US2441112A - Retractable soot blower - Google Patents

Retractable soot blower Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2441112A
US2441112A US539552A US53955244A US2441112A US 2441112 A US2441112 A US 2441112A US 539552 A US539552 A US 539552A US 53955244 A US53955244 A US 53955244A US 2441112 A US2441112 A US 2441112A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
valve
air
blowing
motor
pipe
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US539552A
Inventor
De Los E Hibner
Fred C Arey
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
VULCAN SOOT BLOWER Corp
Original Assignee
VULCAN SOOT BLOWER CORP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by VULCAN SOOT BLOWER CORP filed Critical VULCAN SOOT BLOWER CORP
Priority to US539552A priority Critical patent/US2441112A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2441112A publication Critical patent/US2441112A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28GCLEANING OF INTERNAL OR EXTERNAL SURFACES OF HEAT-EXCHANGE OR HEAT-TRANSFER CONDUITS, e.g. WATER TUBES OR BOILERS
    • F28G3/00Rotary appliances
    • F28G3/16Rotary appliances using jets of fluid for removing debris
    • F28G3/166Rotary appliances using jets of fluid for removing debris from external surfaces of heat exchange conduits

Description

May 4, 1948. DE LOS E. HIBNER ETAL/ 2,441,112
RETRACTABLE 500T BLOWER Filed June 9, 1944 lb Sheets-Sheet 1 ,j re
'lfi/e rzfonsx Be [as ZJZZner Fred 6: ,By wf/ 1948. DE LOS E. HlBNER ETAL 2,441,112
RETRACTABLE 500T BLOWER Filed June 9, 1944 10 Sheets-Sheet 2 -F/Etd y 1948. DE LOS E. HIBNER ET AL 2,441,112
RETRACTABLE 500T BLOWER Filed June 9, 1944 10 Sheets-Sheet 3 y 1948. DE LOS E. HIBNER ETAL 2,441,112
' v RETRACTABLE 500T BLOWER Filed'Jun 9; 1944 10 Sheets-Sheet 4 y '1948. DE LOS E. HIBNER ETAL 2,441,112
- RETRACTABLE SOOT BLOWER Filed June 9, 1944 10 Sheets-Sheet 5 k k} r- 1 l b I I g m J l t\ l 1 m 0 i are I N 3 q I h N f X g $1 "x i q N m Q a Q m; 1 *1 vm Q3 l O a 6 w r N. o I 3 K a 3 g Q fi/enfons: .Fz Z06 lu /1167267 May 4, .1948. DE Los- E. HI BNER E'I'AL 2,441,112
RETRACTABLE SOOT BLOWER Filed June 9, 1944 1o Sheets-Sheet 6 vlttforney y 1948. DE LOS E. HIBNER ETAL 2,441,112
RETRACTABLE SOOT BLOWER Filed June 9,v 1944 l0 Sheets-Sheet 8 May 4, 1948- I DE LOS E; HIBNER ETAL RETRACTABLE SOOT BLOWER Filed June 9, 1944 10 Sheets-Sheet 9 m f y 0 mm W 1% n JF no Z 7 2% MWN 9 all mm 3 Hum WN. WTWQ .Q\
QM .PHN
y ,1948. DE Los E. HIIYBNER EIAL 2,441,112
RETRACTABLE soo'r BLOWER 1o Sheets-Sheet 10 Filed June 9, 1944 QQN v Patented May 4, 1948 RETRACTABLE soor BLOWER De Los E. Hibner and Fred assignors to Vulcan Soot C. Arey, Du 3015, Pa., Blower Corporation, a
corporation of Pennsylvania Application June 9, 1944, Serial No. 539,552
14 Claims. 1
The present invention relates to soot blowing apparatus for boilers, wherein the tubular blowing element normally lies outside of the intensely heated region in which it must be while performing a cleaning operation and enters that region only when it is called upon to discharge cleaning fluid against the surfaces to be cleaned; and it has for its object to produce an apparatus that is simple and rugged in construction, adjustable to meet a wide range of conditions, and instantly responsive to manual control at any point in a cycle of operations to cause a change in that cycle.
In the preferred embodiment of our invention the blowing element moves lengthwise through the wall of a boiler setting between an extended working position in which it lies mainly on the inner side of the wall and a retracted position in which it is disposed mainly on the outer side of the wall. Therefore the invention may be said to have as separate, specific objects: simple and novel manually controlled automatic operating means for the blowing element; means for easily adjusting the stroke of the element over a com siderable range; means to cause the element quickly to return to its retracted position from any other position, when desired; simple means to halt the movement of the element at any point in its cycle of movement, when desired, and then, if desired, to cause it to complete the cycle which was under way at the time of stopping the element; and to provide simple, novel and efficient mechanisms and devices, such as improved bearings, reversing means and motors, forming part of the apparatus or system,
The various features of novelty whereby our invention is characterized will hereinafter be pointed out with particularity in the claims; but, for a full understanding of the invention and of its objects and advantages, reference may be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:
Figure 1 is a side view of an apparatus embodying the present invention, a fragment of the Wall of a boiler setting to which the apparatus is applied being shown in section; Figs. 2 and 3 are sections taken, respectively, on. lines 2-2 and 3-3 of Fig, 1; Fig. 4 is a section on a plane containing the axis of the blowing or cleaning element, showing on a somewhat larger scale than Fig, 1, the aforesaid wall and an adjacent fragment of the apparatus; Fig. 5 is a, section, on a still larger scale, on line 5-5 of Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is a view, on a larger scale than Fig. 1, of the outer end of the apparatus, the cover being removed and the side that is away from the observer in Fig, 1 being shown; Fig. 6 is a section taken approximately on line 6 -6 of Fig. 6, showing only a small fragment of the apparatus; Fig, 7 is a section through a control valve seen in Fig. 6; Fig. 8 is a View similar to Fig. 6, showing the side that is toward the observer in Fig. 1; Fig. 9 is a section on line 99 of Fig. 8; Fig. 10 is a vertical longitudinal section on a plane containing the axis of the shaft of the motor appearing in Fig. 8; Figs. 11 and 12 are sections taken, respectively, on lines H-|l and l2--|2 of Fig. 10; Fig, 13 is a section on line I 33-43 of Fig. 12; Fig. 14 is a section on line Hi-I -l of Fig. 8; Fig. 15 is a section on line l5-l5 of Fig. 14 Fig, 16 is a section through the reversing valve for the traversing motor and its immediate operating mechanism, the section being taken on line |6|6 of Fig. 17; Fig, 1'7 is a section through the reversing valve on a plane transverse to the long axis of the apparatus; Fig.- 18 is a section on line I8-|8 of Fig, 17; Fig, 19
is a section-on line l9--|9 of Fig. 16; Fig. 20 is'a section on line 20-49 of Fig, 6, illustrating the main air valves for controlling the motors, and the scale being larger than that of Fig. 6; Fig, 21 is a view similar to Fig. 20, showing the latches in their holding positions and the motor-driven trip: ping means being omitted; Fig. 22 is a section through the pneumatic actuator for one Of th latches in Figs. 20 and 21; Fig. 23 is a section on line 23-23 of Fig. 20, showing one valve open and the other closed; Fig. 24 is a section on line 24-44 of Fig, 21; Figs, 25 and 26 are sections taken, respectively, on lines 25-25 and 2626 of Fig, 24; Fig. 27 is a front View of the control panel for the apparatus; Fig. 28 is a section on line 2828 of Fig. 27; Fig. 29 is a section on line 29-29 of Fig. 28; Fig. 30 is a diagram illustrating the conditions in and those parts of the system affected by the pressing of the starting button; and Fig. 31 is a diagram similar to Fig, 30, but including the parts affected by pressing the "stop and the "emergency retract buttons.
