US2378371A - Transcribing apparatus - Google Patents

Transcribing apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US2378371A
US2378371A US492896A US49289643A US2378371A US 2378371 A US2378371 A US 2378371A US 492896 A US492896 A US 492896A US 49289643 A US49289643 A US 49289643A US 2378371 A US2378371 A US 2378371A
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Prior art keywords
lever
contacts
typewriter
tape
wire
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US492896A
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Henry L Tholstrup
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International Business Machines Corp
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International Business Machines Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J5/00Devices or arrangements for controlling character selection
    • B41J5/30Character or syllable selection controlled by recorded information
    • B41J5/31Character or syllable selection controlled by recorded information characterised by form of recorded information
    • B41J5/36Character or syllable selection controlled by recorded information characterised by form of recorded information by punched records, e.g. cards, sheets
    • B41J5/38Character or syllable selection controlled by recorded information characterised by form of recorded information by punched records, e.g. cards, sheets by strips or tapes

Description

: June 12, 1945.

H. L. THOLSTRUP TRANSCRIBING APPARATUS 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 50, 1943 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 XN TOR A'TTORNEY June 12, 1945- H. THOLSTRUP TRANSCRIBING APPARATUS Filed June 30, 1943 FIG. 3.

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RNEY

June 12, 1945. I y H. L. THOLSTRUP 2,378,371"

TRANSCRIBING APPARATUS Filed June 30, 1943' 9 Sheets-Sheet '7 370 372 34 A'TTORNEY June 12, 1945. H. L. THOLSTRUP 2,373,371

' 'mmscnxame APPARATUS Filed June 30, 1943 1 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 FIG. 19.

INVENTOR ATTORNEY June 12, 1945. H. L. THOLSTRUP 2,378,371

TRANSCRIBING APPARATUS Filed June 30, 1943 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 FIG. 19b.-

INVENTOR ATTORNEY Patented June 12, 1945 TRANSCRIBING APPARATUS Henry L. Tholstrup, Rochester, N. Y., assignor to International Business Machines Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application June 30, 1943, Serial No. 492,896

15 Claims.

This invention relates to apparatus for transcribing onto a copy sheet, intelligence which has been previously recorded on a record strip, or tape; and it has for a broad object to provide apparatus of this type which is of improved construction and arrangement of parts.

In apparatus of the type referred to, it is customary to use a record strip on which code designations have been successively recorded and representing, respectively, according to a selected combinational code, the intelligence, or data, which it is desired to transcribe on thecopy sheet. A typical example of apparatus of the character referred to, comprises a reading unit through which the record strip is fed and which includes a sensing mechanism operable to sense successively the code designations on the record strip; and the apparatus also comprises a writingunit such, for example, as a typewriter including a platen or supporting a copy sheet, a plurality of character type operatively arranged with respect to the platen, and a plurality of character key mem-' bers, or actuators, corresponding, respectively, to the type and adapted to effect operation of the latter. As the record strip is fed past the sensing mechanism and the code designations are successively sensed thereby, the sensing mechanism effects operation of the character key members corresponding to the designations sensed and thereby transcribes the recorded intelligence, or data, on the copy sheet. Provision is also made for controlling by corresponding code designations recorded on the record tape, the usual functional operations of the typewriter, such as spacing, case shifting, tabulating, carriage return, and back spacing, which are necessary to transcribe correctly the recorded intelligence. The typewriter also includes functional key members controlling, respectively, the functional operations of the typewriter, and, as in the case of a character code designation, when a functional code designation is sensed, the sensing mechanism controls the operation of the corresponding functional key member to effect the desired operation of the typewriter.

This invention has for a further object to provide apparatus of the character referred to, which is relatively simple in construction and which operates smoothly and effectively to transcribe correctly recorded data at a relatively rapid rate. A still further object is to provide an improved reader-typewriter unit including simple and effective control mechanisms for stopping the tape feeding when certain of the functional code designations on the tape are sensed and for resuming .the tape feeding without delay, upon completion of the corresponding functional operation of the typewriter.

Other objects of the invention will be pointed out in the following description and claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which disclose, by way of example, the principle of the invention and the best mode, which has been contemplated, of applying that principle.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view showing one preferred enrbodiment of an apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary plan sectional view showing the mechanical working parts of the reader unit, which forms a component part of the preferred embodiment shown in Fig. 1; certain of the parts being broken away to illustrate the construction more completely;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2, and illustrating the tape feeding mechanism;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary vertical section through the reader unit and the section being taken at right angles to Figs. 3 and 4 and being indicated by the line 55 on Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 i a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 2, and illustrating the clutch mechanism and its controlling magnet which function to connect the main operating shaft of the reader with a source of power;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary vertical section taken on the line l'| of Fig. 3 and showing the reader pins and the manner in which they control their respective contacts;

Fig. 8 is a transverse vertical sectional view through a typewriter which forms another component part of the apparatus disclosed in Fig. l, the section being taken on the line 88 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary detail sectional view illustrating the structure and operation of the back space key of the typewriter;

Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken in a, plane parallel to the plane of Fig. 8, and showing the key controlled mechanism of the typewriter for effecting case shifting;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary plan view showing the key levers and related parts which control the operation of the case shifting mechanism;

Fig. 12 is a detail sectional view taken on the line |2l2 of Fig. 10;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary detail section illustrat- Fig. 17 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sec- I tion showing more clearly the toggle mechanism which actuates the carriage return clutch:

Fig. 18 is a fragmentarydetail view taken in i a vertical plane and showing certain coacting elements which comprise a part of an automatic margin control for the typewriter, the parts being shown as they appear when looking-from the back toward the front of the typewriter;

the sensing station of the reader. The sensing station is indicated at 20 and, as will appear more fully hereinafter, the recording fields of the tape are successively sensed by sensing elements located at this point. A removable gate 2| is provided at the sensing station for properly positioning and holding the tape with respect to the'sensing elements. The tape 10 is guided in its movement toward the sensing station by a suitable guide member 22 fixed to the top of the tape table l3.

At the right-hand side of the reader Hill, are provided three electrical switches indicated at 24, 25, and 28, respectively. As will appear more fully hereinafter, the switch 24 is the power switch and when closed, connectsa convenient source of alternating current with the motor for Figs. 19a and 19b are two parts of an electrical wiring diagram illustrating diagrammatically the various electrical instrumentalities of the apparatus and the circuit wires connecting them; and

Fig. 20 is a view showing a portion of a record tape bearing all of the code hole designations of a preselected combinational code.

Before considering in detail the construction and operation of the illustrated embodiment of the invention, it will be helpful to consider first one practical example of a preselected combinational code by means of which the intelligence, such for example, as a letter, which it is desired to transcribe can be recorded on a record strip or tape. In Fig. 20, a portion of a record tape it is shown, and punched in the tape are 'all of the code hole designations of a combinational six-hole code. -The six code positions are indicated at both ends of the tape In by the reference numerals l to 6, inclusive, and each code designation is arranged in a vertical column or recording field, and opposite each field bearing a code designation and at the lower edge of the tape, is placed the particular character or typewriter function corresponding to the code desig nation in that field. The smaller holes II at the center of the tape it! and within each of the several recording fields are 'for the purpose of feeding the tape lengthwise during the reading or sensing operation. The tape may be punched by any suitable means such for example, as by the typewriter controlled punch disclosed in my copending application Serial No. 492,895, filed concurrently herewith.

In Fig. 1 of the drawings, the reader unit I00 and the copy typewriter 200 which comprise the illustrated embodiment of the present invention, are each shown in plan and as being'connected by an electrical cable RT containing the necessary individual circuit wires '(not shown) for effecting operation of the apparatus. The reader I00 is enclosed within a housing i2 and is provided across its lower side, as viewed in Fig. 1, with a platform or tape table it across which the record tape Ill bearing the recorded intelligenes is fed during operation of the apparatus. A spool I 5 is supported at the right-hand side of the table l3. Before the beginning of an operation the record tape to be transcribedis wound about the spoor IS. A second spool It is also provided at the left of the table l3 and, as will later appear, is rotated by a fiexible belt l 'l during operation of the apparatus, forthe purpose of winding the tape Ill thereon after it leaves driving the reader unit and with the motor for operating the typewriter. The switch 25 is the start switch and when closed, starts the sensing and feeding of the tape and the automatically controlled operation of the typewriter key members. The switch 26 is the stop switch and when closed instantly stops the feeding and sensing of the tape and the controlled operation of the typewriter.

