US2469655A - Counter actuating and resetting mechanism - Google Patents

Counter actuating and resetting mechanism Download PDF

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Publication number
US2469655A
US2469655A US579098A US57909845A US2469655A US 2469655 A US2469655 A US 2469655A US 579098 A US579098 A US 579098A US 57909845 A US57909845 A US 57909845A US 2469655 A US2469655 A US 2469655A
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time
counter
print
shaft
resetting
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US579098A
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Leathers Ward
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International Business Machines Corp
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International Business Machines Corp
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Priority claimed from US73008847 external-priority patent/US2540033A/en
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06MCOUNTING MECHANISMS; COUNTING OF OBJECTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06M3/00Counters with additional facilities
    • G06M3/06Counters with additional facilities for printing or separately displaying result of count
    • G06M3/062Counters with additional facilities for printing or separately displaying result of count for printing
    • G06M3/065Counters with additional facilities for printing or separately displaying result of count for printing with drums
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07CTIME OR ATTENDANCE REGISTERS; REGISTERING OR INDICATING THE WORKING OF MACHINES; GENERATING RANDOM NUMBERS; VOTING OR LOTTERY APPARATUS; ARRANGEMENTS, SYSTEMS OR APPARATUS FOR CHECKING NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • G07C3/00Registering or indicating the condition or the working of machines or other apparatus, other than vehicles
    • G07C3/005Registering or indicating the condition or the working of machines or other apparatus, other than vehicles during manufacturing process

Description

May 10, 1949.
W. LEATHERS COUNTER AGTUATING AND RESETTING MECHANISM 1O Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 21, 1945 mam 10km INVENTOR Ward Leaiizers. 7
4 AILTORNEY y 7 IW.L-.EAT HERS 2,469,655
COUNTER ACTUATING AND RESETTING MECHANISM Filed Feb. 2l, 1945 10 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 3. 20 M i A l W W 00 I FIG.4.
M 5:00 I35 0420 000 0050 027 0054 Q 2 2145 000 0255 000 0050 000 0057 Q M2 1:45 060 0255 000 0000 012 0057 H Q- 12:45 000 0225 000 0000 000 0045 H Mo 1x45 225 0225000 0000 045 0045 H Mo 5:00 000 0000 000 0000 000.0000 H INVENTOR Ward Z eaih 67'6- A'TTORNEY May 10, 1949. w. LEATHERS COUNTER ACTUATING AND RESETTING MECHANISM l0 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Feb. 21, 1945 FIG. 5.
INVENTOR War-o2 Zeal/fans.
' ATTORNEY May 10, 1949.
W. LEATHERS COUNTER ACTUA'IING AND RESETTING MECHANISM Filed Feb. 21. 1945 10 Sheets-Sheet 4 A'i'TORNEY May 10, 1949.
W. LEATHERS COUNTER ACTUATING AND RESETTING MECHANISM Filed Feb. 21, 1945 10 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR l l krdlcaikers.
E: w Qw BY 7 ATTORNEY May 10, 1949. w LEATHERS 2,469,655
COUNTER ACTUATING AND RESETTING MECHANISM Filed Feb. 21, 1945 10 'Sheefs-Sheet 7 FIGS.
INVENTOR Wardl eaiizcrs.
ATTO R N EY W. LEATHERS COUNTER ACTUATING AND RESETTING MECHANISM May 10, 1949.
Filed Feb. 21, 1945 l0 Sheets-Sheet 8 f 444 (@I 450 HI 434 INVETOR 436 I l hrd Zea fliers.
May 10, 1949. w. LEATHERS COUNTER ACTUATING AND RESETTING MECHANISM l0 Sheets-Sheet 9 FIG. 17.
INVENTOR l tivrdllcaifiens.
ATTO RN EY May 10, 1949; w. LEATHERS COUNTER ACTUATING AND RESETTING MECHANISM l0 Sheets-Sheet 10 Filed Feb. 21, 1945 P RDDU CT PROGR/ZM i cs IDLER PRODUCT TIME INVENTOR ll iw'd Z earl/2 6125. BY MZQW ATTORNEY Patented May 19, 1949 CGUNTER ACTUATING AND RESETTIN G MECHANISM Ward Leathers, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignor to International Business Machines Corporation, New York, N. Y., a. corporation of New York Application February 21, 1945, Serial No. 579,098
13 Claims. l
The present invention relates to counter actuating and resetting mechanism for recording apparatus of the type ad ed for use in con-- nection with. factory or 3 machines for 1911-)" paring record of the production output and the workmans time. The counter actuating and setting mechanism compl. the present 1nvention is, however. adaptable for wide variety of uses. The machine illustrated herein and for the present counter Pctuatiz g and reset-- ting mechanism has been desi ned adapted for use m ng records throughout wide range of relat A between ltime and speed of ope Such operation may be the day-today operation of for contiuuously producing a 11."...itaryp oduct or bulk product, and in such an instance the recording ap-- paratus is to render a c ily history of the b av printed record of the production and of the Work ans time. Where a unitary product is conce production out put will be in term f ill or pieces of work, and where a bulls prod lot is concerned, the production output may be in terms of pounds or other units of weight, cubic feet or other units of meas ure, feet or other units of length. Apart from its use as recording device for recording the history of operation of a machine, described above, the same may be employed as a counter for making a printed record of a number or a value with respect to time, as for example, counting the number of ve les which pass a give l point during any selected period of time, the number of pedestrians entering upon a certain street corner or the like.
The invention purely for illustrative purposes, been designed for use in making a coup plete printed record of history of daily operation of a particular shop machine.
Briefly, the machine involves in its general or" gauization series of printing wheels or count cm which are 21 in groups for cumulatively countii 3 us items, p riods of time or the like. counters have associated therewith cei n Gene a drive mechanism. for actuating or mg the same. Means are rov these counters either at d ervals or according to machine pro and means are also provided whereby certain of e wheels may automatically '0 Ze o, while manual means are provic wheels may In. connection. with an apparatus of this charactor, it is among the objects of the invention to provide means whereby the Geneva drive mechanism may be totally disassociated from the printing wheels during either manual or auto matic resetting operation.
It is also an object of the invention to provide such a means wherein the Geneva drive mechanism, when disassociated from the print wheels, is rigidly held. in position against relative turning with respect to the print wheels so that when the Geneva mechanism is restored to operative association with the print wheels, the same will fall readily into register with the printing wheels.
Another object of the invention is to provide recording device having associated therewith means for resetting certain groups of printing wheels automatically and for resetting other groups of printing Wheels manually when desired, together with means for preventing over-carrying of the manual resetting operations to insure that at the completion of such resetting operations all of the wheels associated therewith will be returned to their zero settings.
Another object of the invention is to prevent over-throw of the counters due to the inherent inertia thereof at the completion of each resetting operation.
Another object is to provide a recording apparatus of this character having individual printing wheel groups capable of being cumulatively indexed in step-by-step fashion, together with means for preventing stepping operations from taking place while the printing operation is in progress. In this connection, a related object of the invention is to provide a means whereby, when stepping impulses are received after the printing operation has commenced, such impulses are stored for future consummation after the printing operation has been completed.
Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of this character having plural groups of printing wheels, together with means whereby a single actuating instrumentality, which may be an electromagnet, is alternately employed for the operation of two or more groups of counters.
Other objects of the invention will be pointed out in the following description and claims and illustrated in the accompanying ten sheets of drawings, which disclose, by way of example, the principle of the invention and the best mode, which has been contemplated, of applying that principle.
In the drawings:
,, Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a recording apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the machine showing a manual resetting control therefor.
Fig. 3 is a side elevational view of the machine.
Fig. 4 is a fragmentary plan view of a record sheet which has been operated upon by the machine.
Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line -:':5 of Fig. 1.
Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 66 of Fig. 1.
Fig. '7 is a front elevational view of a printing counter assembly employed in connection with the present invention showing its operative association in the machine.
Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken substantially along th line 8-8 of Fig. 6.
Fig. 9 is an enlarged detailed sectional view taken substantially along the line 9--9 of Fig. 6;
Fig. 10 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line iii-40 of Fig. 9.
Fig. 11 is a sectional view taken along the line I !l l of Fig. 9.
Fig. 12 is a sectional view taken along the line |2|2 of Fig. 9.
Fig. 13 is a sectional view taken along the line i3l3 of Fig. '7.
Fig. 14 is a sectional view taken along the line i i-i4 of Fig. '7.
Fig. 15 is a sectional view taken along the line I 5-45 of Fig. 9.
Fig. 16 is a sectional view taken along the line l6---! 5 of Fig. 7.
Fig. 17 is a sectional view taken along the line Il-l l of Fig. 16.
Fig. 18 is a sectional view taken along the line i8l8 of Fig. 8.
Fig. 19 is a sectional view taken along the line |9| 9 of Fig. 8.
Fig. 20 is a diagrammatic view showing the electrical input connections for the recording apparatus.
substantially substantially substantially substantially substantially substantially substantially substantially substantially In all of the above described views like characters of reference are employed to designate like parts throughout.
The recording device with which the counter actuating and resetting mechanism is associated is shown in its entirety in Fig. 1. This device may be attached to any type of machine or it may be used in any desired location, as for example, at a workmans bench where it is desired to secure accurate production and time records. The device need not necessarily be installed directly at the scene of operations and, if desired, it may be installed at a central station remote from the particular machine with which it is associated. In such an instance. the device might comprise one of a number of similar devices for keeping a record of the operations of a plurality of shop machines.
Before explaining fully the details of construction of the recording device, a brief description of the various functions which it is adapted to perform will be given. In modern factory organization or shop practice it is of prime importance essary to illustrate or describe any specific circuit maker or breaker in the present instance. The present recording device includes a counting mechanism which is operated by means of impulses and which keeps an accurate record of the running time of the particular machine with which it is associated. The record of the running time of the machine is kept both as to total time, during which the machine operates over any given period, and a sub-total of the running time which may automatically be reset to its zero reading at any particular time.
A still further record which is kept in modern shop practice is a record of the idle time for any particular machine. The present recording device is also provided With a series of counters which will record such idle time both as to total time and as to sub-totals.
All of the counter mechanisms above referred to are of the printing type in that they are adapted to cooperate with a record sheet in printing their various records. Records of production time and of idle time of the machine are made with reference to actual clock time and, as a consequence, an additional series of counters, also operable upon reception of electrical impulses, are provided and are adapted to receive their impulses from a conventional type of clock mechanism.
In order that the identity of any particular workman operating a particular machine or the reason for the idle time of the machine may be recorded, a single manually settable printing wheel is provided. This printing wheel, together with all of the previously mentioned automatically operable wheels, is adapted to render printed records on a record sheet in a readily understandable, legible, single line of type.
Means are further provided for advancing the record sheet to accommodate successive printing operations so that at the end of each day a history of the operation of the machine will be available from the printed record sheet. The workmans time, as well as the history of operation of the machine itself, both as regards its production time, its idle time and the amount of production, are all available in convenient form on the printed record sheet at the end of any desired period of operation.
Referring now to the drawings in detail and in particular to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the apparatus involves in its general organization a base plate III on which there is removably supported an outer machine casing or cover II including a front wall 12, a rear wall (4, side walls i6 and [8 respectively, and a top wall 20. The front of the casing is open and is adapted to be closed by a horizontally swinging door l9 having a transparent window 22 formed therein through which there is visible certain indicia and certain printing and counting mechanism, the nature of which will be made clear presently. The operative instrumentalities of the machine are adapted to be enclosed within the casing or cover just described and certain manual control devices are positioned on the outside of the casing and have mechanical lead-in connections to the interior mechanism of the device, all in a manner subsequently to be described.
An indicia plate 23 (Figs. 1 and 6) is suitably positioned immediately behind the window 22 in the upper regions thereof and a backing plate 25 is positioned behind the window adjacent the lower regions thereof. The two plates just referred to form therebetween an elongated horizontal slot 21 through which there is visible the indicia which are formed on the individual print wheels 24 of a plurality of print wheel groups, of which there are seven in number, these groups being designated individually in their entirety at 26, 28, 3t, 32, 34, 36 and it, as shown in Figs. 'i, '7 and 9. The left-hand group or pint wheels are in .icative of chronological time, the extreme left-hand print wheel representing days of the week and a. m. and p. m. divisions thereof, the next adjacent print wheel representing hours of the day, and the next two adjacent print wheels being representatives of the minutes during each. hour. The group of print wheels Eli represents the number of minutes of time during which the particular machine, with the recording device is associated, is in actual operation or production. The group of print wheels 3t represents an accumulation or totaling of previously encountered periods of production time. In other contains three print wheels and indicates a sub-total or production time, while the group contains four print wheels and indicates totals of production time. The first of these two groups has associated therewith means for automatically returning the print wheels to their zero reading after a certain predetermined. period of time has elapsed and the latter group has associated therewith means whereby the print wheels may manually be reset to their zero reading.
The groups of print wheels 35% and are similar in their design and operation to the groups and 30 just described. The first or" these latter two groups contains three print wheels that are representative of sub-totals of idle time and the second group representative of total minutes of idle time.
The group of print wheels and the group of print wheels respectively are possessed of three and four print wheels. The group 355 represents sub-total production, while the grou $8 represents total production. The group is adapt to be automatically reset to zero 51? .taneously with the resetting of the groups while no group 38 is adapted to be manually reset to zero simultaneously with the resetting of the groups 3%) and Eli. A single print wheel lil, shown at the extreme right-hand side of l,
. gable of bein anually set to various positions that are representative of special data, as for exai ole, data relating to the identity of a particular workman, to the reason. for machine idle time, or to any special circumstance that may be encountered during the machine opera-tion.
In Fig. i there is shown a fragmentary portion of a record sheet which has been operated upon by the various groups of print wheels whose accounting functions have been briefly outlined above. It is to be noted that printing on this record sheet is made a h e at a time, and that the various lines of printing occur in groups of two lines each which are separated from each other by a space equivalent to the width or a single line of print. The first line in each group, reading from the bottom of the sheet upwardly, is printed at the commence rent of a machine run and the upper line in the group made at the end of the machine run. As shown in 4:, in the lower line the data in the lert-hand column shows that the machine went into operation on 8:60 in, time is distinguished p. in. time by the presence or the absence from of a small underline situated below the second letter of the group of two letters which represent the day of the week. The data just mentioned is effected by the first group 26 of print wheels. The data in the next two columns represents sub-total production time and total production time and, since at the time of setting the machine into operation no production time has existed previously, this data in the two columns shows 000 and 0000 respectively.
The data appearing in the next two columns which represents sub-total and total minutes of time one and 0000 which obviously is a correct reading since neither production nor idle time can exist before the commencement of the working day. The data in the next two columns, which represents machine production, also appears as 006 and 0000 for, obviously, there has been no production prior to the commence- 5 ment of the working day.
The data appearing in the last column, which is in the form of the letter H, is of a symbolic nature and this letter may represent any desired data, as for example, the identity of the foreman or other person shutting down the machine on the previous evening.
It may, if desired, represent the reason for a previous period of idle time of the machine and may exist as a carry-over since no automatic means are provided for altering the setting of the dial wheel Mi of Fig. 1. It is to be noted that since sub-total production time, sub-total idle time and sub-total production data are automatically rest to zero at the end of every one Tog operation, and since total production time, total idle time and total production are manually set to zero at the proper time, i. e., when the master switch is thrown, the data in the six columns relating to production time, idle I time and production will be reset to zero when t ster switch is 'tliirown at the end of each working day, although no print of this :fact will be made on the record sheet.
