US2481548A - Recoiling barrel firearm with a breech bolt and breech bolt carrier - Google Patents

Recoiling barrel firearm with a breech bolt and breech bolt carrier Download PDF

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US2481548A
US2481548A US16551A US1655148A US2481548A US 2481548 A US2481548 A US 2481548A US 16551 A US16551 A US 16551A US 1655148 A US1655148 A US 1655148A US 2481548 A US2481548 A US 2481548A
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bolt
carrier
barrel
recoil
receiver
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US16551A
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Jr Edwin H Waltke
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Jr Edwin H Waltke
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A3/00Breech mechanisms, e.g. locks
    • F41A3/64Mounting of breech-blocks; Accessories for breech-blocks or breech-block mountings
    • F41A3/78Bolt buffer or recuperator means
    • F41A3/82Coil spring buffers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A3/00Breech mechanisms, e.g. locks
    • F41A3/12Bolt action, i.e. the main breech opening movement being parallel to the barrel axis
    • F41A3/14Rigid bolt locks, i.e. having locking elements rigidly mounted on the bolt or bolt handle and on the barrel or breech-housing respectively
    • F41A3/16Rigid bolt locks, i.e. having locking elements rigidly mounted on the bolt or bolt handle and on the barrel or breech-housing respectively the locking elements effecting a rotary movement about the barrel axis, e.g. rotating cylinder bolt locks
    • F41A3/26Rigid bolt locks, i.e. having locking elements rigidly mounted on the bolt or bolt handle and on the barrel or breech-housing respectively the locking elements effecting a rotary movement about the barrel axis, e.g. rotating cylinder bolt locks semi-automatically or automatically operated, e.g. having a slidable bolt-carrier and a rotatable bolt

Description

E. H WALTKE, JR RECOILING BARREL FIREARM WITH A BREE CH 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Sept. 13, 1949.
BOLT AND BREECH BOLT CARRIER Filed March 23, 1948 g m mm M a Q .l
w A mwwwv m INVENTOR.
' Erma/V127 Sept. .13, 1949. r w JR 2,481,548
. RECOILING BARREL FIR M WITH A BREECH 150mv AND BREECH BOLT CARRIER Filed March 23, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 EMA/E2517; c/. F 6- INVENTOR.
P 1 E. H. WALTKE, JR 2,481,548-
RECOILING BARREL FIREARM WITH A BREECH BOLT AND BREECH BOLT CARRIER Filed March 23, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 EbM/I/HVHATKj Jen INVENTOR.
v irmeA/y Patented Sept. 13, 1949 OFFICE 2,481,548 RECOILING BARREL FIREARM WITH A BREECH BOLT AND CARRIER BBEECH BOLT Edwin H. Waltke, Jr., Los Angeles', Calif.
Application March 23, 1948, Serial No. 16,551
My invention pertains to an improvement in recoiling barrel firearm with a branch bolt and breech bolt carrier, and more particularly to the Claims. (Cl. 891.62)
type of automatic fire arm generally referred to as recoil-operated.
The purpose, and oneof the principal objects,
. ofthis invention is to provide a rifle, or other firearm, having a more compact arrangement of parts than former firearms of this type with a resulting reduction in weight and over-all dimensions, consistent with adequate strength of design.
An important feature of this invention, in carrying out the foregoing object, is the provision of a novel mounting'of the recoil-spring meas, for shifting the bolt forwardly or to its firing position, and in which the spring means is positioned or confined, either when expanded or compressed,
between the rear end of the receiver or barrelsupporting means and near the forward end of the bolt, or the carrier therefor, and further is located at the side of the bolt, or the axis thereof, so as not to interfere with the firing pin.
Another important object of this invention is to provide a recoil-spring means for a firearm of this class which consists of a plurality of separate springs, at least two, so that the firearm will still function if one breaks, or so that it will function properly if a lighter than a normal charge of powder is used in the shell.
A further important object of this invention is to provide a novel arrangement and construction of bolt, bolt carrier or pusher and bolt receiver whereby a compact and sturdy firearm may be made, an important feature of the invention being the provision of a novel cam means for positively operating the several elements in synchromsm.
