US2397046A - Loader - Google Patents

Loader Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2397046A
US2397046A US539304A US53930444A US2397046A US 2397046 A US2397046 A US 2397046A US 539304 A US539304 A US 539304A US 53930444 A US53930444 A US 53930444A US 2397046 A US2397046 A US 2397046A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
fork
push
tractor
means
position
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US539304A
Inventor
Clarence B Richey
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
ELECTRIC WHEEL Co
Original Assignee
ELECTRIC WHEEL Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by ELECTRIC WHEEL Co filed Critical ELECTRIC WHEEL Co
Priority to US539304A priority Critical patent/US2397046A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2397046A publication Critical patent/US2397046A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01DHARVESTING; MOWING
    • A01D87/00Loaders for hay or like field crops
    • A01D87/003Loaders for hay or like field crops with gripping or clamping devices
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01DHARVESTING; MOWING
    • A01D87/00Loaders for hay or like field crops
    • A01D87/0053Tractor-mounted loaders

Description

-March-19, 1946. c, B. RICHEY LOADER Filed June 8, 1944 6 Sheegs-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. CZQPGZZCGB March 19, 1946. c. B. RICHEY LOADER Filed June 8, 1944 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

CZ B h Bqiwenc E00 31 MW March 19, 1946. c. B. RICHEY LOADER 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 8, 1944 INVEfV TORY.

Mam-ch 19, 1946. c. B. RICHEY 2,397,046

LOADER Filed June 8, 1944 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 CZ mmvrge.

are/206B Zf-o'c 6 BY W March 19, 1946. B, RICHE 2,397,046

- LOADER Filed June 8, 1944 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 6 2342 fence 3 fc/g Patented Mar. 19, 1946 LOADER Clarence B. Richey, Quincy, Ill., assignor to Electric Wheel Company, Quincy, III., a corporation of Illinois Application June 8, 1944, Serial 'No. 539,304

16 Claims. (015214-131)- This invention is directed to a loader that may be conveniently attached to a standard make of tractor and which is so arranged as to be connectible with the tractor power lift for its operation forloading or unloading as the case may be. There are a number of loaders on the market which attach to the tractors for use in loading manure-ha or the like, as general utility equipment on a farm. Some are attachable to the front end of a tractor and others ar made to attach to the rear end of a tractor. It has been found from experience that front end loaders have proven expensive for ordinary practical farm use since the require many parts with special framework, hoists, etc., making the same cumbersome, limiting the field of operation thereof considerably and also cutting down the flexibility of operation of such a unit as well. Many diificulties have likewise presented themselves with the use of the types of rear loaders nowon the market, the main drawback in the past having been the cost of such loaders arising because of their complex constructions and bulkiness.

One of the main objects of the utility loader of this invention is to provide one that may be.

used with a small size tractor such as Ford- Ferguson tractor, with the loader so designed as to operate in confined quarters as under roofs,

v facilitates its use under low clearance conditions is the embodiment of mechanism including a pusher for discharging material directly off the top ends of the tines of the fork of the loader, to thereby eliminate the use of a loading fork of the tilting or rocking type. Obviously, a loader of the tilting fork type requires considerable additional head room to permit the loading fork to dip forwardly into a manure spreader box or other receptacle sufliciently to cause the mate-.

rial to move therefrom by gravity. This head room must be sufficient to allow the fork end to clear the rising level ,of material as the box or receptacle gradually fills.

With the loader design herein presented, the

- fork tip or tine ends need only be raised suificiently to clear the top of the box sides or the sides of-a receptacle, which normally disposes the loading fork in an upwardly inclined'position, and thepusher then travels along the fork moving and substantially lifting the load along the surface of the fork to spill the material progressivel off of the fork end into the box or upon the material already loaded therein.

By comparison, for practical operation, it is apparent that a loader of the tilting fork type requires considerably longer framework thereby adding to the cost of making the same, and since too much additional weight is not desirable in a loader suspended from the rear end of a tractor, a relatively long framework within reason able weight limits will lack the necessary rigidity and stability necessary for the loading fork supports and associated parts. Furthermore, a longer frame and fork assembly of a loader requires greater turning clearance when the tractor is in operation.

In the loader herein submitted, the lifting links or framework that actuates the loading fork is comparatively short and compact whereby a well stabilized loader is attained that will-have very little, if any, appreciable side sway, or swing amounts of material can be lifted because of greater leverage.

The compactness of the instant loader reduces wear and tear on the loader parts to a substantial minimum, due to its good stability, thereby adding considerably to the length of service of such a unit and by the same token ,avoiding breakdowns while in use during loading and spreading operations.,

A further advantag of the loader of the present construction is that it is so designed as to be easily attached to or removed from a conventional type of tractor without necessitating any change in the tractor or its parts or in the functions thereof.

Another object is to provide a loader that may be manipulated by the conventional tractor power lift. Dual use is made of the power lift by providing suitable mechanism to cause the lift to raise the loaded fork and to subsequently bring the power lift into action a, second time to actu ate the pusher for discharging loaded material from the fork at a predetermined timeor location.

Certain other features are also incorporated in v1 on the far side of the tractor.

the loader as will hereinafter be mentioned in the detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention. In this connection, attention is also, directed to the fact thatthe fork canbe easily converted into a scoop or shovel for lien.-v dling finer materials such as dirt, sand, gravel or stones, this conversion being accomplished by securing suitable plates to the fork structure.

