US2384222A - Method of and means for desalting petroleum well fluids - Google Patents

Method of and means for desalting petroleum well fluids Download PDF

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US2384222A
US2384222A US390727A US39072741A US2384222A US 2384222 A US2384222 A US 2384222A US 390727 A US390727 A US 390727A US 39072741 A US39072741 A US 39072741A US 2384222 A US2384222 A US 2384222A
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water
tank
oil
chamber
pipe
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US390727A
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Jay P Walker
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C G WELLS
GUY O MARCHANT
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C G WELLS
GUY O MARCHANT
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10GCRACKING HYDROCARBON OILS; PRODUCTION OF LIQUID HYDROCARBON MIXTURES, e.g. BY DESTRUCTIVE HYDROGENATION, OLIGOMERISATION, POLYMERISATION; RECOVERY OF HYDROCARBON OILS FROM OIL-SHALE, OIL-SAND, OR GASES; REFINING MIXTURES MAINLY CONSISTING OF HYDROCARBONS; REFORMING OF NAPHTHA; MINERAL WAXES
    • C10G33/00Dewatering or demulsification of hydrocarbon oils
    • C10G33/06Dewatering or demulsification of hydrocarbon oils with mechanical means, e.g. by filtration

Description

Sept. 4, 1945.

J. P. WALKER u j '2,384,222 METHOD OF AND MEANS FOR DE-SALTING PETROLEUM WELL FLUIDS Filed April-2s, 19414 :s sheets-sheet 1 5G Z 32 l -`2 C '5/ 2O Y 26 46 50 11.532; r.-:::` 'zi Z5 f 'l 43 "51 57 2L f 4a Evil ZO *ai e G7 Ga:

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70 l fL v es v 6c 64 SSS@ l l l 59 o l l 6o 62 49 58 74 7 7G 73 I 65 75 '45 5e JMW z2 Adey 0.- War/ken Sept. 4, 1945. `.1. P. WALKER METHOD OF AND MEANS FOR DE-SALTING PETROLEUM WELL FLUIDS Filed Apr'iiza, 1941 5 sheets-sheet 2 .Isa

@@2- daj/ x9. Wel/ker" Sept. 4, 1945. J. P. WALKER METHO) OF MEANS FOR DESALTING PETROLEUM WELL FLUIDS I 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Apr-i1 28, 194i IIIIII III'IIIII Patented Sept. 4, 1945 METHOD F AND MEANS FR DESALG KETROLEUM WELL FLS `iay P, Wallner,` rilulsa, Okla., assigner of forty per cent to Guy 0. Marchant and sixper cent to C. G. Wells. both oi. Tulsa. Okla.

Application April 28, i941, Serial No. 390,727

7 iDlaims.

harmful ingredients are removed from said stream in a continuous, uninterrupted operation.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved method of treating and de-salting an emulsied well stream from a crude-producing well, wherein the breaking od the emulsions and the de-salting of the stream may be accom-- plished in a single vessel or tank and in one operation, or, if desired, these steps may be performed in two stages; however, in either instance, the method is carried out continuously and immediately upon removal of the stream from the well.

An important object of the invention is to pro- `vide an improved method of de-salting 'well streams which" may be carried out at relatively low temperatures and at atmospheric pressures, or even under vacuum if desired, whereby the use of high pressure vessels is obviated.

A particular object of the invention is to provide an improved method, of the character de.- scribed, wherein fresh water is constantly introduced into the iiow stream to absorb the salt in said stream and thereby de-salt said stream; the method also contemplates heating of the flow stream to break up emulsions and the addition or introduction of the fresh water may take place either prior or subsequent to the heating step, whereby the method is iiexible and capable olf variation to meet various conditions.

