US2530155A - Tone amplifier for musical instruments - Google Patents

Tone amplifier for musical instruments Download PDF

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US2530155A
US2530155A US129221A US12922149A US2530155A US 2530155 A US2530155 A US 2530155A US 129221 A US129221 A US 129221A US 12922149 A US12922149 A US 12922149A US 2530155 A US2530155 A US 2530155A
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mouthpiece
tone
chamber
chambers
musical instruments
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Luca Albert De
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D7/00General design of wind musical instruments
    • G10D7/06Beating-reed wind instruments, e.g. single or double reed wind instruments
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D9/00Details of, or accessories for, wind musical instruments
    • G10D9/02Mouthpieces; Reeds; Ligatures

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  • This invention relates generally to mouthpieces for use with musical instruments, and more particularly to mouthpieces of the type used in con- ⁇ junction with musical instruments of the socalled Woodwind type.
  • YAn object of the present invention lies in the provision of a mouthpiece in which tonal qualities may be obtained which are substantially different from those obtained when using a conventional mouthpiece.
  • Another object herein lies in the provision of a mouthpiece the use of which Will enable the musician to produce a tone of large volume Without the necessity of overblowing the instrument, thereby distorting the tone quality to an objectionable degree.
  • Another object herein lies in the provision of a mouthpiece in which the tone quality may be varied by the musician without removing the mouthpiece from the mouth.
  • a further object lies in the provision of a mouthpiece, having the above mentioned qualities which may be used in conjunction With conventional reeds, and the standard tuning barrel of instruments of this type.
  • a still further object of the invention lies in the provision of a mouthpiece having the above mentioned qualities in which the cost of fabrication may be of a relatively low order with consequent wide sale and distribution.
  • a feature of the present invention lies in the fact that a portion of the tone chamber may be comprised of a flexible membrane, capable of expansion under increased pressure of the air column.
  • Another feature of the present invention lies in the fact that the ,column of air from the lips of the musician is introduced into the tone chamber of the mouthpiece at a considerably higher velocity than in the case where a conventional mouthpiece is employed, thereby permitting greater turbulence within the tone chamber.
  • Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a rst embodiment of the invention, in position on the tuning barrel of an instrument.
  • Figure 2 is a bottom elevational view of the embodiment detached from the tuning barrel with the reed and ligature removed.
  • Figure 3 is a vertical longitudinal central sectional view of the embodiment.
  • Figure 4 is a vertical transverse sectional view as seen from the plane 4--4 on Figure 1.
  • Figure 5 is a vertical transverse sectional View similar to that of Figure 4 showing a second embodiment of the invention.
  • Figure 6 is a side elevational view of a third embodiment of the invention, in position on the tuning barrel of an instrument.
  • Figure 'I is a bottom elevational view of the embodiment detached from the tuning barrel with the reed and ligature removed.
  • Figure 8 is a vertical longitudinal central sectional view of the embodiment.
  • Figure 9 is a vertical transverse sectional view as seen from the plane 9-9 on Figure 6.
  • the device generally indicated by reference character I9, has been shown in a form suitable for use with a saxophone. It will be readily understood, however, by those skilled in the art to which the present invention pertains that this particular mouthpiece is by Way of example, the device being capable of ready adaptation for use with a clarinet with merely the usual modification.
  • the device IIJ comprises broadly a tone chamber I2, a mouth engaging portion I4, and supple.- mental chambers IS and I8.
  • the tone chamber I2 may be of a conventional type having a bore 20 of substantially constant diameter. As may be seen on Figures 1 and 3, it is engageable with the tuning barrel 22 of the instrument in a well known manner, a cork gasket member 24 providing a leakproof seal therebetween.
  • the lay 26 provides a seat for the reed 28, which is maintained in place by the ligature member 30.
  • the mouth engaging portion I4 has external configurations similar to those of a conventional mouthpiece, thereby allowing the new user of the device to retain his original lip embouchure. It includes the angularly disposed upper lip engaging surface 32 and side surfaces 34 and 36.
  • the opening in the forward portion of the lay for the entrance of the air column may also be of conventional design, being bounded by the curved edge 38, the rectilinear edges 40 and 42, and the edge 44 of the surface 32. As in the case of a standard mouthpiece the lay is curved Slightly in a direction away from the tongue 4S of the reed 28 to facilitate vibrating thereof.