All other improvements andadvantages relating to the loader and its aggregate mechanisms will therefore appear in the following description thereof having reference to the accompanying drawings of the device constituting a workable disclosure thereof.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinalcross-sectional view through the rear axle of a conventional tractor illustrating a preferred embodiment of loader attached to such tractor and connected with the power lifts thereof; such loader having the respective parts thereof and the loading fork dis- Ill posed in lowered and normal loading position;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the mechanism illustrated in Fig. 1 with the tractor wheels not shown and substantially as viewed along the line 2-2 in Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a front elevational view of the loading fork structure and its associated push-oil with the respective parts in the same position as the Fig.1 showing of the loader;

Fig.4 is a small detailed view of the links and parts which are attached to the power lift arm at one side of the tractor and substantially as viewed along the line 4-4 in Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to that illustrated in Fig. 1 with the loading fork in raised and load transporting positionbut with the push-oil still in retracted relation;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary portion of the tractor and its connected links illustrating a position of the parts immediately prior to the operation of the push-off.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary side elevational view I also corresponding with the views in Figs. 5 and 6 but illustrating the linkages in a position wherein the push-off has been moved to the extreme load discharging point on the loading fork;

Fig. 8 is a small fragmentary rear elevational view of the tractor casing illustrating a modified construction of latch means for the latching link which normally holds the fork in raised and load transporting position; i

Fig. 9 is a plan view of the modified construction illustrated in Fig. 8:

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary plan view of the loader and a portion of the tractor to illustrate the use of stabilizing mechanism in connection with the Figs. 11 and 12 are fragmentary diagrammatic side views of the mechanism in Fig. 10, but showing two positions thereof;

Fig. 13 is a partial plan view of a modified arrangement of the fork latching means to act as fork stabilizing structure; and

Fig. 14 is a fragmentaryside view of a portion of the mechanism in Fig. 13.

In Figs. 1 and 2 a conventional form of tractor has been generally indicated at IS, the forward portion of the tractor having been omitted, with the power transmission casing l6 indicated enclosing the usual driving mechanism for the tractor axles I 1, one wheel 18 being illustrated in Fig. The loading fork 2'0 of the loader is carried by the power transmission housing and by its associated parts, and

this fork operates vertically just beyond the peripheries of the tractor wheels while the mechanism supporting the loading fork is compactly and conveniently confined between the protective shielding of the tractor wheels as is readily illustrated in Fig. l.

The fork 20 per se may be constructed in many ways and of materials which are easily obtainable. The present construction of fork has proven very efllcient and'relatively inexpensive and is best illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. This fork is of welded construction having two upright comer. standards 2| and 22 welded to the outer fork tines 23 and 24 respectively, the latter being of angle iron construction. Angles 25 and 28 connect the standards 2| and 22 at the tops and-bottoms respectively, and a plurality of intermediate tines 21 also of angular construction are secured to the lower cross angle 26 in spaced relation between the outer tines 23 and 24. Intermediate angles such as 28 are welded between the respective fork tines forwardly of the cross angle and toward the working end of the fork, and a reinforcing strap 30 extends across the under surfaces of such tines to additionally reinforce the same against excessi e spreading during the loading operation.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 3, it is to be noted that the fork has been illustrated as provided with two or more skids such as 3| and 32 for the purpose of relieving the linkage supporting the loading fork of excessive strain when the fork is being backed into a load, Fig. 1 illustrating the fork as angularly disposed with respect to the general horizontal ground surface. The use of skids such as 3| and 32 is optional and they may be detachably secured to be added when desirable for various conditions of operation.

By supporting the loading fork from the tractor at the particular angle illustrated, the fork tears the material loose as the tractor backs the fork into the piled material. Subequently, the lifting links are only subjected to the weight of the fork and its load-as the fork is being raised and such links need not also sustain the additional force necessary for pulling or loosening the material on the fork from the aggregate of material disposed upon the ground. It has been found that by having the tines resting substantially upon the ground and in parallel relation thereto that the fork merely pierces the load adjacent the ground and does not loosen the portion of material to be raised by the fork from the piled material adjacent thereto. In the latter case it is necessary for the lifting links to cause the separation of the loaded material from the piled material obviously producing an undesirable mechanical arrangement. Therefore, by constructing the fork as shown in Fig. 1 the loading is made much simpler and the linkages are spared of this additional strain due to separating the loaded material from the piled material.

As best seen in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the supporting links of the fork are four in number comprising a pair of upper links 33 and 34, and a pair of lower pins 42 and 43 to brackets 44 and 45 secured by saddles such as 46 and the bolts 4'! and 48 to the axle housings 50 of the tractor l5. Obviously, the

fixtures comprising the brackets 44 or 45 and the 2,897,046 saddles l6 and their connecting bolts may be left.

on the tractor axle housings whenever the loading fork and its associated linkages are removed therefrom. v

The fork ends of the lower links 35 and 36 are pivotally mounted upon the pins 5| and 52, see Fig. 3, supported upon the U-shaped brackets 53 and 54 secured to cross angle 26 of the fork. The tractor ends of the links 35 and 36' are carried upon studs 55 and 56 suitably secured to the power transmission tractor housing I6. Collars such as 51 and 58 provided with conventional set screws may be used to hold the links 35 and 36 upon their respective tractor pivot pins 55 and 56 thereby providing an easy means for removing the links when the loading fork is being detached from the tractor.