With these and other objects in View, as will appear hereinafter, I have devised a firearm having certain novel features of construction, combination, and arrangement of parts and portions, as will be hereinafter described in detail, and
particularly set forth in the appended claims,
reference being had to the accompanying drawings and to the characters of reference thereon, which form a part of this application, in which:
Fig. 1 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of a rifle embodying, in one form, the invention of my automatic firearm, portions of the barrel and stock being broken away, dotted lines being also shown to indicate the rearward position of the bolt and bolt carrier;
Fig. 2 is a fra'gn entaryplan view thereof, show,-
'view, taken through |--T of Fig. 6, showing the relation of cams described in Fig. 6;
ing portions broken'away and in section to facilitate the. illustration;
7 Fig. 3 is a transverse sectionalview thereof, taken through 3-3 of Fig, 1,-showing primarily the bolt in a locked position with the barrel;
Fig. 4 is a fragmentarylongitudinal sectional elevational view, showing thebolt in an unlocked position from the barrel and in its initial rearwardly moving position.
Fig. 5 is a transverse sectional view, taken through 5-5 of Fig. 4, showing the adjacent ends of the bolt and barrel in their unlocked relation;
Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken through '56 of Fig. 4, showing the relation between the cams on the rear end of the bolt and the bolt receiver for rotating the bolt to effect unlocking of the bolt from the barrel;
Fig. '7 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional FigIB is a fragmentary longitudinal secti nal elevational view, similar to Fig. 1 but with the bolt and bolt carrier in their rear positions within the'receive'r'; if V .Fig. 9 is a transverse sectional view, showing therear end view of the bolt and bolt carrier within the-receiver;
Fig. 10 is an enlarged side view of the bolt and bolt carrier in their forward positions;
Fig. 11 is a front end View of the bolt and bolt carrier when in their forward positions;
pose of illustration, comprises a stock I, having a rear butt portion l and a' forward portion l A receiver 2 is carried by the stock at the rear and upper portion of-the forward portion l of 7 of the forward portion l of the stock.
The usual barrel 6 is longitudinally reciprocally mounted onthe forward portion of the receiver above the forward portion I of the stock and forwardly of the latter andthe receiver. The barrel has a barrel guide 1 which slides in a longitudinal slot 2 at the bottom of the forward portion of the receiver. A barrel stop pin 8 is Provided on the receiver and extends across the forward portion of the'slot 2 a spring 9 norand axially reciprocally mounted in the carrier. The axial movements of the bolt II and carrier l2 are limited to the space between the rear end.
of the barrel 6 and a plug l3 at the rear end of the receiver, as will be described hereinafter.
The carrier is urged to its forward position, as shown in Fig. 1, by a recoil spring means which is shown as consisting of a pair of coil springs l4 and I5. The rear ends of the springs impinge against the plug and the forward portions extend into deep longitudinal bores. 12 and 12 in the carrier, the bores extending from the rear to near the forward ends .of the carrier. Thus, the greatest practical length or space is provided for the springs Ill and I5; ,Guide rods I6 extend forwardly of the plugl 3 into the springs and the ends of the. bores to facilitate guiding of the (V springs whentheyare compressed into the bores.
When in its forward position, for lookinga cartridge in.the breach 6 of the barrel, the forward ,end of the bolt J l is locked tofthe rear end of the 1 barrel, such locking being effected by locking lugs l I on the bolt and '6 on the barrel. The locking lugs 6 are provided on a rearward extension 6 on the barrel This barrel extension provides an annular. recess li to permit axial rotation of the forward end of thebolt. .The spaces between the locking lugs 6 of the barrel Permit the looking lugs H 110 be inserted from the rear end of the barrel to the annular recess 6.
The upper half of the carrier 12 is .of larger diameter than thelower half and fits into a correspondingly shaped .bore in the. receiver, as shown in Figs. '6 and '9, thus preventing rotation of the carrier when sliding in the receiver.
to the receiver 2 and 'the carrier I'Z except when the locking lugs Il are located within the annular recess E The bolt is then rotated in a counterclockwise direction, when the carrier is urged forwardly y the recoil springs, by means of a cam lug 11!? on the bolt and a cam lug. H2 at the forward end of the lower portion of the carrier, asshown in Figs. .4 and 10.
