US2420781A - Magazine heating stove with gas - Google Patents

Magazine heating stove with gas Download PDF

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US2420781A
US2420781A US2420781DA US2420781A US 2420781 A US2420781 A US 2420781A US 2420781D A US2420781D A US 2420781DA US 2420781 A US2420781 A US 2420781A
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combustion chamber
stove
bricks
lining
gas combustion
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24BDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES FOR SOLID FUELS; IMPLEMENTS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH STOVES OR RANGES
    • F24B5/00Combustion-air or flue-gas circulation in or around stoves or ranges
    • F24B5/02Combustion-air or flue-gas circulation in or around stoves or ranges in or around stoves
    • F24B5/04Combustion-air or flue-gas circulation in or around stoves or ranges in or around stoves the air or gas passing downwards through the bottom of the stove of fire grate
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24BDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES FOR SOLID FUELS; IMPLEMENTS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH STOVES OR RANGES
    • F24B13/00Details solely applicable to stoves or ranges burning solid fuels 
    • F24B13/04Arrangements for feeding solid fuel, e.g. hoppers 

Description

y 1947- G. KLEIN ET AL MAGAZINE HEATING STOVE WITH GAS COMBUSTION CHAMBER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 9, 1945 INVENTOR c 'usrm KLE/A/ PEEEY 5' MART/A ATTORNEY y 1947 G. KLEIN ETAL 2,420,781
' I MAGAZINE HEATING STOVE WITH GAS COMBUSTION CHAMBER Filed Nov. 9, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 6115 TA\/ K1. EM
F g, 7 PE EEY 5. MAeT/ INVENTOR any skill and with minimum effort.
feature of the contemplated improvement is that,
Patented May 20, 1947 MAGAZINE HEATING STOVE WITH GAS COMBUSTION CHAMBER Gustav Klein, Atlantic City, N. J and Perry S. Martin, Harrisonburg, Va.
Application November 9, 1943, Serial No. 509,556
1 Claim.
This invention relates to a stove construction and, more particularly, to a stove construction of the type disclosed in the prior patent of P. S. Martin, No. 2,399,814, and entitled Solid fuel heating stove.
One object of this invention is to produce an improved stove construction of the type set forth.
In a stove of this type, the green coal is fed into a magazine in which the more volatile gases are distilled by heat of combustion in the lower portion of the magazine and are conducted into a secondary combustion chamber, surrounding saidmagazine. In the secondary combustion chamber, the gases are admixed with air and burnt. The combustion of these gases generates a very high degree of heat which tends to damage parts made from ordinary sheet metal.
A further object of this invention, therefore, is to produce a stove construction of the type set forth, in which a high degree of temperature may be generated without damage to the walls of the secondary combustion chamber.
For reasons of economy and because of its wider availability, it is desirable to use bituminous or soft coal. 'Such coal, however, has a very high volatile content and is more adulterated with non-carbonaceous combustible and other noncombustible foreign material than a comparable grade of anthracite or hard coal. when soft coal is used, deposits tend to form on the walls of the secondary chamber which must be cleaned out from time to time.
It is, therefore, a still further object of this invention to produce animproved stove construction, the secondary or gas combustion chamber of which may be very easily cleaned out without A further in cleaning the secondary combustion chamber, the soot or other foreign matter separated from the walls thereof, fall on the bed of incandescent coal in the bottom of the magazine to be conbeing omitted and certain parts being broken away;
Figs. 2 to 5, inclusive, represent perspective front or rear views of individual bricks of which the refractory lining of the stove is made;
Fig. 6 is a section on line VIVI of Fig. 1 certain parts being omitted;
Fig. '7 is a section on line VII-VII of Fig. 1 certain parts being omitted; and
Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a cover for one'of the cleanout holes shown at the top of Fig. l and in Fig. 6.
Referring now to the drawings more in detail, I0 designates a stove of thetype above set forth, which includes an ash pit l2, access to which may be had through a door I 4. At the top of the ash pit I2 is a conventional rotary grate I6 having a central dump section IS. The grate 16, I8 is supported on a ring in the usual man-' ner. The grate-supporting ring is secured to the interior of the body 20 of the stove, but since the structure of the ring is conventional, it is not shown nor described in detail. The body 20 of the stove is preferably made of sheet material and, as will be seen from Figs. 6 and '7, it
is cylindrical in form. The upper portion of the .body 20 is closed by a dome or hood 22 having an access opening normally closed by a door 24.