The loading fork of the present construction is very compact and the linkages are all relatively short, all due to the fact that this fork is not of the tilting type of construction but embodies the use of a push-01f for discharging the load oil of the end of the fork. Such push-off is generally indicated at 60 in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 and consists of a steel plate 6I having its upperedge 62 bent toward the tine end of the loading fork as best seen in Fig. 1, such plate being reinforced at its lower edge by a cross angle 63 with a pair of spaced angles 64 and 55 vertically disposed as illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. Y

The push-oii' 60 is made to ride upon the upper edges of the tines and it will be noted that the outer tines 23 and 24 are greaterin vertical dimen- .sion than the intermediate tines 21. By this construction, the push-off is guided between the upstanding edges of the outer tines 23 and 24 and rides upon the upstanding edges of the intermediate tines 21 during the operation thereof.

A pair of links 66 and 61 are secured to the angles 64 and 65 of the push-01f and are stabilized by the means of the braces 60 and 10 respectively. A set of arms II and 12 are pivotally connected by means of pins I3 and I4 respectively to the outer ends of links 66 and 61. Arms II and I2 are secured to a cross-shaft I5 by welding or in any suitable manner and the shaft 15 is journaled at the upper ends of the standards 2| and 22 of the fork in bearings I6 and TI, each of which are secured to the standards by means of U -bolts such as I8 and appropriate nuts 80.

Therefore, from the above description in connection with the push-oil? it will be noted that the movements of the push-oil? 60 will be controlled by the rotary movements of the shaft I5 through the instrumentality of the linkages described. The push-oil? 60 will normally be maintained in its retracted and inoperative position illustrated in Fig. 1 by means of a tension spring 8| secured at its lower end to the cross angle 26 by the eye bolt 02 and at its upper end by means of a link 03 to the outer end of an arm 86 secured to the cross shaft 15.

Various means may be provided for rocking the shaft 75 against the action of the spring ill to cause the connected links to move the push-off toward the outer end of the tines for discharging the load. In the present construction a pair of links such as 65 and 06 are pivotally connected at 01 and 88 to the ends of arms 90 and also suitably secured to the rock shaft 15. To reinforce the connection of the links and 86 with the rcckshaft as well as to add rigidity to the arms II and I2. the pins 01 and 88 extend through ears 92 and 93, welded to the arms 'II and I2 respectively. The manner in which the push members or links and 08 are operated will hereinafter he explained in connection with the operation of the lifting fork.

There are various forms of lifts or other equivalent mechanisms associated with conventional carried arms I00 and MI that are hydraulically operated and such arms being best illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. These arms are normally operated through manual control means not illustrated in the present disclosures and although the arms I00 and IM may be raised or lowered within certain limits under manual control or may be moved to various intermediate angular positions, the present loader has been designed to utilize the full movement of these arms from their normal inoperative and down positions to their full up and raised positions. There is no need for any intermediate position with the present device for loading spreaders.

A pair of lifting chains such as I02 and I03 are secured to the ends of the arms I00 and HM by means of suitable clevises I06 and I05; while the fork ends of these chains are connected to the links I06 and I0! also carried by the pins 56 and 52. Auxiliary branch chains I08 and i053 are connected intermediate the length of the chains I02 and I 03 as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 and connect with the U-shaped members H0 and HI respectively. The U-shaped links H0 and Ill are welded or otherwise fastened to brackets H2 and H3 which. are respectively bolted to the links 35 and 36. These brackets H2 and H3 carry a cross slat H4 welded thereto which forms the stabilizing means for the links 35 and 36 and such slat also has an intermediate twisted portion H5 to which can be secured an implements clevis straps. Such a draw bar was provided for use in drawing implements or other vehicles while the fork is attached and which draw bar is accessible when the loading fork is held in raised position as best illustrated in Fig. 5.

The use of the dual or Y chains at each side of the loader is for the purpose of obtaining better mechanical advantage during the initial lifting action of the loading fork as brought about by the movement of the arms I00 and NI. The pull through the chains I02 and I03 by reason of their attachment adjacent the fork as shown in Fig. 1 provides a greater lifting leverage and relieves the arms I00 and ml of excessive initial strain in raising the fork from rest and in loading position by reason of being more remotely connected from the pivotal points of the fork supporting links. As the fork is being raised into carrying position, there will be a point at which both of the chains I02 and I03 and the chains I08 and I09 will all carry the load equally and as the fork is lifted still further the entire load will then be raised through the auxiliary chains I08 and I09 and the portions of the chains I02 and I03 which connect the former chains with the arms I 00 and I 0|. This latter action is also well illustrated in comparing Figs. 1 and 5 which show the two relationships between the chain actions. Referring to Figs. 1, 2 and 4 it will be seen that the arms I00 and IN are also further provided with links and pin means for coacting with the push bars or links 05 and 06 for manipulating the push-01f of the loading fork. The arm I00 is provided with links or braces I20 and HI", the former being bolted to the pivotal end of arm I while the arm I2I is secured to the swinging end of the arm I04, such links I20 and I2I termlnating and being secured by means of a cross pin I22 forming a rigid triangular construction directly movablewlth the arm I00 as the latter is swung about its pivotal axis. Similarly, arm I M is also provided with links I23 and I24 supporting and connected by a pin I25. It is the pins I22 and I23 which cooperate with the ends I25 of the two push bars or links 85 and to cause rocking of shaft-I5 and the resultant operation of the push-off on the loading fork. Referring to Fig. 2 it will be seen that the links 85 and 85 are laterally positioned to be in alignment with the space between each of the pairs of links associated with the arms H and IOI. Furthermore, when the loading fork is in lowered loading position as shown in Fig. 1 both of the links 85 and 85 rest upon the peripheries of the axle housings 50 as shown. Rods I21 and I28 are welded to the links 85 and 85 to form projecting members which ride between the respective links associated with each of the arms I00 and IOI to thereby normally maintain the links 05 and 85 in operative alignment to be acted upon by the pins I22 and I25 during the portion of the cycle of operation when the push-off is being actuated.