Still another object of the invention is -to provide an improved method rwherein the well inuent which may be an emulsion of oil and water, or water, emulsion and free oil and some gas, is treated to extract or precipitate the major portion of the water, such extraction being accomplished either by pre-heating or by the use of well-known chemicals, or by both; the well stream is then heated and treated to lbreak .the emulsion, and the stream is also de-salted, the de-salting step taking place either simultaneous- 1y with the treating step which breaks the emulsion, or immediately subsequent thereto.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved method wherein the well iiuid oontaining salt water and extraneous matter is 'introduced into a body oi salt water, together with a quantity of fresh water, whereby the well -iuid and the fresh water co-iningle andadmix with each other and are caused to pass through said body of saltwater. Since the fresh water is much lighter than the salt water, its natural tendency is to rise with the oil and thereby become thoroughly admixed with such oils while passing through the salt fwater zone, which results in a .washing or absorbing method causing the fresh water to become saturated with the salt from the well fluid stream.' The oil will thus be denuded of its water content whereby the salt will .be extracted from the rwell stream and clean oil will float upon the water and strati-fy above the same, after which said oil may be readily drawn oi free from both salt and water.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a method, and means for carrying out the same, wherein the oil and fresh water stream, during their settling period, are allowed to rise concurrently, free of counter-current flowof descending salt water, and the water precipitated and removed from the path of the ascending oil and water stream as rapidly as it is precipitated. l

'I'he construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described, together with other features of the invention.

The invention will lbe more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings, as an example of the invention is shown. and wherein:

Figure 1 is a view partly in elevation and part- 1y in section of an apparatus constructed in accordance with the invention, for treating and desalting the well uids,

Figure 2 is a. horizontal, cross-sectional view,`

taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 1,

Figure 3 is a horizontal, crs-sectional view, taken on the line 3 8 of Figure 1,

Figure 4 is a view, similar -to Figure 1, illustrating a slight modication, wherein the well fluids are treated to break emulsions,

- Figure 5 is a transverse, vertical, sectional view of a de-salting tank which has connection with the vessel illustrated in Figure 4,

Figure 6 is a transverse, vertical, sectional view, taken on the line 6 6 of Figure 5,

Figure 'I is a horizontal, cross-sectional view, taken on the line 1-1 of Figure 4.

Figure 8 is a horizontaLcross-sectional view, taken on the line 8-8 of Figure 4, and

Figure 9 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view, taken on the line D- l of Figure 4.`

Ycontrol the water level This application is filed as a continuation-inpart of my co-pending application, Serial No. 164,181,1lled September 16, 1937.

In the drawings, the numeral 2|) designates an upright cylindrical tank of the usual construction such as' is used in the building of separators. 'I'he tank is provided with a. suitable base 2| and a false bottom 22. A dished head or partition 23 is secured within the tank near the upper end thereof, while the extreme upper end of said tank is closed by a 'crowned top 24. The members 23 and 24 seal on the upper portion of the tank and form a preliminary or primary separating chamber 25. The chamber 25 could be aseparate container or tank.

A transverse partition 26l extends across the separating chamber 25 (Figure 1), being disposed nearer the upper end thereof, whereby a gas separating chamber C is formed in the upper portion of the chamber 25. This partition is inclined and is provided with a central outlet 21 from which a tubular sleeve 28 extends. A conical spreader 29 is suspended axially from the sleeve 28 and is disposed below the outlet opening 21 and within the interior of the chamber 25. 'I'he spreader serves' to spread the liquids 'escaping through the outlet opening 21 into the chamber 25.

An inlet pipe'30 extends through the wall of the tank 20 and discharges into a diverter box 3|, within the gas chamber C, whereby the well stream or influent is caused to take a circumferential and helical course around the inner wall of the tank. The influent is scrubbed on the wall of the tank, whereby the liquids yflow downwardly in the chamber C, while the gaseous fluids which are separated, rise so as to enter an axial gas separating shell 32 through inlet openings 33. The gaseous uids or vapors are caused to whirl within the shell, whereby the gas is liberated and the liquids are dropped out. From the gas shell- 32, the gas is carried ofi' through a suitable outlet pipe 34 lwhich usually has a control valve (not shown) connected therein. A liquid drain pipe 35 depends from the bottom of the shell and extends through the partition 26, whereby the separated liquids are discharged into chamber 25 flowing through said outlet.

The liquids which have been primarily separated from the gas but which may contain some gas in solution, flow through the opening 21 and fall downwardly onto the conical. spreader 29, which directs the liquids into the chamber 25. It is pointed out that the upper chamber C could be eliminated, in which instance, theI inuent from the pipe 30 will be conducted directly into the chamber 25.

Within the separating chamber 25 is an uprightl overflow pipe 36, said pipe being mounted at one side of the chamber. The lower end of. the pipe terminates adjacent the head 23, while the upper portion thereof terminates near the partition 26. This pipe is dividedinto a water leg and a gas leg by a lateral 31 leading from the intersection of the two legs through the side of the tank. A down pipe 38 leads from the lateral to awater syphon box 39 and includes a regulating valve 40. The box has an upright, overflow nipple 4| therein and this nipple is connected to a water discharge pipe 42. Manifestly, water from the chamber 25 may ow upwardly through the water leg of the pipe 36, then through the lateral 31 and downwardly to the l-water discharge pipe 42. The elevation or position of the lateral 31 will within the chamber 25.