The typewriter 200 which is shown in plan in Fig. 1 and the detail construction thereof in Figs.

8 to 18, inclusive, is a well known commercial form of power-driven typewriter and will be described more fully hereinafter. In Fig. 1, the typewriter 200 is shown as comprising the usual keyboard 2H! comprising the character keys 2 which operate corresponding type bars 2, and the functional keys which include the shift key 2l3, shift lock key 2, shift release key 5, the carriage return key 2H5, the back space key 2", and the tabulating key 218. The space bar is indicated at 223.. The typewriter 200 also comprises the conventional rotatable platen 2|! mounted on the typewriter carriage 220 and which supports a copy sheet indicated at 22! and on which the data recorded in the tape I0 is automatically typed. At the lower and lefthand side of the typewriter 200 as viewed in Fig. 1, is provided a power switch 224 which, when closed, like the power switch 24, connects a source of alternatingcurrent with the typewriter and reader motors, At the lower and right-hand side of the typewriter is mounted a start switch 225 and a stop switch' 226 which function, respectively, the same as the switches 25 and 26 on the reader I00. Thus, the operation of the apparatus may be controlled from either the typewriter or from the reader. An insert switch 221 is also provided on the typewriter which,

- when open, prevents starting of thetape feeding and sensing mechanisms in'the reader I00 and thereby eliminates control by the latter of the typewriter, so that the typewriter keyboard 2"! can be operated manually without interference from the reader. The insert switch 221 will normally be closed, and will be :opened when it is desired to type manually an insert in the data being transcribed; for example, when it is de power shaft ll, the latter being mounted for rotation within suitable bearings 82 mounted within a frame 88 which is bolted to the base 84 of the reader.

The reader I60 also comprises an operating shaft 36 which is aligned with the power shaft II and is supported for rotation within suitable bearings 86 carried by the reader frame 88. A clutch 81, under the control of a clutch magnet CM, is operable to connect and disconnect the operating shaft 35 and the power shaft 3|. The operating shaft 85 effects the operation of the tape feeding and sensing means. A cycle of operation of the apparatus is eflected during each revolution of the shaft 35; via, the tape I6 is fed or spaced a distance suflicient to bring the next recording field of the tape into sensing position, such next field is sensed to determine the code designations therein, if any, and the typewriter is operated in response to the sensing of the code designations. As long as'the shafts 8| and 35 are clutched together the cycles of operation are repeated and the typewriter continues to transscribe the recorded data.

Insofar as the present invention is concerned, any suitable form of clutch may be used to connect the shafts 6| and 65. The clutch 61 which is shown, is well known to those skilled in this art, it being substantially the same as that disclosed in the U. S. Patent No. 2,206,646, granted July 2*, 1940. If desired, reference may be had to this patent for a complete showing of the structural details thereof. For the purposes of the present disclosure, it is believed sufficient to say that the clutch comprises a driving element in the form of a toothed wheel 40 fixed to the end of the power shaft 3|, and a driven element in the form of a barrel 4| fixed to the shaft 35 and carrying a radially slidable clutch pawl 42. the barrel 4| is formed with a diametrically disposed slot 48 within which the pawl 42 is slidably mounted. To the outer end of the pawl 42 is fixed a tooth element 44 which, when the pawl 41 is moved radially inward, engages the toothed wheel 46 to provide the driving connection between the shafts 3| and 35. Normally, the pawl 42 is urged in a clutch engaging direction by a suitable spring mounted with'n the clutch barrel 4|. A clutch releasing lever 45 also extends diametrically across the clutch barrel and at right angles to the slot 43 and is mounted for limited angular movement therein. The lever is provided with an outer extension 46 which, when intercepted and engaged by the outer end of one arm 41 of a rocking lever 48, is moved to move the clutch pawl 42 radially outward against the force of the aforementioned spring in the barrel 4| to disengage the clutch.

The clutch parts are shown in Figs. 2 and 6 in their declutched position which is the home or starting position of the reader. The rocking lever 48 is mounted on a stud 56 carried by a part of the frame 33 and includes a second arm which carries at its outer end the armature 52 of the clutch magnet CM. when the clutch magnet CM is energized, the lever 46 is rocked counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 6, which moves the outer end of the arm 41 upward and thereby releases the outer extension 46 of the releasing lever 45, and the clutch spring within the clutch barrel 4| then moves the pawl 42 radially inward to engage the toothed wheel 46 in the manner explained above. when the clutch magnet CM is deenergized, a tension spring 58 rocks the lever 48 clockwise and moves the outer end of the arm 41 into the path of the outer extension 46 of the lever so that the latter is engaged and moved to move the pawl outward to disengage the clutch.

In order to prevent rebound of the parts when the clutch is disengaged and in order to hold the operating shaft 85 in the home position, the clutch barrel 4| is also provided with an annular extension or collar 54 having a notch formed therein which, when the clutch is disengaged, receives the outer end of an arm 56 of a detent lever 61. The detent lever 51 is also pivoted on the stud 50 and includes another arm 58 which is connected to the armature 52 by means of the tension spring 53 previously mentioned. Thus, the spring 53 serves the dual purpose of urging the arm 56 into engagement with the periphery of the collar 54 so that it will fit within the notch 55 in home position, and to urge the arm 41 into position to intercept the extension 46 of the pawl releasing lever 45 and thereby declutch the parts,

As stated above, during the first part of each revolution of the operating shaft 35, the tape is fed or spaced lengthwise to bring a new recording field into sensing position. The tape feeding mechanism is shown more clearly in Figs. 2 and 4, and comprises a cam 66 mounted on the operating shaft 35 and cooperating with a rocking lever 6| pivoted on a fixed stud 62 carried by the frame 33 and comprising a pair of arms 63 and 64. The cam 66 and lever 6| are shown in Fig. 4 in the starting or home position and are so constructed that when the cam 66 begins to rotate in a counterclockwise direction, it first engages the arm 63 to rock the lever 6| counterclockwise and then engages the other arm 64 to rock the lever 6| clockwise and return the same to the position shown. A link 66 is pivoted'at its lower end to the outer end of arm 64 and extends upwardly therefrom and is pivoted at its upper end by a stud 61 with a second link 68. The link 68 is pivoted to a shaft 16 and extends outwardly therefrom to hold the link 66 in the upright position shown.

Also pivotally connected on the stud 61 is a feed pawl H which is held in operative engagement with a ratchet wheel 12 fixed to the shaft 16, by means of a tension spring 13 connecting outer extending arms of the pawl H and the link 68. A detent 14 is pivotally supported by a. fixed stud l5 and is held in engagement with. the teeth of the ratchet wheel 12 by means of a tension spring 16 and thereby serves to prevent reverse movement of the ratchet wheel 12 and shaft 10. From the above, it is apparent that when the clutch is engaged and the lever 6| is first rocked counterclockwise by the cam 66, the pawl 1| will be moved downwardly thereby and will rotate the ratchet l2 and shaft 16 counterclockwise; and, when the cam '66 rocks the lever 6| clockwise, the pawl II will be moved upward to engage the next tooth of the ratchet 12.

The shaft 16 is the tape feed shaft and is provided with a feed wheel 11 having radially extending pins 18 which are adapted to engage the feed holes I l in the tap l0. Thus, when the feed shaft is partially rotated in the manner just described, the tape is fed to the left as viewed in Figs. 2 and 3, a distance equal to the width of a recording field. The belt H which rotates the spool I6 is driven from a pulley l6 fixed to the tape feed shaft 16.

The mechanism for successively sensing the recording fields of the tape comprises six sensing pinsSl to 88, inclusive, there being one pin for each-of the code hole positions. and the pins are arranged in a single 1 plane extending at right angles to the direction of movement 'of the tape,

and so that when the tape-comes to rest at the end of a feeding operation, the upper end of each pin will be directly beneath its corresponding code 'hole pomtion in the field of the tape then in positively connected, respectively, at their lower ends to six pairs of spring blade contacts CI to C8, inelusive. Each pair of the contactscomprises a fixed blade 82 and a movable spring blade 83 which extends outwardly and is connected at its outer end to the lower end of its related sensing,

pin. The construction is such that the sprin blades 83 constantly urge their respective con- 9,878,871 I ter *Y." Sensing pins SI, 88, and 85 have passed through code holes in the co code positions in the tape, which as shown in Fig. 20 is the code designation for Y," and their related contacts Cl, C3, and C5 are closed. The sensing pins S5, S2, and S4 have been stopped in their upward movement by the tape and their related contacts C8, C2, and C4 are thereby held open.