As the loading fork is being operated from its loading position in Fig. 1 to the raised position illustrated in Fig. 5 it will be seen that the links 85 and 80 that act as push bars for operating the push-off of the loading fork are then positioned clear of their normal peripheral contact with the axle housings 50 and now rest upon their respec tive coacting pins I22 and I25 as shown in Fig. 5. It is essential that the links 05 and 80 are so designed that the notches I20 are carried high enough by the axle housing that the pin I22 contacts the links 85 and 80 below and in back of the notch I26 as the fork is lifted. With this arrangement it is possible in the present device to maintain the fork in raised load carrying posi tion to permit freedom of use of the arms I00 and IM to perform a further function, namely, that of operating the push-off. This locking of the loaded fork is accomplished by means of a latch link I30 pivotally connected at I8I to the bracket I32 carried by the fork framework. This link I30 is notched as at I88 for coaction with a pin.l84 which forms a part of the mechanism I85 normally used in implement work, but which pin has no other function in the present apparatus. This pin I34 merely forms a convenient usable means that is present on the tractor construc- .tion shown which can be adapted for latching purposes in cooperation with the slot I88 in the link I80. When the loading fork is lifted into theraised position illustrated in Fig. 5'which position also signifies the limit of operation of the arms I00 and I0! in their raised positions, the notch I88 of the link I80 will drop over the pin I84 as shown in Fig. 5 with just enough clearance between the notch and the pin to insure definite latch action. Obviously. the reversal of motion of the arms I00 and IN in a clockwise direction as shown in Fig. 5 will now cause the link I80, by reason of its -notched engagement with the pin I34, to hold the fork in its raised position while the arms I00 and IN and their connected links will now return to their initial positions as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 6. To hasten the return action of the arms I00 and IN, a suitable spring or two such as I88 and I81 are connected with ears rod 140 on the tractor casing 85, such ears being fixedly secured to links I20 and I28.

cacao-is This return of the arms I I0 and IN to their initial positions with the lifting fork and its load locked and latched in their raised positions permits the second step in the operation of the device well illustrated in Fig. 6.

Referring now to Fig. 6 it will be seen that the pin I22 and the end I20 of the push bar 85 are now positioned for cooperation to actuate the push-off. Upon the manipulation of the manual means for again causing the arm I00 to swing in a counter-clockwise direction, the pin I22 will now engage the end I25 of the push bar 85 whereupon the shaft 15 is then rocked in a counter-clockwise direction. Obviously, the pin I25 on the opposite side of the tractor will also engage the end of the push bar 80 in the same manner. As shaft I5 rocks upon its bearings the push-on will be moved outwardly along the tines of the lifting fork through the linkages connected between the shaft I5 and the push-ofl 50. Various positions of the push-on have been indicated in the illustration in Fig. 7. In Fig. 7 the normal retracted position of the push-off is indicated by the reference numeral a, and the broken line positions indicated by b and c are two intermediate positions in the travel of the push-off toward the outer end of the fork. The full line position indicated by d is the foremost load discharging positionof the push-oil. It will be noted that the links 50-II and 61-12 have been designed and arranged as to cause the push-off to assume the reclining angularities illustrated in the intermediate position a and b. This has been done for the purpose of maintaining the push-off solidly against the surface of the tines and to prevent any tendency of the push-oil to slide over or above the load during the power stroke that moves the load off the end of the tines of the fork. A portion of the side of a manure spreader is also diagrammatically indicated at L in Fig. 7 to show the relation of the loading fork to the spreader and and the function of the push-oil in precipitating the load over the side into the spreader without requiring the use of an extremely long fork or fork supporting framework as in the case of tilting forks.

The release of the latch link I30 is obtained through novel means immediately succeeding the discharge of the load as illustrated in Fig. 7 and after the push-oil has attained the full-line p0- sltion indicated by d in Fig. '7. This is accomplished by the use of a spring I having one end connected at I02 to the link I80, and a chain I43 connects the other end of the spring to a pin or stud I04 secured to the rock shaft I5. As seen in Fig. 1, the overall length of the spring I4I and the chain I43 is so arranged that no tension will be exerted upon the link I80 until the loading fork has been moved into theposition illustrated in Fig. 7 When the parts are positioned as in Fig. '7 the latch link I80 is still supporting the weight of the loading fork due to the cooperative engagement of the notch I38 in the latch link with the pin I34 on the tractor. However, as soon as the arm I00 is caused to swing a slight addition'al amount as is necessary to attain the full up position as illustrated in Fig. 5, the load of the fork and its associated links will again be transferred to the chain as previously described. At this time. the latch link I80 will now be free of the pin I34, and since the link I80 will now be under the pulling action of the spring I 4| the link will be caused to disengage from the pin I84 unlatching the loading iork from the tractor. Thereafter, upon operation of the arms I00 and 'Illl in a clockwise direction, the loading fork then again be lowered into the loading position may the action of the power arms I and I01.

