US2473174A - Double exposure photographing and developing apparatus - Google Patents

Double exposure photographing and developing apparatus Download PDF

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US2473174A
US2473174A US566429A US56642944A US2473174A US 2473174 A US2473174 A US 2473174A US 566429 A US566429 A US 566429A US 56642944 A US56642944 A US 56642944A US 2473174 A US2473174 A US 2473174A
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lens
film
exposure
developing
lever
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US566429A
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George N Pifer
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SPEEDTYPE Inc
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SPEEDTYPE Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ANALOGOUS TECHNIQUES USING WAVES OTHER THAN OPTICAL WAVES; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03BAPPARATUS OR ARRANGEMENTS FOR TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS OR FOR PROJECTING OR VIEWING THEM; APPARATUS OR ARRANGEMENTS EMPLOYING ANALOGOUS TECHNIQUES USING WAVES OTHER THAN OPTICAL WAVES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • G03B17/00Details of cameras or camera bodies; Accessories therefor
    • G03B17/48Details of cameras or camera bodies; Accessories therefor adapted for combination with other photographic or optical apparatus
    • G03B17/50Details of cameras or camera bodies; Accessories therefor adapted for combination with other photographic or optical apparatus with both developing and finishing apparatus
    • G03B17/53Details of cameras or camera bodies; Accessories therefor adapted for combination with other photographic or optical apparatus with both developing and finishing apparatus for automatically delivering a finished picture after a signal causing exposure has been given, e.g. by pushing a button, by inserting a coin

Description

June 14, 19,49. G. N. PIFER DOUBLE EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHING AND DEVELOPING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed 'De c'. 4, 1944 HTTORME'YJ June 14, 1949. G. N. PIFER 2,473,174
DOUBLE EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHING AND DEVELOPING APPARATUS HTTOR IVE Y5 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 G. N. PIFER DOUBLE EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHING AND DEVELOPING APPARATUS Doe REGISTRATION CARD NAME Jo m4 RESIDENQ Birth Roe June 14,1949.
Filed Dec. 4; 1944 INVENTOR.
6202s: 4 fifm 444w WM W 'ATTO/P/VE X) f i" FIG. 7
Na 45 N M11 Patented June 14, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE DOUBLE EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHING AND DEVELOPING APPARATUS George N. Pifer, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, assignor to Speedtype, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio, at corporation Application December 4, 1944, Serial No. 566,429
3 Claims. 1
This invention relates to a photographic apparatus, preferably referred to as Instant Phototure, efficient, rapid and operative on the open counter without darkroom, or booth, with all the de veloping and processing being done in open daylight under a red safe-glass, in full view of the sitter being photographed, and of any onlooker.
The object of the present invention is to utilize, with certain improvements and modifications, the aerated instantaneous and cleanly application of the developing solutions, with the quick-drying and moisture-proof photographic paper base as disclosed in my Patent No. 1,682,931. However, in all other respects I provide a device applicable to the many different current new needs in the photographic field, eliminating the high cost of manufacture and intricate mechanisms, and even motive power, and making same operative by the simple means of pressing a few buttons without wetting a hand.
A further object is a multiplicity of uses and adaptations varying from a speedy method for photographic identification with complete index registration, and making the photograph foolproof by special or specific designs, emblem or fingerprint, etc., to studio portraiture work by the photographer right over the public shopping counter, and, which enables him to show his sitter immediate proofs from the sittings that are being made.
These objects are obtained with almost the entire elimination of mechanical motive power, as seen in the identification procedure which numbers, autographs, imposes upon a film negative and print, any distinctive inscription or mark in conjunction with a preprinted registration card for filing record, and completes the operation and duplicates the photographic prints in a speedy manner. Aside from its variable applications with immediate processing of the film and duplicating prints therefrom, the present invention is also operative singly as a bare camera, for exposures on the film only, or, operative singly as a copying and a projection camera-the developing and fixing being done by the regular darkroom method-4n other words dispensing with the solutions and atomizing processing. All the novel features and objects accomplished by the present invention will be summarized and described in detail in the following specification and as set forth in the appended claims.