From the foregoing. it is apparent that during a sensing operation the contacts CI to C8, inclusive, are closed by their related sensing pins singly or in combination, depending upon the code hole designation in the record fleld of the tape being sensed. The sensing operation is terminated by the high point of the 'cam 9| engaging the roller 98 on the arm 89 and moving the vane 85 counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 3, so that the tacts into closed position and their related sensing pins upwardly as viewed in Figs. 3 and 7. Between sensing operations, the six sensing pins are held in home position, the position shown in Fig. 3, by the outer lateral edge 84 of a vane 85, which edge extends across the pins and within transversely aligned notches 88 provided, respec tively, in the sides of the pins. The vane 85 is, in effect, a rocker arm pivotally supported on afixed stud 81 carried by the frame 33 and constantly urged to move in a clockwis direction, as viewed in Fig. 3, by a tension spring 88. The vane 85 is provided at its center with a depending arm 89 which carries at its lower end a roller 98 held by the spring 88 in contact with the face of a cam 9| mounted on the operating shaft 35 of the reader. When the roller 98 is in engagement with the high point of the cam, the vane 85 is held in the position shown in Fig. 3 where the several sensing pins are held in their respective lower positions and the pairs of contacts controlled thereby are held open.

After the tape has been spaced by the feeding mechanism in the manner previously described and has come to rest with the new recording field above the sensing pins, the cam 9| will have rotated counterclockwise from the position shown in Figs. 3, 94 of arevolution. When the shaft 35 has rotated 114', the roller 98 will begin to move inwardly from the high point of the cam 9i, and

the vane 85 will move in a clockwise direction due to the force of the spring 88. "The sensing pins Bi to S8, inclusive, will also follow the end 94 of the vane 85 upward due to the spring force in their respective movable blades 89. If there be I related pair of contacts are held open.

By way of example, Fig. 7 shows the relative position of the parts during the sensing of a record fleld bearing the code designation for the letend 84 thereof engages again the lower ends of the notches 85 in the several sensing pins Slto S5 inclusive, and thereby moves the latter downward to the position shown in Fig. 3, where the related contacts are held in open position. The sensingoperation is completed and the vane 85 is restored to home position at approximately 346 of each revolution.

In order to provide for automatically stopping the reading and sensing operation when there is no tape at the sensing station, a seventh pin 94 is mounted for vertical sliding movement within aligned openings in the spaced guide blocks 98 and 8| and in the table I! and gate 2| and is positioned so that it will engage the central portions of the tape. The lower end of the pin 94 is supported and operatively connected to the movable spring'blade 95 carrying one of a pair of contacts 95. The blade 95 is normally urged upward by the spring force inherent therein, to open the contacts 98 and move the pin 94 upward. If there is tape at the sensing station, the upper end of the pin 94 engages the underside of the tape and the contacts 98 are held closed; This is the position of the parts shown in Fig. 7. When the tape runs out, the pin 94 moves upward and opens the contacts 95 which, as will'later appear, deenergizes the clutch.

- shown in the upper position and the contacts 96 are open. The pin 94 is large enough in diameter so that the feed holes II in the tape will not affect its operation.

The sensing contacts CI to C8, inclusive, control, respectively, the flow of direct current to six translator relays Ml to M6, inclusive, of a relay type of translatormechanism which is diagrammatically shown in Fig. 19a, and which will be described more fully hereinafter, in connection with the description of the complete wiring diagram shown in both Figs. 19a and 19b- At this point, it is sufficient to say that by energizing translator relays Ml to M5, inclusive, singly and in combination, due to the closing of their related contacts CI to C8, inclusive, during the reading operation described above, a number of controlling circuit paths are selectively established, which, with one exception, actuate, respectively, related key members of the typewriter. The circuit path just noted as being the exception, functions when energized by the sensing of a predetermined stop code designation to stop the sensing and tape feeding operation 01' the 1 also be described 33 and controls through a pivoted follower l33 the operation of a pair of spring blade contacts I34. As will appear more fully hereinafter the contacts I84 control the flow 01' current from a source of D. C. current and through the contacts CI to C3, inclusive, in parallel to their related magnets Ml to M8, inclusive. The contacts l04 can be termed the D. C. common contacts and are normally held open by their movable spring blade. The cam I32 so shaped and positioned on the operating shaft 35 that the contacts I04 are closed at 142 of a revolution which is after the time for closing the sensing contacts CI to C8, inclusive, and are opened at 311 which is before the sensing contacts are opened by the vane 85. The purpose of the D. 0. common contacts is to provide for simultaneously energizing and deenergizing the relays MI to M6, inclusive.

A cam I03 is also fixed to the operating shaft 35 and controls through a pivoted follower I01 the operation of a pair 01' normally open spring blade contacts I08 which are herein termed the A C. common contacts. As will appear more fully hereinafter, the current which flows through the controlling circuit paths previously mentioned as being established by the selective energization of the translator relays Ml to M8, inclusive, is A. C. current, and the cam I05 is so shaped that it connects the source of A. C. current with these circuit paths at a predetermined point in each cycle oi operation. In the structure shown, the cam I08 sheets the closing of the A. C. common contacts I08 at approximately 170 of each revolution and opens the contacts at 294.

The detail construction of the typewriter is shown in Figs. 8 to 18, inclusive, and as stated previously, is a well know commercial form of power driven typewriter. T e structural features and principles of operation of this typewriter are fully disclosed in a number of U. S. patents, among which is Patent No. 1,777,055, granted September 30, 1930, which discloses the general principles of operation of the key lever and how they control through related cam units, the operation of the type bars. In view of the detailed description of the construction and operation 01 the parts given in the patent just mentioned, only a brief description will be given herein which ,willbe sufllcient to enable the present invention to be understood. Reference may be had to the aforementioned patent for further details.

As shown in Fig. 8, the character keys 2 are mounted, respectively, on key levers 228, the latter being pivoted on a rod 223 which is supported by a cross frame 230 rigidly mounted in the type- Rotatably mounted in the base writer frame. "I is the power roller 232 which is rotated in the direction of the arrow by means of an A. C. motor, not shown in Fig. 8, but indicated diagrammatically at TM in Fig. 18b. When the machine is in use, the power roller rotates continually.

Cooperating with the power roller 232 are the cam units 233 which are pivotally mounted on rods 234 extending parallel with tire power roller 232. There is a cam unit 233 associated with each of the key levers 228, and each of the cam units which is operated by a character key 2| I, is connected by a link 235 with a sub-lever 238 pivoted on rod 223. The sub-levers 236 are connected by links 231 to type bars 2i2 through the viously,the platen is adapted to support the work sheet I and is rotatably mounted in the carriase 223. and the latter is supported for lengthwise movement on front and rear rails 2 and 242, respectively, by means of suitable anti-friction roller trucks. Springs 243 connected to a curved spring anchoring member 244 and to to:- gles 238, provide means for locking the toggles in their normal or inactive position shown in Fig. 8.

when any character key 2 is manually depressed, its related cam unit 233 is caused to operatively engage the power roller 232 in a well known way, thereby rocking the cam unit 233 clockwise or counterclockwise, according to whether the operative cam unit is pivoted on the left hand or right hand rod 234, respectively, as viewed in Fig. 8. The rocking of the cam unit 233 causes its link 235 to be drawn downwardly, thereby rocking the corresponding sub-lever 238 in a clockwise direction. This movement of the sub-lever 233, through the corresponding link 231 and toggle 238, causes the type bar 2 I 2 associated with the selected key to rock in a counterclockwise direction to efl'ect the impression of the type upon the work sheet 22! wrapped around the platen H9. The type bar, near the end or its operating stroke, engages the usual universal bar 245 and causes the universal bar to move rearwardly and downwardly in Fig. 8 to space the carriage forward in a manner not disclosed in detail herein, but which is well known to those skilled in the art.

To each of the character key levers 228 is connected by a spring 243, an actuating solenoid 241 which, when energized, pulls its related key lever 228 downward to operate the related cam unit 233 and type bar 2 in the same manner as described above when the related key 2 is man ually depressed. As will appear more fully hereinaiter, the solenoids 241 are selectively energized by the A. C. controlling circuits previously mentioned as being selectively established by the energizing oi the translator relays Ml to M3, inclusive.