There are ways if desired in which stability may be added to the structure illustrated particularly to resist side sway when the fork is loaded when in raised transportable position in back of the tractor. One construction is illustrated in Figs.

Attention is now directed to the illustration in Fig. wherein the latch link I30 is shown' as down and in engagement with the pin 13d in a p n to latch the loaded fork upon reversal of movement of the arms I00 and I01. When the parts are in this position in Fig. 5 the rock shaft 15 has not been actuated and therefore pin M4 is disposed in its original position and no tension is exerted upon the spring MI through the instrumentality of the chain M3. However, when the parts are in the raised position-illustrated in Fig. '7 and the push-ofi has been actuated into the full line position the pin ltd will rotate with the shaft 15 to wind the chain I43 partially upon such shaft whereupon tension is now exerted upon the spring IdI and such tension is transmitted to the link I30. Link 130 will then be released when the mechanism is in the position illustrated in Fig. 7 while the same will not be released nor drawn away from the pin 136 when the parts are in the positions indicated in Fig. 5. To limit the movement of the .bracket I3o away from the pin 136, a small bracket I45 of U-shaped construction is secured adjacent pin ltd and positioned to overlie the path of movement of the link ISt.

Referring now to Figs. 8 and 9, another alternative construction of means for supporting the latch pin in the path of the latch link ltd has been illustrated. In this case a pair of brackets Ito and I 61 are conveniently bolted to the top of the casing I6 of the tractor I5 and support a common pin .168 therebetween for latchingengagement with I415 to prevent excessive outward movement of the link I30 about its pivotal fork mounting, under the action of the spring 1M upon releasing the latch link for the purpose of permitting the fork to assume its original loading position. The shape of the brackets in Figs. 7 and 8 have been illustrated for use in connection with the tractor shown in the preferred form. The brackets I 46 and I41 are shaped to bridge the mechanism I45 and merely illustrate another means of supporting .the pin for latching purposes in connection with the attached loading fork., Obviously, any suitably mounted pin on any portion of the tractor cooperating with the latch link illustrated will operate and act in the same capacity as the pin I36 in the preferredform, and the pin M8 in the modified'form of such a construction.

It will be obvious that various changes may be 10. 1'1 and 12, wherein the use of chains such as I52 and IE3 are connected between brackets I54 and IE5 conveniently secured to the lower swinga-ble links 35 and 36 of the fork. The chains I52 and I53 may be secured to the tractor casing by any suitable adjustable fastening means I56 and I51, such adjustable means permitting a certain amount of regulation of the slack in these chains to allow perfect functioning thereof. As diagrammatically illustrated in Figs. 11 and 12 it will be seen that when the fork is in the lower position porting position which is also equivalent to the Fig. 5 position, the chains willagain be substanefficiency and speed of operation of the fork under use of a double latch link construction in place of the original single link I3Ilillustrated in the preferred form of loader. In the latter construction In Fig. 13, a pair of links such as I60 and I St are provided to coact between the fork 20 and 'the tractor housing I6. These links are spaced as shown and connected by suitable cross members I tfi'and I63 and through the diagonal braces its. In this case, the spring Ida is secured at I65 to one of the cross braces as shown and acts in the same manner as hereinbefore for releasing the pair of latch links. In Fig. 13 the made in the link construction illustrated. For

ing the cost thereof as well as to enhance the latch links I60 and I III vare pivotally connected to the loading fork at points I65 and I61 while the outer ends cooperate with latching pins I19 and Ill supported upon the tractor casing It by the brackets I12 and I13. Bent rods such' as Hi and are secured to the end portions of the brackets and overlay the paths of the swinging latch links 168 and 1.61 as 'best illustrated in Fig. 14 for the purpose of limiting the movement thereof away from their respective latch pins under the action of the spring I4I. It is also possible to use both of the stabilizing ideas presented in Figs. 10 and .13 in combination if that is desirable.

The utility loader described is designed for the purpose of having a loader of a detachable character that will be, within the reach of any small farm owner and at the same time to sup-' manipulation of a single power lift supplied with a tractor as standard equipment thereon.

Summarizing the operation of the loader in connection with the conventional tractor shown it is seen that the first step will be to back the tractor with the fork into the material being loaded as shown substantially in Fig. 1. Then by operating the manual lever for raising the lifting arms the fork is raised into the position illustrated in Fig. which suspends the load in carrying position. The operator can then again manipulate the lever for lowering the arm which looks and latches the load into the position illustrated in Fig. 6, the arms returning to their initial lowered position as the tractor is driven to the point of delivery of the load. When the tractor arrives at the point of discharge the fork is positioned accordingly through steering the tractor and at this point the operator will again operate the manual lever for raising the arms which will operate the push-off and discharge the load in the manner illustrated in Fig. 7. Thereafter the fork will automaticall release itself upon completion of the upper stroke of the arms I00 and I0! whereupon the operator may carry the fork in this raised position and may subsequently operate the lever to allow the fork to lower as he again drives the tractor to the loading point to obtain another load of the material. 1

It is to be understood that the foregoing descriptions and disclosures are all more or less specifically directed to exemplary constructions of the present tractor loader and that various changes and modifications are contemplated which will produce equivalent mechanisms or mechanical structures that shall function or propower lift means to raise said fork, a latch means to lock said fork in raised position, said operable means being rendered ineffective by said latch means in response to the movements of said power lift means after said fork is locked,

and push-oil actuating means automatically con-' nectlble with said power lift means to operate said push-off when said fork is disposed in raised latched position.

