US2463339A - Signaling device for drive-in theaters - Google Patents

Signaling device for drive-in theaters Download PDF

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US2463339A
US2463339A US781926A US78192647A US2463339A US 2463339 A US2463339 A US 2463339A US 781926 A US781926 A US 781926A US 78192647 A US78192647 A US 78192647A US 2463339 A US2463339 A US 2463339A
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means
speaker
primary coil
drive
signal
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US781926A
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Wetzel Joseph Louis
Demetrius G Chakiris
Robert F Poorman
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Autocrat Inc
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Autocrat Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08BSIGNALLING OR CALLING SYSTEMS; ORDER TELEGRAPHS; ALARM SYSTEMS
    • G08B5/00Visible signalling systems, e.g. personal calling systems, remote indication of seats occupied
    • G08B5/22Visible signalling systems, e.g. personal calling systems, remote indication of seats occupied using electric transmission; using electromagnetic transmission
    • G08B5/36Visible signalling systems, e.g. personal calling systems, remote indication of seats occupied using electric transmission; using electromagnetic transmission using visible light sources

Description

March 1, 1949.

J. L. WETZEL ET AL SIGNALING DEVICE FOR DRIVE-IN THEATERS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 24, 1947 $4 INVENTORS. y I

March 1; 1949.

- I Filed Oct. 24, 1947 J. WETZEL ET AL SIGNALING DEVICE FOR DRIVE-IN THEATERS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 1949. J. 1.. WETZEL ET AL.

SIGNALING DEVICE FOR DRIVE-IN THEATERS 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 24, 1947 WATER IMPERVIOUS FIBROUS- MEMBRANE ADHESIVE 56' NE-QN EUl-B sz i EON BULB March 1949. J. WETZEL ET AL 2,463,339

SIGNALING DEVICE FOR DRIVE-IN THEATERS Filed 001;. 24, 1947 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIGZQ FI G- 8 mmv oks.

Patented Mar. 1, 1949 SIGNALING DEVICE FOR DRIVE-IN THEATERS Joseph Louis Wetzel, Demetrius G. Chakiris, and Robert F. Poorman, Dayton, Ohio, assignors to Autocrat Inc., Dayton, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application October 24, 1947, Serial No. 781,926

7 Claims. 1 a

This invention relates to signaling apparatus and more particularly to signaling apparatus for use in drive-in establishments such as theaters and the like.

This application is related to our copending application, Serial No. 74,802, filed February 5, 1949, which is a division hereof.

Drive-in establishments of various kinds have been in existence for many years and in more recent years, the drive-in theater has been added to the already long list of drive-in establishments; Car hops are usually used for giving service to patrons of all such establishments during their stay in the establishment. It is an object of this invention to provide a Signaling system which eliminates the need for the car hops to disturb patrons who do not want service and to eliminate the need for patrons to use their horn or lights to signal for service.

Another object of this invention is to provide a signaling system which is not only applicable for use in drive-in establishments but also applicable for use in restaurant and any other type of establishment in which people gather.

In the usual drive-in theaters, it is customary to provide each automobile with a separate loud speaker which is connected to the main power amplifier which amplifies the signals picked up by the sound head of the projector. These speakers are fairly expensive and are frequently stolen or unintentionally pulled off from the mounting post by patrons who forget to remove the speaker from the car prior to leaving the parking space. It is an object of this invention to provide means for giving a signal when a speaker is disconnected from its support for any reason whatsoever.

Another object of this invention is to provide a signaling system for use in conjunction with either indoor or outdoor loud speakers in which the signaling is controlled by or from the loud speakers, or by or from component parts or attachments to the speakers.

Another object of this invention is to provide a lighting arrangement which may be used as a signaling medium, an advertising medium, or a medium of ornamentation.

Another object of this invention is to provide a signaling arrangement for use in a drive-in theater which eliminates the necessity for adding a large amount of extra wiring to take care of the signaling system.

