABRICS 0F SYNTHETIC POLYAMIDE FIBERS 1 Filed Nov. 29, 1947 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 28 grwwrvtov J4 J5 Fran/6 G. Fl/ez'sbec/fer Patented May 1, 195
APPARATUS FOR FORMING DESIGNS IN KNITTED R WOVEN FABRICS OF SYN- THETIC POLYAlVIIDE FIBERS Frank G. Weisbecker, Glenside, Pa., assignor to Perforations, Inc., Pahnyra, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application November 29, 1947 SerialNo. 788,852
9 Claims. I (01. 18-1) This invention pertains to the formation of designs in fabrics knitted or woven from synthetic polyamide fibers, commonly known as nylon.
The primary field of use of the invention is in result in a design that is not completely permanent.
Therefore, an object of this invention is to devise an apparatus for applying a permanent design to a fabric knitted or woven from synthetic polyamide fibers without damage thereto.
Another object of the invention is to'devise a novel apparatus for applying a design to nylon fabrics without the use of printing liquids.
A further object of the invention is to provide simple inexpensive apparatus which not only will perform the function, but also in which the design applied thereby readily may be changed by the substitution of a different simple pattern member.
Other objects and uses of the invention will be evident from the following description and accompanying drawings in which:
Figure l is an elevational view of one form of apparatus embodying the invention. Parts are broken away to show details more clearly.
Figure 2 is a plan view of the apparatus shown in Figure 1 with the clamping plate removed and a part of the fabric supporting plate broken away.
Figure 3 is a plan view of the apparatus shown in Figure 1 with parts broken away to show the heating coil details.
Figure 4 is a plan view of the pattern member shown in Figure 1.
Figure 5 is a perspective view of a portion of the apparatus shown in Figure 1 provided with another type of heating means.
Figure 6 is a plan view of a portion of a fabric with a typical designformed therein in accordance with this invention.
Figure 7 is an elevational view of a preboarding form incorporating another form of apparatus for forming a design in accordance with this invention. 1 V
Figure 8 is a cross-sectional view'taken on line 8-8 ofFigure '7. a
Figure 9 is an elevational view of a modification of'the apparatus shown in Figure 1 with certain identical parts omitted. Figure 10 is a cross-sectional view taken on line I0-I0 of Figure 9.
This invention makes use of the fact that nylon threads can be given a permanent set by the application of heat.' In employing the apparatus of the invention selected stitches of a fabric are enlarged, thus stretching portions of the threads without damage thereto, and then subjected to heat to set the thread portions permanently in their stretched condition. The stitches or points in the fabric which are so enlarged form small holes in the fabric, and the location of such points of enlargement may be chosen so that the small holes are arranged to form any open work design desired, such as letters, numerals, pictorial representations, or any other type of design. The selected stitches are stretched and the small holes formed" by the insertion of a pointed element through the fabric between the threads atthe desired locations or points of the fabric; Heat is applied while the elements thus pierce the fabric, and then the elements are withdrawn, leaving the small holes permanently set in the fabric to form the desired design.
The heat applied to the fabric to set the open work design therein must be confined within certain temperature limits. Nylon melts at about 488 F., while its tensile strength is affected at temperatures over 356 F. Therefore, the temperature must be keptbelow 488 F. and preferably is kept below 356 F. On the other hand, to impart a set to nylon threads, the heat applied 'should be over about 250 F. Therefore, temperatures in the range from about 250 F. to about 360 F. may be employed safely. The period of time necessary to set nylon threads by the application of heat varies somewhat with the applied temperature. It has been found in practice that a period of from about one-half to about five minutes usually is sufficient for temperatures between 250 F. and 360 F. One form of apparatus constituting the invention is shown in Figures 1 to 4. A fabric sup.- porting plate 20 has a plurality of. holes 2| extending normally therethrough, and preferably arranged in a'series of evenly spaced rows with the hole-spacing in each row being the same, i. e., the holes .are evenly spaced in two dimen, sions. The actual arrangement of the holes, such as the number of holes 2| in each row and their spacing, depends on the type and number of differentkinds of designs'for which the apparatus is to be used. A pointed member or pin 22 is supported in each of the holes 2| with the pointed end 23 thereof normally positioned within the holes and below the fabric supporting surface of the plate 20. The pointed ends 23 are adapted. to. be projected. out of. the holes 2| and above the fabric supporting surface to pierce a fabric 24 secured in proper position on the plate in order to form small holes 25 therein, as best shown in Figure 6. Any desired pattern or design in the fabric thusmay'beformed. (within the limits of the apparatus) by selectively projecting the pins 22. For example, as best shown in Figure those pins; have beenprojected which will form the numeral 51 to produce the resultant fabric design shown in Figure 6. v