In the rear portion of the dome, there is an opening 26 which leads to a smoke stack 28. In the upper portion of the smoke stack 28 is a pivoted damper 38, which may be adjusted manually or which may be connected by a chain or the like 32, to the bottom damper which is usually provided in the back of the ash pit 12. If desired, the damper may be connected to and operated by some well-known heat-responsive, automatically-functioning control mechanism which forms no part of the present invention and which, because it may be of any conventional form, is neither shown nor described. however, that a portion of the opening controlled by the damper 30 is in registration with a portion of the opening 26 which, in turn, is in vertical registration with a portion of the opening defined by the cylindrical body 20 of the stove.
The body of the stove 2!! is enclosed by an outer shell 34, which is spaced therefrom and secured thereto by brackets or the like 36. This produces a space 38 which is open at the top and at the bottom so as to produce an air-circulating channel. Thus the air heated by contact with the exterior-of the stove 20 rises through the space 38 and colder room air enters at the It is noted,
bottom of the space 38 to be warmed and discharged at the top thereof.
The interior of the shell 20 is lined with refractory bricks adapted to withstand relatively high temperatures. These bricks are arranged in superimposed vertical rows and are suitably secured in position. For convenience, the rows of bricks referred to are designated by the letters A, B and C.
The bottom row A is formed of the bricks illustrated in Fig. 5, from which it will be seen that the inner face of each brick is gouged or provided with an upwardly-flaring recess, 42 so as to form an outwardly and upwardly-directed flue. Since the stove is of a round cross section, these bricks are curved so as to be arranged in a continuous circle, as shown in Figs. 6 and '7. As will be seen from Fig. 1, the bricks of the lower row or course A abut against the interior of the shell 26. I
On top of the row A are superimposed the rows B and C. The row B is formed of the type of brick shown in Fig. 2, each of which is provided with a recess 44 formed in the center, lower, outer portion of the brick. The row 0 is made of the type of brick shown in Fig. 2, except that the recesses 44 are omitted. For convenience, the rows B and C are formed of separate bricks, but, if desired, a single brick equal to the height of both of the rows B and C having the lower outer recess 44 could be used. As will be seen from Fig. 1, the rows of bricks B are supported by the inner top edges of the bricks in the row A, so that the rows B and C are spaced from the interior of the shell 26 to form a, secondary gas combustion chamber 46. Also, it will be seen that, when the row of bricks B is built on top of the row of bricks A in the manner stated, the recesses 42 and 44 register and cooperate to form a series of through openings, leading from the combustion chamber defined by the. row of bricks A, into the secondary gas combustion, chamber 46., By this construction, gases distilled from the coal in the magazine, defined by the rows B and C will enter the combustion chamber 46, in a manner and for a purpose which will be subsequently described.
In the secondary gas combustion chamber 46, there is. an auxiliary refractory lining which, for convenience, has been designated with the letter D. This auxiliary lining is formed of the type of bricks shown in Figs. 3 and 4 from which it will be seen that each of, the bricks is provided on its outside convex surface with a recess 48, so that, when the brick is positioned against the interior of the, shell 26, an air chamber 52 is formed. The air chamber 52 communicates with the secondary gas combustion chamber through suitable, openings 56 provided in the bricks forming the lining D. The air chamber 52 is sup plied wth outside air through an opening 54 in the. shell 26, which leads from the. chamber 52 to a chamber 56 provided in the, air passage 38. The chamber 56. is provided with, an outside air inlet 58 which is controlled by a valve 59.. The valve 59 may be operated manually or may be controlled by any desired type of automatic temperature-responsive means.
From Fig. '7, it will be seen that the inner contiguous vertical walls or edges of, the bricks of the row-D abut against the exterior of the upper lining formed of the bricks'B and C, asat 51, thus forming an abutment for the rows B and C and subdividing the corresponding portion of the gas combustion chamber-46; into a series of fiues 6|. By inspection of Figs. 1 and 6, it will be seen that the rear portion of the gas combustion chamber 46 is open at its top, whereas the front top portion of the gas combustion chamber 46 is closed by a cover 63. The cover 63 is provided with a series of openings 567:, which are adapted to be closed by individual hinged covers 5815. It is to be noted that the front upper portion of the gas combustion chamber 46 is accessible when the door 24 is open and that the rear portion thereof, which is not closed by the cover 63, is accessible when the damper 36 is moved to the open position shown in Fig. 1.