The blower unit, as shown in Fig, 1, comprises a long horizontal, stationary pipe I connected at one end to a head 2 to which cleaning fluid,
preferably steam, is supplied in any usual or suit.-'
able way; together with a long, tubular blowing element 3 telescoped upon the pipe and slidable along and rotatable about the same. The free end of the pipe is open and the free end of the blowing element, which, when retracted, projects somewhat beyond the corresponding end of the pipe, is closed. As best seen in Fig. 4, the nose or closed end of the blowing element contains little nozzles 4 adapted to discharge jets of cleaning fluid radially. The other, open end of the blowing element extends into and is rotatable in a casing or housing 5 that is slidable along the pipe I. This casing or housing is provided with a stufling box 6 to provide a steam tight joint between the same and the said pipe. This unit, including also a'bearing 1 in the vicinity of the free end ofthe pipe I, is supported by a long beam 8. One end of this beam is supported by the wall A of a boiler setting and the beam extends away from and at right anglesto thewall. Said wall contains a large opening lined with a heavy sleeve or bushing 9 in the outer end =o"f which the nose of the blowing element lies,- when the said element is in its retracted position.
Normally the blowing element occupies/a retraoted position, as in Fig. 1, the greater part thereof being in the cool region outside of the furnace or combustion-chamber; and even the nose of the element being sheltered against the intense heatin said'chamberbecauseit is withdrawn from the chamber proper into the tunnel through thefurnace wall. To effect. aiblowingor cleaning operation, the blowing element .is extended or'projected into the chamber and is rotated; steam or other cleaning .liuid bein :supplied to the head and issuing from the nozzles in theform of jets.
"Two "motors, preferably-air motors, are used, one for "turning the blowing elementand the other 'for extending and retracting it. These motors are'mountedon opposite sides of the I beam 8 at 'the end remote-from the furnace wall, as best shown in Figs. 6 and 8; it! being the motor for turning the.element'and H being the motor for movingthe element lengthwise.
The driving mechanism between the motor l O and'the blowing elementisbest'shown in Fig. 15. It will-be seen that above and parallel to the blowing element'is a shaft l2 that is noncircular in icross se'ction. A cylindricalportion [4 at one end of "this shaft extends through a bearing-"i5 in "the wall of 'a housing lfifastenedto the outer endedge'of'the I beam and forming withthe latter'ja T. The shaft 12 carries a'pinion -|'l', slidable thereon within-the casing --5=and rotatable in the latter whileinterlocked therewith against axial movements relative thereto. The pinion meshes'with a pinion i8 fixed to the outer end of the tubular blowing element'at'a point Within thecasingii. As the shaft i2 revolves it produces similar turning movements on the part of the blowing element. "In the arrangement shown, the pinions 'i'i .andlfi are :alike, so'that theshaft l2 and the blowing element turn at the same speed. Itiwill benoted-that the-gear casing 5 has at the top whatmay be termed awheeled carriage 13 which rides on'the lower flange of the I beam andthusrelieves .theshaft l2 and the tubular 'themotor shaft. On the shaft 22 is a worm 24 thatmesheswith a worm wheel 25 one. shaft 26 thatilies at right angles to shaft 22. On shaft 26 (seeF-ig. .14), is a second worm ZTthat meshes with'a worm wheel 2'8-on a shaft 29 parallel to themotor'shaft. On shaftiii is-a g r wheel '60 members'l ands of theweight of the casing and meshing with a gear wheel 3| on the shaft member l4, The shaft 22 extends through the wall of the housing It; farthest from the motor and is adapted to receive a crank, not shown, for turning the motor and shafts by hand. The free end of the shaft 22 is shown as having a slot or kerf 32 cut into the end face to form an interlock with the manually operableactuator.
The blowing element is reciprocated lengthwise by an endless chain 34 driven by the motor ii "through speed reducing gearing. As will be seen in .Figs. 1 and 2, one loop of the chain extends around a sprocket wheel on a short, vertical shaft -35 =atthe-furnace end of the apparatus; the other loop being-engaged with a sprocket wheel on "thelower endof'a-vertical shaft 36 mounted in thehousing l-fi was to project from the latter at the top and at the bottom, as best shown in Figs. nland-14. *As in the case of the other motor, the shaft 3! of motor ll, paralleling that of motor i0, extendsinto .the housing It where it is provided with a;pinion -3B n1eshing with a gear wheel 39 on ashaftMthat-paralIeIs the motorshafts. Theshaft -AU maybe turned byhand by applying a crank to the outer free end thereof which contains:a.:slot-:orkerf;32, as does the shaft 22. On shaft 40 ,iS a worm-4i meshing with a worm wheel 42 one shafted. Shaft 44 has thereon a worm 4-5 meshing witha worm-wheel 46 on shaft 36 that drives the'chain. The chain is .connectedwin any suitable way-to the casing 5'sothat the latter andtheblowing element to which it is-attached must travel-with the chain. In the arrangement shown; the casing-forms a link inthe chain, the ends ,of the chain, between which the casing is located,-.being-:connectedthereto by eye bolts 34* of which-one isishown in Fig. 6.
While the motor illmay always turn in the same-.direction,-because the blowing element need only .turnlnone direction, the traversing motor H must be reversed to impart reciprocatory movements to :the blowing element. Such reversal should usually be automatic, as should other steps forming part of a complete-blowing cycle; so :,that,:-after a cycle has bee properly started, it will be automatically completed.
1The:automaticcontrol depends primarily on the operation ofthe-traversing motor,-each cycle being carried out during the time that it takes that: motor torcomplete a variable, predetermined number ofrevolutions. To this end we have pro- .vided a .control shaft -41 arranged transversely above a depressed portion of the'housing it; this shaft being driven by a worm '43 fixed on the upper end of shaft 36 and meshing With'a worm whee1'49 :on theshaft M. Mounted on opposite sides of the housing l'6,'near the ends of the shaft aretwdlarge cam wheels 50 and 5!. Gear wheels 52 on shaft 41 mesh with gear wheels 53 on 'thecam wheels. Thus the cam wheels revolve in thetsamedire'ction and'atthe same speed when the motor II is running; the direction being reversed when the .motor is reversed.