The cross-sectional area of the pins 22 and the character of their pointed ends 23, i. e., whether extremely sharp or relatively blunt, depends upon the size of. the threads and the number of courses, or threads, per inch in the fabric to be pierced; but. the cross-sectional area must be such that the pin. may be inserted through the thread loop of. astitch without causing breakage of a thread. The extreme tip of the pointof each pin 22 preferably issomewhat rounded so that the pins will penetrate between the threads of the fabric instead of. penetrating between the'fibers of a thread or; yarn with con.- se uent damage thereto. The pins mayhave any desiredshape intransverse section, but preferably are circular, as shown, for a purpose described. later. Secured below the: fabric supporting plate 25' isa base plate 26 having a.- plurality of holes 2:! therethrough corresponding in number and arrangement. to the holes 2]: in the fabric. supporting; plate. The pins 2-2 extend through the holes 2.1- in the base plate the. lower ends 28 depending therebelow. A pattern member 29 is mounted. beneath: the base plate. for upward movement against the. depending lower ends 28 of the pins. As shown in. the. drawings, the pat.- tern member may be detachably' hinged, as at 3%, toone edge; of. the base plate 26 and. any,- suitable mechanism. not shown. may be; em.- ployed for moving. the pattern member upwardly against the pins. The pattern-member 29 has a plurality of holes 31 therein of larger diameter than'the. lowenends of the pins 22'. The holes .3. lcorrespond to those pins which are not to be raised during the formation of a selected design. As. shown best in Figures 1 and 4, the holes 3| correspond. to those pins which are not raised duringthe formationv of the numeral 51. Accordingly, it will be seen that upward movement of the pattern member 29 against the depending lower ends 28 of the pins projects 'the points 2.3. of selected pins from the. holes 2| in the fabric. supporting plate.- to. pierce the fabric 2.4. It. is obvious that the pattern member may have. projections thereon to contact those pins desired to be raised, instead of having openings therein to receive those pins which are not to be raised. It also will be seen that the fabric design formed by the pointed ends 23 may be changed by the substitution. of a different pattern member. If desired, the pattern member and the base plate may be provided with interfitting guide lugs 32 and openings 33, as shown, to insure proper registration of the holes 31 in the pattern member with the depending ends. 28 Of the pins. ;It has been found that the pointed ends 23 of the pins will penetrate between the threads of fabric more easily and with less chance of damage to the threads when the pins are rotated during their axial piercing movement. If such rotation is effected, that portion of the pins which pierces the fabric must, of course, be cylind'ricajl in transverse section in order to avoid severe damage to the fabric. One method of rotating the pins is by means of gears. As shown best in Figures 1 and 2, the pins 22 in each row are rotatively connected together by gears 34 mounted on an intermediate portion of each pin. The gears 34 have an axial length sufficient to retain. their mesh with adjacent gears when axially displaced relative thereto upon projection of selected pins, as best shown in Figure 1. Thus, allthe pins in. each row will be rotated by rotation of any one pin in the row. Accordingly, one-pin. in each row may be rotated by any suitable gear train journaled between the plates 29 and. 26 suchasthe idle gears 35, two-of whichare driven by the driving gear 38 and one of which is in driven engagement with a gear 34 on a pin in an adjacent row. The driving. gear 36 may be driven by a belt 31 which is connected to any suitable source of. power, such as an electric motor, not shown, or by any other suitable conventional means. It will be noted that the gears 34 serve. as stops to retain thepins 22 in proper position. between the plates 20 and '25.
Because. of the friction between. the meshing gearsv 34 on the pins 22 during relative axial displacement, it is desirable to provide springs 38-, mounted on. the pins between the gears34- and the fabric supporting plate 20, to retract or withdraw the pins from the fabric when thepattern member 23 is lowered into inoperative position.
If. desired, suitable connections (not shown) may be. provided. between the pattern. member and. the. source of power for driving the belt- 3'! so. thatthe source of-power willv be started by the initial movement of the. pattern member into operative. position and stopped when the member reaches, full operative position and the piercing of. the. fabric has been accomplished.