  • the guide portion 50 includes a rectilinear portion 52 the plane of which is substantially parallel to the lay of the mouthpiece, followed by a gently curved portion 54 leading into another rectilinear portion 56 disposed substantially at a 60o angle with respect 'to the lay.
  • the flutes 15,0 are preferably three in number andmay be omitted if desired as they principally serve an ornamental function. It lwill be readily understood that the guide serves to confine the column'of'air introduced into the instrument to a narrow channel immediately above the reed. As the cross-sectional area of the channel is considerably less than that of the tone chamber inthe standard mouthpiece, the velocity of the air column is consequently of an appreciably 'higher velocity, and lower pressure when entering therein.
  • .'6 yand .i8 are :substantially alike in .purpose .and structure, .and consequently, they avoid needless repetition, a description of the chamber i6 will serve to also describe chamber was-well.
  • the .chamber IIt A is generally conical in shape, and is preferably formed integral with the other portions of the mouthpiece.
  • the chamber intersects the tone chamber
  • the exact internal shape of the chambers is optional depending upon the type rand amount of turbulence it is desired to create therein.
  • the preferred embodiment features ⁇ a chamber of substantially conical shape, having a spherical terminus '58.
  • the second embodiment differs from the first embodiment principally in the structure of the chambers H6 and H8.
  • These chambers unlike those of the first embodiment are not formed integral with the tubular portion .i2 ofthe mouthpiece, but instead are formed from a thin lmembrane of .ductile material such as thin rubber.
  • the chambers H6 ⁇ and IIB shown on Figure 5 are of an exaggerated thickness for purposes of clarity.
  • chambers .HE and llc to .be expanded under .the pressure of the air column introduced therein.
  • the shape of the chambers may be altered Iwhile playing by orally increasing or decreasing the pressure of the air column.
  • the membranes forming the chambers are secured to the tone chamber l2 by any suitable means such as rubber cement.
  • the third embodiment differs from the first embodiment principally in the provision of means to adjust the guide
  • the guidelll lis formed separately from Ithe other portions of the mouthpiece, and vis slidably disposed bymeans of a pin
  • 10 permits of rapid adjustment, :and if desired the set screw may be left nfan .untightened position during playing, thereby 'facilitating adjustment.
  • 12 ⁇ differs from the conventional type in that it does not extend completely about the mouthpiece, but is formed inftwo portions
  • 16 are substantially similar in configuration, and are secured together by the conventional tightening screws
  • Extending from ropposed surfaces of the mouthpiece are two pairs of ligature engaging pins
  • the means for adjusting the guide I have found that merely sliding the same by hand provides adequate sensitivity of adjustment.
  • the means may if desired be provided with screw thread adjustment (not shown).
  • a mouthpiece for use with single reed wood- Wind musical instrument comprising a tone 5 'hr chamber, a mouth engaging portion and a plurality of supplemental chambers each extending laterally of the longitudinal axis of the tone chamber, said supplemental chambers being adapted to Vary the tone quality by permitting greater turbulence and a sustained tone coming from said musical instrument.
  • a mouthpiece for use with single reed Woodwind musical instruments including a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion and at least one supplemental chamber integral with the tone chamber, said supplemental chamber being adapted to produce -a sustained tone
  • said mouth engaging portion having a guide including a first rectilinear portion, a curved portion and a second rectilinear portion.
  • a mouthpiece for use with single reed Wood- Wind musical instruments including: a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion and a pluv rality of substantially conical, supplemental chambers, each extending from the tone chamber and having a spherical terminus merging With the tone chamber to permit the production of a tone of large volume; said mouth engaging portion having a guide including a first rectilinear portion, a curved portion, and a second rectilinear portion; said rst rectilinear portion being disposed parallel to the lay of said mouthpiece.
  • a mouthpiece for use with a single reed woodwind musical instrument comprising: 4a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion and a plurality of substantially conical supplemental chambers each extending from the tone chamber and having a spherical terminus merging with the tone chamber to permit an accumulation of increased volume of air therein and the formation of a sustained tone in the instrument; said mouth engaging portion having a guide including a rst rectilinear portion, a curved portion, and a second rectilinear portion; said supplemental chamber joining said tone chamber at a point juxtaposing said second rectilinear portion of said guide.