Referring now to Figs. 6 and 8, a pair of side plates or standards 42 and M extend upwardly from the base plate ill and serve to support and the latter compartment serving to enclose a plurality of solenoids, the nature and function of which will be set forth presently. The previously described print wheel groups are opera'tively associated assembly 58 which is slidably received between the two side plates '22 and i4 and is adapted to be anchored in position therebetween by means of securing screws or the like 58 (see 5). A removable ribbon assembly Gil, the nature of which will be described subsequently, is mounted on a bottom plate ill and is adapted to be retained in position on the upper ends of the side plates 12 and l-t.
The various print wheel groups are mounted upon a horizontal shaft 52 operatively'associated with the removable counter assembly 56, and
these print wheels occupy positions in alignment with a removable counter adjacent the bottom of the assembly 55 and are designed for cooperation with a movable print bar 64, which is positioned immediately therebeneath and which is adapted to be moved from a lower inoperative position out of pressing engagement with the print wheels to an upper operative position. The manner in which the record media material issuing from the roll 54 is conducted over the upper surface of the print bar 64 and the manner in which the ribbon associated with the ribbon assembly Ell is passed between the print wheels and the record media material will become apparent when the various separate features of the invention are singled out for individual description. The various print wheel groups carried on the shaft have associated therewith a counter mechanism E6 (see also Fig. 9) associated with the counter assembly 56 and whereby the individual print wheels 24 may be periodically advanced.
The counter mechanism 56 is mounted upon a shaft E8 and in turn has associated therewith a plurality of reset gears 70, H and 73 (Figs. 6, 8 and 16) mounted on a shaft 12 extending between the side plates 42 and 44. This latter counter mechanism 56, together with the reset gear assembly, will also be described in detail as the separate features of the invention are set forth.
Referring now to Figs. 5 to 12 inclusive wherein the removable counter assembly 55 is best illustrated. this assembly includes a pair of end plates 88 and 82 which are in part maintained in spaced relationshi by means of an inverted U-shaped channel member 84 to which the plates 85 and 82 are secured by means of screws or the like 85 (Figs. 6 and '7). When the counter assembly 55 is in position within the apparatus, the end plates 89 and 82 and adapted to occupy the same planes as the two side plates 42 and Toward this end. the plates 42 and 44 are recessed as at 88 to accommodate reception of the assembly 58 and are provided with offset portions 91"- which overlap the end plates 8!! and 82 and through which oifset portions the securing screws 58 are adapted to pass.
A plurality of rigid partition plates 94 are maintained in s aced relationship between the two end plates 8!! and 82 by means of a plurality of spacer bar assemblies. of which there are three in number. One of these assemblies includes a supporting rod 96 (Figs. 6, 7 and 13) on which there are mounted a plurality of spacer slee es 98 that extend between the various partition plates 94 and between the two end partition plates and the end plates 8!! and 82, thus assisting in rendering the partition plates and side plates a rigid structure. Another spacer bar assembly includes a supporting rod I E!!! and spacing sleeves I02. while still a third spacer bar assembly includes a supporting rod M34 and spacing sleeves I 05. It will be seen, therefore, that the end plates 80 and 82 and the various partition plates 94 are all maintained in fixed rigid relationship with respect to each other and are supported from each other along three longitudinal axes, as d scribed above.
Referring now to Figs. 6. '7, 9 to 13 inclusive. the print wheel assembly which, as previously set forth. is supported upon the shaft 62. includes the various groups of print wheels 28 to 38 elusive and each of these print wheels 24 has associated therewith a driving gear I93. Each print wheel 24 and its driving gear I08 is mounted for independent rotation upon the print wheel shaft 62 and is adapted to be driven or indexed from the counter mechanism 66 in a manner that will now he set forth. The right-hand print wheel 24 and its driving gear I08 of each of the groups 28 to 38 inclusive has associated therewith an indexing ratchet gear In which derives its motion from a pawl drive mechanism including a pawl H2 in the case of each of the groups 28 to 34, inclusive, and a pawl 29!! in the case of the groups 36- and 35. Motion is thus transmitted directly to the first or right-hand print wheel in each group up to the counter mechanism and from thence back again to the remaining print wheels in each group. In other words. the right-hand pri t wheel assembly 24, I (18, I I0, constitutes a driving unit for its respective section of the counter mechanism 66 and this section of the counter mechanism, acting through a more or less conventional Geneva drive system. operates to conduct carry-over indexing operations to the remaining print wheel assemblies in its respective group.
referring to Fig. '7 and also to Figs. 9 to 12 inch .ve. the counter mechanism 66 includes a lurality of Geneva. drive gear grou s corresponding in number to the rint wheel groups 28 to 38 inclusive and similarly designated at 28 to 38' inclusive. These latter Geneva drive gear groups, with t e exception of a novel form of reset device, are conventional in their desi n and include the usua guide locking discs H4 (Figs. 9 and 10) imp lse d sc H6 and receiving gear I I8, each group of three ements cooperating in a conventional 312 111161 w th a. respective Geneva carry-over gear '20. The various Geneva carry-over ears are loo ely disposed u on a Geneva gear supporting I22 loosely supported in slots I23 (see Fig. 6) formed in the various partition plates 94. Each unit of each section of the counter mechanism 96 also includes a transfer gear I24 by means o which motion is transferred to the various print heel driving gears I88 to efiect cumulative numerical carry-over operations for printin? purposes.
While the mechanism. structure and function of the counter mechanism 66 remains similar to conventional Geneva carry-over systems, the present invention includes a novel form of resetmechanism for the print whee s 24 conte'ned in the groups 30. 34 and 38 which are the production time total, idle time total, and produc ion total groups. The production time subdle time sub-total and production sub-tooups and 36 respectively have profor automatic resetting operations, as will be described subsequently.
The counter units H4. H5, I18, I24. of each of the sections 35!. 34 and 33 are loosely disposed u on sleeves which are pinned as at I28 to the shaft The counter units II4. H6, H8, I24 of the counter groups 28'. 32' and 36' are loosely dis osed u on sleeves I35 which are not pinned to the shaft 68 and which may, consequently, turn loosely thereon so that manual resetting operations associated with the other counter groups do not affect these former groups.
Referring now to Figs. 10. 11 and 12, each of the pairs of transfer gears and. guide lock discs H4, H4 in each of the assembly units H4. H6. s provided with a pair of aligned openings uich openings communicate through slots i ith the central opening of the unit. All of the sleeves I28 are formed with a longitudinalextending recess or slot H6 coextensive thereand have a shoulder 36 associated thereh. .5; loop spring N6 of a width equal to the ii of the two members I24, l M is seated within the opening 32, as shown in Fig. 10, and has one end thereof projecting through the slot I34 and adapted to bear against the outside surface of the sleeve ifiii. As shown by the arrow in Fig. 10, the unit E54, M6, lit, I24 during indexing operations is adapted to move in a clockwise direction so that the projecting end of the spring I40 in traveling around the periphery of the sleeve or may ride over the shoulder I68, into the recess and travel unobstructed outwardly from the recess onto the smooth side of the sleeve. The counter unit is thus capable of continued inthe arrow unobstructed by the sleeve I26.