As will be readily understood by those skilled in the typewriter art, one of the cam units 233 is operated by manually depressing the space bar 223 and its related key lever, and such cam unit when operated effects the rearward movement of the universal bar 245 to space the carriage. The detail mechanism tor efl'ecting this operation has not been shown herein as it would be a needless duplication of drawing and description. A solenoid 241. is also provided for operating the key lever on which the space bar 223 is mounted. The latter solenoid is shown diagrammatically in Fig. 19b.

The segment 233 is mounted in a frame 248 which forms part 01 the type basket. The type basket is movably mounted in the framework of the machine for case shitting movement in a well known way and normally occupies an elevated position shown in Figs. 8 and 10 for the typing oi the lower case characters. The shift mechanism for drawing the type basket downward to permit the printing of upper case characters is described in U. 8. Patent No. 1,945,097, granted January 30, 1934, and is partly shown in Fig. 10.

Secured, respectively, to the back of the type basket frame 243 and on opposite sides thereof, are two brackets 250. The brackets 250 are connected by links 25l to the outer ends of lever arms 252, the latter being fixed respectively, on the ends oi a transverse shaft 253 Journaled in the framework of the machine. Pivoted on a stud 264 atone side of the machine is a lever 266 having two pins 266 and 261, engageable by the short arms .ofs, T shaped lever 256, the latter being pivotally mounted at 223 on one arm 256 of a three-armed lever 266. The lever 255 is connected by a link 26l to the outer portions of one of the lever arms 252 and at points spaced from the connection of such arm and its link 25l. The T-lever 266 has a stud 262 projecting into a slot formed in an arm 26: comprising an extension of the left-hand shift key lever 264 as viewed in Figs. 1 and 11. One arm of lever 266 is connected by a link 266 to a cam unit-266 which is controlled by the shift key lever 264 in substantially the same manner as cam units 263 are controlled by the key levers 226, described above.

The type basket is shifted downward to upper case position when the shift key 2l6 mounted on key lever 264 is moved downward and is returned to lower case position when the key is released and moves upward. It is, therefore, 'customary to hold the key lever 264 in its lower position while writing upper case characters.

When the shift key lever 264 is depressed, the T-lever 256 is elevated to bring one of the short arms thereof to a position to the left of the pin is released to return the type basket to lower case position by the energizing of a second solenoid 216 which pulls down the shift-release lever 214 at the right of the typewriter. The solenoid 266 is energized as a result of sensing a shift code designation in the tape l6 and the solenoid 212 is energized as a result of sensing a release code designation (see Fig. 20)

When the typewriter is operated manually, the shift key 2|3 is depressed and released to shift the type basket to upper'and lower case positions. The manually operable shift lock key or button 2 l4 cooperates with the key lever 264 and latching lever 216 to lock the keylever 264 down in its upper case position when it is desired to type manually a. substantial number of upper case characters. When the key lever 264 is locked down, it may be manually released by depressing the shift-release key 2l5 and its associated key lever 214.

The shift latching lever 216 is arranged on one side of the key lever 264 and the shift-lock button 2 on the opposite side thereof. The shiftlock button 2 I4 is provided with a vertical slot 216 also receiving the stud 21I projecting from the lever. A detent 216 is fixed to a stationary portion 211 of the typewriter frame and cooperates 256, this movement taking place before the cam unit 266 controlled by the key lever 264 is opera-- tively connected to the power roller 232. When the cam unit 266 controlled by the shift key is operated, the link 265 is drawn downwardly thereby rocking lever 266 in a clockwise direction. This draws the T lever 256 to the right in Fig. 10, and thereby through the engagement of said T lever with the pin 256, rocking the lever 255 clockwise. Consequently, through the link connection 26i, the lever arms 252 connected thereto and the shaft 253 are rocked in a counterclockwise direction, thereby pulling downward the links 25I which result in the type basket being drawn downward to upper case position.

As disclosed fully in the aforementioned U. S. Patent No. 1,945,097, when the key lever 264 is released so that it is returned upward to its normal position by the spring 261, the cam unit 266 is again actuated by the power roller so that the cam unit rocks in a counterclockwise direction, as before. When the key lever 264 is released and before the cam unit 266 is actuated, the arm 263 of the lever 264 moves downward and thereby permits the T lever 258 to move downward to bring the lower of its short arms .to a position to the left of the lower pin .251. Consequently, when the cam unit 266 is rocked counterclockwise as just stated, the cam unit through the link 265 rocks the lever 266 clockwise, and the latter through the T lever 256 and pin 251, rocks the lever 255 counterclockwise. The lever 255, through the link 26I, rocks the arms 252 and shaft 253 clockwise to return, through the links 25l, the type basket to the lower case position shown in Figs. 8 and 10.

During the controlled operation of the typewriter by the sensing mechanism and the translator relays, the key lever 264 is pulled downward to shift the type basket to upper case position by the energizing of a, solenoid 266 having an armature 269 pivotally connected to alatching lever 216 which isfiin turn, connected at its upper end by a stud 21l fixed within an opening in the key lever 264 and projecting into a slot 212 formed in the latching lever 216. As will presently ap-- pear, the key lever 264 is locked down when it is shifted by the solenoid 266, and the key lever 264 with the latching lever 216 in looking the key lever 264 down in shifted position. With the parts in their normal lower case position, as shown in Figs, 10, 11, and 12, the detent 216 engages the lowermost inner surface of the lever 216. A tension spring 216 connects the latch lever 216 with the shift key lever 264 and serves to hold the lever 216 in this position, the stud 21I extending from the'lever 264 occupying the lower part of the slot 212. The shift lock button 2 is provided with a pin 216 which extends over the latching lever 216 and engages the top of the latter. With the parts in normal lower case position, the lever 216 supports the button 2i4 through the pin 219 and the stud 21l also occupies the lower part of the slot 216 in the button M4. The button 2 is also provided with spaced tabs 266 and 26i, en-

gaging respectively, the upper and lower sides of the lever 264 which aid in holding the button 2 I4- in an upright position.

When the solenoid 266 is energized, the latchin lever 216 is pulled downward. thereby until the top of the slot 212 engages the stud 2H and then the key lever 264 will also be pulled down to actuate the cam unit 266 to shift the type basket to upper case. When the latter happens, the detent 216 will have cleared a ledge portion 282 on the lever 216 and the spring 216, in conjunction with the oil-center pivotal connection between the armature 269 and lever 216, will move the lever 216 to the right or counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 10, until the ledge 262 is under the fixed detent 216, thus locking the latch lever 216 and key lever 264 down in its shifted position.

tent 216, thus manually locking the latch lever 216 and key lever 264 down in shifted position.

As stated above, the key lever 264 is released to return to lower case position by energizing the solenoid 219 or by depressing the shirt-release key III. To this end, a bail lever 294 is pr vided which comprises a pair or end plates 299 and 299 connected by a bail road 291. The bail lever 294 is mounted for pivotal movement by studs 299 and 299 extending outwardlyirom the plates 299 and 299, and. Journaled, respectively, within opposite sides of the typewriter frame. A stud 290 extends inwardly from the end plate 299 and within a notch 29l 'formed in a downwardly extending projection of key lever 214 on which the key 219 is mounted (see Fig. 8). A second stud 292 extends inwardly from the end plate 299 and over the outer end 299 otlatching' lever 210. Thus, when the lever 214 is moved down by the energizing oi solenoid 219 or by manually depressing thekey '2", the bail lever is rocked about its pivotal support and the stud 292 engages the end 299 01' latching lever 219 and thereby rocks the latter downward and clockwise to move the ledge portion 292 out from under the detent 219 which unlatches the lever 210. when the lever 210 is thus released, the lever 294 is permitted to move up under the force of its spring 261 to the normal lower case position shown in Fig. 10.