Another object of this invention is to provide a signaling system which requires only a very small amount of current for its operation.

Another object of this invention is to provide an arrangement whereby patrons of a drive-in establishment may operate a signal visible from within a remotely located concession booth.

Another object of this invention is to provide a concession light which flickers when the light is turned on by a patron.

In the preferred circuit arrangement, the signal light flickers as the signal which operates the speaker varies and likewise the light intensity varies with the intensity of the signal. It is an object of this invention to make use of this phenomenon as a convenient means for warning the operator of a projection machine when the volume is too high.

Another object of this invention is to provide an arrangement for giving a signal in the event that the speaker cord becomes damaged.

Another object of this invention is to provide an arrangement whereby a single signal light is used for indicating either the removal of the speaker or the request for service by the car hop.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an improved mechanical construction of the various parts such as the speakers and the junction boxes which have been especially designed for use in the improved signaling system.

Other objects and advantages reside in the construction of parts, the combination thereof and the mode of operation, as Will become more apparent from the following description.

In the drawings,

Figure 1 schematically shows a drive-in theater arrangement.

Figure 2 is a fragmentary elevational view showing the manner in which the loud speakers are mounted in relation to a junction box.

Figure 3 is a bottom view of a junction box.

Figure 4. is an end view of a junction box.

Figure 5 is a vertical sectional view showing the construction and arrangement of one of the speakers.

Figure 6 is a front elevational view of the speaker.

Figure '7 is a rear elevational view of the speaker.

Figure 8 is a side elevational view of the speaker.

Figure 9 is a plan view of the speaker.

Figure 10 shows a wiring diagram of the speaker circuit, and

Figure 11 is a wiring diagram showing the circuit used in a modified signaling system.

It has been chosen to illustrate our invention as applied to a drive-in theater, whereas many of the features of our invention are equally applicable to other types of installations.

Referring now to Figure 1 of the drawings wherein there is schematically shown the essential arrangement of a drive-in theater establishment, reference numeral designates the screen used in conjunction with 'a sound projector '22. The projector is provided withfa conventional sound head 24 which translates the impressions on the sound track of a sound film into electrical impulses which are first amplified in the preamplifier 26 and then further amplified in the main power amplifier 28. The amplifier 28 sepplies power for operating individual speakers ,38 which are plugged into sockets 52 on the junction boxes 30 which are placed at spaced points throughout the entire parking area :generally designated by the reference numeral 32. In order to avoid unnecessary repetition, Figure 1 of the drawings shows only a fragmentary portion of the total parking area which would normally be used in conjunction with an outdoor theater. 7

It is customary practice in outdoor theaters to provide a concession booth such as the concession booth 34 shown in Figure 1 of the drawings. For purposes of illustration, the booth 34 has been shown behind the motion picture projector, Whereas it is within the purview of the invention to locate the concession booth at any other convenient location. 'The operator of the concession booth employs car hops for goin around to the occupants of the cars to take orders, to render service, to deliver orders. 'etc. in accordance with well known practice. Each car parked in the parkin'g space 32 is provided with a speaker 38 on which a concession light operating switch 39 is provided which con rols a light 55 mounted on the adjacent junction box 30 "as will be explained more fully hereinafter.

The junction boxes 3i! are removably mounted on suitable supporting posts 36 (see Figure 2) which are wired for sound and which serve to support a pair of speakers 38 "at a convenient height so that they may be reached by theoccupants of cars parked next to the junction boxes.

As best shown in Figures 2, -3 and 4 of the drawings, each junction box is provided with s. pair of cross rods 40 arranged at opposite endsof the junction boxes for removably supporting the speakers 38. Each speaker is provided with a mounting hook or bracket 42 which is used for hooking the speakers on to one of the cross rods 40 or on to some portion of the car "such as the car window M shown in Figure 2. A flexible cord 66 connects each speaker 38 to the power circuit within theadjacent junction box 30 in a manner to be explained more fully hereinafter.