For resetting operations, means are provided whereby each of the sleeves I26 associated with 1 total groups 64 and may be manually turned throughout one complete revolution in the same direction of rotation as that of the counter so that the shoulder I66 will engage the ting end of the spring E46 and bring all of r units to their zero positions. The
s are also recessed lon itudinally and the various elements E29, M4 are likewise formed with openings i332 having springs I46 disposed owever, since the sleeves I36 are not a, manual resetting operaprecluded as far as these assemblies are Means are provided, however, whereatter sleeves are automatically rotated t while the latter remains stationary in order to effect automatic resetting opera- The means for manually resetting the totals ups of p int wheels li t and 3B is best illusl, 2, Z, 9 and 15. Referring now .37 to Figs. and 7, a manual reset knob tably mounted on the side wall I8 of .len'iber and is provided with a shank 1 projects through an aperture in the spring member M6, which .is riveted "r. Mi l, is provided with an inturned apted to project through a slot I50 d n a bifurcated actuator I52 mounted on me left-hand end of the shaft 68, as Figs. '7 and 9. The reset knob I42 is with a finger piece I54 having a finger W6 formed therein for convenience of ma- .tion of the knob M2. By virtue of the fact that the sleeves 526 of the totals counter assemil l', are pinned to the shaft 68 as and by virtue of the spring and slot ar- .-ment i659, previously described, it will seen that upon turning movement of the knob direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. rough one full revolution, the various counter ie, H6, :58, 8'36 will be reset and brought sitions of orientation wherein the print .els 24 are all restored to their Zero settings. Referring now to Figs. 9 and 15, means are provided for preventing rotation of the knob I42 throughout an angle greater than that suiiicient to restore the print wheels to their zero settings, thus over-running of the zero setting during resetting operations is precluded. Toward this end, the shaft 66 has mounted thereon and pinned hereto as at lot a sleeve I66 to which there is secured in any suitable manner, as for example, by spot welding, a circular member I62 having formed thereon a stop finger I64. Also secured sleeves associated with the sub-total to the sleeve I66 is a second cam member I66 having a slot I68 formed in the periphery thereof. The sleeve I66, cams I62 and I66, and actuator I52 all comprise one unitary rigid structure which is mounted on and rotatable with the shaft 68. Pivotally secured to the end plate 86 is a stop pawl I10 which is spring pressed as at I12 against a stop pin I14 and which is provided with a shoulder I16 designed for engagement with one edge of the stop finger I64 when the shaft 68 is in its position of zero setting for the print wheels 26.. Ehe pawl 16 is provided with a cam surface I18 by means of which it is retracted when the stop finger I6l approaches the limit of its movement in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 15. Pivoted as at I to the end plate 80 is a combined stop and release member I82 having an abutment arm I84 formed thereon and normally positioned in the path of movement of the stop finger I64, as shown in Fig. 15. It will be seen that upon rotation of the cam member I62, in the direction of the arrow, the stop finger I64 will ride over the cam surface I18 to retract the pawl I16 until such time as it moves into position just behind the shoulder I16. As the finger I64 assumes this latter position, it will be engaged by the abutment arm I84 and further rotation of the cam I62, and consequently of the shaft 68, will be prevented. Reverse movement of the cam I62 in a counter-clockwise direction, as seen in Fig. 15, and consequent reverse movement of the shaft 68, will be prevented by virtue of the shoulder I16 formed on the pawl I76. Thus the cam H62 will be securely locked against continued rotation or against reverse rotation after resetting operations have been completed.
Pivoted on a rock shaft E86 is a retaining pawl I88 having a retaining finger I96 formed adjacent its outer end and also having a cam roller I92 mounted on this latter end. lShe combined stop and release member I82 is provided with an armate cam surface I94 and an inclined straight cam surface I86, the former being designed for cooperation with the stop finger I64 and the latter being designed for cooperation with the cam roller I92. The member I82 is further provided with an actuating lever I98 having a finger piece 260 formed thereon. A slot 262 formed in the member I82 has extending thereinto a limit pin 204 which projects outwardly from the end plate 86. It will be seen, therefore, that the member I82 is movable from an initial position, wherein the finger I64 is securely held between the abutment arm I84 and shoulder lI16 andwherein the finger I96 of the retaining pawl I88 is disposed in the slot I68, to an advanced position wherein the abutment arm I84 is withdrawn from the path of movement of the stop finger 64 and wherein the retaining pawl I66 becomes elevated by virtue of the engagement of the inclined cam surface I96 with the cam roller I92. With the various parts in respective positions just described, it will be seen that the cam member 62, and consequently the shaft-68, is 'free for clockwise rotation throughout one complete revolution, as shown in Fig. 15. The retaining pawl I98 forms one element of a Geneva gear elevating mechanism, and, as will be described presently, this pawl member must be elevated during both manual resetting operations of the total print wheels 36, 34 and 38 and during automatic resetting operations of the sub-total print wheels 28, 32 and 36,
Obviously, no resetting operations of either the total or sub-total print wheel groups could 11 be effected without removing the Geneva carryover gears I28 from operative engagement with the various counter assemblies. Provision is herein made for so removing the Geneva gears I28 and provision is further made during such removal for maintaining the individual Geneva gears properly oriented so that after all resetting operations have been completed the entire Geneva gear assembly may again be lowered into engagement with the counter assemblies in proper meshing condition. Toward this end the shaft I86, which is supported between the end plates 80 and 82 and which carries the retaining pawl I88, has mounted thereon a pair of arms 7.86, the outer ends of which underlie the Geneva shaft I22, as clearly shown in Figs. 6, '7 and 9. It will be seen that upon elevation of the retaining pawl I88 of Fig. 15, the rock shaft I88 will be turned about its axis in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Figs. 6 and 15, and the elevating arms 286 will be caused to engage the underneath surface of the Geneva gear shaft I22 to elevate the same in the slots I23 and cause the various Geneva gears I28 to be lifted out of engagement with the respective carry-over gears with which they are associated.
All printing operations by the print wheels 24 are conducted when these print wheels are in definite positions of registry with the print bar 64 and, consequently, during reset operations each of the Geneva gears I28 will assume a definite position of orientation wherein one tooth thereof extends vertically, as shown in Fig. 6. In order to maintain the various Geneva gears I28 properly oriented for restoration to their respective counter assemblies, the previously mentioned inverted U-shaped channel member 84 serves to retain within the channel portion thereof an elongated resilient retaining pad 288. While this pad may be formed of any suitable material, the same is preferably formed of soft rubber in order that the teeth of the Geneva gear may readily become embedded therein. The pad 288 directly overlies all of the Geneva gears lit and the slightest elevation of the Geneva shaft l22 will bring immed ate engagement between this pad and the Geneva teeth. Thus it will be seen that the Geneva gears are engaged before they have cleared the counter wheel assemblies and by the time they finally do clear these counter wheel assemblies, they are so embedded in the soft rubber pad 288 that there is no possibility of their becoming misaligned.
Referring now to Fig. 15, automatic resetting operations of the sub-total print wheel groups 28, 32 and 86 is effected at definite intervals of time by means of a rotary cam 2H3 mounted on the previously mentioned reset shaft 12. A description of the manner in which automatic reset operations take place from the shaft I2 will follow immediately. However, it is deemed pertinent at present to state that during such automatic resetting operations the retaining pawl I88 must be elevated to cause tilting movement of the shaft I86 and consequent elevation of the Geneva gear assembly as just described. Toward this end, the retaining pawl I88 has mounted thereon a cam roller 2H1 designed for engagement with the cam 2"). The cam 2I8 is provided with two cam protuberances 2H5 arranged 180 apart so that twice during each revolution of the shaft 12 the retaining member I88 will become elevated. During elevation of the retaining member I88 by the cam 2I8, the cam roller I92 will move out of engagement with the inclined cam surface I98 of the combined stop and release member I82 without disturbing the position of the latter.