In the accompanying sheets of drawings,
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of my improved photographic apparatus;
Fig. 2 is an enlarged view, partly in section and 2. partly in elevation, omitting the outer lamp and the standards which support it;
Fig. 3 is an enlarged perspective view, partly diagrammatic, showing certain parts of the equipment illustrating how the first photographic impression is made on the film and also how the second photographic impression is made on the film;
Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional view largely diagrammatic of the mechanism by which the atomized or aerated developing solutions are applied to the film;
Fig. 5 is an enlarged perspective view largely diagrammatic illustrating the manner in which the prints taken from the negative, are developed by the aerated solutions;
Fig. 6 represents an original index preprinted registration card, with any special data or imprint, on that portion which is to be photographed;
Fig. 7 is a finished photographic card which is produced in my machine;
Fig. 8 is an enlarged view of a portion of a film 20, on which the facial image has been applied and exposed, and a transparent slide with a black-out section adapted to be positioned over the image for the second photographic impression;
Fig. 9 is a view on an enlarged scale, showing the section of the film with the transparent slide of the Figure 8, covering the facial image for the second photographic impression, and illustrating the data that is to be applied and superimposed, for the second exposure; and
Fig. 10 is a view similar to Figs. 8 and 9 showing a modification.
Before describing the machine in detail, I wish to give the sequence of operations to make the double-exposed-negative, and prints. Looking at the exterior view of Fig. 1, the sitter is before the lens and the attendant momentarily presses a switch l'lc in a lamp circuit which lights the sitter; then the attendant turns a lever clockwise which trips and opens the shutter on the portrait lens and rolls the film to the adjacent chamber in focal line with the projection lens, shown in Fig. 2, at the same time placing it in position for atomized development. A second exposure, to impose preprinted data or design, as shown on the preprinted card, is inserted and supported on a given plane and exposed. The film can immediately be developed by application of aerated or atomized solutions thereto. Next, if desired, the double exposed image can be projected down onto a sensitized card through the medium of a taken on the area or portion 20a of the film which 3 lamp in the apparatus and of a condensing lens. For further clarity, sectional views of Figs. 2 and 3 show the triple procedure of making the facial exposure, the copying exposure, and the projected-image exposure on sensitized cards.
Referring now to the drawings and first to Fig. 1, the photographicapparatus comprises a cabinet l5 supported on a base l6 which forms a drainage receptacle for the apparatus. In front of and above the apparatus I5 is a chamber I! for a lamp, a portion I'Ia of the'lamp'chamber consisting of a reflector and a portion l'lb which is at the lower front being formed of glass. The lamp I! is controlled by a momentary switch button [To which is located at the right hand side of the base l6 next to the buttons l2, l3 and M, to be referred to. A pair of standards If! support the lamp chamber I"! from the forward side portions of the base IS, the standards l8 being far enough apart so that a full view of the sitter is attainable'f'rom thespacebetw'een the standards. It was previously stated that'the picture is taken in open daylightund'er a; red'safe-glass in full view of the sitter being photographed and of any on-l'o'ok'er. The red safe-glass referred to for the sitter and'on-looker, is a: glass strip IE1; at the front'inclined 'part' of the machine and the red safe-glass for the operator is shown at I5b, the same'being a part'of the door 42 to be referred to subsequently. The portrait lens 19, Figs. 2 and 3, is'in' front of the film which is mounted on a spool 2| and passes downwardly to a take-up spool 22, the two spools being connected toa belt Thanrstiacial photographic picture is lies directly behind the lens'lil. -To'operate this theoperator'inoves a reversible lever 23 (see Figs. 1, 2 and-3) in a clockwisedirectionygiving to this l'ever'a complete revolution. The movement of this lever trips the shutter 24 for the lens 1-9 (see Fig; 2-), which exposes thenegative for'the-facial image, and immediately afterthe continued movement ofthelever 23 which-is mounted on a roller 25 (see Figs'. 2 and3'l 'moves the film 20 down to the'positi'on-shown 'in Fig. 3, in focal position with respect-to the projection-lens 26 for'producing' a second exposure on the film adjacent to the portion which received the first photographic 'impression from the portrait lens. This movement of the'film' isalso for the purpose of bringing the film: to a position to be processed by atomizing members;
It is to be noted thatasecond light source con"- sisting of a. lamp- 2'! is at thel-reartoi the" new position :of theexposed*film=, therebeing a condensing lens 28 positioned betweenthelamp; and
:said position, boththe lamp and condensing lens being. in a. separate hingedrcompartment. 2.1a which: permits the easy applicationof the film. for
loading purposes;v The purposeuof the. lamptzzl .and tubular shutter w and-"with the copying plane for the preprinted card 3| shown in Fig. 3.