Each junction box is provided with a dependin socket element 41 which slips over the upper end of the mounting post 35 and "is held in place by means of one or more set screws GL8. Each speaker cord 4 6 is provided with a plug 50 which is adapted to cooperate with one of the two sockets 52 provided in the bottoin "Wall of the junction box Ell. These plugs 59 are preferably iie'cted between t held in place within the sockets by locking members 54 which are held in place in any suitable manner such as by screws which would be hard to remove without a screw driver. In this manner it becomes very diificult for anyone to remove one of the speakers without cutting or otherwise severing the cord 46. Each junction box is provided with a pair of signal means which for purposes of illustration, has been -shovvn as a pair of neon lights 56 arranged in the manner indicated by the drawings. While there are certain advantages in using a neon light, any other type of light, a bell, horn or any "other form 'of signal, depending upon the effect desired, could be used.

Referring now to Figures 5 through 9, it will be noted "that each speaker element comprises a p'airb'fcup shaped housing elements 60 and 62 which are provided with a lap joint 64 at their meeting edges as best shown in Figure 5. In orderto make the joint waterproof and at the same time make it possible to separate the parts, a waterproof adhesive material 66 of the type soluble in gasoline or other well known solvents has been used between the overlying surfaces of the lap joint. One example of such a material is polyvinyl acetate. The front housing 'element 6?. is provided with louver members 68 which are formed as integral parts of tl'ieho'using member 62. A water impervious fibrous membrane or gasket 1'0 is pro'v'ided directly behind the louvers and directly -in front of the speaker element I2.

Directly above the louver members 68, there is provided a switch T4 connected in circuit with the neon light 55 in the manner indicated in Figure 1'0 of the drawings. While we have chosen to show a conventional toggle switch for controlling the apparatus of the signal light, it is'obvious thatany other type of circuit controller maybe usedin lieu of the toggle switch 74 without departing from the spirit of our invention.

speakers are connected to the main Signal "(HS- tributi'on lines "at leading from the power pliher 28 through a transformer 82. The transformer is located the junction box so and-in- -'-ciudes a primary winding 84 and s winding be, conn ctedin the circu t as Sh wn in Figure 1'0. A se arate necn iig-nt '56 is rovided for each loud speaker unit and is ice-short err videdont espeaae meanness i'g' e d of he seated ry seems T 9 i li f s d we so that only a small a through "the neon which is 'eontro additional resistance in in the manner indica d t eir e ne light 56. Neon lights n pave pi-e en vry satisia' u Whereas Figure "-10 shows myths Q i 1 Y box connected to the power lines 80. it is apparent that a large number of junction boxes would all be connected to the one power amplifier 28. Likewise, Figure shows only one speaker plugged in, whereas in actual practice one speaker would be plugged in to each of the sockets 52 provided on the junction box.

In the signaling system described hereinabove, the only signal given is that given by the light located directly on the junction box and this signal serves the multiple purpose of indicating to the car hops either that the occupants of a car want service or that someone has removed or disconnected the speaker from the junction box. As explained hereinabove, the intensity of the lights given is an indication to the projection operator as to the strength of the signal leaving the power amplifier 28 so that if the lights become unduly bright, it will be a signal to the operator to cut down the volume or if the lights become unduly dim, it will be a signal to the operator that the volume should be increased.

In Figure 11 of the drawings, I have shown a modified signaling arrangement for use when it is desired to operate a signal in the concession booth in addition to operating the signal on the junction box. The circuit diagram shown in Figure 11 is a fragmentary diagram intended merely for purposes of illustration and shows the signal lights for only four of the parking spaces in a given theater whereas, in actual practice there would be a given number of lights corresponding to the number of parking spaces. In the modification shown in Figure 11, the power for operating the signaling system is supplied from a transformer 100 which supplies power of suitable voltage and frequency for operating the entire signaling system. The out-put of the transformer Iilfl is connected to the lines I02 and H34 as shown. The line I04 is provided with a first branch line [06 which leads to a series of neon lights on a panel board 80a. located within the concession stand 34 and a second branch line 103 which leads to the signal lights llll mounted on the junction boxes in much the same manner as the signal lights described in connection with the preferred arrangement. Reference numeral H2 designates the signal lights located in the concession booth and reference numeral H4 designates the signal operating switch which would be mounted on the speaker in much the same manner that the switch 14 described hereinabove was mounted on the speaker. Thus, it will be noted that for each speaker, there is provided a pair of neon signal lights, one of which is located on the junction box and the other of which is mounted in the concession booth.