:As will hereinafter be :seen, :the :cam wheels exerciseacontrolover the'supplyiof air to the motors and "over the direction .in which the traversing motor turns.
.Air .is supplied to both motors through two main air'valves disposed in a valve casing 55 lo- ;cated just below the .cam wheel, as best seen in Fig. "6. The details of these valves are illustrated inFigsfZl-ZG. The main part of the valve casing contains two'like, vertical, non-communicating chambers "56 and 51 arranged side by side, together with. a separate chamber 58 underlying 5 both of the other chambers but divided therefrom by a horizontal wall. A pair of like sleeves 59 are arranged in the valve casing, one extending from top to bottom through chamber 58 and chamber 56, while the other goes through chambers 58 and 51. These sleeves are stationary and each contains ports 66 and 6|, respectively, that place the interior thereof in communication with.
both of the chambers through which it passes. In the sleeves are spring-actuated piston valve devices which are alike butare numbered differently, 62 and 63, to distinguish them from each other. Each valve comprises .a spool-like valve proper 65 which, in the down position, shuts ofi communication between the ports 66 and GI in the surrounding sleeve; whereas, in the up position, communication is established between those ports. In other words, when a valve is down, no air can pass from the lower chamber 58 to the corresponding upper chamber; whereas, when a valve is up, such a flow of air can occur. Each valve has a stem 66 that extends out through the top of the casing and there terminates in a button or head 61. Surrounding each stem within the casing is a spring 68 tending constantly to hold the valve down. Below the body member of the valve casing is a thick cover plate 69 provided with an interior chamber 10 of irregular shape in communication with the bores in the two sleeves.
When air under pressure is admitted into the chamber 16 it passes into the sleeves below the valves 65 and forces both valves up. If the valves are latched in their raised positions they will remain there until they are unlatched; but, otherwise, they will drop into their closed positions as soon as the air pressure in chamber 10 is reduced.
On top of the casing 55 are mounted two latches, l2 and 13, each adapted to rock about a vertical pivot pin I4 from a position in which its nose underlies the head on the projecting end of the stem of one of the valves 62 and 63, as in Fig. 21, and a position in which the nose is clear of such head, as in Fig. 20; the first being the latching position and the other the release position. Each latch has associated therewith a spring 15 tending constantly to hold it in the latching position. These latches are controlled by the cam wheel 50 which has thereon a cam 16 in the form of a curved finger adapted to engage a pin 11 on the tail of latch 13 in one angular position of said wheel. There is also on the cam wheel a pin 18 for engagement with the tail of latch 12 when the cam wheel is in said predetermined position. The cam finger and the pin 78 move the latches far enough to unlatch the air valves and permit them to close.
Air for energizing both motors enters chamber 58 in valve casing 55 through a pipe 19 when air is admitted to the pipe from a suitable source of supply. Assuming the valves 62 and 6 3 to be closed, no air can enter the chambers 56 and- 51 until these valves are opened. When that occurs, air can enter chambers chamber 56 through a pipe 8| to motor l and from chamber 51 through a pipe 82 which leads to a reversing valve 83 for the traversing motor, located near the motor, as shown in Fig. 8. From the reversing valve two pipes 84 and 85 lead to the traversing motor through a suitable governor The cam wheel actuates the reversing valve whenever the blowing element reaches its retracted position and again when it has been extended to a predetermined, selected point. This wheel is 56 and 51, flowing from located directly above the reversing valve which has a controlling arm 81 supported at its lower end for rocking movements about an axis parallel to and directly below the axis of the wheel. The upper end of this arm extends into the vicinity of the cam wheel which has thereon a pair or peripheral lugs 88 and 89 that are adlustable circumferentially of the wheel. In both Figs. 6 and 8 the parts are in the positions which they occupy when the blowing element is fully retracted, the latches for the main air valves being held in idlepositions and the lug 88 rem-ainlng where it was after having shifted the reversing valve to extend position. In order to cause the motors to start, the valves 62 and 63 must be op ned by air'from a manually controlled control system and must be held open long enough to cause the cam wheel, as viewed in Fig. 6, to turn in the clockwise direction the distance needed to release the latches and cause them to lock the valves open. Thereafter the motors will continue to run, under normal conditions, until the blowing element has returned to its retracted position. The time that elapses in making a complete cycle depends, among other things, upon the angular distance between the lugs 88 and 89. In other words, the cam wheels must turn far enough to bring the lug into engagement with the arm 81 of the reversing valve, before the blowing element can begin its return movement. The
greater the distance between the two lugs, the longer will be the stroke of the blowing element. As is customary, steam should be allowed to flow into the blowing element at the start of each cycle and should be shut off when the cycle is. ended. The head 2, which contains the valve to control the delivery of steam to the blower element, is indicated as being'of a, well known type such as shown, for example, in our prior Patent No. 2,327,524. In that head there is a pilot valve controlling the main valve and operated, in turn, by a pneumatic actuator in the form of a piston in a cylindrical casing. In the present instance 96' represents the pneumatic actuator for the pilot valve in a similar head; and in Fig. 8, 9| is the stem of the pilot valve, whereas 92 is a pipe to deliver air under pressure to the actuator. The pipe 92 is connected with a chamber 94 in a valve casing 95 located near the cam wheel 56. In the bottom of this casing is another chamber 96 communicating with the chamber 94 through a port 91. A normally closed valve 98, controlling this port, hasa stem 99 protruding from the top of the valve casing not far from the cam wheel. The chamber 96 receives air underpressure through a, pipe I09 that is connected to chamber 58 in the casing 55 of the main air valve. Therefore, whenever air under pressure enters chamber 58, some of it flows into chamber 96 so as to be ready to flow to the actuator for the pilot valve in the blower head as soon as the valve 98 opens.
The valve 98 is adapted to be opened and to be locked in its open position by a flat, plate-like cam IOI pinned to an ear I92 on the valve casing for swinging movements in a plane parallel to the adjacent cam wheel. The peripheral edge face I 94 of the cam is so curved that when the can! is in the angular position shown in Figs. 6 and f? the valve 98 is unrestrained and closes. When the Cam is turned counterclockwise, the edge face I04 presses the valve stem down and opens the valve. The valve stem is radial to the axis of the cam so that the cam serves as a positive lock to hold the valve open. At the top of the cam "on past the same.
area pair not tears 105 and i116 thatextend up behind rthezcam-wheel in the =form of ;a 'V. This permits .a rearwardlyprojecting*pin I01 on the cam\wheel ifsee=.Fig. 14) ,to engage-first one ear and then rthe other -:-when the wheel oscillates; therebyarocking thez'cam back and forth between itszidle and working positions. Thepin I01 is preferablyrcarriedby a-lug I68 detachably and adiustablyisecured to the rim of the cam wheel. Theipa'rts areaso designed that, as the camwheel turns in :the counterclockwise direction during the return movement of 'the blowing element to itstretracted-position, the pin I01 passesear I05 andtstrikes ear-lllfizshortlybefore the wheel stops. The cam. is thus rocked into the idle position illustrated; allowing the'valvei98 toclose and the-supply iof steam ito ithe tubular blowing element to be'sshut :off. Then, when the camwheel begins to turn-intheiclockwise direction'iatthe start of a new cycle, :thepin passes ear IE8 and strikes ear I05. This causesithe cam to rock in the direction :to' open valve 98; whereuponsteam begins tosfiowintolthe'blowing element.
ln-order'thatthe blowing element may be-projected :into the furnace or combustion chamber quickly and'be retracted slowly,thereis provided argovernor for throttling theflow ofair to the traversing z'motor during the retreating movementsfof the blowing element but not during movementsin the other direction.