Automatic resetting of the sub-total print wheel groups and counter assemblies is effected by virtoe of the three reset gears I8, II and 13 (Fig. 8) which are mounted on the shaft 12. These three reset gears are designed for cooperation with respective pinions 2i8, 220 and 222 (Figs. 7 and 9) associated with the sub-total groups 38, 32 and respectively and mounted on and rotatable with the sleeves I38 of these assemblies. The reset gears IG and reset pinions 2|8, 228 and 222 constitute conventional reverse Geneva gear reset mechanism and it is deemed sufficient to state that the number of teeth provided on each reset pinion corresponds to the number of teeth provided on a segment of the periphery of each of the reset gears so that When a particular segment encounters and completely traverses its respective pinion one revolution of the pinion, and consequently one revolution of the sleeve I38, will ocour to reset all of the elements of the respective subtotal counter assembly and of its sub-total print wheel group.
Referring now to Figs. 6, 8 and 16, it is to be noted that the toothed segment of the reset wheel fl occurs on this latter gear at a position which is 188 removed from the toothed segments provided on the reset gears I0 and 13. For this reason, simultaneous resetting operations are conducted on the production time sub-total and production sub-total counter mechanisms at a different point in the machine cycle from the single resetting operation of the idle time subtotal counter mechanism. Such dual resetting operation of the production time and production sub-total counter assembly occurs during onehalf revolution of the shaft l2, while such single resetting operation of the idle time sub-total counter mechanism occurs during the other half revolution of the shaft I2. Rotation of the shaft I2 throughout one-half revolution is conducted periodically at predetermined times during the operation of the machine and immediately following printing operations.
The means for intermittently rotating the shaft 72 is best illustrated in Figs. 6, 8, 13, 18 and 19. The compartment 52 serves to house a plurality of solenoids, of which there are four in number, designated at SO, ST, SPI and SP. The solenoid SO constitutes a main operating solenoid whose function is to periodically index the shaft 12 and thus cause printing, resetting, paper advancing, ribbon feeding, Geneva gear elevating and other incidental functional machine operations. The solenoid ST serves to periodically actuate the time group of print wheels 28. The solenoid SPI serves to actuate both the production time print wheels and the idle time print wheels, but not simultaneously, mechanical means being provided whereby when one set of print wheels is being operated upon, the other set thereof remains inoperative. The solenoid SP serves to periodically index the production print wheels 38.
The solenoid SO (Figs. 4, 6 and 8) is suitably supported from th partition plate 48 near the bottom of the compartment 52 and is provided with a movable core 224 to which there is pivotally connected one end of a link 7325, the other end of which is pivotally connected to one end of a bell crank lever 225 which is spring-biased as at 221. The bell crank lever 226 is pivoted as at 228 to an inclined bracket 230 (Fig. 19) mounted on the side plate 42 and the other end of this lever is pivotally connected to a pawl arm 232, the upper end of which is spring-pressed as at 234 in such a manner that the pawl arm may cooperate with a ratchet Wheel 236 mounted on a horizontal shaft 238 extending between the two side plates 42 and M. The ratchet wheel 23% also has a..- sociated therewith a holding pawl 232 to prevent reverse movement thereof. The end of the shaft 238 opposite the ratchet wheel 236 (Fig. 8) has mounted thereon a gear 240 which meshes with a larger gear 262 secured to the shaft l2. Thus it will be seen that upon periodic energizing of the solenoid SO motion will be transmitted through the link 225, bell crank lever 226, pawl arm ratchet wheel 236, shaft 238 and gears E li}, to the shaft l2 for resetting operations.
Referring now to Figs. 6, 7, 8 and 13, the shaft 12 carries near one end thereof a gear 24 which meshes with a smaller gear 246 loosely mounted on the shaft lit. The gear 246 is connected to a cam 7.48 which is positioned on the shaft 68 alongsid a similar cam 250. This latter cam, however, is pinned as at 25?! to the shaft 8 consequently is rotatable therewith. The cams 248 and 25B are provided for the purpose of causing an over-throw comb-like member 254 to move into engagement with the various units of the counter mechanism 65 to prevent over-throwing thereof during either manual or automatic resetting operations. Accordingly, a square rock shait extends between the end plates, 88 and s2 (Fig. 6) and has secured to one side thereof the comb-like member 254 which is provided with a series of spring fingers 260 designed for engagement with the various transfer gears I2 2 of the counter mechanism 66.
It is to be noted that each of the transfer gears I26 has one tooth thereof removed as at 262 (see also Figs. 10 and 12), thus providing in effect a recess designed for reception therein of the extreme ends of the fingers 26% during resetting operations when the transfer gears are so oriented as to cause the print wheels associated therewith to assume their zero indication or setting. The square rock shaft 255 has secured thereto a cam arm zit l (Figs. 7 and 13), the outer end of which is positioned immediately above the two cams 248 and 252] and is designed for camming engagement with either of them upon turning movement thereof. Since the cam 25!) is pinned to the shaft 83 and rotates therewith and since the cam 248 is integrally formed with the gear fi l-ii, it will be seen that these two cams serve during both manual and automatic resetting operations to bring the comb-like member 254 into engagement with the transfer gears of the counter mech anism immediately after resetting operations have commenced. By virtue of the specific design of the two cams and 250. the comb-like member 254 is adapted to remain in engagement with the periphery of the various transfer gears until such time as resetting operations have been completed.
Since the gear 246 and cam 2% are loosely dis-- posed on the shaft 58, they will remain stationary until such. time as they are set into motion by Iii) iii)
and from thence up to the counter mechanism t6 and back again to the remaining print wheels in each group. The mechanism for periodically indexing the first or right-hand print wheel in the time group 26 and unit production groups 36 and 33 are best illustrated in Figs. 6, 8 and 13. These mechanisms are substantially identical and it is thought that a description of the mechanism which periodically indexes the print wheel of the time group it will suffice for a description of the other mechanism. Referring now to these figures, each of the solenoids ST, SPI and SP is provided with a movable core 210, the outer end of which is slotted as at 212 and receives therein the lower end of an oscillatable operating lever which is pivoted as at 2T6 medially of its ends to a bifurcated bracket 2TB suitably mounted upon its respective solenoid. The upper end of the lever 2M has pivotally connected thereto a link Ziiil, the free end of which is provided with a notch in its undeneath side adapted to receive therein a horizontal strut 284 carried between the parallel arms 236 of a swinging U ShflP'Ed cradle Zliii. As shown in Fig. 8, four such cradles 288 have been provided, the extreme left-hand cradle serving to accommodate the time solenoid ST, the two central cradles serving to accommodate the production and idle time solenoid SP1 and the extreme right-hand cradle serving to accommodate the production solenoid SF. The arm 2% of the cradles 288 associated with the time print wheel group 26 and the arms 2% associated with. the unit production groups 555 and 38 each has pivotally connected thereto adjacent its lower end a spring-pressed pawl 2% designed for engagement with a respective indexing gear i it in the groups just mentioned. Each of the cradles 288 is spring-pressed or biased as at 292 in such a manner as to cause the same to be moved to an advanced position, thus retracting the core Elli of its respective solenoid. The impulses received by the various solenoids are of momentary duration and immediately upon energization of each solenoid the core is retracted against the action of the spring 282, thus retracting the cradle 283 and pawl 2%. Immediately thereafter, when the impulse applied to the solenoid has been dissipated, the pawl under the action of the spring 292 moves forwardly to perform the indexing operation.