The wires leading from the neon lights l H) to the switches H4 are placed directly within the same cable which connects the individual speaker unit to the junction box so that severance of the speaker cable severs the wires which short circuit the lights H0. It will be noted that closing of the switch H4 not only short circuits the corresponding light H0 but also short circuits the corresponding light H2 which is arranged in parallel with the light H0. By virtue of this arrangement, opening one of the switches H4 or severing the cables leading to one of the switches l [4 cause the adjacent signal lights H8 mounted on the junction box to light up and also cause the corresponding signal light H2 in the concession booth to light up.

In order to simplify this disclosure, the signaling system as shown in Figure 11 is separate from the loud speaker system whereas in actual prac- 6 tice one could use a common ground line for both systems and thereby eliminate unnecessary duplication of wires.

Although the preferred embodiment of the device has been described, it will be understood that within the purview of this invention various changes may be made in the form, details, proportion and arrangement of parts, the combination thereof and mode of operation, which generally stated consist in a device capable of carrying out the objects set forth, as disclosed and defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1. In a drive-in theater, a power amplifier for amplifying audio signals, a transformer having a primary coil and a secondary coil, circuit means for connecting said primary coil to the output circuit of said power amplifier, a speaker, means for connecting said speaker to said secondary coil, an indicator means, a resistance element, means for supplying power from the output of said power amplifier to said indicator means and said resistance element in series including a first conductor connected to one side of said primary coil and to one side of said indicator means, and means including a resistance element connecting the other side of said primary coil to the other side of said indicator means, whereby voltage developed by said primary coil constitutes said means for supplying power.

2. In a drive-in theater, a power amplifier for amplifying audio signals, a transformer having a primary coil and a secondary coil, circuit means for connecting said primary coil to the output circuit of said power amplifier, a speaker, means for connecting said speaker to said secondary coil, an indicator means, a resistance element, means for supplying power from the output of said power amplifier to said indicator means and said resistance element in series including a first conductor connected to one side of said primary coil and to one side of said indicator means, and means connecting the other side of said primary coil to the other side of said indicator means whereby voltage developed by said primary coil constitutes said means for supplying power.

3. In a drive-in theater, a power amplifier for amplifying audio signals, a plurality of speaker stations each of which comprises a transformer having a primary coil and a secondary coil, circuit means for connecting said primary coil to the output circuit of said power amplifier, a plurality of speakers, means including a cable for connecting at least one speaker to each of said secondary coils, a neon light, a resistance element, means for supplying power from the output of said power amplifier to said neon light and said resistance element in series including a first lead wire connected to one side of said primary coil and to one side of said neon light, means including a resistance element connecting the other side of said primary coil to the other side of said neon light whereby voltage developed by said primary coil constitutes said means for supplying power, and means for short circuitin said neon light including conductor means forming a part of said cable whereby severance of said cable breaks said short circuit.

4. In a drive-in theater, a power amplifier for amplifying audio signals, a plurality of speaker stations, each of which comprises a transformer having a primary coil and a secondary coil, circuit means for connecting said primary coil to the output of said power amplifier, a plurality of speakers, means including cables for connecting said speaker to each of said secondary coils, a separate neon light for each of said Speakers, each of said neon lights having a resistance element connected in series therewith, means for supplying power from the output of said power amplifier to each of said neon lights including first lead wire means connected to one side of said primary coil and to one side of each of said neon lights, means includinga resistance element connecting the other side of said primary coil to the other side of each of said neon lights whereby voltage developed by said primary coil constitutes said means for supplying power to said neon lights.