Upon firing of the cartridge in the breech, the barrel ;6, carrier .12, and bolt H are forced rearwardly, causing a cam'll at the rear end of the bolt to engage a helical cam 2& at the .right side I of the lower portion of the bore in the receiver, and causing the boltto 'berotated in a clockwise direction topermit the lockinglugs H of the bolt tov pass backwardly, between the locking lugs 6 of the barrel. The cam lug 11 then moves into C a longitudinal slot 2 in the receiver below the helical cam 2 thereby preventing further rotation of the bolt. As the bolt .is rotated in a clockwise direction the cam I I again engages the cam I2 and causes the carrier 12 to move backwardly at an increased speed, both the bolt II and the carrier 12 moving backwardly together against the force of the .reco'ilsprings.
The rearward movement of the bolt forces the hammer 4f! backwardly, and causes the trigger mechanism to be cocked and the trigger 42, which is pivotally mounted about its lower end .at the '4 rear portion of the receiver, to be forced into a cocked position by a trigger plunger 43 against the compression of a spring 44, the trigger being held in its cocked position by a scar portion 42* on the trigger and a sear portion 43 on the plunger 43.
As the bolt l I moves backwardly, the extractor 2| withdraws the empty shell from the breech 6 of the barrel opposite an open space 2 in the receiver. In the bolt is longitudinally slidably mounted an ejector rod 22, which engages the plug 13 .at the rear end of the receiver, causing the forward end of the ejector to extend beyond the forward end or face of the bolt against which the head end of the cartridge is normally seated. Such forwardlextension of the ejector causes projection ofthe empty shell to the right side of the receiver through the opening 2 therein.
The discharge of th empty shell permits a new cartridge to be forced upwardly from the ,magazine 31, this magazine being shown as having a cartridgefollower 32 backed by a spring 33.
receiver through the opening 2 effected by drawing the handle 11 .backwardly,
The 7, bolt l l is inanon-rotatable position with respect When .the new cartridge is forced upwardly, the recoilspring-s M and 1.5 force the carrier l2 and bolt l l forwardly, forcing thenew cartridge into the chamber or breech b as described/Pulling of the trigger resultsin release of the hammer so that the free end thereof may strike the rear end of the firing pin 24 in the usual manner.
The following is .a description of the operation of my firearm, and describes insequence the various steps as well as co-relation and co-operationof the variouselements:
A cartridge may be inserted into the breech or chamber '6 by means of a handle ll, mounted on the carrier, and extendin to the right of the This may be against the compression of the recoil springs, behind the rear end of a new cartridge forced upwardly from the magazine. Forward movement .of the handle, or automatic action of thesprings,
causes the cartridgeto be forced into the breech .or chamber 6*.
Assuming thecartridge to be in firing position, the gun is now ready to fire, whichis effected by pulling the trigger 42 backwardly. This permits the firing spring 44 to force the plunger 43 forwardly and force thehammer 4| forwardly until it strikes the rear end of the firing pin knob 23 provided at the rear end of the firing pin 24 which extends through the axial portion of the bolt, and forces the forward end of the firing pin beyond the forward end of the bolt against which the head of the cartridge rests, as shown best in Fig. 12. The cartridge is Upon the explosion of the cartridge, the barrel, carrier, and bolt are reooiled rearwardly with respect to the receiver 2, as described above. As the cam ll engages the helical cam 2 on the receiver, the bolt and carrier are unlocked from the barrel. The recoil of the barrel is limited by the annular shoulder 2 at the rear of the bore 2'. "The spring .9 then returns the barrel to its initial or normal forward position.
Simultaneously with the clockwise rotation of the bolt, effected by the engagement of the cams [Hand 2 another camming action takes place between the cams 11- and 12 which causes the bolt carrier to move backwardly at a greater speed than the bolt, as described above, both the carrier .and the bolt, however, continuing backwardly together due to their own momentum,
.the recoil of both of these elements being gradually absorbed by the springs l4 and I5. The remaining energy of these two members is absorbed by' the receiver plug 13. At this pomt the spent cartridge case or shell is ejected, as stated. Shortly after the beginning of the forward movement of the carrier byv the recoil springs, the face of the bolt. H engages the edge of a new cartridgewhich is forced by the bolt into the chamber or breech of the barrel. As the face of the bolt strikes the rear of the'barrel at 6 the bolt carrier continues forwardly a short distance, and durin the latter movement a retary action takes place between the cams II and [2 causing the bolt to be rotated in a counterclockwise direction, :causing the lugs ll at the-forward end of the bolt to be locked behind the lugs 6* onthe barrel. Thus the cartridge is locked into position to be discharged when the trigger is pulled.