To make the second exposure from the preprinted card 3|, the button 32 of Fig. 3 is first given a slight turn which moves the pin 34, see Fig. 3, into a slotted portion 35 of lever 33 and then the button connected with sliding tube 38 is pulled outwardly, which, at the: same time, moves the transparent slide '36 having a b1ackingout portion 31, which is designed to cover the fractional area on which the first exposure was made throughithe lens 19. The blacking-out area 3'! can be variable in size or location, in sharp outline or vignette or. design. This same outward movement of the button 32 exposes the lens 26, thus the second exposure is made on the him by a lamp 4! which illuminates the copy and which canbe controlled on and off, in any suitable way, as by opening and closing a door 42 shown in Figs. 1 and 2.
The lens 26 is mounted inwardly of the slidable tubular member '38, which is connected to the button 32, and isin line with'a pair of openings 39 in a stationary outer tube 40. That is to say, the movable tubular'memb'er 38 is between the lens 26 and the outer tube having the openings 39. This makes thesecond exposure, by having first turned-the button 32 and withdrawing the tube "38 from over the lens 26. Thereafter it is manually restored to normal position again, which is the meansof closing the shutter for the lens 26, and thissame movement withdraws the transparent slide -36 from in front of the exposed film, -to permit the unobstructed and the subsequent application-of atomizing solutions.
For the second exposure, I-have here shown exposed to the negative the matter shown in Fig. '7 at 68a. -I-Iowever, this may be variedas desired in design or character of the-data, finger print, etc.
The atomizing'solutions are in a'series'of bottles 43, 44' and 45. From these bottles the solutions are adapted'to be conductedxupwardly to the at'omizer lfi by tubesl 41 leading from the bottles containing the solutions-'and'by flexible tubes 2-3 leading to the atomizer, seelparticularly Fl s. 2 and 4. Mechanism for controlling the atomizer 46 includes thedial shaft 49 which is. manually controlled by 'turnin'g a small dialindicator 59 shown in Figs. 1, 2 and in the enlarged view of Fig. 4.
Mounted" on the' dial sha-ftare several cams, including a cam: 5'I ,which-functions to shift the application-of air from the atomizer to an ato-mizer t'o be 'referred'to presently. Also the shaft 49 is provided-"with three cams 52, 53 and 51 having cam lugs which are adapted to engage-levers 55 toreleaseone of thethree tubes 48 so that the'right-solution can' be applied to the film. Furthermore,'- the dial shaft is provided withacam 56 which is provided with three lugs which areadapted tosuccessively engage an arm'5l whichin turn isadapted to close switch contacts '58 in an electric circuit 59 leading to the air compressor which is not shown and which is exteriorly located. The tube from the air compressor is shown 'at 60 in Fig; 1' and also in Fig. 4. Whenit is desiredto developthe film, the dial indicator' or lever 'SGis'mOVe'd' clockwise to developing position. In doing'this, the cam 5i raises the lever 51 and, in so doing; closes the switch contacts "58. Thisstarts'the'operation of the air compressorso that the developing; fixing or washing solutions are sprayed-"on the'fi'lm. When the lug orthe ca-m'passes theieverti; thereis'set' into is a standard article well known in the art.
Simultaneously with the 90 degree turn of the cam shaft 49, the cam 52 is first actuated, which .cam actuates the lever 55 which releases the developing tube 48, thus the developer is sprayed from the tube for the given length of time which, in this instance, is ten seconds and the time switch shuts off the compressor at the end of said period opening the switch 58 and shutting off the air clockwise another 90 to the fixing position, the fixing solution is released by the cam 53 for a period of time during which the fixing solution is sprayed onto the film. Then on further onequarter clockwise movement of the lever 50, the
same operation is repeated by cam 54 for the wash of the film, thus the cam shaft is moved to a position to develop, and then to fix, and then towash.
