US2520942A - Vacuum cleaner head - Google Patents

Vacuum cleaner head Download PDF

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Publication number
US2520942A
US2520942A US523541A US52354144A US2520942A US 2520942 A US2520942 A US 2520942A US 523541 A US523541 A US 523541A US 52354144 A US52354144 A US 52354144A US 2520942 A US2520942 A US 2520942A
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Prior art keywords
throat
rib
head
comb
nap
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Expired - Lifetime
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US523541A
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William H Leslie
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Aerus LLC
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Electrolux Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/02Nozzles

Description

Sept. 5, 1950 w. H. LESLIE 2,520,942

VACUUM 0mm HEAD Filed Feb. 25, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 1' Sept. 5, 1950 w. H. LESLIE 2,520,942

VACUUM CLEANER HEAD Filgd Feb. 23, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 wil 12w TOR. WM N.

Patented Sept. 5, 1950 VACUUM CLEANER HEAD William 11. Leslie, Kittanning, Pa., assignor to Electrolux Corporation, Dover, Del a corporation of Delaware Application February 23, 1944, Serial No. 523,541

3 Claims. (Cl. 15-354) This invention relates generally to vacuum cleaners and more particularly to the head or surface engaging member of a vacuum cleaning apparatus.

The vacuum cleaning head of the character comprising this invention is arranged be detachably connected to the end of a wand or tube having a flexible hose attached to the suction side of a blower which draws the air and dirt through the head and discharges it into a bag or similar container from which the dirt may be emptied. The wand is rigid and permits the operator to apply a reciprocating motion to the head to make it glide back and forth over the surface to be cleaned.

The rincipal object of this invention-is the provision of a vacuum cleaner head that glides easily over a thick nap surface and quickly and eiliciently removes waste particles, dirt and threads therefrom. The principal aim of this invention is efllciency in cleaning. A cleaning head that ofl'ers the least resistance to movement and removes the greatest percentage of dirt per pass or per unit of time with the same suction and from a surface having the same amount of dirt, is'the most eiiicient.

Another object is the provision of a cleaning head which glides or has a low resistance to movement over the surface to be cleaned.

Another object is the provision of a vacuum cleaner head with a dome-shaped under surface outlined by depending ribs and terminating in a suction throat that lifts the rug or carpet into a complementary. shape as the head is drawn thereover for the purpose of opening the nap.

Another object is the provision of a throat in --.the vacuum head bounded on one side with a comb having arcuately shaped teeth forming slots angularly disposed to transverse planes of the throat, .the slots on one side of the center of the throat being disposed in one direction and on the other side in the other direction.

Another object is the provision of a vacuum cleaner head with a dome-shaped under surface outlined by spaced depending ribs and divided into. two sections by a comb, one section having a suction throat and the other section being con- Fig. 1 is a plan view of the vacuum cleaner head comprising this invention, with the top cover and wand connection removed.

Fig. 2 is a view in front elevation of the head.

Fig. 3 is a view in side elevation of the head.

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the under side or rugengaging surface of the head.

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of the head.

Fig. 6 is a transverse sectional view of the head.

Fig. 7 is a plan view of the shutter.

Fig. 8 is a detailed view of a portion of the comb adjacent the large throat.

Referring to the drawings, the vacuum cleaner head is constructed on a rectangular base plate It. A wind box II is carried bythe base III and its bottom I2 is provided with the longitudinally disposed throat openings I 3 and I4 aligned with similar throat openings in the base Ill. The bottom I2 of the box II is spaced from the upper surface of the base III to provide clearance for the operation of the shutter I5 which has a sliding fit between the surfaces of these members.

The bottom edge of the front wall It of the box II is undercutas shown at I! inFig. 6 to receive the front edge It of the shutter I5. The bottom edge of the rear wall 20 of the box II is provided with slots 2| for receiving the rearwardly projecting tongues 22 of the shutter I5.