  • a mouthpiece for use with a single reed Woodwind musical instrument comprising: a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion having a guide including a rst rectilinear portion, a curved portion and a Second rectilinear portion; a plurality of supplemental chambers each closed at one end and at its other end joining said tone chamber at a point juxtaposing said second rectilinear portion of said guide; and means to adjust said guide Within said tone chamber.
  • a mouthpiece vfor use with a single reed Woodwind musical instrument comprising a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion and a pair of supplemental substantially conical shaped tone chambers, and a guide including a rectilinear portion, each of said supplemental tone chambers intersecting the tone chamber substantially in a circle at a point juxtaposing the rectilinear portion of said guide, said supplemental chambers being closed at one end and adapted to contain additional volumes of air and create turbulence and sustained tone of air passing through the mouthp1ece.
  • each of said supplemental tone chambers has a spherical terminus merging With the rectilinear portion of said guide.

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  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Acoustics & Sound (AREA)
  • Multimedia (AREA)
  • Auxiliary Devices For Music (AREA)

Description

Nov. 14, 1950 A. DE LUCA 2,530,155
TONE AMPLIFIER FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Filed Nov. 25, 1949 2 sheets-sheet 1 A745597' uz-H .INVENTOR Nov. 14, 1950 A. DE LUCA 2,530,155
TONE AMPLIFIER FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Filed Nov. 25, 1949 v 2 sheets-sham 2 lug.
Eleve/QT DE LULF/ INVENTOR wwf ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 14, 1950 TONE AMPLIFIER FOR MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Albert De Luca, New York, N. Y.
Application November 25, 1949, Serial No. 129,221
7 Claims.
This invention relates generally to mouthpieces for use with musical instruments, and more particularly to mouthpieces of the type used in con- `junction with musical instruments of the socalled Woodwind type.
YAn object of the present invention lies in the provision of a mouthpiece in which tonal qualities may be obtained which are substantially different from those obtained when using a conventional mouthpiece.
Another object herein, lies in the provision of a mouthpiece the use of which Will enable the musician to produce a tone of large volume Without the necessity of overblowing the instrument, thereby distorting the tone quality to an objectionable degree.
Another object herein lies in the provision of a mouthpiece in which the tone quality may be varied by the musician without removing the mouthpiece from the mouth.
A further object lies in the provision of a mouthpiece, having the above mentioned qualities which may be used in conjunction With conventional reeds, and the standard tuning barrel of instruments of this type.
A still further object of the invention lies in the provision of a mouthpiece having the above mentioned qualities in which the cost of fabrication may be of a relatively low order with consequent wide sale and distribution.
, A feature of the present invention lies in the fact that a portion of the tone chamber may be comprised of a flexible membrane, capable of expansion under increased pressure of the air column.
Another feature of the present invention lies in the fact that the ,column of air from the lips of the musician is introduced into the tone chamber of the mouthpiece at a considerably higher velocity than in the case where a conventional mouthpiece is employed, thereby permitting greater turbulence within the tone chamber.
A These objects and features, as well as other incidental objects and advantages will become more fully apparent during the course of the following specication and be pointed out in the appended claims.
In the drawing similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views:
' Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a rst embodiment of the invention, in position on the tuning barrel of an instrument.
Figure 2 is a bottom elevational view of the embodiment detached from the tuning barrel with the reed and ligature removed.
Figure 3 is a vertical longitudinal central sectional view of the embodiment.
Figure 4 is a vertical transverse sectional view as seen from the plane 4--4 on Figure 1.
Figure 5 is a vertical transverse sectional View similar to that of Figure 4 showing a second embodiment of the invention.
Figure 6 is a side elevational view of a third embodiment of the invention, in position on the tuning barrel of an instrument.
Figure 'I is a bottom elevational view of the embodiment detached from the tuning barrel with the reed and ligature removed.
Figure 8 is a vertical longitudinal central sectional view of the embodiment.
Figure 9 is a vertical transverse sectional view as seen from the plane 9-9 on Figure 6.
Turning now to the first embodiment, the device generally indicated by reference character I9, has been shown in a form suitable for use with a saxophone. It will be readily understood, however, by those skilled in the art to which the present invention pertains that this particular mouthpiece is by Way of example, the device being capable of ready adaptation for use with a clarinet with merely the usual modification.
The device IIJ comprises broadly a tone chamber I2, a mouth engaging portion I4, and supple.- mental chambers IS and I8.