As the hand lever 50 is moved to the first position, a lever 62 has been actuated by the cam 5| which brings a port 63 into line with the flexible tube 60 which goes to the atomizer 46. As the hand lever is moved to the two succeeding positions, the port 63 remains in engagement with the tube 6|] continuing the admission of air to the atomizer 46, and on the fourth turn of the lever 56 and the dial shaft 49, the lever 62 is again restored to its inner or normal position as indicated in Fig. 4, thus again bringing the port 63a of the air intake into line with flexible tube 66a which passes to the atomizer 46a to be referred to presently.
It has previously been stated that after the first and second exposures are made on the negative, respectively through the lens l9 and through the lens 26, the positive picture will be made on a sensitized card which is in the same position as the card 3| (Fig. 3) when making the second ex- 'posure on the negative. These sensitized cards are fed from the bottom of a magazine 65 by actuating an external knob 66, which in turn actuates a roller which moves the lowermost card onto the inclined projection plane 61. In Fig.2 I have shown one of the sensitized cards 68 in exposure position, as well as in position for the r developing operation. Also, I have shown in Fig. 7 one of the finished positive pictures or cards 68. The sensitized card 68 has been exposed in the inclined plane 61 (Fig. 2) in the projection position by means of the lamp 21, the condenser lens 28 through opening 29 and the lens 26, previously referred to.
It will be understood that before the exposure on the card 68 can be made, the lens 26 is exposed by pulling out the knob 32. Next, the exposed sensitized card 68 is developed in the same position that the exposure was made, and this mechanism will now be described. The development of the exposed sensitized card 68 is by the atomizing system previously employed, using the same bottles 43, 44 and 45. It will be recalled that for the first development the solutions were supplied through flexible tubes 48, from the extensions 41 of the bottles. To develop the exposed sensitized card, flexible tubes I are employed and these tubes are normally closed by the inner ends of a series of hand levers pivoted at lla (Fig. The operating buttons for these levers are on the exterior of the camera and are designated 12, 13 and 14. To supply the develop- On again shifting the dial shaft ing solution in atomized condition, i first depress the button 12, which is on one of the levers II. This depressing of the button 12 releases the solution from the corresponding flexible tube Ill. At the same time that any one of the levers 1| is depressed, it operates a lever 15 which in turn is adapted to close the circuit at the contacts 16 of the motor driven air compressor. Accordingly as long as the lever havin the button 12, is held depressed the developing solution is applied to the exposed card in the form of a spray. When the developing has been completed, aspring I1 restores the lever to its normal position, again closing the flexible tube 10 which supplied the developer and at the same time the switch 16 is opened, stopping the compressor. Next, the button 13 is depressed, actuating the lever 1| which in like manner supplies the atomized fixing solution to the card. After this has been supplied the requisite time, it is released, and finally the button 14 is depressed which supplies the atomized washing solution.
It will be remembered that in the first atomized developing process the atomizer is designated 46, the air being supplied by means of a tube 66 which, when the lever 62 is actuated, brings the port 63 of the tubular member into alignment with the tube 66 which supplies the air to the atomizer 46. Normally, however, with the lever 62 is the position shown in Fig. 4 the port (here designated 63a) is in register with the flexible tube 66a which leads to the atomizer 46a shown in Fig. 5, this being the atomizer used in the second developing process last described above.
This completes the development of the exposed card, which is ready to be removed either by opening the door 42 or through a slot 18, shown in Fig. 1.
'I might here state that the portrait lens '24 and the feed spool 2| are in one light-tight compartment 86, While the atomizer 46, the shutter 40 and the take-up spool 22 are in another lighttight compartment, designated 8|, which is adjacent the compartment 80. Also, the bottles of solutions 43, 44 and 45 are located in a separate compartment 82, closed off by a partition 83. It will be understood that all the compartments mentioned may have separate doors or movable lids by which access may be had for any purpose.
To explain further its versatile character and variable functioning, a double exposed photograph illustrated in Fig. '7 can be obtained in some instances, particularly when the device is to be operated for just plain portraiture and without special or written data, by preparing in advance the rolled sensitized film 20 with a latent pro-exposed border or design. This is accomplished by the removal of small lever 24, Fig. 2, so the lens does not open while hand lever 23 consecutively winds film to its position for second exposure, (which in this procedure is actually a first exposure).