The shutter is substantially rectangular in shape as shown in Fig. 7. The rear edge 23 of the shutter uncovers the port II when the shutter is moved forward with its front edge I 8 engaging in the undercut ll of the front wall I6, as shown in Fig. 6. When the shutter is retracted, as indicated in Fig. 7, the rear edge 23 engages the rear wall 20 of the box II and closes the throat It In the base III, while the front edge I8 is retracted and opens the throat I3 in the base III into the box I I. The rectangular shutter may be slid back and forth between the front and rear walls It and 20 of the box I I by the rearwardly projecting tongues 22 of the shutter, which extend through the rear wall 20 and are provided with the holes 24 located above the openings 25 in the base III. These holes are arranged to receive the lower end of the depending arms 26 of the double winged bell crank levers 21. Each wing of the levers 21 is provided with a foot pad which when depressed swings the lever and the depending arm 26 to move the shutter forwardly or rearwardly. when the foot pad 30 is depressed the shutter l5 moves forward to close the throat I! and open the throat I4 to the box II, as shown in Fig. 6. If the foot pad 3| is depressed the a shutter i5 moves rearwardly to open the throat i3 and close the throat N to the box H, as shown in Fig. 7. Thus the operator may selectively control the opening of either throat 13 or H to the box il.

One of the bell crank levers 21 is provided with a spring biased detent 32 arranged to engage in the recesses 33 and 34 on the standard 35, as shown in Fig. 3, for the purpose of locking the shutter in either its forward or retracted position and not permitting both throats to be opened simultaneously.

The lid 36 of the box II is provided with a cylindrical socket member 3! closed at its ends and open on the under side thereof. The inner cylindrical surface of this member is greater than 180 and thus provides an inner socket or bearing surface for the second cylindrical member 38 which swivels therein. The side of the second cylinder 38, which is exposed within the box II, is provided with the ports 40 and 4| that open toward the throats l3 and M respectively. On the wall opposite these ports the cylindrical member 38 is provided'with the bell attachment 42 which extends through the arcuate opening 44 of the outer or stationary cylindrical member 31 and is arranged to be connected to the wand 43. When the wand 43 is moved back and forth the inner cylindrical member 38 oscillates within the outer cylindrical socket member 31 and permits the wand to assume different angular positions relative to the head as the latter glides over the surface to be cleaned.

The base plate I is elevated from the surface to be cleaned by the wing plates 45 which are hingedly secured along their inner edge 46 to the under side of the base plate "I by any suitable means, such as the bolts 4! which pivotally hold the inner edge of the wing plates 45 to the base plate I0, and are adjustably held in a set inclined position by the bolts 48. The inclination of the wings may thus be adjusted by the extent of the depth of the bolts 48 which force the outer edge of the wings away from the base 10.

The under face of each wing 45 is provided with a rib runner 50 along the outer marginal edge thereof, as shown in Fig. 4. At the front of each wing the runner 50 is joined at right angles to the inwardly directed depending rib which mates and is aligned with the depending rib 52 that is secured to the under side or face of the base and extends across the head between the ribs 5i, as shown in Figs. 2 and 4. The rib 52 arches slightly in the center and forms an extension of the front wall of the throat l3 in the base 10.

Another depending rib 63 is secured to the under side or face of each wing 45 in spaced relation to the rear of the rib 5!. The ribs 53 are joined to the runners 50 and extend inwardly and rearwardly to the edge 46 at approximately the center of the wing plate 45 where they are joined by the rib 54 that traverses the width of the base Ill. The rib 54 is substantially parallel with the rib 52 and has a short intermediate section in which forms an extension of the front wall of the'throat N in the base It as shown in Figs. 4 and 6.

Thus the parallel ribs 52 and 54, together with the inclined wing extension ribs 5| and 53 and the rib runners 50 form a. substantially rectangular mouth on the under side or face of the head, which mouth arches to form the dome on the under side of the head that draws the rug 4 upwardly into engagement with the ribs, as indicated by the dotted line 55 in 155g. 6. Thus in the vicinity of the open throat lS-the arched rug is in the shape of a'tlomethe highest portion being directly under the throat IS.