Operation Fire is started on the top of the grates i6, I8 and, as the coal begins to burn, additional coal is introduced through the door 24 until the magazine defined by the rows A, B and C is filled to the desired extent. Upon being heated, an upward draft is produced in the secondary gas combustion chamber 46 and in the stack 28. Since the gas combustion chamber 46 communicates with the lower portion of the magazine through the openings formed by the recesses 42 and 44, a downward draft is induced in the magazine, thus causing gases distilled from unburned coal to flow towards the solid fuel combustion chamber defined by the row of bricks A. Upon reaching the vicinity of the junction of the rows A and B, gases are drawn up into the gas combustion chamber 46 through the openings formed by the recesses 42 and 44. In the gas combustion chamber 46, the distilled gases are mixed with con trolled outside air admitted through the inlet 58 and the holes 59 and 56, and are set on fire by the hot products of combustion which enter the gas combustion chamber 46 from the lower combustion chamber defined by the row of bricks A. In this way, the combustible gases are utilized instead of being permitted to escape upwardly through the stack 28. The burning of the distilled gases in the combustion chamber 46 produces relatively high temperatures, particularly in the zone of the auxiliary lining D, and to obviate the necessity of using special alloys which are expensive at all times and are now entirely unavailable, the row of bricks D has been designed andmounted as shown, thus protecting the shell 29 which is made of relatively thin and common sheet metal.
When soft coal is burned in a stove of this kind, it tends to leave combustible and noncombustible deposits along the interior of the shell 20 and the interior of the fiues 6| formed by the rows B and C and the auxiliary lining D. By opening the door 24 and the covers 58:0, and using a longhandled wire brush or the like, the fiues formed along the front half of the stove can be conveniently cleaned. To clean the rear half of the secondary gas combustion chamber 46, the damper 36 is opened, as shown in Fig. 1, and the damper (not shown) controlling the opening 26 is like wise opened, thus affording access to the rear portion of the gas combustion chamber 46. It will be noted that combustible and noncombustible material deposited as above stated, is scraped downwardly into the combustion chamber defined by the row of bricks A to be burnt or dumped, as the case may be.
It will thu be seen that a stove. built as described can be constructed of inexpensive, common sheet metal of relatively thin cross section, and that the auxiliary lining acts both as an air manifold and as protection for the thin sheet meta1 in the zone of highest temperature. It
will also be seen that the flues in which the secondary gas combustion takes place are readily accessible for cleaning.
The covers 58:: which close the openings 56:1: may be constructed in any desired manner. For example, they may be hinged, at 60, to the cover 63 and may be provided with handles or manipulating knobs 62.
While the invention has been shown in but one form, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited but is susceptible of various modifications and changes without departing from the spirit thereof.
What is claimed is:
In a solid fuel burning stove including a, shell and a grate in the lower portion of said shell, a lower, relatively thick refractory lining for the lower portion of said shell disposed above said grate and abutting against the interior of said shell to form a primary solid fuel combustion chamber, an inner, upper, relatively thin refractory lining for the upper portion of said shell forming a fuel magazine above and communicating with said primary combustion chamber, said inner, upper lining being seated on the inner top edge of said lower lining, with the inner surface of said upper lining offset inwardly of the inner surface of said lower lining, and the outer surface of said upper lining being spaced from the interior of said shell to form a secondary gas combustion chamber, there being openings formed at the junction of said upper and said lower linings interconnecting said combustion chambers, an outer, upper relatively thin refractory lining for said secondary gas combustion chamber, said auxiliary lining being seated on the outer, top edge of said lower lining and being disposed in spaced relation to said upper lining and to the interior of said shell, whereby an annular, continuous air chamber is formed between said outer, upper lining and the interior of said shell, an air inlet introducing outside air to said air chamber, there being a port though said outer, upper lining leading from said air chamber to said secondary gas combustion chamber, there also being clean-out openings accessible from the top of said stove and leading into said secondary combustion chamber, and movable covers adapted to obstruct said clean-out openings.
GUSTAV KLEIN, PERRY S. MARTIN.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,329,993 Kriner Sept. 21, 1943 1,043,587 Gathright et a1 Nov. 5, 1912 368,951 Keep Aug. 30, 1887 2,097,817 Hunker Nov. 2, 1937 529,072 Hinstin Nov. 13, 1894 1,408,743 Jones Mar. 7, 1922 665,462 Peek Jan. 8, 1901 841,673 Dockery Jan. 22, 1907 2,367,094 Blumstengel Jan. 9, 1945 2,365,675 Blumstengel Dec. 26, 1944 1,620,905 Dawson Mar. 15, 1927 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 108,295 Germany Jan. 27, 1900 547,710 Germany -Apr. 2, 1932
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4461272A (en) * 1981-05-26 1984-07-24 Peter Larsson Kachelofen
US20170328571A1 (en) * 2016-05-13 2017-11-16 Firebox Outdoors Llp Nested stove and configurations thereof