2. A loader for a tractor having power lift means operable between certain limits of movement, comprising a load carrying member supported upon said tractor for movement relative thereto, a push-off on said load member, operable mechanism connected between the load member and said power lift means to move said load member into raised load transporting position during movement of said power lift means in one direction, lock means to hold said load member in raisedload carrying position, said lock means functioning to render said operable mechanism ineffective to allow said power lift means to move in the opposite direction, and push-off actuating mechanism connectible with said power lift means to be operated by said lift means as the latter again moves in said one direction to operate said push-off when said load member is in said raised and locked position.

3. In a loader for a tractor having power lift arms, a loading fork, a material push-off on said fork, links for pivotally supporting said fork from said tractor, chain means connected between said fork and the power lift arms for raising the fork, push-off actuating means disposed for connection with said power lift arms, locking means for holding said fork in raised posi-' tion independently of said power lift arms, and means carried by said power lift arms and adapted for engagement with said push-off actuating means to cause the latter to move said push-off and discharge the loaded material from said fork, said chain means permitting said arms to so function while said fork is locked in raised position, and release means connected with said locking means to render the latter ineffective after the material is discharged from said fork.

4. In a loader for a tractor having power lift arms movable between two positions, a loadin fork swingably supported upon said tractor, a push-oil carried upon said fork, lifting means connected between said fork and the lift arms to dispose said fork in loading position upon the ground when said arms are in one position and to dispose said fork in material transporting position when said arms are in their second position, locking means for holding said fork in transporting position independently of said lift arms when the latter move to said second position, and coacting mechanisms connected with said push-off and said lift arms respectively to move said pushoff along said fork to discharge material therefrom as said arms are again moved from said one to the other of their positions.

5. Ina loader for a tractor having power lift arms movable between two positions, a loading fork swingabiy supported upon said tractor, a

push-off carried upon said fork, lifting means connected between said fork and the lift arms to dispose said fork in loading position upon the ground when said arms are in one position and to dispose said fork in material transporting position when said arms are in their second position, locking means for holding said fork in transporting position independently of said lift arms when the latter move to said second position, and coacting mechanisms connected with said push-off and saidlift arms respectively to move said pushoff along said fork to discharge material therefrom as'said arms are again moved from said one to the other of their positions, and means controlled by the movement of one of the aforesaid coacting mechanisms to release said fork locking means when said lift arm are again disposed in their aforesaid second positions to subsequently lower said fork into contact with the ground.

6. In a ladder for a tractor having lift arms operable from lowered to raised positions, 8 l ing fork swingably supported upon the tractor, a push-off on said fork to discharge loaded materials therefrom, lift means connected betweensaid lift arms and the fork to raise the latter from loading position to load'carrying DOsition, operating mechanism carried by-said fork and connected with said push-off to move the latter including actuators disposed for engagement by said lift arms, and connectible means carried by said tractor and said fork respectively and adapted for cooperation with said lift arms whereby said fork is automatically suspended in raised position from the tractor after said lift arms are operated from lowered to raised positions, and whereby said arms are rendered operative to engage said push-off actuators to operate said push-off to discharge the loaded material from said fork.

'7. In a loader for a tractor having lift arms operable from lowered to raised positions, a load.-

said lift arms and the. fork to raise the latter from loading position tqghd carrying position,

test out of the pile d material with a greater mechanical advantage and whereby said second chain end subsequently becomes effective to permitra greater lift of said fork, a push-.oifon said operating mechanism carried by said fork and fork member, operating means to actuate said connected with said push-oil! to move the latter including actuators disposed for engagement by said lift arms, and connectible means carried by said tractor and saidfor-k respectively and adapted for cooperation" with said lift arms whereby said fork is automatically suspended in raised position from the tractor after said lift arms are operated from lowered to raised positions, and whereby said arms are rendered. operative to engage said p'ush-ofi actuators to operate said push-off to discharge-the loaded material froin said fork, and release means cooperating with one of said connectible means to dieengage the latter and to transfer the fork fsuspension from the tractor back to the lift arms.

8. In a loader for a tractor having lift arms operable from lowered to raised positions, 8.10311, ing fork swlngably supported upon the tractor, a push-ofi on said fork to discharge loaded materials therefrom, lift means connected between said lift arms and the fork to raise the latter from loading position to load carrying position, operating mechanism carried by said fork and connected with said push-off to move the latter including actuators disposed for engagement, by said lift arms, and connectible means carried by said tractor and said fork respectively and adapted for cooperation with said lift arms push-off disposed for connection with said power lift means, and coacting means carried by said fork member and said tractor respectivel to lock the forkmember in suspended position to release said Y-chalns of their lifted loaded fork whereby said lift means may be brought into contact with said push-ofi operating means to actuate the latter, and release means responsive to the movement of said push-0d operating mechanism to unlock the fork member and again transfer the weight thereof to said'chains after the fork member load has been discharged to permit lowering of said fork member into position to receive a new load.