5. In a drive-in theater, a power amplifier for amplifying audio signals, a plurality of speaker stations, each of which comprises a transformer having a primary coil and a secondary coil, circuit means for connecting said primary coil to the output of said power amplifier, a plurality of speakers, means including cables for connecting said speakers to said secondary coil, a separate neon light for each of said speakers, each of said neon lights having a resistance element connected in series therewith, means for supplying power from the output of said power amplifier to. each of said neon lights including first lead wire means connected to oneside of said primary coil and to one side of each of said neon lights, means including a resistance element connecting the other side of said primary coil to the other side of said neon lights whereby voltage developed by said primary coil constitutes said means for supplying power to said neon lights; and means for selectively short circuiting said neon lights including conductor means forming a part of said cables whereby severance of any one of said cables breaks the short circuit for one of said neon lights whereby a signal is given.

6. In a drive-in theater, a power amplifier for amplifying audio signals, a transformer having a primary coil and a secondary coil, circuit means for connecting said primary coil to the output'circult of said power amplifier, a pair of speakers, means for connecting said speakers to said secondary coil, first indicator means, a first resistance element, means for supplying power from the output of said power amplifier to said first from the output of said power amplifier to said second in i tor ans and said second resistance element in series including aconductor connected to said one side of said primary coil and to one side oi said second indicator means, and means including a resistance element connecting said other side of said primary coil to the other side of said second indicator whereby voltage developed by said primary coil supplies power to said second named indicator means,

and to one side of said indicator means, and

indicator means and said first resistance element in series including a first conductor connected to one side of said primary coil and to one side of said first indicator means, means including a resistance element connecting the other side of said primary coil to the other side of said first indicator means whereby voltage developedibysaid primary coil constitutes said means for supplying power, a second indicator means, a second resistance element, means for supplying power REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES. PATENTS Number Name Date 1,216,534 Yanochowski Feb. 20, 1917 1,690,279 Craft Nov. 6, 1928 1,794,040 Stichney Feb. 24, 1931 1,804,902 Walton May 12, 1931 1,993,382 Rodth Mar. 5, 1935 2,062,019 Arnold Nov. 24,1936 2,066,672 Bernard Jan. 5, 1937 2,068,121 Babson Jan-, '19,, 1937 2,193,811 Blanchard Mar. 19,1940 2,299,379 Cargill Oct. 20, 1942 2,305,656 Yopp Dec. 22, 1942 2,317,525 Finley et al Apr. 27, 1943 2,339,471 Foresman et al'. Jan. 18, 1944 2,415,991 Christian Feb. 1.8, 1947 OTHER REFERENCES Radio Age, Oct. 1946, pages 14 and 15 (published by RCA)