Al conductor or pipe 43 extends from the opposite side of the chamber 25 and establishes an oil level (Figure 1) above the spreader 29. The lateral 31 establishes a water level within the pipe 36, which owing to the hydrostatic head caused by the floating oil is higher than the water level in the chamber 25. A transverse filter 44 extends across the lower portion of .the chamber 25 below the water level. The nlter may be formed of ex-V celsior or other suitable material conilned between screens or perforated partitions 45. A vent pipe 46, hereinafter referred to, extends through the bottom 23, up through the filter 44, partition 26, and terminates in a hood 41 at the upper portion of the chamber C.

The well stream or influent liquids discharging through the sleeve 28 depending from the lower end of the chamber C and falling upon the spreader 29 will spread therefrom in a more or less circumferential sheet which will have a tendency to liberate gas and to spread out the wateroil globules. The oil will tend to float and rise while the water will settle or precipitate. Those water-oil globules or droplets which reach the lter 44 will be broken up in attempting to pass therethrough, whereby the water will pass through the filter and the oil will oat and rise to the oil zone above the water level. As the water settles in the main chamber 25, it will rise in the pipe 36 and will discharge through the lateral 31.

The water and oil levels in the chamber 25 will define water, oil and gas spaces or zones therein. It is pointed out that the major portion of the gas is separated from the'inuent in the'chamber C. The remaining liquidswith some gas in solution, then pass into the primary separating chamber 25 where a major portion of the water is separated. However, all the water does not settle out in the chamber 25, and, thus, the liquids entering or overflowing into the pipe 43 comprise oil with, perhaps, some gas in solution, and some water admixed therewith, which is an emulsion mixture requiring further treatment. While gas is separated in the chamber C, the gas might be previously extracted, or if no gas separation was necessary, the gas separating step could be"V omitted.

The inuent may be pre-heated, if desired, and

l a any suitable device may be used for the purpose.

A pre-heater 48, similar to that shown and described in my Letters Patent No. 2,181,685, may be employed. In this device, the oil, gas and water mixture enters through an inlet pipe 49 at the bottom and flows upwardly through a plurality of tubes 50 to the top of the pre-heater and the inlet pipe 30 is connected to the top of said pre-heater. A hot oil discharge or outlet pipe 5| extends from the tank 20 at the oil level therein and connects to the upper portion of the pre-heater, whereby the hot oil flows down around the tube and escapes through an outlet 52,. The counter-flowing influent and oil undergo i trolled valve 54 may a. heat exchange, whereby the influent is preheated and the oil is cooled. A gas escape pipe 50a connect-s the oil space of the pre-heater with the tank above the oil outlet pipe 5I.

The pipe 43 which leads from the chamber 25 extends downwardly along the outer surface oi.' the tank. At its lower end, the pipe 43 is connected to one end of a horizontal nozzle 53 which extends diametrically across the tank, as is thus shown in Figure 1.

be connected in the pipe 43 on the outside of the tank, whereby the ow of liquids or uids through said pipe may be readilyk A suitable manually con--v invehtion. The nozzle 53 -is usually placed va suitable distance above the bottom 22 to provide a .wfater settling and collecting space therebelow, in .which extraneous matter may also deposit. The nozzle is preferably provided with longitudinal rows of perforations 55 on itsupper side so as to discharge the liquid mixture upwardly in numerous small streams. The tank contains a body of water, usually salt water, up to a certain level which is maintained by a syphon pipe 56. This pipe has one end connected to the syphon box 39 located outside of the tank, while its lower end extends downwardly to the bottom of the tank. In this manner, water is4 drawn upwardly through the pipe, discharged into the syphon box, and then escapes through the water outlet pipe 42. Obviously, due to the hydrostatic head within the tank, the water level will be maintained at a point below the lateral leg or horizontal portion of the water pipe 56. A gas vent pipe 51 extends from the upper portion of the syphon 39 and is provided with a vertical portion which terminates adjacent the underside of the parti-` tion or head 23. With this arrangement, water is discharged from the upper'chamber 25 and also from the lower chamber by means-of a single water discharge pipe 42. It will be seen that gas is vented not only through the pipes 46 and 51, but also through the upper area of the lateral 31 and gas leg of the pipe 36. By making the nipple 4I in the syphon box 39 adjustable, predetermined liquid levels in the lower chamber of the tank may be maintained.