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US368951A (en) * 1887-08-30 Base-burning stove
US529072A (en) * 1894-11-13 hinstin
US665462A (en) * 1900-05-21 1901-01-08 Sylvester H Peek Flue-cleaner.
US841673A (en) * 1905-11-14 1907-01-22 James J Dockery Smoke-burning fire-box for stoves, furnaces, and boilers.
US1043587A (en) * 1912-07-02 1912-11-05 Josiah B Gathright Stove.
US1408743A (en) * 1920-08-14 1922-03-07 Jones William Rufus Heater
US1620905A (en) * 1925-02-02 1927-03-15 Einar H Madsen Adjustable spoke
DE547710C (en) * 1928-10-03 1932-04-02 Frank Sche Eisenwerke Akt Ges Filling shaft long-life furnace
US2097817A (en) * 1934-09-06 1937-11-02 Reeves Mfg Company Top for stoves
US2329993A (en) * 1941-06-17 1943-09-21 Kriner Oscar Stove
US2365675A (en) * 1944-12-26 Heating stove
US2367094A (en) * 1945-01-09 Heating stove

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US368951A (en) * 1887-08-30 Base-burning stove
US529072A (en) * 1894-11-13 hinstin
US2365675A (en) * 1944-12-26 Heating stove
US2367094A (en) * 1945-01-09 Heating stove
US665462A (en) * 1900-05-21 1901-01-08 Sylvester H Peek Flue-cleaner.
US841673A (en) * 1905-11-14 1907-01-22 James J Dockery Smoke-burning fire-box for stoves, furnaces, and boilers.
US1043587A (en) * 1912-07-02 1912-11-05 Josiah B Gathright Stove.
US1408743A (en) * 1920-08-14 1922-03-07 Jones William Rufus Heater
US1620905A (en) * 1925-02-02 1927-03-15 Einar H Madsen Adjustable spoke
DE547710C (en) * 1928-10-03 1932-04-02 Frank Sche Eisenwerke Akt Ges Filling shaft long-life furnace
US2097817A (en) * 1934-09-06 1937-11-02 Reeves Mfg Company Top for stoves
US2329993A (en) * 1941-06-17 1943-09-21 Kriner Oscar Stove

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4461272A (en) * 1981-05-26 1984-07-24 Peter Larsson Kachelofen
US20170328571A1 (en) * 2016-05-13 2017-11-16 Firebox Outdoors Llp Nested stove and configurations thereof

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