A comb agitating rib or metal brush 5G is secured to the under side of the base "I dividing the face of the dofiie between the front and rear ribs 52 and 54 into two sections. This comb is higher than the ribs 52 or 54 and forms an extension of the rear wall of the front throat I 3 and is provided with spaced teeth 51 having slots 58 therebetween; The comb is a rib substantially triangular in cross section to produce a pointed tooth of material depth. The width of em!!! tooth U is substantially twice the width of slots 58 separating them. On each side of he center of the comb the teeth are parallel other but the teeth on one side are at a divergent angle to the teeth ontheotlie'g side and are disposed at an normal to the path of flow of mouth of the dome depending ribs, into two sections. the nonsxeee section so and the rear section 6|. The front section 60 is open directly to the front throat l3. whereas the rear section 81 is shallow and is connected to the throat I! through theslots 58 between the teeth of the comb. Thus the air and dust must travel in divergent directions from each side of the center of the comb from the rear section 6| to the throat it. At the 'same time the triangular teeth of the comb ruff up the nap of the rug at the top of the dome formed in the m8. formation of the dome but it is ruffed in divergent directions by the teeth of the comb. The slots 58 between the comb teeth being deep permit the air and dirt to be drawn up from the nap and pass on to the throat l3. This action may be simulated by drawing a straight edge against the nap of the rug to ruff it and simultaneously fling the dirt particles upwardly onto the back of the straight edge. The reciprocating motion of the head causes the comb 58 to ruif the nap and kick up the dirt when traveling in either direction. When traveling backward the dirt passes directly up the throat I3 and when traveling forward it must pass through the slots 58. The section 60 is carried out into the wings 45 by the hollowed out portions 62 which terminate in the small transverse grooves 63 in the runners 50. The small transverse grooves 63 permit dirt to be drawn into the front section 60 of the head when the latter is moved along a wall or other similar object.

The apices of the teeth 51 in the comb 56 lead the front face 64 of the teeth and project into the throat 13. The angular side edges of each face 64 are abrupt. Air suction carrying dirt and string from the nap of the rug past the teeth and through the slots 58 of the comb must reverse its direction to be drawn vertically up into the throat I: and horizontally at an acute angle of approximately 30 to be directed back toward the center of the. throat I 3. The free end of a piece of string, which is ordinarily held by the nap of the rug, will catch on the angular edges of the face 64 of the teeth 51 by The nap is not only opened up by the trying to make these the head is moved the string will be drawn free bends with the air. As

materially higher velocity of the air drawn therethrough. The rear edge of the throat I4 is provided with a comb or agitating rib 55 similar in shape to the comb 56 as shown in Fig. 4. The ends of the comb 65 have forwardly extending short ribs connecting with the rib 54 closing the ends of the throat l4. When the shutter is moved forward to close the throat I; and open the throat l4, the rug or carpet continues to be held up in the shape .of a dome and approximately assumes the contour designated by the dotted lines 66 in Fig. 6, the apex of the dome being under the throat I4 and being more abrupt due to its width. The high velocity of the air at the apex of the dome formed in the rug opens the nap, drawing threads and other particles from the surface being cleaned. This action is aided by. the comb 65 which grasps the end of loose threads raised by the suction and thus aids the suction in withdrawing it from the nap.

If the nap is heavy and long the wings 45 may be lowered to increase the height of the dome formed in the carpet. Ifthe nap is very short the wings 45 may be flattened or drawn up to the base and the arched contour of the ribs 52 and 54 forming the mouth on the under side of the head are depended upon to form the low dome. By changing the elevation of the head in this manner the cleaning head eillciency is increased. In a plane transverse to the throat I 3 and to one side of the throat [4. the bottoms of the rounded rib 54 is higher from the rug than the rib 52. A straight edge engaging the center sections of the rib 52 and comb 65 slants upwardly to the rear and is spaced from the comb 55. The rounded bottom surface of rib 54 is in the same horizontal plane as the bottom surface of the comb 65 and since this portion of the rib 54 is higher than the rib 52 the straight edge lying across the rib 52 and the comb 65 will not engage the rib 54. However the comb 56' is more than twice as far from the straight edge as the central portion of the rib 54. These relative positions of the underhead structure produce the dome in the rug or carpet, as illustrated by the dotted lines 55 and 58 in Fig. 6, depending upon which throat is open. Thus the under structure of the head is constructed to have dual throats which may be selectively used and the elements associated with each throat do not interfere with the other throat in raising the carpet in the shape of a dome to open the nap thereof.

A soft rubber guard 61 issecured to the base by the bolts 48 and extends around the front of the head to protect the wall and furniture from being marred by impact of the head. The bell attachment 42 is arranged to swivel relative to the head and permit the wand 43 to be held in a horizontal position so that the head may be operated under furniture without tilting on the runners 50.