.From the foregoing, it will be seen that the liquids and uids conducted downwardly through the pipe 43 from the upper chamber 25 are discharged through the nozzle 53 and upwardly within the lower por-tion of the tank in numerous small streams. within theA tank above the nozzle 53 and this unit is shown as a U-shaped tubular or return bend A heating unit 58 isdisp'osed the ltank, while the other end terminates short of the tank wall, whereby the staggered bates provide for a circuitous or el gate path through which the upwardly moving liquids must travel. Water drain openings 10 are provided in each side wall 61 of the housing near the lower ends of the baliles 69. Obviously, liquids which drain downwardly along the ba'les 69 may flow outwardly through the drain openings 1.0 and into the-vertical ow passages 68 on each side of thf housing.

The space between the inclined :bailles 69 is filled with a suitable filtering material 1 I, such as excelsior, hay or other material suitable for the purpose. Thus, liquids flowing. upwardly through the housing formed |by the side walls 61 and the inclined baffles 69 is forced` to pass through the excelsior, or other filtering material, before reaching the space within the tank above the housing.

As explainedfthe lower portion of the tank is lled with a body of water, which is preferably salt water, and this :body is heated by means of the fire box 58. 'I'he liquids flowing through the pipe 43 which leads from the, upper chamber 25 are introduced into this :body of heated salt water through the nozzle 53 and said liquids rise upwardly through the body of salt water, For introducing fresh waterl into the tank 20 a water inlet nozzle 12 is disposed within the lower portion of the tank above the nozzle 53. The water inlet nozzle12 is provided with a plurality of perforartion 13 in its upper surface, whereby the water is ejected therefrom in numerous small streams. As is clearly shown in Figure 1, the water nozzle 12 is supported on a suitable angle bracket 14 and has its outer end connected by means of a coupling 15 with a fresh water inlet line 16. The

` fresh water is introduced into the tank so as to re box 29 which is mounted in a manhole cover` 60, the latter being attached to a' rectangular frame 6i which is attached to the upright wall of the tank 20. Removal of the cover will permit the unit to be taken out of the tank for cleaning or replacement. The lower leg of the box rests upon a supporting channel bar 62 which extends across the tank. A suitable burner (not shown) may be introduced into the lower leg of i the box, while the upper leg of said box is closed at its outer end and provided with a collar 54 to which a suitable stack may be attached.

inclined bailies 65 are located above the nozzle 53 and serve to direct the small upwardly owing streams against the bottom of the lower leg 'of the fire box and to flow upwardly on each side thereof, whereby they are heated. Similarinclined baffles 65a, overhang the re box and maintain the upwardly flowing streams in heating contact therewith. A vertical housing 6.6 is mounted within the tank above the rebox 58 and this housing includes vertical walls 61 which extend on each side of the r'e box and nozzle, as is clearly shown in Figure 1. The vertical edges of the walls 61are secured to the inner wall of the tank, whereby vertical passages, or ducts 68, open at their upper and lower ends, are formed with the wall of the tank. Above the re box and within the housing 66, staggered, 'upwardly inclined cross-bales 69 are provided and these baille's may have their free ends serrated to divide upwardly -owing liquidsinto numerous small streams.

One end of `each baille is secured-to the wall of `surface thereof.

absorb the salts which may 'be present in the well liquids introduced through the nozzle 53.

Briey, in operation, the influent is brought through the inlet pipe 49 from the well. This influent may be an emulsified stream from a crude producing well and may include oil mixed with salt in solution, or salt in any form, and extraneous matter, such as'dirt or silt. The term Well uids and influent as used herein covers any fluid produced by a well, either liquid or gaseous, or both and including, oil, water, gas, saltA and extraneous matter or any of them,- and in such association as they may occur or be admixed. The influent from the pipe 49 is taken through the pre-heater d8, wherein it is heated in order to precipitate free water. From the pre-heater, the iniluent is discharged into the 'diverter :box 3l within the chamber C and said influent is thereby whirled around the tank on the inner -This circumferential action scrubs out a considera-ble amount, possibly the major portion of the gas; s ome gas, however, will remain in solution. The liberated gas and gaseous fluids rise and enter the shell 32, wherein they are whirled and the liquids are scrubbed l out. 'Ihese liquids drain through the pipe 35 into the separating chamber 25. The remaining influent liquids will pass through the outlet opening 21, and will fall upon the spreader 29, and then into the chamber 25.