The entire roll can be consecutively exposed to any special design or border, etc. that is placed on the copying plane, by advancing the film with each turn of the lever clockwise after each exposure. When the entire film has been preexposed with the aforesaid border or design, and, again rewound on spool 2| by turning the lever backwards, it can subsequently be reused in the camera, needing only the facial exposure or portrait for a completed photographic card, thus making it a time saver in actual operation or practice before a busy public. It will be seen that in functioning in this manner, the device isonly being applied specifically to straight portraiture work. with a fixed pre exposed design, already ex:- posed in the film, and therefore would not at the same time be feasible for identification, where newly imprinted or inscribed data or numbering is required.
Mentioning further its versatile character and functioning, a double exposed photograph similar to card shown in Fig. 7 can be obtained without a preprinted registration card, or a second ex posure to copy same. As generally known in regular portraiture work, a photograph is desirable with a bordered embellishment and, say. the name of the studio or the photographer for illustration. This is accomplished with my invention. by having any design or embellishing matter permanently and specially fixed on the transparent slide, which as already described is pushed in front of the exposed section just. before the tubular shutter opens. By merely opening tubular shutter on a blank. lighted space on the copying plane, the light transmitted through the lens 26 passes through the transparent slide, and exposes upon the unexposed area of the film whatever image is designed or fixedon the slide. Then when the shutteris. closed. and the slide is moved back the exposed portion. is developed in the same manner as before. This is illustrated. in Fig. 10 wherein the slide 360. is shown as. having an in.- ner border portion 35b, an outer border portion 36c-outside of the black-out section 31:.
Thus it will be seen that the objects stated in the early part of the; specification are very effectively attained with the present invention, with the alternative of making the second. ex.- posure without. exposing from the preprinted card.
I do not desire to be confined tothe precise details shown, but aim in my claims to cover.
all modifications which: do: not involve a departure from the spirit and. scope of the invention.
Having thus described my invention, 1 claim:
1. In a photographic apparatus. including a housing, a camera therein having :a shutter and lens, means for. moving a. sensitized strip in photographing relationship to said camera, and a window in said housing in alignment with said lens; the improvement which comprises the provision of means for exposing to said camera. a
fractional area only of said strip, a second lens and shutter within said housing, a slide within said housing and having an opaque area and a transparent area, means for moving said slide just prior to the opening of said second shutter to position the opaque area of the slide over the fractional area of the strip which was exposed during the first exposure and the transparent -area oi the slide over the unexposed portion of the strip, means for advancing the strip from its photographing position relative to said camera to a photographing position before said second lens for a second exposure thereon adjacent the first exposure, and means within said housing for developing simultaneously the two exposed portions of the strip while the strip remains in the position it occupied during the second exposure.
2. Photographic apparatus as defined in claim 1: and wherein means is provided within the housing for projecting the developed negative image produced by the two exposures onto a sensitized element for the purpose of producting a positive image of the two exposures.
3. Photographic appartus as defined in claim 1 and wherein means is provided within the housing for presenting preprinted matter to said second lens to constitute the subject matter of the second exposure.