The-pipe '85 from the reversing valve to the traversing motor II is connected'to the lower partiof .the'governor 86 which, in this instance, serves simply as a continuation of the pipe to the motor. In other words,the bulging part of the casing, .indicated'at I09 in Fig. 9, contains a bore II'Ildntoone end of which the pipe 85 leads while the'other end opens-into abore or passage III, appearing .in Fig. '12, in the motor block. The pipe 84, on the other hand,-as best seen in Fig. 9 and-Fig. 10,leads to a bore I I2 near the top of the governor'casing; from which bore there are two paths to the'passage II4 that leads directly to the second bore or port I IS in the motor block. Thefirst of these paths contains a check valve l'lfi'while the second path goes through a throttle valve 111. Air entering through pipe 84 closes the check valve and must therefore follow the second path, containing the throttle valve. When air comes to the motor through pipe 84 and exhausts through pipe '85, the motor is revolving in the -direetionto retract the blowing element and is therefore running at its slower, regulated speed. When the direction of air flow is reversed so as to extender project the blowing element, the incoming air flows through pipe 85 and is not subject'to the control of the governor. The exhaust air which now flows back from the passage I14 is not'required to go through the throttle valvebut simply lifts the check valve and flows The motor now runs at a much higher speed than 'before, permitting the blowing 'element to be extended quickly. The "throttle valve is spool shaped and cooperates with ports 8 to reduce or completely stop'air'flow through the same. The speed of the motor'deterniinesthe position of the valve. 'In the'arrangementshown, the motor shaft has a crank on the endof which is a pin that rotates aball-governor I20 which, through a lever IZI, moves the throttle valve in the'direction to close the ports IIB when the motor speed exceeds a predetermined value. A spring I22, bearing against one end ofthe valve, acts in opposition to the governor so that, --when the motor is :not runnine,-the valve is wide open. Consequently, whenever the motor is :started, the I energizing air is flowing rfreely and under full pressure, throttling occurring only after it has reachedamredetermined speed, and then only while the motor is driving the blowing element in the direction to retract it.
Previously the reversing valve has been -.described only in generalterms. Since it includes novel and useful features, the detailed construction-must be understood. The preferredwformeis illustrated in'Figs..-16-to 19. The valve casing contains three independent, high, narrowchambers, I25, I26 andl2-1, arranged-side'by side. 'I-he;pipe B2 is connected to the middle chamber,-I-25; pipe 84 is connected to chamber 126; and pipe -:85 is connected to-chamber J21. These chambers surround a partition or wall in-the formof a cylindrical, open-ended :sleeve or shell +28 WhiBhT-iS perforated at each chamber-'to;provide-one:or moreports I29 for communication with the same. Slidable back'and-forth within and lengthwise of thecylinder-I28 is a spool-shaped valveI3Il movable between 'two positions -in one of 'whichit connects chamber I26 to atmosphere-and-.chamber I21 to pipe'82, through chamber =:whereas, in the otherposition, it-connects chamber I21 to atmosphere and chamber 126 to pipeiiz. Thus air for the traverse motor can flow tmthesame through either pipe 84 or pipe -85 and :exhaust through the other of these pipes, depending on the position of the valve I30. The-valve proper has stem-like axialextensions Nil at its sends, these extensions passing through and Y being fixed to the arms of a yoke'l32 inthe-form-ofta Wide, flat U. The cross-memberor-theokeafits slidably in a groove I34" in the-frontfaceof 'the valve casing. .At-theIcenter of the cross-pieceof-the .yoke is a'pin I35 which projects from'the-same at the front and at the back. The .rearwardly projecting-portion of the pin lsentered-in a recess I36 in the face of the casing to define the distance through which the yoke and valve -.can
.travel.
The immediate operating meansfor'the -reversing valve-is'an arm I31 mounted at itsupper arm I-31 is a downward continuation of theactuating arm 81, heretofore described and which.is also journalled. on the stub shaft. Themovements imparted to .the-actuator-81 by .the cam wheel 5| are comparatively slow-whereas it. is de- .sirable that the reversing valve move quickly from one workingposition to the other, preferably by a snapaction. To this end wefhave mounted the arms 81 rand I31 so that theymay swing .relatively toeach other andhave providedmeans to lock the arm I31 against movement until then-arm 81 has almost completed .each shifting. movement from one ofits two positions to the other; .energy beingstoredas the armiilswings ineither direction and being released .to drive the arm I31 sharply to'anew position just about the time that the arm 81 stops.
Associated with the arm 81 is a spring holder I39 that is preferably's'eparateirom the arm and free to rock relatively thereto on the stubv shaft. A strong spring I40 is mterposed between the .members 81 and 1.39 to causethem to act as aunit in normalservice, but'permitting either to move while the other is being prevented from moving due to some abnormal condition that may arise. As best shown in Fig. 8, the arm I31 is T-shaped, the cross piece of the T being at the top. The spring holder lies in the plane of this arm and contains two vertical compression springs I4 I, one above each end of the cross piece. Thus the arms 81 and I31 are yieldingly connected for movementsin unison with each other and if the arm I31 is held fast while the other is moved, one spring or the other will be further compressed, to supply the power subsequently to shift the valve very rapidly. Cooperating with the arm I31 are a pair of latches I44 standing upright at opposite ends of the cross arm or piece and provided with shoulders adapted to underlie the ends of said cross piece and lock the arm against rocking movements in one direction or the other, depending which of the latches is in action. A tension spring I45, connecting the latches together, holds them in their latching positions but allows them to be rocked into release positions. Thelatches project up on opposite sides of the spring holder and close to the latter. Consequently, when the actuating armand its spring holder are rocked in either direction, the spring on the side which is swinging downward is compressed until, finally, the holder strikes the latch on that side and trips it. Upon the tripping of the latch the arm I31 is shifted and the other latch snaps into locking position to prevent a return movement of the arm I31 until the actuating arm 81 is again swung in the opposite direction and has almost completed that stroke.