In Figures 9 and 10 is shown another form of apparatus for causing rotation of the. pins 22 during their axial movement to pierce the fabric. 24. Mounted between the two plates 20 and 26 is an intermediate plate 39' to which the pins 22 are helicall-y splined, as by a helical thread or spline 40. on each of the pins which cooperates with a notch 41 in the periphery of a corresponding, hole in the intermediate plate. Such a helical spline could, of course, be accomplishedv as well by providing a helical groove, not shown, on. each pin into. which a. tooth projects from the periphery of the corresponding hole in the plate 39. It Will be seen that. with either spline construction, axial movement. of the pins, to pierce the fabric, will cause simultaneous rotation-thereof. Hence, movement of a pattern. member (not shown in Figure 9) into operative position is sufiicient to both rotate and project the pins into a, position, such as that shown. In this: construction, the pins are provided with collars. 42 which serve as stops in place of the gears 34. Withdrawing springs 38 are also provided.
Cooperating with the fabric supporting plate is a fabric clamping plate 43 which has a plurality of holes 44 therein corresponding in size, number; and arrangement to the holes 21' in the plate 20. The holes 44 receive the ends 23 of the pins when the latter are projected to pierce fabric clamped between the. two plates: 20 and 43.
The clamping plate 43. may be hinged to one edge of the supporting plate 20, as at 45, and preferably means, such as lugs 46 and pivoted thumb screws 41, are provided for locking the plates together in fabric clamping position.
That area of the fabric clamped between the two plates which is pierced by the pins may be heated in various ways to set the design therein; As shown in Figures 1 and 3, the clamping plate 43 may be provided with an electric heating coil 48 mounted in a compartment 49 which overlies the ends 23 of the pins. The electric circuit for the heating coil 48 preferably includes an adjustable thermostat 50, of a suitable type, so that the temperature to which the plate 43, and consequently fabric, is heated readily may be controlled.
There is shown in Figure 5 another method of heating the fabric while it is clamped between the plates 20 and 43. A steam jacket 5| surrounds the apparatus on three sides to heat the fabric supporting plate. Steam under pressure may be supplied to the jacket, through inlet and outlet connections 52 and 53, from any suitable source of supply andthe temperature controlled in any conventional manner.
' The operation of the apparatus shown in Figures 1 to 5 and 9 is as follows. The fabric to which a design is to be applied is placed smoothly over the supporting "plate 20 and the clamping plate 43 lowered and locked to clamp the fabric therebetween. If gears, instead of a helical spline, are provided to rotate the pins 22, the source of power to rotate the gears is started and the pattern member 29 raised to operative position, thus piercing the fabric with the selected pins. Rotation of the pins then may be stopped and the electric circuit to the heating coil 48 closed, or steam let into the steam jacket 5| if the latter type of heating means is provided. The fabric is left in pierced position between the plates for a period of from about one-half to about five minutes while heated to a temperature of from about 250 F. to about 360 F. The pattern member then is lowered to permit the pins to withdraw, the clamping plate unlocked and raised, and the fabric removed. If desired, heat may be supplied to the apparatus constantly, provided suitable apparatus, such as'the thermostat 50, is incorporated in the heat supply to maintain the temperature at the desired degree.
Nylon stockings must be preboarded before being .dyed in order to give shape thereto. If this operation is not performed and if a nylon stocking is dyed loose in a hot dye bath, like silk or other fiber stockings, and dried on a form, the result is a wrinkled misshapen stocking. .Hence, nylon stockings are preboarded, i. e. placed on a form and subjected to live steam at about 282 F. for about five minutes before being dyed. The stockings then retain a permanent set. Other setting agents are described in U. S. Patent No. 2,157,119. The process of this invention may be performed on nylon stockings before or after the preboarding treatment. It also has been discovered that the process can be performed as a part of the preboarding treatment.
Suitable apparatus for forming a design in a nylon stocking simultaneously with the preboarding treatment is shown in Figures '7 and 8. A relatively thin plate 54 is secured to an attaching member 55 which has curved ends 56 for adjustable attachment to a preboarding form 51. Projecting from the plate 54 are a plurality of pointed pins 58 arranged to form any selected design,
such as the numeral 51" as shownzi 'Theipin's 58 are long enough to project through the fabric; of a stocking between the threads to enlarge 'selected stitches and form small holes in the fab-' ric. In use, the apparatus is attached to a pre--- boarding form and the stocking drawn thereon; That portion of the fabric overlying the pins 58 is pressed down to force the pins through the fabric. The stocking is then subjected to the heat and moisture of the preboarding process and afterwards stripped from the form 5'1. The heatand moisture will have set the design in thestocking.
Numerous changes in the apparatus showr'i and described herein will be apparent to one skilled in the art. Hence, the invention embraces all variations thereof that come within the spirit and scope of the following claims.