The mechanism for periodically indexing the first or right-hand print wheel in the sub-total and total idle time groups 28 and 3t and in the sub-total and total production time groups 32 and M1 is similar in each instance and one such mechanism is shown in Fig. 16. This mechanism specifically is the one which serves to index the first print wheel. in the total print wheel group 34 of the two production time groups 34. The oscillatable operating lever 2M associated with the solenoid SPI has pivotally connected thereto at its upper end a 21'5. similar to the link. 28!] of Fig. 13, the free end of which is provided with a notch Ell adapted to receive therein a horizontal strut 2'59 carried between the parallel arms 2% of the cradle 2553 which is associated with this particular set of instrumentalities. The lower end of each arm 2% of this particular cradle and of the cradle associated with the sub-total and total idle time groups 28 and 3E! carries a springpressed pawl H2 designed for engagement with a respective indexing gear H8 associated with i8 print wheel groups 28, 3t, 32 and 34. Each of the cradles just mentioned is spring-pressed or biased as at 28! in such a manner as to cause the same to be moved to its advanced position, thus advancing the core 218 of its respective solenoid. The indexing operation thus takes place in a manner similar to that described in connection with the indexing of the time and unit production print wheel groups.
The rear end of the pawl l 52 has formed thereon an extension 283 provided with a cam surface 285 designed for engagement with a pin 23? (Figs. 8 and 16) formed on a collar of which there are three in number and all of which are mounted on the shaft '52 in the vicinity of their respective reset gears ll], H or '53, as the case may be.
The pins 2% associated with the operating instrumentalities for the production sub-total and total production groups 34, 36 are diametrically opposed to the pins which are associated with the operating instrumentalities for the sub total and total idle time print wheel groups 23, 30, such diametrical opposition being with respect to the shaft '12. Idle time does not run concurrently with production time and vice versa and thus when idle time is in effect no production time impulses should be transmitted to the print wheel groups 3-! and 3B. The reverse is true and during production time no impulses should be transmitted to the idle time print wheel groups 30 and 32. Toward these ends, the pins 28? are designed to fall into position at the end of resetting and printing operations against the cam surfaces 285 of the extensions 283 of the para ls H2 alternately in pairs to maintain such pawls as are associated with the production time groups elevated during idle time operations and to maintain such pawls as are associated with the idle time groups elevated during production time operation.
It is essential that should an impulse be received by either of the indexing solenoids ST, or SPI, as the case may be, during the power reset cycle, i. e. during rotation of the shaft l2 and reset gears '56, ll and the effect of this impulse be stored for future use at the end of the power cycle, otherwise an impulse would be lost. It is also necessary that should an impulse be received by any one of the solenoids just mentioned during manual resetting operations when the shaft 72 is stationary, this impul e be stored for future use. Accordingly, two different kinds of impulse storing mechanism are provided, one for preventing an impulse from being eifective during the power reset cycle when the shaft it is moving, and the other for preventing an impulse from being effective during manual resetting when the shaft i2 is stationary.
The means for preventing impulses from being effective during the power "eset cycle is shown in Fig. 16. A plurality of ears 294 are struck downwardly from the bottom plate 6! of the ribbon assembly 56 and serve to support therebetween a horizontal shaft ZQB. A plurality of latch members 298 are pivotally mounted on the shaft 2% and have associated therewith springs 331'], the tendency of which is to normally bias the latch members 288 in a clockwise direction. Each latch member 288 includes a latch arm 332 adapted when the member is in its normal latching position to bear against the rock shaft 136 which acts as a limit stop. Each latch member also includes a cam arm 3&5 having a cam surface 368 formed thereon and designed for engagement with a pair of studs Sit formed on one side of each of the two reset wheels ll and 73. No latch member is provided for the reset wheel 70 because of the fact that this latter reset wheel controls the resetting of production totals, and since resetting operations occur only at the time of starting the machine or at the time of stopping the machine, in the former instance a machine product will not be turned out at the instant of machine starting and in the latter instance a machine product will not be turned out after the machine has stopped. The impulse storing mechanism under discussion is, therefore, applicable only to chronological time impulses and to either production or idle time impulses and only two such mechanisms are employed. When the latch member 298 is in its normal position with the latch arm 392 bearing against the shaft I86, the extreme end of this latch member is positioned in the path of movement of the extreme upper end of the lever 214. Should, therefore, an impulse be received, the upper end of the lever 2l4 will trip beneath the latch arm 302 and assume a position behind the same so that after the impulse has been dissipated the lever 214 will be held retracted with its respective core 210 retracted within its solenoid. The impulse will thus be stored for future use in indexing the print wheel groups until such a time as the power cycle is completed and one or the other of the two studs 3E6 comes into engagement with the cam surface 393 to tilt the latch member 298 in a counter-clockwise direction against the action of the spring 305 It is deemed pertinent at this point to state that the power reset cycle just referred to is effected by one-half a revolution of the shaft 12. The toothed sector of the production reset gear it and the toothed sector of the production time sub-total reset gear '13 are disposed on their respective gears with the same identical degree of orientation, whereas the toothed sector of the idle time sub-total reset gear H is disposed on its gear at an angle of from the two other sectors. The reason for this is that resetting operations are conducted only at .the end of a period of idle time and at the end of a period of production time. Since production time and idle time do not run concurrently, it is unnecessary to go through the motions of resetting idle time when no idle time is shown on the print wheels, and similarly, it is unnecessary to go through the motions of resetting production time when no production time is shown on the print wheels.
The means for storing impulses received by the various solenoids ST, SP1 and SP that might be received during manual resetting operations is shown in Figs. 6 and 17. In this instance, in the case of the solenoid SP, a latch member 3l2 is mounted on a stud 291 and is provided with a latch arm 3M designed for cooperation with the lever 2T5 of the solenoid SP, in the same manner as the latch arms 302 previously described. The latch member 312 is spring-pressed as at 3l6 in such a manner that the same will be urged in a counter-clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 6. The latch member 3 l2 is provided with a forwardly extending finger 318 which underlies a lateral extension 320 formed on one of the arms 206 which controls the elevation of the Geneva gear assembly. Thus it Will be seen that Whenever the Geneva gear assembly is in its elevated poition, the latch member 312 is released for latching purposes, and whenever this assembly is in its lowered position the latch arm 3 is held out of the path of movement of the upper end of the lever 214.
In the case of the solenoids ST and SPI, a. dual latch member 3H is provided. This latter memher is generally of U-shaped design and is mounted on the shaft 296 and has associatedtherewith a single latch arm 3l5 adapted to underlie the lateral extension 320 associated with the arm 205. The latch member 3!! is provided with two rearwardly extending latch arms 3 I 8, one being adapted to accommodate the lever 214 associated with the solenoid ST, and the other being adapted to accommodate the lever 214 associated with the solenoid SPI.
The single print wheel 49, shown at the extreme right-hand sides of Figs. 1 and '7' and which has thereon the indicia representative of special, data, such as data relating to the identity of a particular workman, the reason for machine idle time or the like, is adapted tobe manually set to any desired position by means of a finger knob 335 (Figs. 3 and. 7) located. on. the outside of the machine casing and mounted on the side wall U6. The knobis provide. with a shank 331 which projects through an. aperture in the wall I 8. A spring member 339, whichis rivetedto the shank 331, is provided with an inturned finger 34| adapt.- ed to project through a slot 343 (see Fig. 9) formed in a bifurcated actuator 345 mounted. on a hub 341'rotatab1y carried on the end of the shaft 68 and also rotatably mounted in a bushing 349' projecting through the end plate 32. The hub 341 carries a gear 35! adapted to mesh with the driving. gear I08 associated with the print wheel 40.
A circular face plate 353. mounted on the side wall It is provided with a plurality of indicia 355, corresponding to the indicia on the print wheel 40, and by means of which the operator may make his selection.
It is to be noted that the inturned finger 3.4.! and. bifurcated actuator 345. afford a means whereby the cover l I may be removed from or installed on the base plate It] without disturbing the neutral setting of the print wheel 40. and. whereby when the cover is removed this print wheel will automatically be restored to such a neutral setting or position.