The reversing valve is also provided with pneumatic actuating means. This means consists of a pair of aligned cylinders I46 and I41, disposed behind the actuating arm 81 with their common axis parallel to that of the valve. A plunger or connected-piston device I48 is engaged with both cylinders and is interlocked with the actuating arm to rock the same in one directionor the other, depending on which of the cylinders is energized. In the arrangement shown, the device I48 is a plunger provided at the middle with a circumferential groove I49, and there is a pin I59 projecting rearwardly from the actuating arm into the groove. When air under pressure is let .into cylinder I46, the reversing switch is shifted to the extend position, as shown in Figs. 8 and 1'7. This is always done at the time of starting a cycle, in order to insure that the'reversing valve is properly set; air being delivered to cylinder I46 directly from chamber 10 in the bottom cover plate 69 for the valve casing 55 through a pipe II Therefore, when air is admitted to chamber- 10, through pipe I52, to open the main air valves, .the reversing valve is automatically shifted to the extend position if it be not already there.
There are certain additional devices Or features whose functions have not yet been explained. One of these is a device for unlatching the air valve 63, at will, to stop the traverse motor II at any time, regardless of the position of the blowing element. This device is a little cylinder I54 provided with a piston I55 having a stem I56 that protrudes from the cylinder. The device is mounted on the valve casing 55 in such position that when air is admitted into the cylinder, behind the piston, the stem is driven against the tail of latch 13 to force the latch into the release position which it occupies in Fig, 20. There is preferably a small vent I51 in the closed end of the cylinder. Air is delivered into the cylinder,
when desired, through a pipe I58.
retraction of the blowing element. This comprises means to shift the reversing switch if it not already be in the retract position and means to eliminate thev influence of the governor -on the speed of the traverse motor during retracting movements of the blowing element. To accomplish the first of these aims, air is delivered to the cylinder I41 of the pneumatic actuator for the reversing valve through a pipe I59. As shown in Fig. 8, a branch pipe I69'from pipe I59 leads into a cap-like closure I6| for one end of the cylindrical chamber in which the throttle valve II1 moves. Thus, when air is admitted into pipe I59 to cause the reversing valve to be shifted, some of this air enters the said chamber for the throttle valve, at a' point to actin opposition to the force applied to the throttle valve by the ball governor, as can be seen in Fig. 10, and hold the valve wide open regardless of the speed of the motor. In other words, the blowing element can be withdrawn from the furnace just as fast as it can be projected into the same.
The starting of a cycle of operations and the altering of the same before it can be completed can conveniently be achieved by the operation of a few simple devices as, for example, push buttons. In Figs. 27-29 there is shown a simple control panelin which the manually-operable means are push buttons. Referring to these figures, I62 represents a casing open at the back and having on the front side, at the top, an air gauge and a steam gauge. Below the region of the gauges is a vertical row of three push buttons I64, I65 and I66. Within the casingzbehind the push buttons, is a casting I61 that forms a housing for three valves. In the rear portion of the casting is an internal chamber I68, sufiiciently long, in the vertical direction, to be intersected by the extended axes of all the push buttons and receiving air under pressure through a pipe I63. In the wall closing the front side of said chamber are three bores I69, coaxial with the push buttons. Each button has a stem I19 extending rearwar'dly therefrom through the corresponding bore. A forwardly seating valve I1I on the rear end of each stem controls communication between the corresponding bore and the chamber I68. A spring I12 tends constantly to hold each valve seated. An intermediate portion of each bore is enlarged to form a little chamber I14 to which a little pipe is connected; these pipes, corresponding-to the push buttons I64, I65 and I 66, being pe tively, I58 and I59 to which reference has already been made. The push button devices are all alike except that, whereas the valves corresponding to the push buttons I64 and I65 close immediately when the operators finger is withdrawn, the third push button is provided with means whereby its valve may be locked in the open position. It will be seen that push button I66 has a little radial handle I15 by means of which it may be turned. This push button also has a radial finger I16 that rides on aninfim'd surface I11 extending in an are about the axis of the push button on the back side of the front Wall of the panel. Therefore, by turning the push button I66, the corresponding valve is not only opened, but is locked in the open position due to the small angle of inclination of the cam surface I11, With this arrangement, no'separate vent ports are required, air leaking out of chambers I14 past the corresponding push buttons to reduce the pressure insuch chambers toithatof ll the atmosphere when the orrespon ing; push buttons are in positions to close their valves;
In Fig. 39 there is shown thecontrol panel and, more qrless diagrammatically, so much of the apparatus heretofore described, at least in general terms, that is used to start a blowing cycle and permit it to be automatically completed in the normal or usual way. Referring to this figure, a pipe I18 from a main air line I9'to the air gauge enables the operator tosee whether there is sufficient air pressure for proper operation of the system. If there is, he simply presses the push button I64: whereupon air flows from pipe IB 3into pipe I52 and thence into chamber win the bottom of the casing 55 for the main air valve. Thiscauses the valves 62 and 63 to open and air to be delivered to motor I9 through pipe 8 I and to the reversing valve 83 through pipe 82'. A branch II of pipe I52 delivers air to Cylinder I49 of the reversing valve to move that valve into extend position if it be not already there. Consequently, air iromthe pipe 82 will pass through the reversing valve and pipe 85 to traversing motor II andfrom there through pipe 84 back tothereversing valve and be there exhausted into the atmosphere.
Although air entering the chamber 58 in the casing for the main air valves from pipe I9 cannot pass on to the motors until the air valves are opened some of this air immediately flows through pipe lllflto chamber 94 in control valve casing 95. Both motors having been supplied with air, theblowing element begins to rotate and move lengthwise into the furnace chamber. As heretofore explained, the operator must keep the push button I94 depressed until the cam wheel 59 has released thelatches I2, and T3 to permit them to latch th main air valves in their open positions. By the time thatthis has occurred the cam IO'I will havebeen actuated to open the valve 98 inthe valve casing 95-and lock it against closing; air nowbeing permitted to how through the pipe 92 to the pneumatic actuator 99 for the pilot valve in the Scot blower head. A pipe I19,
extendingfrom a the sloot blower head v 2 to the steam gauge on the control parielindicates what the pressure in the blowing element is. A
As a safety factor, so that the cycle will not continue if no or not sufldcient steam is being supplied to the bl'owirigelement, there may be a secondary cam or lug I80 on the cam wheel 59 for tripping the latch 13am allowing the air valve 63 to closeshortly after the wheel has turned far enough to release the latches. This causes'the traverse motor to stop, although the blowing element continues to rotate. Then, if the operator sees that thegauge shows su filcient steam pressure, he may press the starting button again and cause the cycle to continue. The cycle having finally been started, either by the first pressing of, the push button or by the second, (when the auxiliary cam I80 is used), the cycle completes itself automatically, as heretofore explained; the blowing element rotating continuously, moving quickly into anextended position in the furnace chamber determined by the spacing between the lugs 88 and 89 on the cam wheel BI, and returning slowly under the control of the governor to its retracted position. H Because it mayat times be desirablegor even necessary, to stop the lengthwise movement of the blowing element, or toretract it quickly, means toaccomplish these-ends are associated with the push buttons fl'fiian'd I96, respectively. As shown in Fig. 31', the depression of push button I65 caused air to be delivere'dfrom supply'plpe I69 to pipe I581 and-by the latte'r' to'jthe pneumatic trippingdevice ISl" for the lateli I31 when this is done, the main valve 63 for: the traversing motor II automatically close'sand that motor'sto'ps; Upon again pres'sing'the-starting button' I64, the valve'63- is again opened and is 'lo'ck'ed open by the latch 13",'sothat the cycle that was interrupted start s whereit leftoff andcontinues until the blowing elementis fully retracted When it is des ired not merely to stopthet'ra'versing motor but to cause a quick withdrawal of the blowing eminent? from the furnace chamber, the operator pressesibutton lfiii. This cause'sair from pipe I93 to how throughpipe I59-to'cylinder I41 of the reversing valve; If the blowing element is not already onitsreturn stroke toward its retractedposition, the reversingvalve will be shiftedsoiasto cause-the-return movement to begin at once. previously explained, pipe I69, branching from pipe I59, carries air into the chamber for the throttle valve in the governor andcausesthis valve to be heldwide open; the infiuence of the governor over the return speed of the blowing element being temporarily destroyed. It is to ensure against the assumption of control by the governor, during the retreating movement of the blowing element, thatmeans have been provided to lo'ck the button I66 in position to hold its, valve open; since, otherwise, the operator would be required to keep his finger on the button until the blowing element reached its fully reracted position.