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Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2522930A (en) * 1949-07-12 1950-09-19 Autocrat Inc Signaling system for drive-in theaters
US2549676A (en) * 1949-09-16 1951-04-17 Earl C Dunn Communication system for drive-in establishments
US2557408A (en) * 1948-09-28 1951-06-19 Edward B Brady Loud-speaker system for drive-in theaters
US2588086A (en) * 1949-03-12 1952-03-04 Maurice S Cole Speaker and heater unit for drive-in theaters
US2588756A (en) * 1949-06-13 1952-03-11 William S Oftebro Automobile air conditioner for drive-in theaters
US2591288A (en) * 1949-02-21 1952-04-01 Arthur H Pitchford Shaving appliance
US2598343A (en) * 1949-03-10 1952-05-27 Edward B Brady Program and communication system for drive-in theaters or restaurants
US2612830A (en) * 1949-03-24 1952-10-07 James R Kendrick Air conditioning and speaker unit for automobiles
US2614478A (en) * 1949-09-29 1952-10-21 Carl Thornquist Air conditioning means for motor vehicles
US2619544A (en) * 1949-10-05 1952-11-25 Richard A Satterfield Auto circuit for drive-in theaters
US2629780A (en) * 1949-03-31 1953-02-24 Rca Corp Illumination and signaling system for drive-in theaters
US2632156A (en) * 1950-05-01 1953-03-17 Claude Ezell & Associates Inc Vacancy indicator for drive-in theaters
US2661505A (en) * 1953-12-08 Dilione
US2679643A (en) * 1948-08-17 1954-05-25 Autocrat Inc Signaling device for drive-in theaters
US2688657A (en) * 1951-01-09 1954-09-07 Allen B Wilson Concession ordering system for drive-in theaters
US2691160A (en) * 1949-03-31 1954-10-05 Rca Corp Illuminating and signaling device for outdoor automobile drivein theaters
US2709953A (en) * 1950-05-22 1955-06-07 Walter E Engle Air conditioning system
US2732546A (en) * 1956-01-24 Magers
US2739857A (en) * 1953-01-02 1956-03-27 Elmer L Fisher Fixture for use in the parking space of drive-in restaurants
US2786098A (en) * 1953-01-02 1957-03-19 Jr Bishop N Alsbrook Drive-in theater speakers severance warning system
US2895179A (en) * 1953-02-24 1959-07-21 Wilson Lewis Eugene Multiple screen drive-in theater
US3382494A (en) * 1965-06-11 1968-05-07 David R. Mahacsek Theft alarm for electrical device
US3397441A (en) * 1965-04-26 1968-08-20 Rich Engineering Inc Method of making an ornamental faceplate
US3407400A (en) * 1965-08-20 1968-10-22 Eli M. Lurie Theft control system
US3656158A (en) * 1970-11-30 1972-04-11 Audio Alert Corp Integrated fully supervised fire alarm system
US4073368A (en) * 1975-01-20 1978-02-14 Mustapick Andrew James Automated merchandising system

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US1216534A (en) * 1913-11-28 1917-02-20 Automatic Electric Co Automatic telephone system.
US1690279A (en) * 1928-11-06 Apparatus for the visual interpretation of speech and music
US1794040A (en) * 1929-10-14 1931-02-24 Jr Charles L Stickney Call-indicating device
US1804902A (en) * 1929-05-15 1931-05-12 Kenneth B Walton Annunciator system
US1993382A (en) * 1933-06-03 1935-03-05 Joseph R Rodth Protection device for telephones
US2062019A (en) * 1934-11-19 1936-11-24 Benjamin M Vogel Telephone
US2066672A (en) * 1930-07-14 1937-01-05 Associated Electric Lab Inc System of recording
US2068121A (en) * 1930-05-22 1937-01-19 Roger W Babson Combined parking meter and advertising device
US2193811A (en) * 1936-02-25 1940-03-19 Western Union Telegraph Co Signaling system and apparatus
US2299379A (en) * 1941-09-12 1942-10-20 Edward K Cargill Signal device for serving trays
US2305656A (en) * 1940-07-31 1942-12-22 Harry T Yopp Signal device
US2317525A (en) * 1939-07-05 1943-04-27 Thomas J Finley Signal device
US2339471A (en) * 1942-07-13 1944-01-18 Edwin D Foresman Table signal
US2415991A (en) * 1944-02-04 1947-02-18 Charles L Christian Portable signaling device