11. In a loader for a tractor having power lift means, a fork swlngably supported from said tractor, a push-0d on said fork, link means connected between said lift means and said fork whereby said lift means may raise said fork into whereby said fork is automatically suspended in pension from the tractor back to the lift arms,

said release means being connected with a part of said push-ofi operating mechanism to automatically cause said fork load transfer to the lift arms upon completion ofsaid load dischar 11% function of said push-off. l 9. In a loader for a tractor having power lift A means, a loading fork member, link members for swingably supporting said fork member from said I tractor, Y-chain means connected between two points on said members and said power lift means i whereby one of the chain ends on said members is effective to initially raise the loaded fork from rest out of the piled material with a greater mechanical advantage and whereby said second chain end subsequentlybecomes effective to permit a greater lift of said fork, a push-off on said fork member, operating means to actuate said push-oil disposed for connection withsaid power lift means, and coacting means carried by said fork member and said tractor respectively 7 to lock the fork member in suspended position 1 to release said Y-chains of their lifted loaded 9 fork whereby said lift means may be brought into contact with said push-ofi operating means J to actuate the latter. 0

10. In a loader for a tractor having power hi means, a loading fork member, link members for swingably supporting said fork member from said tractor, Y-chain means connected between two points on said members and said power lift means whereby one of the chain ends on said members is effective to initially raise the loaded fork from an upwardly inclined position, operable mechanism including joined links connected with said push-ofl and disposed for operation by-said lift means after said fork is raised said push-on comprising a generally fiat load contacting member disposed substantially at right angles to said fork when retracted upon the latter to partially hold the load as said fork is raised, and said joined links of said push-off operating mechanism comprising means to force the fork contacting edge of said push-off under the load and against the surface of said fork during the discharge of loaded material from said fork.

12. In a loader for a tractor having power lift means, a' fork swingably supported from said tractor, a push-0d on said fork, link means connected between said lift means and said fork whereby said lift means may raise said fork into an upwardly inclined position, operable mechanism including joined links connected with said push-0H and disposed for operation by said lift means after said fork is raised, said push-ofi comprising a generally fiat load contacting member disposed substantially at right angles to said fork when retracted upon the latter to partially hold the load as said fork is raised, and said joined links of said push-0d operating mechanism comprising means to force the fork contacting edge of said push-0E under the load and against the surface of said fork during the discharge of loaded material from said fork, and means carried by said fork and connected with said push-off to hold the latter in inoperative retracted position and to return said push-off to such position after having discharged the fork,

hold the load as said fork is raised, and said joined links of said push-off operating mechanism comprising means to force the fork contacting edge of said push-off under the load and against the surface of said fork during the discharge of loaded material from said fork, and resilient mechanism connected between said fork and said operable push-off actuating mechanism to normally maintain said push-off in retracted position upon said fork and to return said push-ofi to such position after discharging a fork load.

14. The combination with a tractor having power operated lift arms, of a loader having a lifting fork and a push-oif on said fork, a first means connected between said fork and said lift arms for raising and lowering said fork, a second means connected with said push-ofl and adapted for operative engagement by said lift arms when said fork is in raised position, said second means including actuators disposed for nonengagement with said lift arms when said fork is in loading position, said actuators being grought into a position to be engaged by said lift arms while said fork is raised, and automatic latching means for locking said fork in raised position and to permit saidlift arms to engage said actuators to operate the pilSh-Ofl when said fork is so raised, and means responsive to the movement of said pushoff to release said automatic latching'means to permit said lift arms to again lower said fork through the instrumentality of said first means. 15. A tractor loader operable by power lift means of the tractor, comprising a fork, a pushmeans, subsequent movement of said power liftmeans from its initial position operating said push-off.

16. A tractor loader operable by power lift means of the tractor, comprising a fork, a pushoff on said fork, collapsible raising means connected between said fork and the power lift means for lifting said fork upon movement of said lift means from initial position, lock means to hold the fork in raised position, actuating means for said push-off including latch means arranged for connection with said lift means after said fork is locked, said raising means collapsing while the power lift means returns to initial position to engage the latch means of the push-off actuating means, subsequent movement of said power lift means from its initial position operating said push-on, and release means to release said fork for lowering.

CLARENCE B. RICHEY.

US539304A 1944-06-08 1944-06-08 Loader Expired - Lifetime US2397046A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US539304A US2397046A (en) 1944-06-08 1944-06-08 Loader

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US539304A US2397046A (en) 1944-06-08 1944-06-08 Loader

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2397046A true US2397046A (en) 1946-03-19

Family

ID=24150661

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US539304A Expired - Lifetime US2397046A (en) 1944-06-08 1944-06-08 Loader

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2397046A (en)