Referring now to Figs. 5 and 6 wherein the means for actuating the print bar 54 is bestillustrated, a pair of bell crank levers 350 are pivotally mounted as at 352 to the side plates 42 and 44, on the outside and near the bottom thereof. Each bell crank lever 353 is provided with a long arm 354, the outer end of which carries a cam roller 356 designed for engagement with a cam 358 formed on a hub 359 mounted on the end of the shaft 238. Each lever 350 is also provided. with a short arm 3'50, the outer end of which is pivo-tally connected by an eccentric adjusting connection 35! to the lower end of a toggle link 362. The upper end of the toggle link is pivotally connected as at 364 to an end of the print bar 64. The two cams 358 on. the opposite ends of the shaft 238 are similarly oriented and thus it will be seen that. as the high regions of these came bear against the cam rollers 353, the two bell crank levers 350 will be moved in unison in such a manner as to cause alignment of. the toggle link 362 and the short arm 363, thus forcing the print bar upwardly into engagernent with the type on the print wheels 24. The print bar 34 carries the usual rubber platen pad 36 3. A pair of springs 358 serve to normally bias the levers 350- into cam engaging position.
The ribbon feeding and reversing mechanism is illustrated in Figs. 5, '1 and 14. As previously stated, this mechanism is mounted upon the bot.- tom plate Bi and includes a pair of spool plates 400 and 432 which are centered and freely rotate able upon a pair of centering: pins 404 projecting upwardly from the bottomplate. The spool plates 4G0: and 402 each have associated there:- with aratchet periphery 436, the. teeth of which are arranged for actuation of the platesin op.- posite directions. Each spool. plate has extending. upwardly therefrom: a. conventional offset pin (not shown) designed for reciprocation. in an offset hole (not shown) provided in a conventional ribbon spool 4H). An elongated reciprocable actuating bar 3H2 has one endthereof-slotted as at 4M and the slotted portion thereof straddles a guide pin 4H3; extending upwardly from. the bottom plate 61.. The actuatingbar 412 has. pivoted thereto. as at 413 in the medial regions thereof a double-ended pawl element 420 having down-turned pawl fingers 4:22 and: 42.4 designed for engagement with. the peripheral ratchet teeth 4% of the spool plates 400 and 402'. The bar M2 is formed with an offset anchoring lug 425 which receivesone end of a. bias spring 423. The other end ofthe bias spring 428. is received in a. notch 433 formed. in t-he'pawl' element 433. The nature and mounting of the spring 323 is such that the pawl element 420may'pass from one extreme inclined position. with respect to the bar 412 to an opposed inclined position, either positions being on. opposite sides: of an unstable dead-center. These two positions. are determined by. virtue of a pin and slot connection 432 which limits the tilting movement of the pawl element 420.
Referring now to Figs. 5 and 14:, the hub 359 is formed with an eccentric cam 43.3v adapted to be straddled by the bifurcated. end 435 of a bell crank lever 431. The bell crank lever is. pro.- vided with an upwardly extending arm 433', the upper end of which projects into a slot 445 formed in one end of a rocker arm 441, which is pivoted as at 449 to the bottom plate *5] of the ribbon assembly 60. The other end ofthe rocker arm 441 is pivotally connected as at 45.1. to the actuating bar 4l2.
Slidable upon the bottom plate 61% throughout a limited degree of. movement, by virtue of pin and slot connections 434,. is a. trip plate 4361having spaced trip arms 438 and 440 associated therewith. The tripplate 436 is formed with. a pair of upstanding fork members 442'. and 444 designed for reception. therein of the; ribbon R as it is fed from or wound upon the respective ribbon spools 410.. The ribbon R is, providedwith the conventional eyelets (not shown) adjacent its ends and the function of. the fork. members 442 and 444 is to shift the, position of the trip plate 436 at such time as an eyelet is encountered by these forked members. A pair of retaining pawls in the form of yieldable spring elements 446 and 448 are secured to upstanding flanges 450 formed on the bottom plate til and the outer ends of these spring elements are designed. for selective engagement with the respective peripheries of the spool plates 4130 and 4.32;. The downwardly turned pawl fingers 422' and 424 encompass the two spring arms 4146 and 448 in: such a manner that when the pawl element 4:23, cooperates with one spool plate, the spool arm associated with the other spool plate is withdrawn from the ratchet teeth thereof and vice versa'.
As previously stated, the bar 412 is adapted to be reciprocated by means of the rocker arm 44:1. Upon such reciprocation, the pawl fingers 422- or 424, as the case may be, are adapted to engage the ratchet. teeth on oneor the other of the spool plates and periodically index the same. At such time as an eyelet in the ribbon R engages one of the fork members 442 or 444, the trip plate 433 will be shifted, as previously explained, and one of the trip arms 438 or 440 will engage the pawl element 420 when the latter is moved bodily with the bar M2 to cause shifting of the pawl element 420 over its dead-center position and into engagement with the other ratchet Wheel.
The ribbon R is passed from one spool to the other over a pair of upper ribbon guides 44! which are struck upwardly from the ribbon bottom plate GI and beneath a pair of guide roller assemblies 443 suitably secured to the end plates 80 and 82. The ribbon thus leaves one of the ribbon spools and passes downwardly just outside one of the end plates 80 or 82, across the machine beneath the print wheel assembly, and upwardly along the outside of the other end plate back to the other ribbon spool.
In Figs. 5 and 6 the paper feed instrumentalities are illustrated. The record media is supplied in the form of the roll 54 which is wound in the conventional manner upon a spindle 452, the ends of which are loosely received in a pair of tapered inclined slots 454 formed in the end plates 42 and 44. The lower edge of each of the slots 454 is of such extent and is so inclined that when the ends of the spindle 452 are inserted therein the roll will, by gravity, assume a central position within the paper storage compartment 50. The upper edge of the partition 45 is provided with a plurality of forwardly curved fingers 456 which serve as paper guides, while a plurality of laterally extending flanges 458, also formed on the upper edge of the partition 46, serve as a support for a horizontal plate 46!]. A lower feed roller shaft 4'52 is rotatably supported between the two end plates 42 and 4-4 and is provided with a plurality of resilient feed rollers proper 464 at spaced points therealong. A spring-pressed upper idler feed roller 465 is biased against the feed rollers 464 and paper issuing from the roll 54 is adapted to pass over and around the rollers 464 and beneath the roller 466. An angular flange 468 extends between the two end plates 42 and 44 and is provided with a substantially horizontal flange portion 418 against which there is adapted to bear coextensively the outer end of a tension plate 412. The tension plate 412 is provided with a plurality of apertures therein through which are received a plurality of shouldered fingers 424, by means of which the tension plate 412 is maintained in position on the plate 488. Paper issuing from the roll 54 and passing between the feed rollers 464, 456, also passes between the flange portion 479 and forward edge of the tension plate 412 and from thence over the print bar 64 and downwardly over the surface of the inclined backing plate 25. The base plate id is formed with an elongated slot 426 near the forward edge thereof through which the printed record media may pass to a point of storage. The base plate 10 is provided with a forwardly and downwardly inclined surface 4'58 which cooperates with a toothed tear-off strip 480 in providing a slot 482 through which the record media may pass to a region of discharge.