The mechanism for back spacing the typewriter carriage is disclosed in Figs. 9 and 14, and operates in the same manner as the construction disclosed fully in U. S. Patent No. 2,873,553, granted August 23, 1932. In Fig. 9 herein, the back space key 2" is shown as mounted on a key lever 299 which is pivoted on the rod 229. A solenoid 291 is connected by a spring 299'to the key lever 299. When the solenoid is energized as a result the sensing of a back space code designation in the.

tape, the lever 299 is pulled downward to operate a cam unit 299, similar in construction and operation to the cam unit 299 shown herein in Fig. 8 at the left oi. the power roller 299. When the cam unit 299 is operated, it pulls down a link 900 connected to one end of a rock lever 90! which 9 is pivotally supported on the rod 229. The other end of rock lever 90l is connected by a link 902 (see also Fig. 14) to one arm of a} bell crank 909 pivotally mounted on the'rear fixed rail 242. The

other arm of the bell crank 909 is connected by a link 904 to a pivoted dog 905 having a tooth 909 formed on its outer end and adapted to engage with the teeth of the escapement rack 901 mounted on the carriage 229. As is explained fully in the aforementioned U. S. Patent No. 1,873,553, when the bell crank 909 is rocked clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 14 herein, the link 904 moves the dog 905. clockwise. and at the same time down.- wardly and into engagement with the teeth of the rack so that the carriage 220 is moved to the right, or backward, one space. Suitably mounted on the back of the typewriter is a pair of normally open spring blade contacts 9 I 0; and, when the bell crank 909 is rocked clockwise due to the operation of the cam unit 299, a stud 9| I projecting upwardly from-the arm of the bell crank 909 engages and closesthe contacts 9l0 for a purpose which will appear i'ully hereinafter. The contacts 9 l0 are closed during the time the carriage is being back spaced and when the latter operation is completed the contacts will return to their normal open position. V

The tabulating mechanism for the typewriter is shown more clearly in Figs. 13, 14, and 15. Fig. 13 shows t e t b y 21a and its related cam unit 9 l 2 which is operated in response to the actuation of the tab key lever 9l9, either by manuallydepressing the key 2 l9 or by the energizing or a solenoid 9 in to the sensing oia tab code designation recorded in the record tape (see Flg.20). Thecamunitlflissimilartothecam unit 299 shown at, the left or the power roller 292 in Fig.8 and. as will be readily understood, is operated by its related key lever III in the same manner as the operation previously described in connection with the cam units 299. The

cam unit 9!! is connectedby a link 9l9 to one end of a rock lever 9'9 pivotally supported by the rod 229 and the other'end of the lever 9" is connected by a link 9| 1 with a lever. 9 l 9 pivoted to a bracket mounted on the left-hand end of the fixed rail 242 and operatively connected to the tab lever 9| 9 shown inFigs. 14 and 15.

The tabulating mechanism shown in Figs.-14

and 15 is the same as is fully disclosed in U. S.

Patent No; 1,935,436 granted November 14, 1933, and operates in the same manner as the structure disclosed therein, with the exception that instead'of providing removable tab stops like the one indicated at 4 in the last mentioned patent, a plurality of tab stops 920 are pivotally mounted on a stop bar 9 carried by the carriage 220 and are equal in number and correspond respectively, to the letter space positions in a line of typing. The latter type or pivoted tab stop may be selectively and individually set to be engaged by the tab lever M9 to stop the carriage at any related letter space position in the same manner as is disclosed in U. S. Patent No. 2,151,053, granted May 2, 1939. The operation and detail construction of the tabulating mechanism shown herein, is well known to those skilled in this art and can be readily understood by reference to the patents mentioned. Consequently, it will be needless duplicationto describe the mechanism in full herein. It is considered suflicient for the purposes of the present disclosure, to state that the tab lever 919 is pivoted at 929 in such a manner that it has limited movement about an axis normal to the plane of Fig. 14-01 the drawings. When the cam unit 9" is operated, the link 9"- pulls the left-hand end of the tab lever 9 [9 downward as viewed in Fig. 14, which will be toward the rear of the typewriter, which results in the moving of the stop 929 on the right-hand end thereof upward in Fig. 14 or toward the rear of the machine where it will intercept and engage the next selected one of the tab stops 920. When the latter engagement occurs, the tab lever 9 I9 is moved back to the position shown and the escapement pawls 929 are released and thereby engage the rack 901 to stop the carriage ,220 at the letter space position corresponding to the selected oneof the tab stops 920 which was just engaged.

The several letter space positions where it is desired to stop the carriage by a tabulating operation, are determined during the preparation of the record tape and they are manually noted on the leading end of the tape in any suitable way so that when it is desired to transcribe the intelligence, such as a letter, from the prepared record tape, the tab stops 920 corresponding to the letter space positions noted on the tape are first set in the manner explained in the above-identified Patent No. 2,157,053. Then, when the tape is run through the reader, the typewriter carriage 220 will be automatically moved to the correct positions determined by the tab code designations in the tape and the position of the' tab stop 929.

' As shown in Fig. 14, two pairs of spring blade contacts 929- and 921, respectively,-are arranged at the rear and left-hand end of the typewriter and are operated by the adjacent end of the tab .of the typewriter. of lever 343 is connected by a toggle link 344 lever Ill. The contacts maybe any suitable manner on a fixed part of the typewriter.

Theeontacts forming the pair 323 are carried by a fixed blade 323 and a movable spring blade 323, respectively, and the blade 323 is biased to move toward open position. The contacts forming the a pair 321 are'carried by a fixed blade 333 and a structuralLv connected by a member 332 for movement together in unison. Themember 332 may be formed of any suitable insulation material. The end of the member contacts the left hand end of the tab lever 3" and is held thereagainst by the inherent resiliency in the blades 323 and 331. The normal position of the parts is shown in Fig. 14. The contacts 323 are held by the member 332 and tab lever 3" in closed position and the contacts 321 are held thereby in open position. When the tab key lever 3|3 is operated,

by the energization of the solenoid 314, the link 3" will pull the left-hand end of the tab lever 313 downward, as viewed in Fig. 14, which is toward the front of the typewriter, and as a result,

"the inherent resiliency in the blades 323 and 33| will cause the member 332 to follow the tab lever and thereby open the contacts 323 and close the contacts 321. when the stop. 324 engages the next pre-set tab stop 323, the tab lever 313 will be engaged and returned to the normal position shown and the contacts 321 will be moved to their normal open position and the contacts 323 moved to their normal closed position. The function of the contacts 323 and 321 will be described more fully hereinafter in connection with the wiring diagram-shown in Figs. 19a and 19b.

The mechanism shown herein for returning the carriage to begin a new line of typing is well known to those skilledin the typewriter art. Attention is directed to U. S. Patent No. 2,104,559, granted January 4,1938, and U. 8. Patent No. 1,753,453, granted April 8, 1930, for a full disclosure or the structural details of the carriage return mechanism shown herein, the later granted patent being directed to the specific clutch shown herein for connecting the power roller to the drum about which the carriage return tape is wound.

Referring to Figs. 16 and 17, the carriage return key 215 is shown as mounted on a key lever 335 pivoted on the rod 229 and controlling the operation of a cam unit 333 which is similar in construction and operation to the previously described cam unit 233 shown at the right of the power roller in Fig. 8 hereof. A solenoid 331 is connected by a spring 333 to the key lever 335 and when energized, moves the key lever downward to effect operation of the cam unit 333. The latter is connected by a link 333 with the inner or left-hand end of a toggle lever 343 pivoted on a, fixed stud 1 carried by a bracket 342 which is secured to'a part 343 (Fig. 17) of the frame The outer or right-hand end (Fig. 1"!) to one arm of a two-part lever 345 pivoted on a pin 343 which is carried by the lower end of a bracket 341 fixed on the typewriter frame part 343. Another arm 348 of the twopart lever 345 is disposed adjacent a clutch 343. As described fully in Patent No. 2,104,559, when lever 345 is rocked clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 1'! herein, the clutch 343 connectsthe power roller 232 with a drum 353 about which one end of a carriage return tape 35l is wound. The other end of the tape "I is connected to a parts! the typewriter carriage 223.

When the; cam unit 333 is operated by energizing the solenoid 331 as Just stated, or by manually depressing the key 2", the lever 343 is rocked counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 17, and the toggle formed by the right-hand arm of lever 343 and the link 344 is straightened and thereby effects the Just mentioned clockwise movement of two-part lever 345 to engage the clutch 343. The lever 343 is moved by the link 333' slightly past the dead center position of'the toggle'andthus the lever 343 and the associated parts are held in their clutch engaging position. Upon engagement of the clutch 343, the carriage 223 will be returned, 1. e., moved to the right as viewed in Fig. 1'1, to begin a new line of typing.