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2418661A (en) * 1946-01-19 1947-04-08 Towmotor Corp Industrial truck
US2456879A (en) * 1946-01-11 1948-12-21 Joseph B Kucera Loader machine
US2458195A (en) * 1945-11-20 1949-01-04 Daniel S Pearse Loader attachment for tractors
US2464224A (en) * 1946-12-11 1949-03-15 Int Steel Co Transport box
US2468424A (en) * 1946-04-11 1949-04-26 Smith Harry A Hay buck and stacker
US2472194A (en) * 1946-06-15 1949-06-07 Carroll R Cook Farm implement or loader
US2479841A (en) * 1946-01-19 1949-08-23 Jordan William Clayton Tractor power lift attachment
US2503522A (en) * 1947-08-14 1950-04-11 Donald K Struthers Tractor mounted manure loader
US2505639A (en) * 1945-10-30 1950-04-25 Frederic N Eaton Tractor lift
US2518105A (en) * 1946-12-23 1950-08-08 Frank F Werth Power shovel and fork attachment for tractors
US2595661A (en) * 1949-07-25 1952-05-06 Horn Mfg Company Stacking machine
US2638237A (en) * 1947-10-24 1953-05-12 Donald K Struthers Control for tractor mounted manure loaders
US2670089A (en) * 1947-10-31 1954-02-23 Paterson Rex Munro Sweep or like attachment for tractors
US2671570A (en) * 1950-01-12 1954-03-09 Dearborn Motors Corp Buck rake and stacking device
US2731161A (en) * 1953-04-29 1956-01-17 Earl J Carstens Fork attachment for tractors
US2742167A (en) * 1953-12-23 1956-04-17 Clark Equipment Co Pusher attachment for lift trucks
US2743027A (en) * 1951-03-12 1956-04-24 Robertson Jackson Perry Load elevating and transporting attachment for tractors
US2772011A (en) * 1944-05-15 1956-11-27 Ferwerda Ray Bucket ejector for digging apparatus
US2820558A (en) * 1954-06-15 1958-01-21 Elmer L Miller Tractor-mounted loader
US3208612A (en) * 1963-04-22 1965-09-28 Calvin B Blair Bale handling head
US3426928A (en) * 1966-11-03 1969-02-11 Caterpillar Tractor Co Ejector mechanism for loader buckets
US3985246A (en) * 1974-08-19 1976-10-12 Sperry Rand Corporation Bale retrieving and transporting apparatus
US4101040A (en) * 1977-05-13 1978-07-18 Outboard Marine Corporation Vehicle for transporting palletized loads
US4318653A (en) * 1979-11-05 1982-03-09 Benefield William F Hay loader
US9241475B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-26 Trav-Call, Ltd. Hydraulic bale distribution system

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2772011A (en) * 1944-05-15 1956-11-27 Ferwerda Ray Bucket ejector for digging apparatus
US2505639A (en) * 1945-10-30 1950-04-25 Frederic N Eaton Tractor lift
US2458195A (en) * 1945-11-20 1949-01-04 Daniel S Pearse Loader attachment for tractors
US2456879A (en) * 1946-01-11 1948-12-21 Joseph B Kucera Loader machine
US2418661A (en) * 1946-01-19 1947-04-08 Towmotor Corp Industrial truck
US2479841A (en) * 1946-01-19 1949-08-23 Jordan William Clayton Tractor power lift attachment
US2468424A (en) * 1946-04-11 1949-04-26 Smith Harry A Hay buck and stacker
US2472194A (en) * 1946-06-15 1949-06-07 Carroll R Cook Farm implement or loader
US2464224A (en) * 1946-12-11 1949-03-15 Int Steel Co Transport box
US2518105A (en) * 1946-12-23 1950-08-08 Frank F Werth Power shovel and fork attachment for tractors
US2503522A (en) * 1947-08-14 1950-04-11 Donald K Struthers Tractor mounted manure loader
US2638237A (en) * 1947-10-24 1953-05-12 Donald K Struthers Control for tractor mounted manure loaders
US2670089A (en) * 1947-10-31 1954-02-23 Paterson Rex Munro Sweep or like attachment for tractors
US2595661A (en) * 1949-07-25 1952-05-06 Horn Mfg Company Stacking machine
US2671570A (en) * 1950-01-12 1954-03-09 Dearborn Motors Corp Buck rake and stacking device
US2743027A (en) * 1951-03-12 1956-04-24 Robertson Jackson Perry Load elevating and transporting attachment for tractors
US2731161A (en) * 1953-04-29 1956-01-17 Earl J Carstens Fork attachment for tractors
US2742167A (en) * 1953-12-23 1956-04-17 Clark Equipment Co Pusher attachment for lift trucks
US2820558A (en) * 1954-06-15 1958-01-21 Elmer L Miller Tractor-mounted loader
US3208612A (en) * 1963-04-22 1965-09-28 Calvin B Blair Bale handling head
US3426928A (en) * 1966-11-03 1969-02-11 Caterpillar Tractor Co Ejector mechanism for loader buckets
US3985246A (en) * 1974-08-19 1976-10-12 Sperry Rand Corporation Bale retrieving and transporting apparatus
US4101040A (en) * 1977-05-13 1978-07-18 Outboard Marine Corporation Vehicle for transporting palletized loads
US4318653A (en) * 1979-11-05 1982-03-09 Benefield William F Hay loader
US9241475B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-26 Trav-Call, Ltd. Hydraulic bale distribution system

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2750204A (en) Side brace for hydraulic stackers
US2348899A (en) Loader
US3800966A (en) Loader crane for gooseneck trailer
US2234599A (en) Tractor-mounted receptacle
US2037222A (en) Automatic dumping wheelbarrow
US4019753A (en) Adjustable three-point tractor hitch
US2319921A (en) Power shovel
US2352466A (en) Power pickup and dumping scraper attachment for tractors
US2668631A (en) Hydraulic loader
US2332742A (en) Load-moving machine
US2846094A (en) Tractor operated trencher
US2427968A (en) Powered implement carrier and loader
US2295917A (en) Hay loader and stacker
US2495143A (en) Power lift attachment for tractors or the like
US3414064A (en) Adjustable rotary hoe
US3283486A (en) Implement supporting and lift linkage
US2820555A (en) Power shovels or the like
US3057496A (en) Bucket loader
US2602389A (en) Plow
US2427301A (en) Buck rake loader attachment for tractors
US4897013A (en) Electrically operated material handling attachment for a garden tractor or the like
US2363749A (en) Tractor-drawn liftable planter
US2731162A (en) Loader with self-leveling carrier
USRE22627E (en) Agricultural implement
US3492889A (en) Adjustable control stand