US2453572A - Means for varying the tuning of stringed instruments - Google Patents

Means for varying the tuning of stringed instruments Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2453572A
US2453572A US790626A US79062647A US2453572A US 2453572 A US2453572 A US 2453572A US 790626 A US790626 A US 790626A US 79062647 A US79062647 A US 79062647A US 2453572 A US2453572 A US 2453572A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
string
tensioning
varying
tension
tuning
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US790626A
Inventor
Ferrier David John
Original Assignee
Ferrier David John
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to AU2453572X priority Critical
Application filed by Ferrier David John filed Critical Ferrier David John
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2453572A publication Critical patent/US2453572A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/14Tuning devices, e.g. pegs, pins, friction discs or worm gears
    • G10D3/147Devices for altering the string tension during playing

Description

Nov. 9, 1948. D. J. FERRIERA 2,453,572
I MEANS FOR VARYING THE TUNING OF STRINGED INSTRUMENTS Filed Dec. 9, 1947 Ihventor Jaw/i0? J6hn 1'27"?" p'er Patented Nov. 9, 1948 MEANS FOR VARYING THE TUNING OF STRINGED INSTRUMENTS David John Ferrier, St. Kilda, Victoria, Australia Application December 9, 1947, Serial No. 790,626 In Australia June 12, 1945 Section 1, Public Law 690, August 8, 1946 Patent expires June 12, 1965 11 Claims.
This invention relates to means for varying the tuning of steel guitars and other stringed instruments and its objects are to enable the tunings of strings to be varied instantly by semi-tones or other predetermined amounts; to obtain a greater range of open tunings with steel guitars and other similar instruments; to make it easier to get the full range with the said instruments; and to enable a much wider variety of chords and effects to be produced than is possible with existing instruments of this type.
The pitch of each string of a steel guitar or other like stringed instrument is normally adjusted to a particular note, and although it is possible to adjust the pitch of the strings by the usual method, no means are provided for rapidly altering the pitch of a string by varying its tension while the instrument is being played. A purpose of this invention, therefore, is to provide mechanism for enabling this to be done in a 1 simple and efficient manner, whereby the instrument may be employed to obtain a greater number of musical effects.
I attain these objects by the mechanism illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which-- Figure l is a perspective View, partly in section, of a steel guitar embodying mechanism according to this invention.
Figure 2 is a view in elevation of the mechanism shown in Figure 1, and
Figure 3 is a fragmentary view showing an alternative method of attaching the buffer spring.
Referring to the drawings, wherein the same reference numerals are used to indicate like parts, the reference numeral ID indicates the rame or body of a steel guitar. A recess or cavity II is formed in the frame or body [0 and plates l2 are secured to the side walls of said recess.
Bearing plates l3, [4 are arranged in the recess H and are secured at their ends to the plates l2. The bearing plate 13 may, if desired, also constitute the bridge for the strings. Rods l5, l6, l1, [B are longitudinally disposed in the frame and are slidable in holes formed in the bearing plates [3, M. The ends of the rods l5, I! are connected by a bar 19 secured to their lower surfaces and the ends of the rods l6, 18 are connected by a bar 20 secured to their upper surfaces. Links 2 i, 22 are connected to the bars I9, 20 respectively and at their other ends are pivotally attached to levers 23,
24 respectively which extend transversely of the frame and are pivoted at 25 to the frame. The free ends of the levers 23, 24 are placed within easy access of the player and are provided With knobs or the like for manual adjustment. The
three positions of the levers are suitably marked on the frame.
A rod 26 extends transversely between and is secured at its ends to the plates I2. Four tensioning members 2'! are pivotally mounted on the rod 26, the said members having slots 28 in their upper ends by which the ends of the strings 29 are attached to the members 21. Rollers 30 are attached to the lower ends of the tensioning members 21, and buffer springs 3| connect the said rollers to a rod 32 mounted in the frame H1.
The tension of the buffer springs 3| may be made adjustable by attaching the ends of said springs to hooks 3 l the threaded shanks of which pass through holes in a rod 32, the required adjustment being effected by nuts 3 I (see Figure 3).
A pair of screws 33, 34 is provided in each of the slidable rods l5, l6, 11, I8, the said set screws 33, 34 being adjustable to different heights and being adapted to engage the upper surfaces of the rollers 30 when the levers 23, 24 are operated, thereby pivoting the tensioning members 21 to varying amounts.
The mechanism is adjusted so that when the levers 23, 24 are in the right-hand position as viewed in Figure 1, the rollers 30 are in engagement with the lower surfaces of the rods I5, I6, 11, I8 and the strings are tuned to their lowest pitch. When either of the levers 23, 24 is moved to the central position the corresponding set-screws 33 engage the upper surfaces of the rollers 30 and the corresponding strings are tensioned to a higher pitch.
By moving either of the levers 23, 24 to the lefthand position in Figure 1 the corresponding set screws 34 are brought into engagement with the upper surfaces of the rollers 30, thereby further increasing the tension in the strings. Thus for the three different positions of each lever 23, 24 the tunings of the pair of strings associated therewith are adjusted to three different values. The particular pitch to which each string is altered at each position of the lever may be varied by adjusting the corresponding set-screw 33 or 34.