As before described, the water, oil and gas stratify in the chamber 25, thefllter 44 breaking up the oil-water globules and water droplets. The

water extracted in the chamber -25 flows upwardly in the pipe 36 from which it escapes through the lateral 31 4and syphon box 39 to the water outlet pipe 42. The oil and water mixture flows out through the pipe 43 and downwardly in said pipe until it is discharged from the nozzle il through the perforatlons 55. This mixture. which may contain salt, or other extraneous matter is bailled upwardly through the body'of heated salt water within the tank 28. As the heated mixture flows upwardly, the baffles will wash out the entrained water which is admlxed with the 011 and the water which is thus washed out will tend to run down the upper sides of the bailies and drain through the openings into the passages 88. By the time the mixture reaches the top of the Vhousing 68, the entrained water will be substantially washed out of the oil-and-water mixture and the clean oil will rise and iloat upon the body of water up to the oil level. The water which drains into the passages 88 flows downwardly and cools, finally admixing with the water in the bottom of the tank, whereby said Water is re-circulated. The oil is, of course, taken ofi through the oil discharge line E i, through the preheater I8 and line 52. v

From the above,lt will ybe seen that the emulsion isbroken up and the oil and water eiliciently separated At the same'time that liquid is discharged from the nozzle 53, fresh water is sup- 'finally out through the oil outlet plied by the nozzle l2. This fresh water is discharged immediately Ibelow the heating unit d@ and flows upwardly in small streams with the in fluent, whereby all the fluids and liquids thereby become thoroughly admixed. The influent and the fresh water are obviously in close proximity to the heating. unit before passing upwardly through the .bailles 69 within the housing.

Since the fresh water is so much lighter than the salt water, its natural tendency is to rise with the oil and thereby become admixed with it while ,flowing upwardly through the heated body of salt water. During this flow there is more or less of a washing or contacting of the fluid whereby the fresh water is agglomerated with the salt component ofthe influent. Further, extraneous matter, together with such salts as solidify will tend to' settle in the housing section toward the bottom and escape to the bottom of the tank. 'I'he comingled fluids will pass upwardly between Athe bullies $9 and through the filters 1i disposed betwe'en said ballles.

The admixed iluids and liquids will contact the underside of the lowermost baille plate 88 and this step willact to strain water and extraneous matter from the lluids and liquids. The admixtu're will travel laterally along the inclined bottjojln ofthe baille plate toward its upper end whereby water-oil broken up.l The admixture will pass-around the end' of the baille plate and then ow along the underside oi' the next baille where the operation will be repeated. Obviously, continued upward will cause the mixture to take the circuitous path back and forth across the tank and through thel filters 1I. This prolonged travel. together with the filtering will thoroughly carry out the de-hydration and cle-saltin'g of the oil. Water and extraneous matter which is extracted during the upward travel will now down the upper side oi' the bames and will escape through the openings 18 in the side walls ,of the housing and will enter the vertical passages 88. The heavier components and extraneous matter will settle to the bottom 22. A valve outlet 2|y is provided in the bottom 22 for'periodlcally cleaning out the tankr and for draining o il' salt water manually, if desired.

l'I'he fresh water which is-introduced provides emulsion globules will befor a complete absorption of the salt within the well inuent. lifterv the emulsion is broken, the salt crystals in the water which is separated from the oil ls absorbed by the fresh water and in this manner substantially all of the salt is removed. It has been found that the salt water body within the tank 20 will become fully saturated and incapable o! picking up additional salt after the aD- paratus has been in use for some time. The addition of the fresh Water maintains the body of water within the tank in a condition where it is capable of constantly absorbing additional salt. In effect, the oil is washed through a body of water which' is not fully saturated with salt, and this washing is greatly assisted by the particular bailling arrangement as well as by the provision of the filter between said baffles.