At the same time the lever 343 is moved to engage the clutch in the mannerjust described, the inner of left-hand. end ofthe lever 343 engages and moves downward one arm 352.01 a bell crank 353 which is suitably pivoted by a pin 354 to a fixed part 355 of the typewriter frame. The bell crank 353 will thus be moved about its pivot pin and a second arm 353 thereof, through a connecting link 351, will move a lever 353 pivotally mounted on a, pin 353, clockwise about its pivot; and the lever 353 through a link 333 will move a lever 36i which is pivoted on a pin 382 carried by the rail 242, counterclockwise about its pivot (see also Fig. 15). I with an arm 363 which when moved counterclockwise in the manner just stated, will be positioned within the path of travel of the left-hand marginal stop 334 of the typewriter. The stop 334 is mounted on a rack bar 353 carried by the typewriter carriage, and can be positioned thereon at any selected point corresponding to a' letter space position of the carriage. Near the end of the return movement of the carriage and just before the marginal stop 334 engages a fixed v lug 335 formed on the tab lever, M3, to stop the carriage, the marginal stop 334 engages the top surface of arm 333 and thereby rocks the lever 33l clockwise. clockwise, motion is-transmitted through the link 333, lever 353, and link 351 to rock the bell crank 353 so as to move its arm 352 upward to engage the lever 34!? and thereby move the latter clockwise to break the toggle and move the two-part lever 345 counterclockwise which will'eflect disengagement of the clutch 343 and thereby disconnect the power roller 232 from the tape drum 353.

As indicated in Fig. 16, the carriage return cam unit 333 isprovided with a downward extension 331 carrying a contact operating roller 338 which engages the intermediate movable spring blade 333 of a set of transfer contacts 313 suitably mounted'on the typewriter. Upper and lower stationary blades 3" and 312 are arranged at opposite sides of the movable blade 333 and .carry, respectively, contact points 313 and 314.'

The inherent resiliency of the blade 333 normally holds the latter in position where it enages the contact point 313 to hold closed a cir- The lever 33| is formedwhen the lever 33l isthus moved' cam unit 336 in the shifted position and the latter holds the contact point 314 closed and the contact point 313 open. When the carriage returns to the point for beginning a new line of typing and the toggle is broken by the arm 362, the cam unit 336 returns to its normal position, shown in the drawings, and the blade 363 moves to open contact point 314 and to close the contact point 313. The purpose of the transfer contacts mechanically operated in the manner just explained by the cam unit 336 will be described presently.

, Fig. 18 of the drawings, shows a portion of the rack bar 366 which is mounted on the typewriter carriage 228 and with the right hand marginal stop 316 mounted thereon and formed with a rearward extension 311 adapted to operatively engage a contact operating lever 318 when the typewriter carriage reaches a preselectedletter space position determined by the position of the stop 311 (see also Fig. 8). In Fig. 18, the stop 316 and the direction of movement of the carriage and bar 366 is reversed with respect to Fig. 1'1, because Fig. 18 shows the parts as they appear when viewed from the back of the typewriter. The contact operating lever 318 is pivotally supported by a stud 319 projecting from the rear fixed 7 part 388 of the typewriter and normally remains in the position shown in Fig. 18. The marginal stop 316 is shown in the position it occupies just as the extension 311 engages the lever 318 to move it clockwise. Thelever 318 is formed with a central projection 38! which normally rests on an upper movable spring blade 382 of a set of normally open contacts suitably mounted on the typewriter. The set of contacts also comprise an intermediate movable spring blade 383 normally held in the position shown, and a lower stationary blade 384. The upper blade 382 is provided with a contact 385 on its under side, the intermediate blade with contacts 386 and 381 on opposite sides thereof, and the lower blade with a contact 388 on its upper side.

As stated, the rack bar 366 and right-hand marginal stop 316 are shown in the position'they occupy just before closure of the contacts. A typing of another letter or the spacing of the carriage, will resultin the movement of the rack bar one space and the consequent movement of the blade 382 a distance sufficient to close contacts 385- and-386. The typing of a second letter or the actuation of the typewriter space bar will move the "carriage an additional space which will effect the movement of both the blades 382 and 383 to engage also contacts 381 and 388'and will thereby eflect an electrical connection between all pf the contacts. The circuits controlled by the contacts just described provide for the automatic return of the carriage at any selected point and'will be presently described. As will presently appear, the apparatus disclosed herein provides for the control of the carriage return either from the record tape by energizing the solenoid as a resultoi sensing a selected code designation recorded in the tape, or carriage return may be efiected by energizing the solenoid 331 as a result of the closure of the automatic of typing. Also, the right-hand marginal stop 318 (see Figs. 17 and 18) can be adjusted to fix the end of the line of typing at any desired point when automatic margin control is desired, or the stop 316 can be moved out of the way when it is desired that the right-hand margin be controlled by a carriage return code designation in the tape.

Referring now to the wiring diagram shown in Figs. 19:: and 19b, it is noted that all of the electrical instrumentalities and circuit wires located within the reader 188 are shown diagrammatically in Fig. 19d, and this includes the relay translator mechanism previously referred to herein; and all of the electrical instrumentalities and circuit wires carried by the typewriter are shown in Fig. 19b. For the purposes of simplicity, the

, circuit wires of the r ader which are connected,

margin control contacts 385, 386, 381, and 388 U desired letter space position to begin a new line respectively, by the individual wires within the cable RT (Fig. 1) with corresponding circuit wires in the typewriter areshown as terminating at the right-hand margin of Fig. 190. in plug socket connections, designated, respectively as RI toR56,inclusive. The corresponding circuit wires in the typewriter terminate at the left-hand margin of Fig. 19b in plug socket connections TI to T56, inclusive. It is to be assumed that the plug sockets Rl to R56 are connected, respectively, to the plug sockets TI to T56, inclusive, by the individual cable wires.

As stated above, the relay translator mechanism comprises the series of relays MI to M6, inclusive, which, during each cycle of operation of the reader, are energized singly or in combination, as a result of the sensing of code hole designations in the record tape. The relay translator shown is a well known mechanism which, in response to the selective energization of its relay magnets in the manner just stated, sets up a number of circuit paths corresponding, respectively, to the code designations sensed. The relays Ml to M6, inclusive, control, respectively, the operation of one or more related transfer contacts which during each sensing cycle will be transferred, or left at normal position, so that the contacts may be connected in combinational series to establish the just mentioned circuit paths. As shown, the armature of relay Ml operates a pair of contacts Ml-l; the armature of relay M2 operates two pairs of contacts M2--l and M2-2; the armature of relay M3 operates four pairs of contacts M3| to M3-4, inclusive; the armature of relay M4 operates eight contacts M4l to M4-8, inclusive; the armature of relay M5 operates sixteen contacts M5| to M5l6, inclusive; and the armature of relay M6 operates thirty-two contacts M6l to M6-32, inclusive. These various relay controlled contacts are shown in their upper or normal position, which is the position they occupy when their related operating relays are deenergized. When any translator relay is energized, all of its related contacts transfer to the lower position.

In Fig. 19b the plug socket connections Ti to T48, inclusive, are shown as connected, respectively, by individual circuit wires with the solenoids which operate the character and functional key levers of the typewriter previously described. A legend appears adjacent each solenoid indicatlng'the typewriter character or function corresponding thereto.

In Figs. 19a and 19b, all switches, solenoids relays, contacts and associated parts are shown in the positions they normally occupy with no tape under the sensing gate 2| (Fig. 1) and with both power switches 24 and 224 in open position. A source of 110 v. alternating current is indicated in Fig. 19a by the lead wires 400 and 40l.

As stated previously, both the reader motor RM and the typewriter motor TM are operated when either the power switch 24 or the power switch 224 is in closed position. One side of the motor RM is permanently connected to the lead 400, and also one side of the motor TM is permanently connected to the lead 490 by awire 402, plug socket connections R56 and T56, wire 403, and wire 404. Upon closing of switch 24, the other side of the motor RM is connected thereby to the other AG supply lead 40! by a wire 406, and the other side of the motor TM is connected to the supply lead 40l by a wire 409, plug socket connections R50 and T50 and wire 405. The closure of the switch 24 also energizes a rectifier transformer 406, one side of the primary being permanently connected to the supply lead 400, and the other side being connected by a wire 401 with the wire 408. g

With one side of the motors RM and TM and transformer 406 being permanently connected to the lead 400 in the manner Just explained, the closing of switch 224 also energizes the motors RM and TM and the transformer 406 as follows: from wire 40l, wire 4i0, plug socket connections R55 and T55, wire 4| l, the switch 224, a wire 4I2, wire M3, and wire 405, to the other side of the motor TM; and through wire 405, plug socket connections T50 and R50, the wires 409 and 408, to the other side of motor RM and by wire 401 to the other side of the prima y of transformer 406.