Hereto'fore we have referred to the motors in general terms; only. In the particular type of motor illustrated there are three radial cylinders I8 I i82'and I83, containing pistons I841 on connecting rods that are attached to a crank pin I I9. Shoes I86. on the conneeting rods form with each other a, sleeve held on the. crank pin by a cap nut I81 that surrounds one end thereof while the other end extends into a groove I88 in the crank arm. The engine shaft, with a thickwalled sleeve valve I98 surrounding it, extends through a hub I89 on the cylinder block. In the periphery of valve I99 are similar, oppositely disposed, circumferential recesses. HI and I92 spaced apart by a rib composedvoitwo oppositely disposed sections I94, displaced axially relative. to each other and joined together at their ends by diametrically opposed rib elements I95; the latter elements being of small angular lengthand wider than the combined widthsof said rib sections.
A assage Isc ext mis through the cylinder block from the outer end ofeach cylinder to the bore in the-hub I89, the hub ends of these passages constituting both inlet andexhau'st ports for the cylinders. These ports are distributed about the axis t me motor shaft, spaced at equal distances from one another, and lie with their centers in a plane parallel. to and midway between the planes of the ribs I94. There are two other ports, I91 and I98, in the bore in the hub. These, as best seen in Fig. l3, are spaced apart angularly of the aide of the shaftjand at opposite endsof the reces'sedarea of the valve. 'I'hes'e ports are the en'ds jo'f the passages III and [15, previously described. The function {of the valve is to connect'eaeh port or passage I96 alternately to the passag'e'sl I 1' and H5 toadmit air to and then exhaust it from each cylinder in proper time relation to the 'same'cycl'e tor the other cylinders.
There is another feature at the apparatus that has not been described in detail, hamely, the bearing indicated as -awholeby -the numeral 1 in Fig. 1 and the construction of which is illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5. As there shown the blowing element extends through a spider l 99 carrying three distributed rollers 200, rotatable about axesin a plane at right angles to the axis of the blowing element, and shaped to the curvature of the surface of the latter. The spider has at each end a hub 20!, mounted in annular ball bearings the stationary races of which are supported by the casing; the planes of these ball bearings being at right angles to the axis of the blowing element.
As shown in Fig. 4, the discharge end of the stationary pipe I terminates in a nozzle acting on the ejector principle on fluids in the narrow annular space between the pipe and the surrounding tubular blowing element. Beginning a short distance inwardly from the end of the pipe, the bore is first gradually contracted, as indicated at 203, and then expands again, as indicated at 204, as the end of the pipe is approached. In the region of minimum diameter there are holes or ports 205 bored through the wall of the pipe. As the steam flows past these holes or ports it creates a partial vacuum in the same to take care of any back pressure which might otherwise be built up in the free space surrounding the stationary pipe within the tubular blowing element. v
For the sake of economy it is desirable to use ordinary commercial I beams to support the blower units. However, these I beams have the disadvantage of not being made as accurately as possible in the case of similar members that have machined surfaces. To compensateior this deficiency we provide means to make adjustments in the carriage l3 over a range equal to the variations likely to occur in ordinary I beams. The compensating means illustrated, as best shown in Fig. 6A, comprises an eccentric axle or journal 206 for each supporting wheel 20! for the carriage. Each of the members 298 is carried by one end of a short stub shaft 208 rotatably mounted in an arm 209 that projects upward from the body of the carriage. Each stub shaft may be clamped in any position angularlyof its axis by simply tightening the nut 2! on the outer end thereof; further security against accidental displacement being afforded by a set screw 2| I extending down through the top edge of the corresponding 'arm 209 and into a groove 2l2 in the shaft. By turning the stub shaft carrying the same, each supporting wheel may be raised or lowered as may be necessary for achieving smooth working of the tubular blowing element in its various movements. In other words, the rollers M3 on the carriage can be made to contact the underside of the beam while the wheels run on top of the flanges, regardless of the thickness of the flanges, within limits. a
We claim:
1. The combination with a blowing element and power means to move it back and forth between a retracted position and an extended position of a governor for the power means to cause the said element to travel more slowly toward its retracted position than it does toward the extended position, and manually controlled means to cause a reverse in the movement of said element toward the extended position and to render the governor inoperative to control the speed of movement of the element toward the retracted position.
2. The combination with a blowing element and power means to move it back and forth between a retracted position and an extended position, and a controller for said power means of an actuator for the controlling means including a member 1'4 tending constantly to move from a working po= sition to an idle position, a manually operable device to move said member to a working position, a latch for holding said member in its working position, mechanism coordinated in movement, with movements of said element to trip the latch, and means including a second manually operable device for tripping the latch at will.
3. The combination with a blowing element and power means to move it lengthwise between a retracted position and an extended position, and a controller for said power means including a re- Versing device of an actuator for the controller including a member tending constantly to move from a working position to an idle position, a manually operable device to move said member to a working position, a latch for holding said member in its working position, mechanism coordinated in movement withmovements of said element to operate the reversing device and to trip the latch, means including a second manually operable device for tripping the latch, and means including a third manually operable device cooperating with the last mentioned means to operate the reversing device.
4. The combination with a blowing element, means including an air motor to move it back and forth from a retracted position to an extended position, and a Valve for admitting steam to said element: of air operated means for controlling the steam valve, a main air valve for admitting air to the motor, means to admit air to said main air valve and to said air operatedcontrol means, the said main air valve tending constantly to close, means including a pneumatic actuator and a manually operable device for admitting air thereto for opening the main air valve, a latch for holding the main air valve open, and means coordinated in movements with said element for tripping the latch.