In Figures l to 3, a single vessel or tank is provided for breaking the emulsions andfor simultaneously de-salting the oil.' Thus, the emulsion treating and the de-salting are all accomplished simultaneously in th'e single apparatus. However, the invention is not .to be limited to the particular apparatus shown in Figure l, and in Figlters ll are omitted and also the fresh water inlet nozzle l2 is eliminated. Otherwise, the tank is substantially identical in construction. The well influent is introduced into this tank and is conducted therethrough in the manner above described, whereby the emulsion is broken and the oil is carried off through the discharge line 52. This oil may have salt or other extraneous matter admlxed therewith.

After treatment within the tank A, th'e separated oil is conductedto a second tank B which is clearly shown in Figure 5. The tank B is upright Aand is of the usual construction, being provided with e. false bottom 22 and a crowned top 23. An inlet nozzle 88, similar in construction to the nozzle 83 is disposed within the lower end of th'e tank and has connection with the oil discharge line 52 of the tank A, whereby lthe oil which has been separated in the tank A is sprayed upwardly within the tank B in numerous small streams. A fresh water inlet nozzle 8l is disposed above the nozzle 80 and serves to introduce fresh water into the tank B. A heating unit 58', similar in construction to the lire box 58 is disposed within the tank above the water pipe 8l An upright housing 82 -is provided within the tank Band is formed of an upper section 83 and a lower section 84. Asshown in Figure 6, the upper section overhangs the lower section, the latter being of considerable less width than the upper section. The housing sections are formed f by upright metal plates 85 and 88. The lower ends of the plate 86 are inclined inwardly below the nozzle to form a hopper bottom and a, longitudinal opening 81. The metal plate 88 which forms the sides ,of the lower housing section confine the heating unit 58' therebetween and extend upwardly beyond the lower ends of the plate 85.

By welding or otherwise securing the vertical edges of the housing plate to the inner wall of the tank, vertical passages or channels 88 (Figure 6) are provided outside of the housing between said plate and the Wall of the tank. The walls of the upper section terminate relatively below the upper leg of the fire box 58 and the walls 88 being spaced inwardly of said walls 8l. short passages Il `through the tank B is obvious. is constantly added and serves to absorb the salt are provided therebetween, as shown in Figure 6. Just above the heating unit and the upper end of the lower housing section is mounted a flanged, perforated baille plate 90 having its ends suitably attached to the inner wall of the tank within the upper housing section.

Above the plate 90 is an upwardly inclined baille plate 9| 'which underlies a second upwardly inclined bale plate 92. 'Ihese plates extend from opposite sides of the tank but terminate short of the wall of the tank so as to occupy a staggered relation within the housing. The outer portion of each baffle plate is perforated and the edges may have saw teeth (not shown) if desired. Outlets 93 are provided in the housing walls 85 adjacent the lower ends of the baflles so that liquids which drain down the baffles may escape into the passages 88 through said outlet.

Above the baille plate 92 are a pair of .divergent filter plates 94, the lowermost plate inclining upwardly with relation to the plate 92 and the upper plate inclining upwardly in the opposite direction below an oppositely inclined baille plate 95.

The baiile and filter plates which have been described extend across the housing 82 but are conned therein. The filter plates 94 extend from wall to wall of the tank 2 0 and have perforations 96 at their opposite ends.

The space between the plates 94 is illled with a suitable filtering material 91 such as hay, ex' celslor or any other material suitable for the purpose. Drain openings 98 above the bottom illter plate 94 are covered with wire mesh to prevent the filtering material passing therethrough. Above the upper filter plate 94 and above the baiile plate 95 the side walls 85 of the housing are provided with the openings 99. The top 83' of the housing is inclined upwardly from the plate 95 and forms a bale the same as the other plates. It is provided with perforations at its free end opposite the perforations of the plate 95. The free edge or end of the top plate 83' may be provided with downwardly projecting saw teeth, if desired.

The housing extends above mid-height of the tank, whereby a sizable chamber i0| is formed in the upper portion of the tank. In some instances, it may be found desirable toprovide a filter in this upper chamber and in such event filtering material |02 may be confined between perforated filtering plates |03 extending diagonally from one side of the chamber at the top of the housing to the upper end of said chamber. It is to be understood that instead of perforations in any of the elements which have been described, screen fabric or any foraminous material may be use d. It is to be noted that either of the lters may be omitted and either one or both may be used.

An outlet box |04 may be secured to the tank wall near the top 23 and diametrically opposite the upper end of the filter |02. of this box may have saw teeth |05. An outlet collar |06 is secured in the wall of the tank within said box sothat oil which drains into the box may be piped therefrom. Theoretically, oil discharged through the outlet |06 will be substantiauy free from both salt and water.