Patent Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1690279A (en) * 1928-11-06 Apparatus for the visual interpretation of speech and music
US1216534A (en) * 1913-11-28 1917-02-20 Automatic Electric Co Automatic telephone system.
US1804902A (en) * 1929-05-15 1931-05-12 Kenneth B Walton Annunciator system
US1794040A (en) * 1929-10-14 1931-02-24 Jr Charles L Stickney Call-indicating device
US2068121A (en) * 1930-05-22 1937-01-19 Roger W Babson Combined parking meter and advertising device
US2066672A (en) * 1930-07-14 1937-01-05 Associated Electric Lab Inc System of recording
US1993382A (en) * 1933-06-03 1935-03-05 Joseph R Rodth Protection device for telephones
US2062019A (en) * 1934-11-19 1936-11-24 Benjamin M Vogel Telephone
US2193811A (en) * 1936-02-25 1940-03-19 Western Union Telegraph Co Signaling system and apparatus
US2317525A (en) * 1939-07-05 1943-04-27 Thomas J Finley Signal device
US2305656A (en) * 1940-07-31 1942-12-22 Harry T Yopp Signal device
US2299379A (en) * 1941-09-12 1942-10-20 Edward K Cargill Signal device for serving trays
US2339471A (en) * 1942-07-13 1944-01-18 Edwin D Foresman Table signal
US2415991A (en) * 1944-02-04 1947-02-18 Charles L Christian Portable signaling device

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2661505A (en) * 1953-12-08 Dilione
US2732546A (en) * 1956-01-24 Magers
US2679643A (en) * 1948-08-17 1954-05-25 Autocrat Inc Signaling device for drive-in theaters
US2557408A (en) * 1948-09-28 1951-06-19 Edward B Brady Loud-speaker system for drive-in theaters
US2591288A (en) * 1949-02-21 1952-04-01 Arthur H Pitchford Shaving appliance
US2598343A (en) * 1949-03-10 1952-05-27 Edward B Brady Program and communication system for drive-in theaters or restaurants
US2588086A (en) * 1949-03-12 1952-03-04 Maurice S Cole Speaker and heater unit for drive-in theaters
US2612830A (en) * 1949-03-24 1952-10-07 James R Kendrick Air conditioning and speaker unit for automobiles
US2629780A (en) * 1949-03-31 1953-02-24 Rca Corp Illumination and signaling system for drive-in theaters
US2691160A (en) * 1949-03-31 1954-10-05 Rca Corp Illuminating and signaling device for outdoor automobile drivein theaters
US2588756A (en) * 1949-06-13 1952-03-11 William S Oftebro Automobile air conditioner for drive-in theaters
US2522930A (en) * 1949-07-12 1950-09-19 Autocrat Inc Signaling system for drive-in theaters
US2549676A (en) * 1949-09-16 1951-04-17 Earl C Dunn Communication system for drive-in establishments
US2614478A (en) * 1949-09-29 1952-10-21 Carl Thornquist Air conditioning means for motor vehicles
US2619544A (en) * 1949-10-05 1952-11-25 Richard A Satterfield Auto circuit for drive-in theaters
US2632156A (en) * 1950-05-01 1953-03-17 Claude Ezell & Associates Inc Vacancy indicator for drive-in theaters
US2709953A (en) * 1950-05-22 1955-06-07 Walter E Engle Air conditioning system
US2688657A (en) * 1951-01-09 1954-09-07 Allen B Wilson Concession ordering system for drive-in theaters
US2739857A (en) * 1953-01-02 1956-03-27 Elmer L Fisher Fixture for use in the parking space of drive-in restaurants
US2786098A (en) * 1953-01-02 1957-03-19 Jr Bishop N Alsbrook Drive-in theater speakers severance warning system
US2895179A (en) * 1953-02-24 1959-07-21 Wilson Lewis Eugene Multiple screen drive-in theater
US3397441A (en) * 1965-04-26 1968-08-20 Rich Engineering Inc Method of making an ornamental faceplate
US3382494A (en) * 1965-06-11 1968-05-07 David R. Mahacsek Theft alarm for electrical device
US3407400A (en) * 1965-08-20 1968-10-22 Eli M. Lurie Theft control system
US3656158A (en) * 1970-11-30 1972-04-11 Audio Alert Corp Integrated fully supervised fire alarm system
USRE29580E (en) * 1970-11-30 1978-03-14 Audio Alert Corporation Integrated fully supervised fire alarm system
US4073368A (en) * 1975-01-20 1978-02-14 Mustapick Andrew James Automated merchandising system

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