One of the essential features of my invention is that the spring means, consisting of a spring or springs, returning the bolt assembly to the firing position and causing the locking of the breech, is or are somounted'that it or they impinge upon the locking means, or one of the elements thereof, which, in this instance, is the bolt pusher or carrier, at a point near the front end of the bolt. Therefore when the bolt and locking means thereof recoil rearwardly and the rear end of the bolt strikes the plug or stop in the receiver, an appreciable space is provided between the rear end of the bolt and the point of im= pingement of the spring or springs upon the looking means. Therefore no space is necessary or provided between the rear end of the bolt and the bolt stop. This construction results in the advantage of a more compact arrangement of i the working members.
I wish it to be understood that I do not desire to be limited to the exact details of construction shown and described, for obvious modifications will occur to a person skilled in the art.
I claim:
1. A firearm operated by. recoil, comprising a supporting means, a barrel longitudinally reciprocally mounted on'the supporting means, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means at the rear end of and longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, said carrier having an opening extending from its rear end to near the forward end, and a recoilspring positioned with its forward. portion in the opening and its rear end bearing against the supporting means. 7 i a 2. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a barrel, a receiver reciprocally supporting the rear end portion of the barrel, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted within the receiver at the rear end of and longitudinally shift-- able with respect to the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, said carrier having an opening extending from its rear end to near the forward end, and a recoil spring positioned with its forward portion in the opening and its rear end bearing against the rear end portion of the receiver.
3. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a supporting means, a barrel longitudinally reciprocally mounted onthe supporting means, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means at the rearend of and longitudinally shiftable with respect'to the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally. shiftable with respect thereto, said carrier having openings extending from its rear end to near the forward end, and aplurality of recoil springs positioned with their forward portions in.
the openings and their rear ends bearing against the supporting means. a i
4. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a barrel, a receiver reciprocally supporting the rear end portion of the barrel, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted within the receiver at the rear end of and'longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt 'mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, said carrier having openings extending from its rear end to near the forward end, and a plurality of recoil springs positioned with their forward portions in the opening and their rear ends bearing against th rear end portion of the receiver.-
5. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a supporting means, a barrel longitudinally, reciprocally mounted on the supporting means, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally and nonrotatably mounted on the supporting means at the rear end of and longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt rotatably mounted in the carrier and longtitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, and a recoil spring positioned with its forward end against the carrier and its rear end bearing against the supporting means.
6. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a barrel, a receiver reciprocally supporting the rear end portion of the barrel, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally and non-rotatably mounted within the receiver at the rear end of and longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt rotatably mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, and a recoil spring positioned with its forward end against the carrier and its rear end bearing against the rear portion of the receiver.
'7. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a supporting means, a barrel longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally and nonrotatably mounted on the supporting means at the rear end of and longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt rotatably mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, and a plurality of recoil springs positioned with their forward ends against the carrier and their rear ends bearing against the supporting means. i
8. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a barrel, a receiver reciprocally supporting the-rear end portion of the barrel, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally and'non-rotatably mounted within the receiver at the rear end of and no longitudinally shiftable with respect to the'barrel, a bolt rotatably mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, and
nomes to near the for-ward end, a recoil spring positi'oned with its forward portion in the opening and its rear end be'aring against the supporting means, means for rotating the bolt andlocking the same to the rear end of the barrel at the instant of firing, means automatically disconmeeting the bolt from the barrel upon the recoil --of the latter, and means to check the recoil of the barrel.
10. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising :a bar-rel, a receiver reciprocally supporting the rear-end portion of the barrel, a boltcarrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted within the receiver at the rear end of and longitudinally jshiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, said carrier having an opening extending from its rear end to near the forward end, a recoil spring positioned with its forward portion in the opening and its rear end bearing against the "rear end portion. of the receiver, means for rotating the bolt and looking the same to the rear end of the barrel at the irrstant of firing, means automaticall disconnecting the bolt from the barrel upon the recoil of the latter, and means to check the recoil of the barrel.
11. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a supporting means, a barrel longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally and non-rotatabl mounted on the supporting means at the 'rear end of and longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt rotatably rnounted'in ithe roar-rier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, a rec'oil spring positioned. with its forward end against the carrier and its rear end "bearing against the supporting means, means for rotating the bolt and locking the same to the :lrear end .of the barrel at the instant of firing, means automatically disconnecting the bolt from the barrel upon the recoil of the latter, and means 'to-check-ithe recoil of the barrel.
12. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising ;a barrel, a receiver reciprocally supporting the rear end portion of the barrel, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally and non-rotatably mounted within the receiver at the rear end of and longitudinally shiftab'le with respect to the barrel, :a bolt rotatably mounted in the carrier "and longitudinally .shiftable with respect thereto, a recoil spring positioned with its forward end against the carrier and its rear end bearing against the rear portion of bolt, means for rotating the bolt and locking the same to the rear .end of the barrel at the instant of firing, means automatically disconnecting the receiver from the barrel upon the recoil of the latter, and means to :check the recoil of the barrel.
13. .A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a supporting means, .a barrel longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means at the rear end of and longitudinal-1y shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally sh-if-table with respect thereto, said carrier having an opening extending from its rear end to near the forward end, and a recoil spring 100- sitioned with its forward portion in the opening and its rear end bearing against the supporting means, said spring being compressible, upon the recoil of the carrier, substantiall into said opening.
.14. .A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a barrel, a receiver reciprocally supporting'th'e rear 'en portion of the barrel, 2. bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocallymounted Within the receiver at the rear end of and longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, said carrier having an opening extending from its rear end to near the forward end,
and a recoil spring .positioned with its forward portion in the opening and its rear end bearing against therear end portion of the receiver, said spring being compressible, upon the recoil of the carrier, substantially into said opening.
el, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudirnally shi'ftable with respect "thereto, said carrier having openings extending/from its rear end to near the forward end, and a plurality of recoil springs positioned with their forward portions in the openings and -their rear ends bearing against the supporting means, .said springs being compressible upon the recoil of the carrier, substantially into said openings.
16. A firearm operated "by recoil, comprising a barrel, 2. receiver reciprocally supporting the rear end portion of the barrel,:a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted within the receiver at the rear end of and longitudinall shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shifta'ble with respect thereto, said carrier -having openings extending from its rear end to near the forward end, and a plurality of recoil springs positioned with their forward portions in the openings and their rear ends bearing against the rear end portion of the receiver, said springs being compressible, upon the recoiliof the carrier, substantially into said openings.
1'7. A firearm operatedby recoil, comprising a supporting means, a barrel longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means at the rear end of the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftabl'e with respect thereto, and a recoil spring positioned with its forward end against the carrier and its rear end bearing against the supporting means, :said spring being compressible, upon the recoil of the barrel and the carrier, into a space surrounding the longitudinal axis of the bolt.
18. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a barrel, a receiver reciprocally supporting the rear end portion of the barrel, 2. bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally mounted within the receiver at the rear end of the barrel, a bolt mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, and a recoil spring positioned with its forward end against the carrier and its rear end bearing against the rear end portion of the receiver, said spring being compressible, upon the recoil of the barrel and the carrien'into aspace surrounding the longitudinal axis of the bolt.
19. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a supporting means, a barrel longitudinally reciprocally mounted on the supporting means, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally and nonrotatably mounted on the Supporting means at the rear end of and longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt rotatably mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, a recoil spring positioned with its forward end against the carrier and its rear end bearing against the supporting means, mating cams at the forward portions of the carrier and the bolt for rotating the latter and locking the forward end thereof to the rear end of the barrel at the instant of firing, other mating cams on the rear portion of the bolt and the supporting means for rotating the bolt in the opposite direction a distance sufficient only automatically to disconnect the bolt from the barrel upon the recoil of the same, and means to check the recoil of the barrel upon the disconnection of the bolt therefrom, the first cams reengaging each other, simultaneously with the disconnection of the bolt from the barrel, to increase the rearward movement of the carrier.