5. The combination with a blowing element and an air motor for moving it back and forth from a retracted position to an extended position: of pneumatically actuated apparatus to reverse the direction in which said element travels, a governor for controlling the flow of air through the motor to cause the movement of said element toward the retracted position to be slower than movement in the opposite direction, and a manu ally operable member and means associated therewith to admit air to the means for actuating the reversing apparatus and simultaneously cause air to be supplied to the motor independently of governor control.
6. A soot blower apparatus comprising a stationary pipe for supplying cleaning fluid and a tubular blowing element surrounding and movable lengthwise of the pipe between a retracted idle position and an extended working position, wherein the end of the pipe within said element terminates in a nozzle wherein the bore is.restricted at an intermediate point and. wherein there are ports through the wall of the nozzle at such point.
7. The combination with a blowing element adapted to be reciprocated between an extended position and a retracted position and to rotate about its own axis, of an air motor to reciprocate said element and a second air motor to turn the latter, a reversing valve for the first motor, a valve device to control the delivery of air to the first motor through its reversing valve and directly to the second motor, separate pneumatic actuators for the reversing valve and said valve device, and means, including a manually operable member; simultaneouslyrto. energize; ondeenergize' said'actuators;
8'; The combination asset forth in. claim: '7; wherein there is a device driven bythe firstmotor, and means controlled by that device :toecausothe reversing valveto beshifted at each end ofl a reciprocatory movement of the blowing element and to cause the said valve deviceto shutoff 'the air controlled thereby whenever the blowing element is in its retracted position.
9. The combination with a blowing element adapted to be 'reciprocated between an extended position and a retractedposition andto-rotate about its own axis, of anair motor to reciprocate saidelementand a second air motor to turnthe latter; a reversing valve for the first motor; a valve device to control the delivery of: air-to the firsthmotor through its reversing valve anddirectly to the'second-motor, separate actuatorsfor the reversing valve and said'valve--device; and' means, including a push button at aremote' point; to energizesaid actuators as long as said: push button is being pressed, latch meansfonsaid valve device; and means driven bythe first'motor-to control said latchmeans.
10. The combination, with a blowing element adapted to be reciprocated'between an extendedpositionandja retracted position and to rotate about its ownaxiaofjan air motor, to.recip rocate saidmelement .and a, second air motor to turn the latter, a,reversing valve for the first motor, self closing valvesto control the delivery of air tothe reversing valveand directly to the second, motor, respectively, pneumatic actuating means, for opening said valves, means including a. manually operable device. to. energize such. actuators so. as toopen the seli-closing valves. and shift the re.- versing valve into position for causing the blow,- ing element to be extended, latchesrtosholdlthe self-closing valves open, means driven by the first motorto causethe reversing valve to be shifted to its retracting position whentheblowinaele: ment reaches its extended positiornand. other means driven bythe first motor to trip the. latches whensaid element reaches its retracted position.
' 11.. The combination as set forth in claim 10, wherein there is a second manually operable device and means controlled thereby to make, it. possible, at any time to energize the actuator for the. reversing valve and cause it toenter'itsretractingposition if, it is notalready there.
12. The combination assetforthin claim 10, wherein there is an additional manually operable device totrip the latch that holds openthe valve through whichair passes tothe first motor by way of .the reversing valve.
13., The combination with a blowing, element adaptedto be reciprocated between anextendd. position and a retracted position andto, rotatev about its. own axis, of an air motor to reciprocate saidelement and a second air motor to turn the latter, a. reversing valve for the first motor, self closing valves to control the delivery ofair. to the reversing valve and directly to the secondmotor, respectively, pneumatic actuating meansv for 16%? openingzsaddivalves, meansrincluding a manually operahlesdeviceto energize said actuators so as to openthe@selfeclosing'valves and'shift the revers ing valveaintonpositlon .for. causing the blower elementato be extended; latches to hold'the selfclosing; valves-open, ac. shaft driven by the first motor and-:extending; topoints near said valves, meanss on 1 said shaft to shift the reversing valve whenever?- the.- blowing element reaches the vicinity. oil. either of? its extreme positions, and other meanspni said shaft to trip the latches when: said. element reaches the vicinity ofits retractedposition.
14.v Thacombination with aeblowing element, means including. an air motor to move it back and forth from-aretractedposition to an extended position,-.and avalve for admitting steam to said element: of air'operatedmeans for controlling the steam valve; a main air valve, piping connecting the main -airvalve to the motor and having therein'artwo-positiomreversing'device for the motor, meansdriven by the-motorin timed relation to theblowingelement acting on the reversing device to operate the same, the main air valve tending constantly to'close, piping connectedto both thema-inairvalve and said air operated means to supply air, thereto,- a valve-in-the-latter piping controlling admission of air to saidair operated means, means driven'bythe; motor in ,timed relation' to' theiblowing element to. operate the last mentioned-valve: an'additional, pneumatic operating meansifor' said reversing device; means, including apneumatic actuator that is connected to' the" main-air valve, and a manually operable device for admittingair thereto, to open the main air'valversaidmanually operable device also admittingair tosa-id' pneumatic operating means for" thereversing" device to set the latter in one ofits-two;positions,, if-itis notalready there; a latch foi holdingthe. main air valve open; and means coordinated in movement withsaid'blowing element for tripping the latch.
DE 'LOS'E. ,HIBNER.
FRED C. AREY.
REFERENCES GITED The. following. references ,are. of record in the file, ofpthis patent;
UNITED: STATES PATENTS Hibner et, a1; Aug. 24, 1943
US539552A 1944-06-09 1944-06-09 Retractable soot blower Expired - Lifetime US2441112A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US539552A US2441112A (en) 1944-06-09 1944-06-09 Retractable soot blower

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US539552A US2441112A (en) 1944-06-09 1944-06-09 Retractable soot blower

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2441112A true US2441112A (en) 1948-05-04

Family

ID=24151714

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US539552A Expired - Lifetime US2441112A (en) 1944-06-09 1944-06-09 Retractable soot blower

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2441112A (en)

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2604358A (en) * 1948-04-22 1952-07-22 United States Steel Corp Apparatus for cleaning furnace checker works
US2668978A (en) * 1951-02-07 1954-02-16 Diamond Power Speciality Retractable soot blower of the long-travel trolley supported type
US2696016A (en) * 1950-04-11 1954-12-07 Diamond Power Speciality Retractable soot blower
US2722032A (en) * 1949-05-20 1955-11-01 Diamond Power Speciality Control means for movable soot blower heads
US2730749A (en) * 1956-01-17 hibner
US2760222A (en) * 1952-02-28 1956-08-28 Superior Ab Soot removing apparatus for steam boilers and the like
US2883694A (en) * 1955-06-13 1959-04-28 Blaw Knox Co Soot blower
US2885711A (en) * 1956-08-28 1959-05-12 Mart Le Roy S De Long retracting soot blower
DE1082363B (en) * 1952-08-22 1960-05-25 Ivor Power Specialty Company L Long feed blower
US3069715A (en) * 1959-04-27 1962-12-25 Combustion Eng Soot blower
US3140503A (en) * 1961-01-06 1964-07-14 Diamond Power Speciality Soot blower construction
US3230568A (en) * 1964-04-20 1966-01-25 Diamond Power Speciality Variable speed soot blower
DE1300621B (en) * 1962-09-10 1969-08-07 Diamond Power Speciality Russblaeser
US4567622A (en) * 1984-03-16 1986-02-04 The Babcock & Wilcox Company Sootblower nozzle apparatus
US4580310A (en) * 1981-02-17 1986-04-08 White Consolidated Industries, Inc. Soot blower including revolving roller assembly with modular construction
US5920951A (en) * 1997-04-03 1999-07-13 Diamond Power International, Inc. Parameter sensing sootblower

Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1228312A (en) * 1916-08-17 1917-05-29 Anna E Steddom Antifriction-bearing for stamp-mills.