Although in the instrument described above the strings are adjusted in pairs, it will be understood that the strings may also be controlled individual- 1y or in any desired combination, and that each movement of a lever may effect a variation in the pitch of any particular string of a tone, a semitone, or any suitable multiple or fraction thereof.
As examples of the effects obtainable it is pointed out that in a steel guitar the open strings are tuned to the chord of Amajor, namely, A, C sharp,
- E. This chord can be changed, for example, by
decreasing the tension to form the chords of C major (G, C, E); E major (G sharp, B, E); A minor (A, C, E); E minor (G, B, E), or C sharp minor (G sharp, C sharp, E)
By way of other examples of the effects that may be achieved by changing the tension of the strings by the mechanism of this invention, it may be mentioned that passing chords such as ninths, sevenths and augmented and diminished chords can be obtained by operation of the mechanism.
As will be clear to musicians, there are a number of other possible effects, obtainable by variations of the tuning of the strings in accordance with the invention; thus, for example, any inversions of chords can be obtained.
I claim:
1. Means for varying the tuning of a string in a stringed instrument comprising a tensioning member pivoted to the frame of the instrument, one end of the string being afiixed to the upper end of said member, a roller on thelower end of the tensioning member, a member slidably mounted in the frame, an abutment on the slidable member, and means for actuating the slidable member in order to move the abutment thereon into engagement with the roller on the tension ing member, thereby altering the tension of the string.
2. Means for varying the tuning of a string in a stringed instrument, comprising a tensioning member pivoted to the frame of the instrument, one end of the string being afiixed to the upper end of said member, a roller on the lower end of the tensioning member, a rod slidably mounted in the frame, abutments on the rod, and means for actuating the rod in order to move the abutments thereon into successive engagement with the roller on the tensioning member, thereby altering the tension of the string.
3. Means for varying the tuning of a string in a stringed instrument, comprising a tensicning member pivoted to a rod extending transversely of the frame of the instrument, one end of the string being affixed to the upper end of the tensioning member, a roller on the lower end of the tensioning member, a rod disposed longitudinally in the frame and slidably mounted therein, setscrews in the rod at intervals therealong adapted successively to engage the upper surface of the roller as the rod is moved longitudinally, a lever pivoted to the frame of the instrument and movable to a series of positions, and means connecting the lever to the rod so that operation of the lever will move the tensioning member to a series of positions, thereby altering the tension of the string.
4. Means according to claim 3 wherein the tensioning member is movable to any of three positions whereby the tuning of the string may be altered to any of three predetermined values.
5. Means according to claim 3 wherein a buffer spring is provided to compensate in part for the tension of the string,
6. Means according to claim 3 wherein a buffer spring extends between the said roller and an abutment secured to the frame.
7. Means according to claim 3 wherein buffer spring extends between the said roller and an abutment secured to the frame, means being also provided to adjust the tension of the said buffer spring.
8. Means for varying the tuning of strings in stringed instrument, comprising tensioning members pivoted to a rod extending transversely of the frame of the instrument, the ends of the strings being afiixed to the upper ends of the tensioning members, rollers on the lower ends of the tensioning members, rods disposed longit dinally in the frame and slidably mounted ther in, set-screws in the rods at intervals therealo g adapted to successively engage the upper surfac s of the rollers as the rods are moved longitudinally, means connecting said rods, a lever pivoted to the frame of the instrument and movable to a series of positions, and means connecting the lever to the rods so that operation of the lever will move the tensioning members to a series of positions, thereby altering the tension of the strings.
9. Means for varying the tension of a string in a stringed instrument, comprising a tensioning member adapted to engage the string and movable to vary the tension of the string, an abutment on the tensioning member, a member slidably mounted on the instrument, and an abutment on the slidable member adapted, on movement of the slidable member, to engage the abutment on the tensioning member. thereby moving the tensioning member and altering the tension of the string.
10. Means for varying the tension of a string in a stringed instrument, comprising a tensioning member adapted to engage the string and movable to vary the tension of the string, an abutment on the tensioning member, a member slidably mounted on the instrument, abutments on the slidable member, and control means con nected to the slidable member, the abutments on the slidable member being adapted, on movement of the control means, to successively engage the abutment on the tensioning member, thereby moving the tensioning member and varying the tension of the string.
11. Means for varying the tension of a string in a stringed instrument as claimed in claim 10, and in which the control means is movable to a series of positions, movement of the control means from one of its positions to another effecting a predetermined variation in the tension of the string.
DAVID JOHN FERRIER.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number
US790626A 1945-06-12 1947-12-09 Means for varying the tuning of stringed instruments Expired - Lifetime US2453572A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2453572X 1945-06-12