This tank type vacuum cleaning head has been found to remove 17.9% more dirt from a carpeted surface than other similar and well known heads. This improved result in the tank type vacuum cleaning apparatus, which has a materially stronger suction than the exterior bag type cleaning apparatus, is believed to be due to the arching of the rug or carpet in the shape of a dome in combination with the serrated metal brush 56 which engages the nap at the crest of the dome. The nap at the crest of the dome is open and loose due to the arching of the rug by the suction and the metal brush flexes the nap under these conditions to free the embedded dirt particles. This is an important object of this invention. The depending ribs, which outline the mouth of the nozzle, have a similar effect on the nap of the rug or carpet but they also produce a seal around the dome determining its shape and enabling the metal brush to work effectively on the nap to loosen and remove the embedded dirt particles with the aid of the suction. The metal brush 55 being disposed substantially midway between the depending ribs that are parallel therewith produces the effect of a nozzle opening substantially twice the width of the throat it as the suction is eifective on both sides of this metal brush.

I claim:

1. A suction cleaning tool consisting of an elongated hollow nozzle body having an outlet adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a face on said nozzle body arranged to be applied to a, surface to be cleaned, a wing on each end of said face extending below said face to form a gliding surface for said nozzle, an inlet in said face defined by a longitudinal throat of uniform width, a depending rib on the face and wings completely encircling the inlet with a portion thereof providing the front marginal lip of said throat, and an agitating rib having downwardly and forwardly projecting teeth and forming the rear marginal lip of the throat and in spaced relation with the encircling rib, said agitating rib being spaced above the surfaces of the encircling rib.

2. A suction cleaning tool consisting of an elongated hollow nozzle body having an outlet adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a nozzle face on said nozzle body arranged to be applied to a surface to be cleaned, an inlet in said nozzle face defined by a longitudinal throat of uniform width, an elevating wing extending laterally on each end of the nozzle face to raise the latter, a depending rib on the face and wings completely encircling the inlet with a portion thereof providing the front marginal lip of the throat, and an agitating rib carried by said face between the wings and forming the rear marginal lip of the throat, said agitating rib being spaced from and higher than the encircling rib.

3. A suction cleaning tool consisting of an elongated hollow'nozzle body having an outlet adapted to be connected to a source of suction, a nozzle face on said nozzle body arranged to be applied to a surface to be cleaned, an inlet in said nozzle face defined by a longitudinal throat of uniform width, an elevating wing extending laterally on each end of the nozzle face to raise the latter, a depending rib on the face and wings completely encircling the inlet with a portion thereof providing the front marginal lip of the throat, an agitating rib carried by said face between the wings and forming the r ar marginal lip of the throat, said agitating 7 being spaced from and higher than the encircling rib, and means to change the angular position of the elevating wings to increase and decrease the height of the nozzle face from the surface to be cleaned.

1 WILLIAM H. LESLIE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Number Blackall Aug. 3, 1909 Doyle Aug. 29, 1916 Fisher Sept. 4, 1917 Rosenfield Mar. 4, 1919 Spencer Jan. 24, 1911 15 Number Number

US523541A 1944-02-23 1944-02-23 Vacuum cleaner head Expired - Lifetime US2520942A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2649610A (en) * 1949-03-05 1953-08-25 Hoover Co Valved cleaning nozzle with plural mouths for suction cleaners
US2716254A (en) * 1948-12-30 1955-08-30 Raymond T Moloney Vacuum cleaners
US2815525A (en) * 1954-06-23 1957-12-10 Electrolux Corp Suction nozzles for vacuum cleaners
US2825925A (en) * 1954-04-05 1958-03-11 Hoover Co Suction nozzle with suction powered agitator
US2856627A (en) * 1956-06-26 1958-10-21 Eldridge M Pierce Vacuum cut hair removing machine
US3036325A (en) * 1961-02-15 1962-05-29 Parks Cramer Co Collapsible nozzle for textile suction cleaner
US3150402A (en) * 1962-04-11 1964-09-29 Electrolux Ab Suction cleaner nozzle
JPS50120262U (en) * 1974-03-18 1975-10-01
US20100206336A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2010-08-19 Sami Souid Extendable vacuum cleaner
EP2989952A3 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-09-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Suction nozzle and vacuum cleaner having the same

Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US930134A (en) * 1908-08-19 1909-08-03 Blackall And Baldwin Company Cleaner-head for vacuum cleaning apparatus.
US982640A (en) * 1908-11-03 1911-01-24 Spencer Turbine Cleaner Company Cleaning-tool.
US1196090A (en) * 1916-08-29 Printing press
US1238903A (en) * 1915-07-31 1917-09-04 Hurley Machine Company Vacuum-cleaner nozzle.
US1296121A (en) * 1913-02-04 1919-03-04 William W Rosenfield Suction-cleaner.
US1654186A (en) * 1921-06-06 1927-12-27 Hoover Co Suction sweeper
GB293782A (en) * 1927-07-12 1928-10-25 Fisker & Nielsen As Improvements in and method for vacuum cleaning
US1816538A (en) * 1927-01-26 1931-07-28 Kern Bernard Carpet and floor cleaner
US1899107A (en) * 1929-02-27 1933-02-28 Air Way Electric Appl Corp Vacuum cleaner
FR743683A (en) * 1933-04-03
GB391607A (en) * 1932-04-27 1933-05-04 Hoover Co Improvements in or relating to suction cleaners
US1992238A (en) * 1932-08-04 1935-02-26 Air Way Electric Appl Corp Suction cleaner
US2048273A (en) * 1933-08-05 1936-07-21 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2227299A (en) * 1937-01-28 1940-12-31 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2249463A (en) * 1939-07-21 1941-07-15 Electric Vacuum Cleaner Co Suction nozzle
US2274560A (en) * 1939-07-13 1942-02-24 Ott Thomas Wellington Vacuum cleaner attachment
US2333471A (en) * 1941-04-23 1943-11-02 Electrolux Corp Suction nozzle
US2348082A (en) * 1942-09-18 1944-05-02 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner

Patent Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1196090A (en) * 1916-08-29 Printing press
FR743683A (en) * 1933-04-03
US930134A (en) * 1908-08-19 1909-08-03 Blackall And Baldwin Company Cleaner-head for vacuum cleaning apparatus.
US982640A (en) * 1908-11-03 1911-01-24 Spencer Turbine Cleaner Company Cleaning-tool.
US1296121A (en) * 1913-02-04 1919-03-04 William W Rosenfield Suction-cleaner.
US1238903A (en) * 1915-07-31 1917-09-04 Hurley Machine Company Vacuum-cleaner nozzle.
US1654186A (en) * 1921-06-06 1927-12-27 Hoover Co Suction sweeper
US1816538A (en) * 1927-01-26 1931-07-28 Kern Bernard Carpet and floor cleaner
GB293782A (en) * 1927-07-12 1928-10-25 Fisker & Nielsen As Improvements in and method for vacuum cleaning
US1899107A (en) * 1929-02-27 1933-02-28 Air Way Electric Appl Corp Vacuum cleaner
GB391607A (en) * 1932-04-27 1933-05-04 Hoover Co Improvements in or relating to suction cleaners
US1992238A (en) * 1932-08-04 1935-02-26 Air Way Electric Appl Corp Suction cleaner
US2048273A (en) * 1933-08-05 1936-07-21 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2227299A (en) * 1937-01-28 1940-12-31 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2274560A (en) * 1939-07-13 1942-02-24 Ott Thomas Wellington Vacuum cleaner attachment
US2249463A (en) * 1939-07-21 1941-07-15 Electric Vacuum Cleaner Co Suction nozzle
US2333471A (en) * 1941-04-23 1943-11-02 Electrolux Corp Suction nozzle
US2348082A (en) * 1942-09-18 1944-05-02 Electrolux Corp Vacuum cleaner

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2716254A (en) * 1948-12-30 1955-08-30 Raymond T Moloney Vacuum cleaners
US2649610A (en) * 1949-03-05 1953-08-25 Hoover Co Valved cleaning nozzle with plural mouths for suction cleaners
US2825925A (en) * 1954-04-05 1958-03-11 Hoover Co Suction nozzle with suction powered agitator
US2815525A (en) * 1954-06-23 1957-12-10 Electrolux Corp Suction nozzles for vacuum cleaners
US2856627A (en) * 1956-06-26 1958-10-21 Eldridge M Pierce Vacuum cut hair removing machine
US3036325A (en) * 1961-02-15 1962-05-29 Parks Cramer Co Collapsible nozzle for textile suction cleaner
US3150402A (en) * 1962-04-11 1964-09-29 Electrolux Ab Suction cleaner nozzle
JPS50120262U (en) * 1974-03-18 1975-10-01
US20100206336A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2010-08-19 Sami Souid Extendable vacuum cleaner
EP2989952A3 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-09-14 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Suction nozzle and vacuum cleaner having the same
US9737184B2 (en) 2014-08-29 2017-08-22 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Suction nozzle and vacuum cleaner having the same

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