With the transformer 406 energized in the manner Just explained, alternating current is supplied to the input terminals of the rectifier H5. The positive and negative DC output terminals of rectifier 4 I 5 are connected, respectively, to the D. C. bus 6 and to the D. C.

bus M1. The coil of reader relay 420 is connected bywire'42l with the bus 4l6 and by a wire 422 with the bus 1, so that as long as the rectifier is supplied with alternating current, the relay 420 remains energized. When the latter is energized, the armature 423 thereof connects the bus 411 to each of wires "I, 432, 433,434, 435and 43-6, which are, respectively, connected to the return sides of the six translator relays Ml toM6, inclusive.

With a record tape properly positioned under the gate 2| in the reader, the contacts 96 are closed by the pin 94 and the apparatus is ready for successively reading and transcribing the code designations in the tape onto the record sheet 22l in the typewriter. The tape sensing and feeding operation is started by depressing either the reader start switch 25 or the typewriter start 225. The reader start switch 25 is provided with two pairs of spring blade contacts 440, and I, respectively, the-contacts 440 being normally open and being closed upon depressing the start switch and the contacts '4 being normally closed, and being opened when the start switch 25 is depressed. The movable one of the normally open contacts 440 is connected by a wire 442, with the D. C. bus 6. When contacts 440 are closed by depressing switch 25, direct current will flow from the bus 6 through the wire 442, contacts 440, a wire 443, plug socket connections R53 and T53, a wire 444, the normally closed insert switch 221, a wire 445,, plug socket connections TBI and RN, 9. wire 446, normally closed pick-up con-; tacts 441 of a master control relay 448, a wire 446 to one side of a main coil 450 of such relay;

thereby opens the pick-up contacts 441 and" closes a pair of holding contacts 453, the latter being connected directly to the bus 4" by a wire 454. The contacts 441 and 453 are of the overlapping type, that is, the holding contacts 453 make before the pick-up contacts 441 break.- With the holding contacts 453 closed, direct current will flow through the holding circuit for the main coil 450 which is traced as follows: from the bus 6, through the wire 454, contacts 453, wire 443 to the coil 450; and, from the latter, through the wire "I, contacts 86 and wire 452, to the bus 4".

Contacts 455 also close when master control relay 448 is energized; and when the start switch 25 is released, the contacts 4 thereof again close and an energizing circuit for the clutch magnet CM is thereby established, which is traced as follows: from the D. C. bus4l6 through the plug socket connections R54 and T54, a wire 456, a wire 451, normally closed contacts 313 which are under the control ofthe carriage return cam unit 336, a wire 458, normally closed contacts 326 which are under the control of the tab lever 3I9, wire 459, the normally closed contacts 460 of the typewriter start switch 225, wire 4'6l, plug socket connections T52 and A52, wire 462, the now closed contacts 455 of the master control relay 448, a wire 463, the now closed contacts 441 of start switch 25', wire 464, the clutch magnet CM, and from the latter through a wire 465, wire 45I, the now closed contacts 98, and

wire 452, to the bus 1. The circuit just traced is hereinafter referred to as the clutch magnet circuit, and it i noted that such circuit can be broken by the opening of either the contacts 455, the contacts 313, or the contacts 326. With the clutch magnet CM energized, the operating shaft 35 of the reader is connected by the clutch 31 to the power shaft 3| and the successive tape feeding and sensing operations will begin in the manner fully explained hereinbefore.

The typewriter start switch 225 is connected in parallel with the start switch 25, and the operation of the apparatus may be started by depressing and releasing theswitch 225 in the same manneras Just described in connection with the switch 25. As shown, the switch 2251s provided with two pairs of spring blade contacts which are the normally closed contacts 460 mentioned above,

and a normally open pair of contacts 451. One, contact of the pair of'contacts 461 is permathe wire 445, plug socketconnections TH and R5l pick-up contacts 441 of the master control relay, wire 449, coil 450, wire 45!, contacts 96, and wire 452. Thus, ,with the apparatus at rest, by depressing the switch 225 to close the contacts 461. and open the contacts 460, a flow path for direct current is established through the pick-up contacts ,441 and coil 450 of the master control relay 448, which, when energized, will close the holding contacts 453 and remain energized by the circuitpreviouslyftraced. When the start switch 225 is released, contacts 460 are closed, which establishes the energizing circuit for the clutch magnet CM through the now closed contacts 455 or the master control relay, which circuit was also traced above.

As described previously herein, when the reader shaft 35 commences to rotate, due to the energizing of the clutch magnet CM and the resulting engagement of clutch 31, the tape I is first spaced to move a record field into sensing position which is directly above the sensing pins SI to S8, inclusive, and the field is sensed by the pins to determine the code hole designation therein. As an example, let it be assumed that the record field being sensed bears the code hole designation for the letter character Y," which, as shown in Fig. 20, comprises code holes in positions I, 3, and 5. As shown in Fig. 7, and as previously explained, the sensing of the code hole designation for the letter Y" will result in the sensing pins SI, S3, and S moving upward through the code holes in the tape to close contacts CI, C3, and 05, respectively. The contacts C, C3, and C5 will close at approximately 130 of the revolution of shaft 35 and will remain closed until 325, and the D. C. common contacts I04 are closed by the cam I02 at 142 and are opened again at 311. With the contacts CI, C3, and C5 closed, and with the D. C. common contacts I04 closed, direct current will fiow from the D. C. bus 6 through contacts I04, the contacts CI, 03, and C5 in parallel, and through wires "I, 413, and 415 to translator relay magnets MI, M3, and M5, respectively, and from the latter through wires 43I, 433, and 435, respectively, to the D. C. bus 1. With the relay magnets MI, M3, and M5 energized, their related contacts are transferred to the lower position. As the relays M2, M4, and M6 remain deenergized, their related transfer contacts will remain in their normal upper position.

With the transfer contacts of the translator in the position Just stated, and when the cam I06 on the reader shaft 35 closes the A. C. common contacts I08 at 170 of the revolution, alternating current will flow through the circuit path established by the translator contacts to the solenoid 241 controlling the key lever for the letter Y on the typewriter, and, thereby, effect -the operation of the related type bar in the manner previously explained. The established circuit path is traceable as follows: from the A. C. supply lead 400, a wire 411, contacts I08 now closed, a wire 418, contacts MI-I in the lower position, a, wire 419, contacts M22 in the position shown, a wire 480, contacts M33' in the lower position, a wire 48I, contacts M46 in the position shown, a wire 482, contacts M5-II in the lower position, a wire 483, contacts M6-22 in the position shown, a wire 484, the plug socket connections R33 and T33, a wire 485, solenoid 241 for actuating the key lever corresponding to the letter character "Y, a wire 486, and if the power switch 24 is closed, through the wires 4 I3 and 405, plug socketconnections T50 and R50, the wire 409, switch 24 to the A. C. supply wire I. If instead, the switch 224 is closed, the circuit will include the wire 4I2, switch 224, wire 4| I, plug socket T55 and R55, and wire 4I0.

As long as the clutch magnet CM remains energized, and the contacts 93 are closed by the tape III at the reading station 20, the cycles of'operation of the apparatus will be repeated. During eachsuch cycle of operation, the tape will first be spaced to bring the .new record field into sensing position, and such record field will then be sensed to determine the code designation therein in the manner previously described. I! the field sensed bears a character code designation, a spaced code designation, a shift code designation or a shift release code designation, the translator relays will be operated to establish an A. C. circuit path through the related solenoids to actuate the related key lever in the same manner asjust explained in connection with the sensing ,of the code designation for the letter character Y." 1

Provision is made herein for stopping the tape I feeding and sensing operation when the code designation sensed is that corresponding to a carriage return, a, back spacing or a tabulating operation, so that the typewriter will have time to complete such functional operations. Just as soon as these functional operations are completed, the tape feeding and sensing operation is automatically resumed so that a minimum of 7 time is lost.