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2453572A true US2453572A (en) 1948-11-09

Family

ID=3838331

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US790626A Expired - Lifetime US2453572A (en) 1945-06-12 1947-12-09 Means for varying the tuning of stringed instruments

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2453572A (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2573963A (en) * 1949-07-07 1951-11-06 Gibson Inc Pitch changing mechanism for stringed musical instruments
US3439571A (en) * 1967-01-03 1969-04-22 Mattel Inc Stringed instrument having improved tuning and chording means
US3721150A (en) * 1971-10-20 1973-03-20 R Hoffman Pitch raising and lowering device for guitars
US4191086A (en) * 1978-01-05 1980-03-04 Spercel Robert J Tuning device
US4348934A (en) * 1980-06-25 1982-09-14 Saburo Ogata Tuning device for stringed musical instruments
US4354417A (en) * 1981-09-16 1982-10-19 Glaser Ii Joseph Tone changer for stringed instrument
US20070214935A1 (en) * 2006-03-15 2007-09-20 Cosmos Lyles Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
US7855330B2 (en) 2008-01-17 2010-12-21 Intune Technologies Llc Modular bridge for stringed musical instrument
US8779258B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2014-07-15 Intune Technologies, Llc Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
US20150059550A1 (en) * 2013-09-03 2015-03-05 Intune Technologies, Llc Constant tension device
US9484007B1 (en) 2015-11-18 2016-11-01 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo stop tuner and tremolo stabilizer
US9792886B2 (en) 2015-01-22 2017-10-17 Intune Technologies, Llc String tensioner for stringed instrument
US9847076B1 (en) 2016-10-18 2017-12-19 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo spring and stabilizer tuner
US10229659B2 (en) 2014-10-13 2019-03-12 Intune Technologies, Llc Low-friction bridge for stringed instrument

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US974095A (en) * 1909-09-30 1910-10-25 Henry Schlemmer Tuning device for stringed instruments.
US1924854A (en) * 1932-11-25 1933-08-29 Arthur R Harmon Musical instrument
US2323969A (en) * 1942-04-28 1943-07-13 Biederman Clarence Stringed instrument