The operation as the liquids flow upwardly The fresh water The upper edge in accomplishing the desa1tingis the same as has been hereinbeforey described. The method which is performed in the tanks A and B shown in Figures 4 and 5 is substantially the` same as that performed by the single tank shown in Figure 1, with the exception that theemulsion treating` takes place at one stage, while de-salting takes place at another stage. In both methods,

the fresh water is added as an absorbent of the salt present in the fluid and is utilized to maintain. the body of water in a condition capable of removing the salt from the well fluid. It is pointed out that the method may be carried out under atmospheric or moderately low pressure conditions, or even under vacuum,'whereby the necessity o`f exceedingly high high-pressure vessels is eliminated. Also, the method is carried out at relatively low temperature because it is not necessary that the temperature be maintained sumeiently high to cause evaporation of the water.

The fresh water may be added at-any stage in the I method and it is preferably added after pre-heating of the influent,and free water removal, or after heating takes place in the lower part of the washing chamber.

It will be found advantageous at times to add certain chemicals for the purpose of assisting the breaking up of the emulsion globules, and.these chemicals may be added at any point/in the method, either ahead of a pre-heater, after a preheater, ahead of lgas separation, or after gas separation, or as the flow stream enters the washing chamber or after introduction into the washing chamber, or chemicals may be added into the introduced fresh water at any point in the method,

and this chemical may be such as .to act as best suited for the purpose.

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape, and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made, within the scope of the appended claims, without departing'from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: 1. The method of continuously treating and removing extraneous matter from well fluids in the field as they flow from the well which includes, separating the free water from the well stream,

4whereby the water content of the well stream is mixing fresh water with the well vstream and the body of heated water, flowing the mixture upwardly through a body of salt water, whereby extraneous matter held in suspension in the well fluids is agglomerated with thefresh water in said body of water, and precipitating the extraneous v matter from the flowing fluids.

2. The method of continuously treating andremoving extraneous matter from oil well fluids in which is -present in the oil. Also any water which is entrained in the oil is separated therefrom. A predetermined water level may be maintained in the tank B byran overflow pipe |01 or any'other suitable means. The action of the fresh water through a' body of heatedsalt water, whereby theextraneous matter held in suspension in the well stream is agglomerated with the water, and ,adding fresh-water to the body of 4salt in sufficient quantities to prevent the body frm reaching a saturated condition.

3. The method oi continuously treating and removing extraneous matter trom-well fluids in the eld as they flow from the well which includes,

separating the free water from the well stream,

whereby the water content of the well stream is ter held' in suspension in the well stream/is ag-' l glomeratedwith the water, adding fresh water to the body of salt water in sumcient quantities to prevent the body from reaching a saturated condition, and precipitating the extraneous matter from the ilowing well iluids.

4. In a desalting apparatus, the combination of an emulsion treater having means for conducting a well stream thereunto, means for tlrst penna nently separating free gas from the influent and means for washing the oil in a of heated water in dispersed order, a conductor for discharging the Washed cil from the treater, and a deselting tank having an inlet connect with the oil discharge of the treater, means for introducing fresh Water into the tank adjacent the oil inlet, means for maintaining a Tc of water in the tenir tin'cugh which the oil. and fresh water ows upwarrliy, means tor heating the Water in the/ desalting tank means for dispersing and caiing the upwardly ilowing oil, and means for carrying off oil from the u per end of the tank.

5. An apparatus as set io th in claim 4, and a preheater connected in the oil discharge from the treater and also connected with the influent con-- ducting mea is. said preheater having a well stream inlet, i. hereby the well stream is preheated by heat exchange with the washed oil.

6. An' apparatus as set forth in claim 4 with a4 illter in the tank in the path of the upwardly owing oil to break up water bearing oil globules.

7. The method-of continuously treating and removing extraneous matter from well iuids in the eld as they iow from the well which includes, separating the tree water from the well stream, whereby the water content oi.' the well stream is reduced, then conducting the stream into a con# lined body of heated water wherein said stream is heated and treated to break emulsions and to further extract water from the emulsied cil, admixing fresh water with the well stream and the body or heated water in sucient quantities to ab- Sorbl salt trom the emulsion stream components, ew the mixture upwardly through s, body of salt Water, whereby extraneous matter held in suspension in the welt ulds is agglmerated with the fresh water in said of water, and precipitating the extraneous matter from the owing huida.