I claim:
1. Apparatus for forming a design in syn thetic polyamide fiber fabric comprising: a fabric supporting plate having a plurality of holes extending normally therethrough; a plurality of fabric piercing members having pointed ends supported for projection through said holes, the fabric piercing portion of said members being circular in transverse section; means for selectively projecting said members through said holesto pierce the fabric supported on said plate at selected points to form a predetermined design; means for rotating each of said members while it is being projected to pierce the fabric; and means to heat and thereby set the fabric While pierced by said members.
2. Apparatus for forming a design in synthetic polyamide fiber fabrics comprising: a fabric supporting plate, a base plate mounted parallel to and spaced from said supporting plate, said plates having a plurality of aligned holes extending normally therethrough; a plurality of fabric piercing members mounted in said holes and extending between said plates, said members hav ing pointed ends normally positioned below the supporting surface of said fabric supporting plate; pattern means for axially moving said members to selectively project the pointed ends thereof above said supporting surface to pierce fabric thereon at selected points to form a predetermined design; constant mesh gears secured to that portion of said fabric piercing members located between said plates for rotating said members while they are being projected to pierce the fabric; and means to heat and thereby set the fabric while pierced by said members.
3. Apparatus for forming a design in a stocking knitted from synthetic polyamide fibers comprising the combination of a preboarding form, a relatively thin members detachably mounted on said form and having a plurality of pointed elements arranged in a predetermined pattern projecting outwardly thereof, said elements being adapted and proportioned topierce the fabric of a stocking placed on said form over said member by penetration between the threads to stretch portions thereof and enlarge the normal distance therebetween; preboarding treatment of a stocking on said form will set the stocking fabric and simultaneously form a design therein by the pattern of holes set therein at points pierced by saidelements.
4. Apparatus for forming a design in synthetic polyamide fiber fabric comprising: a fabric supporting plate, a base plate mounted parallel to and spaced from said supporting plate, said plates having a plurality of aligned holes ext nding-i normallyther' brou ht: a plnraiity r: fabric piercin zrmemhers.moun d. nasaid h les and xtending: between. s id plates;v said; meme hers;- having pointedends-v normally positioned below the supporting. surface of said fabric supporting plate; pattern means foraxially moving said members toselectivelyproject' the pointed ends thereof above said supporting surface to pierce fabric thereon; at selected points to -;fo rm= a-predetermineddesign; a helical spline securedto that portion of. saidfabric" piercing members located between said plates for rotating said members upon axial movement thereof; and means to hea-t and thereby set the fabric while pierced by said-members.
5.: Apparatus for forming a designrin': synthetic polyamide fiber, fabric: comprising: a plurality of substantially parallel fabric piercing members arranged in a predetermined pattern andhaving ppintedends that-are circular in transverse section; meanssupporting said members for rota;- tion about theaxisof said pointed: ends and in positions substantially normal tothe. fabric to be pierced;.means for rotating saidmembers: and simultaneously efiecting relative movement between said members and the fabric, to pierce the latter by insertion of said pointed ends between the threads to. stretch portions thereof. and enlarge the normal distance therebetween; and means; for setting the fabric while pierced by said. members to forma design in thefabric by theepattern. of holes set therein at points pierced by said. members.
6. The apparatus defined. in claim 5 in which the means. for rotating the fabric piercing. members includes constant mesh gears conneflting. said; members for, simultaneous; rotation.
7., Theapparatus defined in claim 5 in. which themeansfor rotating the fabric piercing members. includes; helical splinemeans. associated. with each. of said members. to efiect. rotation thereof upon the said relative movement.
8'. Apparatus. for forming. a design in. a-stock ingi knitted fromsynthetic polyamide fibers com-v prising the, combination-v of a. preboarding form and. a; plurality of pointed elements i. mountedxon said form in a predetermined: pattern and adapted and proportioned to-pierce. the-fabric of a stocking placed on said form by penetration between: the threads to. stretch portions thereof and enlarge the normal distance therebetween, whereby preboarding treatment of a stocking on said form will form a design in the stocking fab.- ricby the; pattern of holes set therein at: points pierced by saidelements.
9. Apparatusfor forming a designin a stock! ing knitted from synthetic polyamide fibers comprising the combination; ofa preboarding form andmeans for stretching portions of the threads of: astocking on-v said form: to enlarge the normal distance between said'threa'ds at selected points of the stocking and for maintaining said threads in. their stretched condition during preboarding treatment of the stocking, said'means including i aplurality of pointed elements arranged in a predetermined pattern andinsertable throughthestocking between the threads atsaid points Whilesaid stocking is on said'form.