The tone chamber I2 may be of a conventional type having a bore 20 of substantially constant diameter. As may be seen on Figures 1 and 3, it is engageable with the tuning barrel 22 of the instrument in a well known manner, a cork gasket member 24 providing a leakproof seal therebetween. The lay 26 provides a seat for the reed 28, which is maintained in place by the ligature member 30.
The mouth engaging portion I4 has external configurations similar to those of a conventional mouthpiece, thereby allowing the new user of the device to retain his original lip embouchure. It includes the angularly disposed upper lip engaging surface 32 and side surfaces 34 and 36. The opening in the forward portion of the lay for the entrance of the air column may also be of conventional design, being bounded by the curved edge 38, the rectilinear edges 40 and 42, and the edge 44 of the surface 32. As in the case of a standard mouthpiece the lay is curved Slightly in a direction away from the tongue 4S of the reed 28 to facilitate vibrating thereof.
The interior of the mouth engaging portion I4,
is provided with a fluted guide 50 preferably formed integral with the other portions of the mouthpiece. As may be best seen in Figures 2 and 3 the guide portion 50 includes a rectilinear portion 52 the plane of which is substantially parallel to the lay of the mouthpiece, followed by a gently curved portion 54 leading into another rectilinear portion 56 disposed substantially at a 60o angle with respect 'to the lay. The flutes 15,0 are preferably three in number andmay be omitted if desired as they principally serve an ornamental function. It lwill be readily understood that the guide serves to confine the column'of'air introduced into the instrument to a narrow channel immediately above the reed. As the cross-sectional area of the channel is considerably less than that of the tone chamber inthe standard mouthpiece, the velocity of the air column is consequently of an appreciably 'higher velocity, and lower pressure when entering therein.
The supplementalzcharrrbers 1|.'6 yand .i8 are :substantially alike in .purpose .and structure, .and consequently, they avoid needless repetition, a description of the chamber i6 will serve to also describe chamber was-well.
The .chamber IIt Ais generally conical in shape, and is preferably formed integral with the other portions of the mouthpiece. "The chamber intersects the tone chamber |2 substantially in a circle Aat a point just juxtaposing the rectilinear portion 56 of the `guide "50. The exact internal shape of the chambers is optional depending upon the type rand amount of turbulence it is desired to create therein. As has vbeen mentioned the preferred embodiment features `a chamber of substantially conical shape, having a spherical terminus '58.
Turning nowto the second embodiment of the invention in which to avoid needless repetition, certain of the parts corresponding to those of the first embodiment have been designated by similar reference characters with the Vaddition of the prefix 1.
The second embodiment, as may be seen on Figure 5, differs from the first embodiment principally in the structure of the chambers H6 and H8. These chambers, unlike those of the first embodiment are not formed integral with the tubular portion .i2 ofthe mouthpiece, but instead are formed from a thin lmembrane of .ductile material such as thin rubber. It will be understood that the chambers H6 `and IIB shown on Figure 5 are of an exaggerated thickness for purposes of clarity. chambers .HE and llc to .be expanded under .the pressure of the air column introduced therein. By the use of the flexible chamber, the shape of the chambers may be altered Iwhile playing by orally increasing or decreasing the pressure of the air column.
The membranes forming the chambers are secured to the tone chamber l2 by any suitable means such as rubber cement.
Operation The operation of the device is readily understandable from a study of the drawing. The column of air orally introduced in the normal manner passes over the tongue 46 of the reed 23 and strikes the rectilinear portion 52. It is then subsequently guided through the narrow channel formed by this portion and the thicker portion 50 of the reed, rfherercm i-t emerges at a relatively high velocity and reduced pressure, into This membrane permits the the tone chamber I2. At this lpoint a turbulence is set up, e, portion of the air column passing directly into the tuning barrel 22, as in the conventional mouthpiece, While the remaining portion passes into and out of the chambers i6 and I8. This portion of the air column is thus set into a vibration which tends to reinforce the other portion, thereby creating tonal qualities different from that obtained from the ordinary mouthpiece.
It may thus lbe seen that I have inventeda novel and highly useful improvement for use with saxophones, clarinets and other Woodwinds of similar type. Through its use a wide variety of tonal effects are obtained, with a brilliance and volume heretofore unobtainable.
Turning now to the third embodiment of the invention, to avoid needless repetition, certain of the parts corresponding to those of the first and second embodiments have been designated by similar reference characters with the additional prefix 2.
vmay be seen on Figures 6 to'9, inclusive, the third embodiment differs from the first embodiment principally in the provision of means to adjust the guide |50. As it is often desirable lto change the ton'al effectbeing produced during the course of a particular imusical selection, such adjustment should be made without the Vnecessity of changing to another mouthpiece. Byemploying the third embodiment such change is unnecessary.