When the carriage return code designation is sensed, the sensing pin S4 closes contact C4, which, when the D. C. common contacts I04 are closed by the cam I02, provides for the flow of direct current through the translator relay M4, and thereby moves its related transfer contacts to the lower position; and, when the A. C. common contacts I08 are closed, alternating current will fiow through an established circuit path including the translator relay contacts and the carriage return solenoid 331, to effect the return of the carriage in the manner previously described. This A. C. circuit path is traced as follows: from the supply line 400, through the wire 411, contacts I08, wire 418, contacts MI-I in the position shown, contacts M2--I in the position shown, contacts M3-I in the position shown, contacts M4I in the lower position, contacts M5-2 in the position shown, contacts M6-3 in the position shown, wire 488, plug socket connection R4 and T4, wire 489, switch 490, the carriage return solenoid 331, wire 491, wire 492, plug socket connections T49 and R49, to one input terminal of a rectifier 493, and from the other input terminal of the rectifier through wire 409, power switch 24 to the A. C. supply wire 40I. If the power switch 224 be closed, instead of switch 24, the A. C. supply wire 40!. will be connected to the aforesaid other input terminal of the rectifier 493 by the wire 0, plug sockets R55 and T55, wire H I, switch 224, wires H2, H3, and 405,and plug sockets T50 and R50.

The D. C. positive output terminal of the rectifier 493 is connected by a wire 494 with a pair of contacts 495 01' the master control relay 448- which are now closed as the relay 448 isenergized, and a wire 496 connects the contacts 495 with one side of a bucking coil 491 of the relay 448, and the other side of the bucking coil 491 is connected by a wire 498 with the D. C. negative outputterminal of the rectifier 493. The bucking coil 491 is wound in the opposite direction to the main coil 450 and when alternating currentis supplied .to the rectifier 493 by the above traced A. C. circuit path established due to the sensing 01' a carriage return code designation, the bucking coil 491 is energized by the D. C. circuit just traced, and the coil 491 is of suificient strength to overcome the effect of main coil 450 and thereby cause the master control relay to drop out and open contacts 453, 455, and 495, and close again pickup contacts 441. This will open the holdin cir cuit for coil 450, and will also open the circuit holding the clutch magnet CM energized. The

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Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2448842A (en) * 1945-06-09 1948-09-07 Ibm Record-controlled printing apparatus
US2453781A (en) * 1946-06-14 1948-11-16 Addressograph Multigraph Record controlled operating mechanism for embossing machine keyboards
US2461451A (en) * 1945-04-19 1949-02-08 Ibm Signal-controlled printing apparatus
US2464608A (en) * 1946-01-24 1949-03-15 Ibm Record controlled printing apparatus
US2477011A (en) * 1945-03-26 1949-07-26 John A Skinner Record controlled printing apparatus
US2503647A (en) * 1947-05-02 1950-04-11 Homer W Young Phototypographic composing machine having electromagnetic spacing means
US2543435A (en) * 1945-12-29 1951-02-27 Gorton George Machine Co Record forming, translating and printing apparatus, and automatic control mechanisms therefor
US2543935A (en) * 1946-01-24 1951-03-06 Ibm Record controlled recording apparatus
US2605879A (en) * 1947-09-26 1952-08-05 William F O'halloran Automatic typewriter
US2646733A (en) * 1947-12-20 1953-07-28 Howard B Ackerman Record-actuated photocomposing machine
US2700446A (en) * 1950-10-13 1955-01-25 Commerical Controls Corp Tape controlled typewriter
US2704596A (en) * 1955-03-22 ackell
US2704595A (en) * 1955-03-22 ackell
US2717686A (en) * 1952-11-05 1955-09-13 Ibm Word writing typewriter
US2765038A (en) * 1953-12-07 1956-10-02 Powers Samas Account Mach Ltd Machines for punching record cards
US2769379A (en) * 1952-05-22 1956-11-06 Time Inc Character positioning mechanism
US2790362A (en) * 1946-12-26 1957-04-30 Graphic Arts Res Foundation In Photo composing machine
US2831410A (en) * 1950-10-09 1958-04-22 Lester M Walden Equipment for type setting
US2845123A (en) * 1955-01-17 1958-07-29 Bessie F Murchison Perforator device
US2854118A (en) * 1956-04-30 1958-09-30 Commercial Controls Corp Control system for tape readers
US2854117A (en) * 1955-05-17 1958-09-30 Anthony A Berlinsky Automatic stencil cutter
US2859817A (en) * 1956-04-30 1958-11-11 Commercial Controls Corp Generation of line feed signals in tape punch equipment
US2860756A (en) * 1952-03-31 1958-11-18 Sperry Rand Corp Information translating apparatus
US2883187A (en) * 1953-05-22 1959-04-21 Time Inc High speed tape reader mechanism
US2911086A (en) * 1954-08-25 1959-11-03 Fairchild Camera Instr Co Tape controlled embossing machine
US3082670A (en) * 1957-09-25 1963-03-26 American Type Founders Co Inc Typesetting system and apparatus
US3136886A (en) * 1960-05-25 1964-06-09 Shell Oil Co Graphical readout system for records
US3217854A (en) * 1960-11-26 1965-11-16 Olympia Werke Ag Capital-shift mechanism for code printer
US3501747A (en) * 1965-07-08 1970-03-17 Intern Systems Inc Code conversion system

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2704595A (en) * 1955-03-22 ackell
US2704596A (en) * 1955-03-22 ackell
US2477011A (en) * 1945-03-26 1949-07-26 John A Skinner Record controlled printing apparatus
US2461451A (en) * 1945-04-19 1949-02-08 Ibm Signal-controlled printing apparatus
US2448842A (en) * 1945-06-09 1948-09-07 Ibm Record-controlled printing apparatus
US2543435A (en) * 1945-12-29 1951-02-27 Gorton George Machine Co Record forming, translating and printing apparatus, and automatic control mechanisms therefor
US2464608A (en) * 1946-01-24 1949-03-15 Ibm Record controlled printing apparatus
US2543935A (en) * 1946-01-24 1951-03-06 Ibm Record controlled recording apparatus
US2453781A (en) * 1946-06-14 1948-11-16 Addressograph Multigraph Record controlled operating mechanism for embossing machine keyboards
US2790362A (en) * 1946-12-26 1957-04-30 Graphic Arts Res Foundation In Photo composing machine
US2503647A (en) * 1947-05-02 1950-04-11 Homer W Young Phototypographic composing machine having electromagnetic spacing means
US2605879A (en) * 1947-09-26 1952-08-05 William F O'halloran Automatic typewriter
US2646733A (en) * 1947-12-20 1953-07-28 Howard B Ackerman Record-actuated photocomposing machine
US2831410A (en) * 1950-10-09 1958-04-22 Lester M Walden Equipment for type setting
US2700446A (en) * 1950-10-13 1955-01-25 Commerical Controls Corp Tape controlled typewriter
US2860756A (en) * 1952-03-31 1958-11-18 Sperry Rand Corp Information translating apparatus
US2769379A (en) * 1952-05-22 1956-11-06 Time Inc Character positioning mechanism
US2717686A (en) * 1952-11-05 1955-09-13 Ibm Word writing typewriter
US2883187A (en) * 1953-05-22 1959-04-21 Time Inc High speed tape reader mechanism
US2765038A (en) * 1953-12-07 1956-10-02 Powers Samas Account Mach Ltd Machines for punching record cards
US2911086A (en) * 1954-08-25 1959-11-03 Fairchild Camera Instr Co Tape controlled embossing machine
US2845123A (en) * 1955-01-17 1958-07-29 Bessie F Murchison Perforator device
US2854117A (en) * 1955-05-17 1958-09-30 Anthony A Berlinsky Automatic stencil cutter
US2859817A (en) * 1956-04-30 1958-11-11 Commercial Controls Corp Generation of line feed signals in tape punch equipment
US2854118A (en) * 1956-04-30 1958-09-30 Commercial Controls Corp Control system for tape readers
US3082670A (en) * 1957-09-25 1963-03-26 American Type Founders Co Inc Typesetting system and apparatus
US3136886A (en) * 1960-05-25 1964-06-09 Shell Oil Co Graphical readout system for records
US3217854A (en) * 1960-11-26 1965-11-16 Olympia Werke Ag Capital-shift mechanism for code printer
US3501747A (en) * 1965-07-08 1970-03-17 Intern Systems Inc Code conversion system

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