FRANK G. WEISBECKER'.
REFERENCES CITED- The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS

Claims (1)

1. APPARATUS FOR FORMING A DESIGN IN SYNTHETIC POLYAMIDE FIBER FACRIC COMPRISING: A FABRIC SUPPORTING PLATE HAVING A PLURALITY OF HOLES EXTENDING NORMALLY THERETHROUGH; A PLURALITY OF FABRIC PIERCING MEMBERS HAVING POINTED ENDS SUPPORTED FOR PROJECTION THROUGH SAID HOLES, THE FABRIC PIERCING PORTION OF SAID MEMBERS BEING CIRCULAR IN TRANSVERSE SECTION; MEANS FOR SELECTIVELY PROJECTING SAID MEMBERS THROUGH SAID HOLES TO PIERCE THE FABRIC SUPPORTED ON SAID PLATE AT SELECTED POINTS TO FORM A PREDETERMINED DESIGN; MEANS FOR ROTATING EACH OF SAID MEMBERS WHILE IT IS BEING PROJECTED TO PIERCE THE FABRIC; AND MEANS TO HEAT AND THEREBY SET THE FABRIC WHILE PIERCED BY SAID MEMBERS.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE919347C (en) * 1952-09-30 1954-10-21 Hans Thierfelder Knitted or knitted goods made from fully synthetic fiber material and process for their production
US2724216A (en) * 1950-06-22 1955-11-22 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Method of fabricating electrode spacers
US2977661A (en) * 1955-11-18 1961-04-04 Deering Milliken Res Corp Yarn elasticizing apparatus
US3011697A (en) * 1957-11-21 1961-12-05 Ibm Record punching machine

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US725391A (en) * 1901-12-17 1903-04-14 Charles A Amelang Cloth-cutting machine.
US735398A (en) * 1902-12-01 1903-08-04 Herbert S Mills Vending-machine.
US850485A (en) * 1905-03-18 1907-04-16 Edison Storage Battery Co Apparatus for producing rubber strips.
US957595A (en) * 1908-02-09 1910-05-10 Jacob Ranz Check-writing machine.
US980316A (en) * 1903-11-02 1911-01-03 Philip J Meahl Machine for making perforated music.
US2157119A (en) * 1939-05-09 Method of making fabric
US2244550A (en) * 1940-03-11 1941-06-03 Chandler Frank Jermain Perforating method and apparatus
US2286117A (en) * 1939-05-09 1942-06-09 Seiberling Latex Products Comp Method of making perforate articles
US2309659A (en) * 1940-02-12 1943-02-02 Paramount Textile Mach Co Machine for setting the shape of textile articles
US2424124A (en) * 1947-03-20 1947-07-15 Elmer F Seemuller Method of forming designs in knitted or woven fabric of synthetic polyamide fibers such as nylon

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2157119A (en) * 1939-05-09 Method of making fabric
US725391A (en) * 1901-12-17 1903-04-14 Charles A Amelang Cloth-cutting machine.
US735398A (en) * 1902-12-01 1903-08-04 Herbert S Mills Vending-machine.
US980316A (en) * 1903-11-02 1911-01-03 Philip J Meahl Machine for making perforated music.
US850485A (en) * 1905-03-18 1907-04-16 Edison Storage Battery Co Apparatus for producing rubber strips.
US957595A (en) * 1908-02-09 1910-05-10 Jacob Ranz Check-writing machine.
US2286117A (en) * 1939-05-09 1942-06-09 Seiberling Latex Products Comp Method of making perforate articles
US2309659A (en) * 1940-02-12 1943-02-02 Paramount Textile Mach Co Machine for setting the shape of textile articles
US2244550A (en) * 1940-03-11 1941-06-03 Chandler Frank Jermain Perforating method and apparatus
US2424124A (en) * 1947-03-20 1947-07-15 Elmer F Seemuller Method of forming designs in knitted or woven fabric of synthetic polyamide fibers such as nylon

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2724216A (en) * 1950-06-22 1955-11-22 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Method of fabricating electrode spacers
DE919347C (en) * 1952-09-30 1954-10-21 Hans Thierfelder Knitted or knitted goods made from fully synthetic fiber material and process for their production
US2977661A (en) * 1955-11-18 1961-04-04 Deering Milliken Res Corp Yarn elasticizing apparatus
US3011697A (en) * 1957-11-21 1961-12-05 Ibm Record punching machine

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