To accomplish this end the guidelll lis .formed separately from Ithe other portions of the mouthpiece, and vis slidably disposed bymeans of a pin |62 which is mounted on the extremity |64 of the tongue |66, which in turn is adjustably mounted on the upper surface of the .mouthpiece byzmeans of a set screw |68. .A finger engaging :portion |10 permits of rapid adjustment, :and if desired the set screw may be left nfan .untightened position during playing, thereby 'facilitating adjustment.
Since the above described structure is Vsodisposed as Yto interfere with proper positioning of a conventional type of ligature, it is necessary in the case of the third embodiment to provide a ligature of somewhat altered structure. The 1igature |12 `differs from the conventional type in that it does not extend completely about the mouthpiece, but is formed inftwo portions |14 and |16. The portions |14 and |16 are substantially similar in configuration, and are secured together by the conventional tightening screws |18. Extending from ropposed surfaces of the mouthpiece are two pairs of ligature engaging pins |80, which are detachably connectable Vwith corresponding edges of openings |82. The ligature, when properly positioned, will accordingly receive the equivalent tension as compared with the conventional or unitary type of ligature.
Referring lagain to the means for adjusting the guide, I have found that merely sliding the same by hand provides adequate sensitivity of adjustment. In the case of larger instrument mouthpieces, however, such as the baritone saxophone, bass Vclarinets and saxophones, or the like, where a larger `range of adjustment is possible, the means may if desired be provided with screw thread adjustment (not shown).
I wish it to be. understood thatI do not desire to 'be limited to the exact details of construction shown and described, for obvious modifications will occur to a person skilled in the craft.
I claim:
1. A mouthpiece for use with single reed wood- Wind musical instrument, comprising a tone 5 'hr chamber, a mouth engaging portion and a plurality of supplemental chambers each extending laterally of the longitudinal axis of the tone chamber, said supplemental chambers being adapted to Vary the tone quality by permitting greater turbulence and a sustained tone coming from said musical instrument.
2. A mouthpiece for use with single reed Woodwind musical instruments including a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion and at least one supplemental chamber integral with the tone chamber, said supplemental chamber being adapted to produce -a sustained tone When said mouthpiece is used in connection with said instrument; said mouth engaging portion having a guide including a first rectilinear portion, a curved portion and a second rectilinear portion.
3. A mouthpiece for use with single reed Wood- Wind musical instruments including: a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion and a pluv rality of substantially conical, supplemental chambers, each extending from the tone chamber and having a spherical terminus merging With the tone chamber to permit the production of a tone of large volume; said mouth engaging portion having a guide including a first rectilinear portion, a curved portion, and a second rectilinear portion; said rst rectilinear portion being disposed parallel to the lay of said mouthpiece.
4. A mouthpiece for use with a single reed woodwind musical instrument comprising: 4a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion and a plurality of substantially conical supplemental chambers each extending from the tone chamber and having a spherical terminus merging with the tone chamber to permit an accumulation of increased volume of air therein and the formation of a sustained tone in the instrument; said mouth engaging portion having a guide including a rst rectilinear portion, a curved portion, and a second rectilinear portion; said supplemental chamber joining said tone chamber at a point juxtaposing said second rectilinear portion of said guide.
5. A mouthpiece for use with a single reed Woodwind musical instrument comprising: a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion having a guide including a rst rectilinear portion, a curved portion and a Second rectilinear portion; a plurality of supplemental chambers each closed at one end and at its other end joining said tone chamber at a point juxtaposing said second rectilinear portion of said guide; and means to adjust said guide Within said tone chamber.
6. A mouthpiece vfor use with a single reed Woodwind musical instrument comprising a tone chamber, a mouth engaging portion and a pair of supplemental substantially conical shaped tone chambers, and a guide including a rectilinear portion, each of said supplemental tone chambers intersecting the tone chamber substantially in a circle at a point juxtaposing the rectilinear portion of said guide, said supplemental chambers being closed at one end and adapted to contain additional volumes of air and create turbulence and sustained tone of air passing through the mouthp1ece.
7. A mouthpiece according to claim 6 in which each of said supplemental tone chambers has a spherical terminus merging With the rectilinear portion of said guide.