JAY P. WR.l

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2468958A (en) * 1945-07-19 1949-05-03 Maloney Crawford Tank & Mfg Co Apparatus for treating crude oil vapors
US2546269A (en) * 1946-10-18 1951-03-27 Black Sivalls & Bryson Inc Method and apparatus for treating liquid mixtures
US2598988A (en) * 1948-05-01 1952-06-03 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treating methods and means
US2601904A (en) * 1946-12-03 1952-07-01 Salt Water Control Inc Method and apparatus for treating crude oil emulsions from oil wells
US2601903A (en) * 1948-02-24 1952-07-01 Salt Water Control Inc Method and apparatus for treating crude oil emulsions from oil wells
US2614649A (en) * 1950-09-13 1952-10-21 Nat Tank Co Method of and apparatus for treating oil well streams
US2615528A (en) * 1948-09-20 1952-10-28 Forrest Lee Murdock Sr Apparatus for separating oil emulsion
US2620043A (en) * 1948-08-27 1952-12-02 Forrest Lee Murdock Sr Apparatus for treating emulsion emanating from natural oil wells
US2624462A (en) * 1950-02-10 1953-01-06 Elmer R Williams Apparatus for siphoning water from oil treating structure
US2656006A (en) * 1947-07-28 1953-10-20 Maloney Crawford Tank & Mfg Co Emulsion treater
US2685938A (en) * 1951-04-11 1954-08-10 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treater
US2740804A (en) * 1951-08-28 1956-04-03 Gulf Research Development Co Process for separating water-oil mixtures containing fine solids
US2765917A (en) * 1953-08-06 1956-10-09 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treaters
US2864502A (en) * 1954-04-26 1958-12-16 H2 Oil Engineering Corp Methods and means for the treatment of oil, gas and water emulsions
US2948352A (en) * 1957-08-16 1960-08-09 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treating method and means
US3200567A (en) * 1956-09-07 1965-08-17 Black Sivalls & Bryson Inc System for the sonic treatment of emulsions and for resolving the same into their constituent parts
US6341667B1 (en) * 1997-02-18 2002-01-29 Safematic Oy Arrangement in a circulation lubrication system

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2468958A (en) * 1945-07-19 1949-05-03 Maloney Crawford Tank & Mfg Co Apparatus for treating crude oil vapors
US2546269A (en) * 1946-10-18 1951-03-27 Black Sivalls & Bryson Inc Method and apparatus for treating liquid mixtures
US2601904A (en) * 1946-12-03 1952-07-01 Salt Water Control Inc Method and apparatus for treating crude oil emulsions from oil wells
US2656006A (en) * 1947-07-28 1953-10-20 Maloney Crawford Tank & Mfg Co Emulsion treater
US2601903A (en) * 1948-02-24 1952-07-01 Salt Water Control Inc Method and apparatus for treating crude oil emulsions from oil wells
US2598988A (en) * 1948-05-01 1952-06-03 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treating methods and means
US2620043A (en) * 1948-08-27 1952-12-02 Forrest Lee Murdock Sr Apparatus for treating emulsion emanating from natural oil wells
US2615528A (en) * 1948-09-20 1952-10-28 Forrest Lee Murdock Sr Apparatus for separating oil emulsion
US2624462A (en) * 1950-02-10 1953-01-06 Elmer R Williams Apparatus for siphoning water from oil treating structure
US2614649A (en) * 1950-09-13 1952-10-21 Nat Tank Co Method of and apparatus for treating oil well streams
US2685938A (en) * 1951-04-11 1954-08-10 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treater
US2740804A (en) * 1951-08-28 1956-04-03 Gulf Research Development Co Process for separating water-oil mixtures containing fine solids
US2765917A (en) * 1953-08-06 1956-10-09 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treaters
US2864502A (en) * 1954-04-26 1958-12-16 H2 Oil Engineering Corp Methods and means for the treatment of oil, gas and water emulsions
US3200567A (en) * 1956-09-07 1965-08-17 Black Sivalls & Bryson Inc System for the sonic treatment of emulsions and for resolving the same into their constituent parts
US2948352A (en) * 1957-08-16 1960-08-09 Nat Tank Co Emulsion treating method and means
US6341667B1 (en) * 1997-02-18 2002-01-29 Safematic Oy Arrangement in a circulation lubrication system

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