The mechanical means for advancing the paper in step-by-step fashion comprises a ratchet wheel 484 which is positioned on the feed roller shaft 462 outside of the end plate 44. A holding pawl 485 which is spring-pressed as at 488 is pivoted to the end plate 44 and bears against the teeth of the ratchet wheel 484 to prevent over- 2f) throwing of the feed rollers 464, 465, during stepping operations. A driving pawl 495 is pivoted as at 492 to an operating lever 494, which in turn is pivoted as at 4-96 to the end plate 44. A coil spring 590 serves to normally maintain the lever 494 in its elevated position, while at the same time causing the pawl 49% to engage the periphery of the ratchet wheel 484. The lever 494 is provided with a cam roller 592 medially of its ends designed for engagement with a cam element 504 carried on the shaft 12 outside of the end plate 44. The cam 504 constitutes a paper feed indexing cam and is provided with a pair of relatively closely spaced cam protuberances 50B and 588 and a single removed cam protuberance 5H]. It will be seen that during the printing portion of a machine cycle, the cam roller 532 will ride outwardly on the cam protuberances 596 and 508 in rapid succession to actuate the lever 494, driving pawl 49B and ratchet wheel 434 twice in succession and index the paper twice, thus rendering a double space on the record media. When the cam roller 502 rides outwardly on the single cam protuberance 510, a single actuation of the record media advancing instrumentalities will occur. The reason for first resorting to double spacing operations and therea ter resorting to single spacing operations arises from the fact that after a particular machine has commenced its operation, the next printing material on the record media will be an accounting of machine idle time. After any such period of idle time when the machine is again set into operation, a record of the commencement of production time will be required. Thus, in Fig. 4, there is shown a grouping of the data into a series of two lines each, the first or lower line representing the condition of the machine when the same went into production and the second or upper line representing the condition of the machine at the commencement of an idle period. To avoid confusion, the paper advancing means above described makes provision for double spacing after each period of production time and idle time has been recorded. The operating lever 494 is provided with an extension or handle 5%! which becomes available when the door i9 is swung open for manual indexing of the paper feeding instrumentalities.
The manner in which the cover H is made removable from the base plate It is shown in Figs. 5 and '7. Toward this end, a pair of latch plates 552 are secured to the inside of the side Walls 16 and i8 of the cover H and are provided with laterally eXtending flanges 5M adapted to be engaged by latching fingers 5H3 formed on a pair of latching levers 5H3 pivoted as at 520 to the end plates 42 and 44 near the bottom thereof. The latching levers BIB are provided with operating handles 522 which become available for manipulation when the door If! is swung to its open position.
A lamp L (Fig. 5) is suitably mounted on the end plate 44 and projects across the front of the machine within the cover ii for the purpose of illuminating the data appearing on the record media so that the latter may be readily readable through the window 22.
Referring now to Fig. 20, the circuit diagram therein is illustrative of aselected installation for the recording apparatus. It is to be distinctly understood that this installation is presented herewith purely for illustrative purposes and that numerous other installations are contemplated. In this installation the recording
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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2646929A (en) * 1953-07-28 Gourdon
US2693316A (en) * 1954-11-02 B benson ctal
US2774063A (en) * 1954-02-05 1956-12-11 Photocon Res Products Sequential circuit control device
US2797049A (en) * 1952-11-26 1957-06-25 United States Steel Corp Production counter
US2985368A (en) * 1956-05-23 1961-05-23 Hancock Telecontrol Corp Production control system
US2991935A (en) * 1957-03-08 1961-07-11 Automatic Switching Ltd Electrical traffic analysers
US3002684A (en) * 1956-07-21 1961-10-03 Sodeco Compteurs De Geneve Indicator of telephonic fees
US3037696A (en) * 1953-12-15 1962-06-05 Ibm Toll highway recorder
US3095145A (en) * 1959-10-12 1963-06-25 Jersey Prod Res Co Counter type data storage unit
US3132243A (en) * 1962-04-20 1964-05-05 Greissman Jacob Simultaneous graphic recording, counting and timing device
US3213267A (en) * 1961-05-18 1965-10-19 Gen Electric Data accumulation system
US3242320A (en) * 1962-02-09 1966-03-22 Stout George Philip Production line evaluation system
US4486890A (en) * 1981-07-20 1984-12-04 Hammes Leo R Control arrangement for an acreage counter
US4547891A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-10-15 Gte Products Corporation Apparatus for monitoring the performance of a press or like machine

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US396070A (en) * 1889-01-15 William s
US743579A (en) * 1903-08-05 1903-11-10 James B Sleeman Counting-machine.
US794112A (en) * 1903-01-29 1905-07-04 Western Electric Co Service-meter for party telephone-lines.
US994602A (en) * 1910-04-25 1911-06-06 Miehle Printing Press & Mfg Registering and counting machine.
US1046835A (en) * 1911-09-09 1912-12-10 William B Moon Counting-machine.
US1217920A (en) * 1913-06-07 1917-03-06 Henry H Cummings Revolution-counter.
US1461956A (en) * 1920-04-21 1923-07-17 Stewart Warner Speedometer Odometer-train-resetting device
US2117168A (en) * 1935-09-09 1938-05-10 Holzner Adolf Counter with telescoped number wheels
US2131622A (en) * 1935-08-29 1938-09-27 Gen Motors Corp Odometer reset mechanism
US2144373A (en) * 1936-12-11 1939-01-17 Waltham Watch Co Resetting means for counters
US2283993A (en) * 1939-05-29 1942-05-26 Sangamo Electric Co Production indicating apparatus
US2344497A (en) * 1943-02-22 1944-03-21 Chronotype Corp Time and production recorder

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US396070A (en) * 1889-01-15 William s
US794112A (en) * 1903-01-29 1905-07-04 Western Electric Co Service-meter for party telephone-lines.
US743579A (en) * 1903-08-05 1903-11-10 James B Sleeman Counting-machine.
US994602A (en) * 1910-04-25 1911-06-06 Miehle Printing Press & Mfg Registering and counting machine.
US1046835A (en) * 1911-09-09 1912-12-10 William B Moon Counting-machine.
US1217920A (en) * 1913-06-07 1917-03-06 Henry H Cummings Revolution-counter.
US1461956A (en) * 1920-04-21 1923-07-17 Stewart Warner Speedometer Odometer-train-resetting device
US2131622A (en) * 1935-08-29 1938-09-27 Gen Motors Corp Odometer reset mechanism
US2117168A (en) * 1935-09-09 1938-05-10 Holzner Adolf Counter with telescoped number wheels
US2144373A (en) * 1936-12-11 1939-01-17 Waltham Watch Co Resetting means for counters
US2283993A (en) * 1939-05-29 1942-05-26 Sangamo Electric Co Production indicating apparatus
US2344497A (en) * 1943-02-22 1944-03-21 Chronotype Corp Time and production recorder

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2693316A (en) * 1954-11-02 B benson ctal
US2646929A (en) * 1953-07-28 Gourdon
US2797049A (en) * 1952-11-26 1957-06-25 United States Steel Corp Production counter
US3037696A (en) * 1953-12-15 1962-06-05 Ibm Toll highway recorder
US2774063A (en) * 1954-02-05 1956-12-11 Photocon Res Products Sequential circuit control device
US2985368A (en) * 1956-05-23 1961-05-23 Hancock Telecontrol Corp Production control system
US3002684A (en) * 1956-07-21 1961-10-03 Sodeco Compteurs De Geneve Indicator of telephonic fees
US2991935A (en) * 1957-03-08 1961-07-11 Automatic Switching Ltd Electrical traffic analysers
US3095145A (en) * 1959-10-12 1963-06-25 Jersey Prod Res Co Counter type data storage unit
US3213267A (en) * 1961-05-18 1965-10-19 Gen Electric Data accumulation system
US3242320A (en) * 1962-02-09 1966-03-22 Stout George Philip Production line evaluation system
US3132243A (en) * 1962-04-20 1964-05-05 Greissman Jacob Simultaneous graphic recording, counting and timing device
US4486890A (en) * 1981-07-20 1984-12-04 Hammes Leo R Control arrangement for an acreage counter
US4547891A (en) * 1983-12-08 1985-10-15 Gte Products Corporation Apparatus for monitoring the performance of a press or like machine

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