ALBERT DE LUCA.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,504,387 Shane Aug. l2, 1924 1,621,608 Slechta Mar. 22, 1927 2,397,593 Brilhart Apr. 2, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 655,634 France Dec. 18, 1928
US129221A 1949-11-25 1949-11-25 Tone amplifier for musical instruments Expired - Lifetime US2530155A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3057243A (en) * 1959-04-27 1962-10-09 Jaquith Douglas Mouthpiece for a wind instrument
US4345503A (en) * 1981-06-17 1982-08-24 Runyon Clinton A Interchangeable tone chamber
FR2529364A1 (en) * 1982-06-23 1983-12-30 Ferron E Ets METHOD FOR IMPROVING THE TRANSMISSION OF PREDETERMINED NOTES OF A WIND INSTRUMENT AND INSTRUMENT APPLYING SAID METHOD
BE1000687A4 (en) * 1987-07-14 1989-03-14 Louis Francois Mouthpiece formation for saxophone - has spherical chamber formed within mouthpiece along line of central axis of air passage
WO1997046996A1 (en) * 1996-06-05 1997-12-11 Eric Hansen Mute for saxophones and single reed instruments
EP0874350A2 (en) * 1997-04-22 1998-10-28 Valgon Sound Inc. Acoustical ring and bell sound system
US5910039A (en) * 1997-06-24 1999-06-08 Primos, Inc. Adjustable game call apparatus with moisture diverter and precision tuning system
US6673992B1 (en) 2000-09-20 2004-01-06 Clinton A. Runyon Saxophone mouthpiece
US11620970B1 (en) * 2022-08-21 2023-04-04 Silas M. Patlove Mouthpiece for single-reed wind instruments

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1504387A (en) * 1923-04-02 1924-08-12 Frederick E Shane Tone modifier
US1621608A (en) * 1924-12-04 1927-03-22 Thomas J Slechta Tone modifier
FR655624A (en) * 1927-06-11 1929-04-22 Alarm device to prevent gas poisoning
US2397593A (en) * 1942-08-03 1946-04-02 Arnold Brillhart Ltd Mouthpiece for musical instruments

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1504387A (en) * 1923-04-02 1924-08-12 Frederick E Shane Tone modifier
US1621608A (en) * 1924-12-04 1927-03-22 Thomas J Slechta Tone modifier
FR655624A (en) * 1927-06-11 1929-04-22 Alarm device to prevent gas poisoning
US2397593A (en) * 1942-08-03 1946-04-02 Arnold Brillhart Ltd Mouthpiece for musical instruments

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3057243A (en) * 1959-04-27 1962-10-09 Jaquith Douglas Mouthpiece for a wind instrument
US4345503A (en) * 1981-06-17 1982-08-24 Runyon Clinton A Interchangeable tone chamber
FR2529364A1 (en) * 1982-06-23 1983-12-30 Ferron E Ets METHOD FOR IMPROVING THE TRANSMISSION OF PREDETERMINED NOTES OF A WIND INSTRUMENT AND INSTRUMENT APPLYING SAID METHOD
US4499810A (en) * 1982-06-23 1985-02-19 Ferron Ernest J Obturator for flute designed to improve the emission of certain notes
BE1000687A4 (en) * 1987-07-14 1989-03-14 Louis Francois Mouthpiece formation for saxophone - has spherical chamber formed within mouthpiece along line of central axis of air passage
WO1997046996A1 (en) * 1996-06-05 1997-12-11 Eric Hansen Mute for saxophones and single reed instruments
EP0874350A2 (en) * 1997-04-22 1998-10-28 Valgon Sound Inc. Acoustical ring and bell sound system
EP0874350A3 (en) * 1997-04-22 2000-08-16 Valgon Sound Inc. Acoustical ring and bell sound system
US5910039A (en) * 1997-06-24 1999-06-08 Primos, Inc. Adjustable game call apparatus with moisture diverter and precision tuning system
US6234859B1 (en) * 1997-06-24 2001-05-22 Primos, Inc. Adjustable game call apparatus with moisture diverter and precision tuning system
US6673992B1 (en) 2000-09-20 2004-01-06 Clinton A. Runyon Saxophone mouthpiece
US11620970B1 (en) * 2022-08-21 2023-04-04 Silas M. Patlove Mouthpiece for single-reed wind instruments

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