. GEORGE N. PIPER.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2582001A (en) * 1949-06-22 1952-01-08 Eastman Kodak Co Photographic print making machine
US2688278A (en) * 1950-12-23 1954-09-07 Kenyon Instr Company Inc Rapid presentation of photographic images
US2759815A (en) * 1953-03-02 1956-08-21 James C Faulkner Aerial alignment sheets and methods of making same
US2760418A (en) * 1952-03-17 1956-08-28 William L Ulmer Photographic apparatus
US2769369A (en) * 1953-11-16 1956-11-06 Oscar Smith Microfilm printer
US2784653A (en) * 1953-08-27 1957-03-12 Polaroid Corp Photographic apparatus
US2930296A (en) * 1958-12-12 1960-03-29 Luther G Simjian Apparatus for collecting an article for deposit
US3021769A (en) * 1958-12-29 1962-02-20 Raymond R Mann Photography means and method
US3080802A (en) * 1960-07-28 1963-03-12 Visual Graphics Corp Visible photo composer
US3097255A (en) * 1954-07-16 1963-07-09 John P Farquhar Corrector for image-forming optical assemblies
US3115075A (en) * 1960-02-09 1963-12-24 Gen Dynamics Corp Bright display system
US3143943A (en) * 1957-02-27 1964-08-11 Smith & Sons Ltd S Processing of photographic material
US3200724A (en) * 1962-11-29 1965-08-17 Itt Apparatus for accurate formation and presentation of a visual display
US3230849A (en) * 1963-12-26 1966-01-25 Clark Charles William Photographic apparatus for producing multiple exposures
US3398664A (en) * 1965-11-26 1968-08-27 Radio Broadcasting Company Combined television and photographic machine
US4080069A (en) * 1976-04-27 1978-03-21 Peter John Pollina Vignetting assembly
FR2621404A2 (en) * 1987-07-09 1989-04-07 Milovanovich Andre A novel transmission in the processing of images in photography in the general sense and applications
US20160213798A1 (en) * 2015-01-26 2016-07-28 E & C Manufacturing, LLC Ultraviolet and misting disinfecting unit

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US2153212A (en) * 1939-04-04 Composite printing apparatus for
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US2153212A (en) * 1939-04-04 Composite printing apparatus for
US2153211A (en) * 1939-04-04 Composite printing of motion picture
US1490487A (en) * 1921-04-19 1924-04-15 Benjamin F Schmidt Camera for aerial photography
US1682931A (en) * 1924-12-31 1928-09-04 American Phototure Company Automatic photographing machine
US1795050A (en) * 1928-07-16 1931-03-03 Luther G Simjian Apparatus for producing margined photographs
US1734780A (en) * 1928-07-21 1929-11-05 Luther G Simjian Apparatus for producing margined photographs
US2218656A (en) * 1934-12-05 1940-10-22 Speedtype Inc Automatic photographing machine
US2125536A (en) * 1935-12-24 1938-08-02 Paul W Rosenfeld Photographic camera with built-in developing device
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Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2582001A (en) * 1949-06-22 1952-01-08 Eastman Kodak Co Photographic print making machine
US2688278A (en) * 1950-12-23 1954-09-07 Kenyon Instr Company Inc Rapid presentation of photographic images
US2760418A (en) * 1952-03-17 1956-08-28 William L Ulmer Photographic apparatus
US2759815A (en) * 1953-03-02 1956-08-21 James C Faulkner Aerial alignment sheets and methods of making same
US2784653A (en) * 1953-08-27 1957-03-12 Polaroid Corp Photographic apparatus
US2769369A (en) * 1953-11-16 1956-11-06 Oscar Smith Microfilm printer
US3097255A (en) * 1954-07-16 1963-07-09 John P Farquhar Corrector for image-forming optical assemblies
US3143943A (en) * 1957-02-27 1964-08-11 Smith & Sons Ltd S Processing of photographic material
US2930296A (en) * 1958-12-12 1960-03-29 Luther G Simjian Apparatus for collecting an article for deposit
US3021769A (en) * 1958-12-29 1962-02-20 Raymond R Mann Photography means and method
US3115075A (en) * 1960-02-09 1963-12-24 Gen Dynamics Corp Bright display system
US3080802A (en) * 1960-07-28 1963-03-12 Visual Graphics Corp Visible photo composer
US3200724A (en) * 1962-11-29 1965-08-17 Itt Apparatus for accurate formation and presentation of a visual display
US3230849A (en) * 1963-12-26 1966-01-25 Clark Charles William Photographic apparatus for producing multiple exposures
US3398664A (en) * 1965-11-26 1968-08-27 Radio Broadcasting Company Combined television and photographic machine
US4080069A (en) * 1976-04-27 1978-03-21 Peter John Pollina Vignetting assembly
FR2621404A2 (en) * 1987-07-09 1989-04-07 Milovanovich Andre A novel transmission in the processing of images in photography in the general sense and applications
US20160213798A1 (en) * 2015-01-26 2016-07-28 E & C Manufacturing, LLC Ultraviolet and misting disinfecting unit
US9750832B2 (en) * 2015-01-26 2017-09-05 E & C Manufacturing, LLC Ultraviolet and misting disinfecting unit
US10729796B2 (en) 2015-01-26 2020-08-04 E & C Manufacturing, LLC Ultraviolet and misting disinfecting unit

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