US1680202A (en) * 1918-11-21 1928-08-07 Diamond Power Speciality Boiler-tube cleaner
US1709167A (en) * 1929-04-16 Soot blower
US1963423A (en) * 1933-05-03 1934-06-19 Gen Motors Res Corp Connecting rod design for radial engines
US2126683A (en) * 1934-09-28 1938-08-09 Diamond Power Speciality Boiler cleaner
US2139234A (en) * 1936-07-09 1938-12-06 Barnes Drill Co Carriage mounting
US2144744A (en) * 1935-02-13 1939-01-24 Hopkinsons Ltd Soot blower
US2152044A (en) * 1938-02-07 1939-03-28 Cleveland Automatic Machine Co Automatic clutch shifter
US2218332A (en) * 1939-04-10 1940-10-15 Leonard E Fowler Internal combustion engine
US2236032A (en) * 1939-04-13 1941-03-25 Louis P Sandbakken Automatic fuel control for internal combustion engines
US2249741A (en) * 1941-07-22 Boiler cleaner
US2319682A (en) * 1940-08-14 1943-05-18 Vulcan Soot Blower Corp Soot blower
US2324785A (en) * 1940-01-17 1943-07-20 Frederick W Linaker Soot cleaner
US2327524A (en) * 1940-04-17 1943-08-24 Vulcan Soot Blower Corp Automatic soot blower system

Patent Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2249741A (en) * 1941-07-22 Boiler cleaner
US1709167A (en) * 1929-04-16 Soot blower
US1228312A (en) * 1916-08-17 1917-05-29 Anna E Steddom Antifriction-bearing for stamp-mills.
US1680202A (en) * 1918-11-21 1928-08-07 Diamond Power Speciality Boiler-tube cleaner
US1963423A (en) * 1933-05-03 1934-06-19 Gen Motors Res Corp Connecting rod design for radial engines
US2126683A (en) * 1934-09-28 1938-08-09 Diamond Power Speciality Boiler cleaner
US2144744A (en) * 1935-02-13 1939-01-24 Hopkinsons Ltd Soot blower
US2139234A (en) * 1936-07-09 1938-12-06 Barnes Drill Co Carriage mounting
US2152044A (en) * 1938-02-07 1939-03-28 Cleveland Automatic Machine Co Automatic clutch shifter
US2218332A (en) * 1939-04-10 1940-10-15 Leonard E Fowler Internal combustion engine
US2236032A (en) * 1939-04-13 1941-03-25 Louis P Sandbakken Automatic fuel control for internal combustion engines
US2324785A (en) * 1940-01-17 1943-07-20 Frederick W Linaker Soot cleaner
US2327524A (en) * 1940-04-17 1943-08-24 Vulcan Soot Blower Corp Automatic soot blower system
US2319682A (en) * 1940-08-14 1943-05-18 Vulcan Soot Blower Corp Soot blower

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2730749A (en) * 1956-01-17 hibner
US2604358A (en) * 1948-04-22 1952-07-22 United States Steel Corp Apparatus for cleaning furnace checker works
US2722032A (en) * 1949-05-20 1955-11-01 Diamond Power Speciality Control means for movable soot blower heads
US2696016A (en) * 1950-04-11 1954-12-07 Diamond Power Speciality Retractable soot blower
US2668978A (en) * 1951-02-07 1954-02-16 Diamond Power Speciality Retractable soot blower of the long-travel trolley supported type
US2760222A (en) * 1952-02-28 1956-08-28 Superior Ab Soot removing apparatus for steam boilers and the like
DE1082363B (en) * 1952-08-22 1960-05-25 Ivor Power Specialty Company L Long feed blower
US2883694A (en) * 1955-06-13 1959-04-28 Blaw Knox Co Soot blower
US2885711A (en) * 1956-08-28 1959-05-12 Mart Le Roy S De Long retracting soot blower
US3069715A (en) * 1959-04-27 1962-12-25 Combustion Eng Soot blower
US3140503A (en) * 1961-01-06 1964-07-14 Diamond Power Speciality Soot blower construction
DE1300621B (en) * 1962-09-10 1969-08-07 Diamond Power Speciality Russblaeser
US3230568A (en) * 1964-04-20 1966-01-25 Diamond Power Speciality Variable speed soot blower
US4580310A (en) * 1981-02-17 1986-04-08 White Consolidated Industries, Inc. Soot blower including revolving roller assembly with modular construction
US4567622A (en) * 1984-03-16 1986-02-04 The Babcock & Wilcox Company Sootblower nozzle apparatus
US5920951A (en) * 1997-04-03 1999-07-13 Diamond Power International, Inc. Parameter sensing sootblower

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2342770A (en) Valve mechanism
US1816829A (en) Hydraulic upright drill
US2271587A (en) Air register
US1541712A (en) Power-control mechanism
US2807138A (en) Fuel control for a split-turbine type of power plant
US1004541A (en) Fluid-pressure control.
US1582468A (en) Fluid-pressure controlling and reversing mechanism for grinding machines and the like
US2004929A (en) Control means for varying the relative speeds of members driven through a common differential mechanism
US2664708A (en) Hydraulic control system
US691968A (en) Controlling device.
US3034296A (en) Control mechanism for aircraft jet-propulsion engines having means for producing forward and reverse propulsive thrusts
US957200A (en) Tube-bending machine.
US2078749A (en) Hydraulically operated grinding machine
US2444273A (en) Engine conditioning control apparatus for starting, stopping, and reversing
US1686827A (en) Automatic coupling device for transmission of power
US2243656A (en) Power reverse gear
US2327524A (en) Automatic soot blower system
US571129A (en) Macher
US2017086A (en) Locomotive power reverse gear
US2172981A (en) Fluid pressure driving and reversing mechanism
US1201097A (en) Tunneling-machine.
US2325090A (en) Dump valve for hydraulic couplings
US2741460A (en) Power tongs and control system therefor
US2004426A (en) Grinding machine
US2013102A (en) Garment or ironing press