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US974095A (en) * 1909-09-30 1910-10-25 Henry Schlemmer Tuning device for stringed instruments.
US1924854A (en) * 1932-11-25 1933-08-29 Arthur R Harmon Musical instrument
US2323969A (en) * 1942-04-28 1943-07-13 Biederman Clarence Stringed instrument

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2573963A (en) * 1949-07-07 1951-11-06 Gibson Inc Pitch changing mechanism for stringed musical instruments
US3439571A (en) * 1967-01-03 1969-04-22 Mattel Inc Stringed instrument having improved tuning and chording means
US3721150A (en) * 1971-10-20 1973-03-20 R Hoffman Pitch raising and lowering device for guitars
US4191086A (en) * 1978-01-05 1980-03-04 Spercel Robert J Tuning device
US4348934A (en) * 1980-06-25 1982-09-14 Saburo Ogata Tuning device for stringed musical instruments
US4354417A (en) * 1981-09-16 1982-10-19 Glaser Ii Joseph Tone changer for stringed instrument
US20070214935A1 (en) * 2006-03-15 2007-09-20 Cosmos Lyles Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
US7592528B2 (en) * 2006-03-15 2009-09-22 Cosmos Lyles Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
US20090301283A1 (en) * 2006-03-15 2009-12-10 Cosmos Lyles Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
EP1999742A4 (en) * 2006-03-15 2017-08-16 Cosmos Lyles Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
US7888570B2 (en) * 2006-03-15 2011-02-15 Intune Technologies, Llc Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
US20110126689A1 (en) * 2006-03-15 2011-06-02 Intune Technologies Llc Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
US7855330B2 (en) 2008-01-17 2010-12-21 Intune Technologies Llc Modular bridge for stringed musical instrument
US8779258B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2014-07-15 Intune Technologies, Llc Stringed musical instrument using spring tension
US20150059550A1 (en) * 2013-09-03 2015-03-05 Intune Technologies, Llc Constant tension device
US9318081B2 (en) * 2013-09-03 2016-04-19 Intune Technologies, Llc Constant tension device
US9613600B2 (en) 2013-09-03 2017-04-04 Cosmos Lyles Constant tension device
US10229659B2 (en) 2014-10-13 2019-03-12 Intune Technologies, Llc Low-friction bridge for stringed instrument
US10224009B2 (en) * 2015-01-22 2019-03-05 Cosmos Lyles String tensioner for stringed instrument
US9792886B2 (en) 2015-01-22 2017-10-17 Intune Technologies, Llc String tensioner for stringed instrument
US20180040312A1 (en) * 2015-01-22 2018-02-08 Cosmos Lyles String tensioner for stringed instrument
US9484007B1 (en) 2015-11-18 2016-11-01 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo stop tuner and tremolo stabilizer
US9847076B1 (en) 2016-10-18 2017-12-19 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo spring and stabilizer tuner

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2453572A (en) Means for varying the tuning of stringed instruments
US2972923A (en) Floating tremolo and bridge construction for lute-type musical instruments
DE3030999A1 (en) FOOT CONTROL MUSIC INSTRUMENT
US3437001A (en) Key changer and tremolo for guitar
US3390600A (en) String tension adjustment for steel guitars
US2844985A (en) Quick-change string tuner
GB1268974A (en) Chord forming apparatus for musical instruments
US1892223A (en) Percussion instrument
US2196531A (en) Musical instrument bridge
US2122396A (en) Musical instrument
US1259062A (en) Stringed musical instrument.
US1924854A (en) Musical instrument
US4106387A (en) Stringed musical instrument
US383275A (en) Guitar
US2070082A (en) Kettle drum
US615053A (en) Bridge for stringed instruments
US4020730A (en) Musical instrument
US1823683A (en) Tone modifying device for the vibrating elements of musical instruments
US3440920A (en) String tension adjustment device for stringed instrument
US2234874A (en) Stringed musical instrument
US4342249A (en) String mounting pitch changing apparatus for a pedal steel guitar
US2889732A (en) Pedal operated tuning control for a stringed instrument
US3250167A (en) Tone levers for individual strings in a stringed musical instrument
US2504752A (en) Stringed musical instrument
US3748943A (en) String mounting and adjustment for steel guitars