20. A firearm operated by recoil, comprising a barrel, a receiver reciprocally supporting the rear end portion of the barrel, a bolt carrier longitudinally reciprocally and non-rotatably mounted within the receiver at the rear end of and 10 longitudinally shiftable with respect to the barrel, a bolt rotatably mounted in the carrier and longitudinally shiftable with respect thereto, a recoil spring positioned with its forward end against the carrier and its rear end bearing against the rear portion of the receiver, mating cams at the forward portions of the carrier and the bolt for rotating the latter and locking the forward end thereof to the rear end of the barrel at the instant of firing, other mating cams on the rear portion of the bolt and the receiver for rotating the bolt in the opposite direction a distance sufficient only automatically to disconnect the bolt from the barrel upon the recoil of the same, and means to check the recoil of the barrel upon the disconnection of the bolt therefrom, the first cams reengaging each other, simultaneously with the disconnection of the bolt from the barrel, to increase the rearward movement of the carrier.
EDWIN H. WALTKE, JR.
No references cited.
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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2901854A (en) * 1956-06-18 1959-09-01 Jessie T Ivy Thumb, face, and eye guard attachment for rifles
US3013355A (en) * 1959-02-11 1961-12-19 Roy E Weatherby Firearm breech bolt mechanism with a bolt stop
US3273460A (en) * 1965-06-14 1966-09-20 James D Mason Firearm with gas operated breech block unlocking means
US4152855A (en) * 1976-07-28 1979-05-08 Dubiel Joseph T Rifle bolt locking apparatus
US5911173A (en) * 1996-10-18 1999-06-08 Westrom; Mark A. Breech bolt assembly for a firearm
WO2000045109A1 (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-08-03 Heckler & Koch Gmbh Self-loading hand gun with a moveable lock with locking projections
US6182389B1 (en) 1998-11-06 2001-02-06 Karl R. Lewis Bolt assembly for a firearm
US6510778B1 (en) * 2000-12-28 2003-01-28 Custom Shooting Technologies, Inc. Automatic bolt hold-open assembly
US6625917B2 (en) 1999-01-28 2003-09-30 Heckler & Koch Gmbh Bolt assembly for a firearm
US20060236582A1 (en) * 2002-05-10 2006-10-26 Lewis Karl R Monolithic rail platform and bolt assemblies for a firearm
US7568422B1 (en) * 2006-09-28 2009-08-04 Christopher Gene Barrett Bolt operation facility for autoloading firearm
US20090277067A1 (en) * 2006-10-19 2009-11-12 Gregg James P Take-down rifles including a caliber exchange system
US8745911B2 (en) 2011-11-17 2014-06-10 Jing Zheng Bolt assembly and bolt carrier assembly with switch mechanism for discharging spent casing from either side of firearm receiver without need of disassembling the firearm

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
None *

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2901854A (en) * 1956-06-18 1959-09-01 Jessie T Ivy Thumb, face, and eye guard attachment for rifles
US3013355A (en) * 1959-02-11 1961-12-19 Roy E Weatherby Firearm breech bolt mechanism with a bolt stop
US3273460A (en) * 1965-06-14 1966-09-20 James D Mason Firearm with gas operated breech block unlocking means
US4152855A (en) * 1976-07-28 1979-05-08 Dubiel Joseph T Rifle bolt locking apparatus
US5911173A (en) * 1996-10-18 1999-06-08 Westrom; Mark A. Breech bolt assembly for a firearm
US6044748A (en) * 1996-10-18 2000-04-04 Armalite, Inc. Breech bolt assembly for a firearm
US6182389B1 (en) 1998-11-06 2001-02-06 Karl R. Lewis Bolt assembly for a firearm
US6536150B2 (en) 1999-01-28 2003-03-25 Heckler & Koch Gmbh Automatic firearm with a moving bolt assembly with locking projections
WO2000045109A1 (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-08-03 Heckler & Koch Gmbh Self-loading hand gun with a moveable lock with locking projections
US6625917B2 (en) 1999-01-28 2003-09-30 Heckler & Koch Gmbh Bolt assembly for a firearm
US6510778B1 (en) * 2000-12-28 2003-01-28 Custom Shooting Technologies, Inc. Automatic bolt hold-open assembly
US20060236582A1 (en) * 2002-05-10 2006-10-26 Lewis Karl R Monolithic rail platform and bolt assemblies for a firearm
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