US2377602A - Carton - Google Patents

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Publication number
US2377602A
US2377602A US500467A US50046743A US2377602A US 2377602 A US2377602 A US 2377602A US 500467 A US500467 A US 500467A US 50046743 A US50046743 A US 50046743A US 2377602 A US2377602 A US 2377602A
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United States
Prior art keywords
tube
supporting
filler
container
carton
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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US500467A
Inventor
Belden Perry
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National Union Radio Corp
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National Union Radio Corp
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Publication date
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Priority to US500467A priority Critical patent/US2377602A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/44Integral, inserted or attached portions forming internal or external fittings
    • B65D5/50Internal supporting or protecting elements for contents
    • B65D5/5028Elements formed separately from the container body
    • B65D5/5035Paper elements
    • B65D5/5059Paper panels presenting one or more openings or recesses in wich at least a part of the contents are located
    • B65D5/5061Paper panels presenting one or more openings or recesses in wich at least a part of the contents are located the openings or recesses being located in different panels of a single blank
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/44Integral, inserted or attached portions forming internal or external fittings
    • B65D5/50Internal supporting or protecting elements for contents
    • B65D5/5028Elements formed separately from the container body
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D85/00Containers, packaging elements or packages, specially adapted for particular articles or materials
    • B65D85/30Containers, packaging elements or packages, specially adapted for particular articles or materials for articles particularly sensitive to damage by shock or pressure
    • B65D85/42Containers, packaging elements or packages, specially adapted for particular articles or materials for articles particularly sensitive to damage by shock or pressure for ampoules; for lamp bulbs; for electronic valves or tubes

Description

P. BELDEN CARTON Filed Aug. 30, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 l -q 0 0 rlNVEN TOR Jerr Be 1 22/ ATTORNEY is securely suspended within the carton so as not to engage Or contact the side walls or ends thereof.
Patented June 5, 1945 UNITED STATES a a a r 2,377,602
2,377,602 CARTON Perry Belden, Lansdale, Pa.,-,assignor to National Union Radio CorporatiomNewark, N. J., a corporation of Delaware Application August 30, 1943, Serial No. 500,467 9 Claims. (01.2294) The present invention relates to a carton having an outer and an inner member, more particu-. larly to the construction of the inner or supporting member which carries the contained article. According to thepackaging of electron devices, suchas radio receiving and transmitting tubes, cathode ray tubes, etc, as well as incandescent lamps, it is common practice to have such fragile articles supported within some form of a, paper receptacle, the supporting means varying with the type of device as well as the form of container used. Irrespective of the type of device, the packaging thereof must be of such a nature that the device Atthe same time it is necessary to provide a certain degree of resiliency capable of absorbing ordinary shocks and jars which the device is subject to in transit or under dispensing conditions. In attempting to meet these requirements various types of packaging material arepresently in use but they are not generally characterized by simplicity of construction. The number and complexity of parts not only increase the cost of the materials used, but also the labor involved in assembling the parts during packaging.
It is anobject of the present invention to provide a simple and inexpensive cartonpreferably 1 consisting of an outside container having an inner filler member designed to suspend the device free from the side walls and ends of the carton.
Another objectis to provide a carton having an inner filler stamped from a single blank piece of packing material, which blank is suitably scored for folding purposes to provide corners,
spacing sections, and supporting portions, some of which have reinforcing means, so that the packaged article may be firmly suspended in a resilient manner.
A special object, of the invention is the provision of a carton embodying an outer container and an inner filler, the latter having die cut openi ings or apertures so related to each other that the tube is held in axial alignment with the carton.
A special feature of construction of the invention is the provision of die-cut apertures which are adapted. to accommodate a tube device having different diameters, suchas a cathode ray tube, and designed to lock the tube in axial alignment with the carton but out of contact therei with except at the points of support afforded by the tube engaging the apertures. This feature of construction involves the provision of apertures having different geometrical shapes so as to afiord the proper supporting contact with the contour of the envelope of "the device at its point of support. v
Other objects will manifest themselvesas the descriptionproceeds.
Referring'to the accompanying drawings: Fig. 1 is a vertical cross-sectional view of a completely assembled package embodyingthe invention as appliedto a carton designed for a cathode raytube, thetube being shown. in elevation;
Fig. 2 is a perspective view, partly in section,
showing the member; I
Fig, 3 is an extended view or development of assembled or folded inner filler the innerfiller member;
Fig. 4 is aview similar to Fig. 2, showing a' modification of the filler member; i 4 Fig. 5is a perspective view, partly in section with certain parts broken away to more clearly illustrate the construction;
Fig. 6 is a diagram showing the resolution of thebending moment of diiferent pointsof s'upport ofthe tube; and Fig. '1 is a diagram showing theoretically the supporting points of a cathode ray tube and the relationship of the supporting sections comprising the inner fillermember.
Although, as mentioned above, my carton is adaptable to the packaging of different types of fragile electrical devices, I have chosen to illustrate the inventionas applied to a cathode ray tube. As is well known, this type of tube has considerable variation in bulb structures: respecting length, contour and size of a given bulb. It
is, therefore, more of a problemto provide a simple inner filler'm'ember which may be characterizedby standard construction, yet, at the same time, capable of modification to accommodate readily such variations in bulb structures. These features will become manifest by reference to the accompanying drawings.
The cartonillustrated, particularly in Figs. 1 to 3, may comprise an outer container il having side walls 2 and cut-out closing end flaps 3, the general contour of the container-being tubular. An inner supporting filler member referred to generally by the reference character 4 is of a telescopic form and may comprise a one-piece blank 5 of paperboard, such as corrugated board. The blank 5 is provided with score lines 6, which form corners in bending and the spacing of the score lines 6 are such as to form sections having For example, section 1 com- Succeeding the supporting wall I is a transverse supporting platform 8 provided with a circular.- aperture 9, the center of which coincides with the longitudinal axis of the container I. Following the platform 8 is a spacing'member I l. It will be observed that the width of the transverse supporting platform 8 is the same asthe inner .widtha of the container I and when the spacing section II is folded along its upper score line, itdepends' downwardly adistance-sufficient; to afford proper spacing for the succeedingsection- I2 which constitutes an oblique or diagonal. portion. Theoretically, the angle of inclination of the. diagonal. member I2 should be 45 degrees or slightly thereunder, as will be explainedina theoretical-discussion to follow. The diagonal section I2 hasan oblong or elliptical shaped aperture I3-.. It will be noted. that the minor axis or the elliptical aperture corresponds toth'e: diameter of the neck. of the cathode ray tube: Hl and the. apertures 9 and I3 have a common axis when the filler member 4- is telescoped within the container I. t
In order'to" strengthenthe transverse supporting member 8, each of the outer edges thereof is provided; with a wing- I5, adapted tofold upwardly so as to form a reinforcing strut member. For the same reason; i. e., to affordreinforcement, the diagonal sect-ion I2. is similarly providedwith strut members Ill, adapted tofold downwardly. To augment the reinforcing effect of. the wing members II], the top edges thereof are out on an angle so as to. abut against the. inner side. wall of the container I. (See Fig.1.) The inclination of the diagonal section: Ills-preferably such that the. lowerend thereof engages. the opposite supportingwall I ofthe/filler 4, ate. pointso as to reduce the bending moment of thecentrallsection of the tube to a minimum between its supports. This feature will.- be presently explained theoretically.
Succeeding the diagonal section I2, is another spacing section I6. The width of this spacing section is such that when it is folded along its score lines, it will produce a corner for atransverse section I1, which corner rest on the-bottom of the container I, thus giving support to the superstructure, and is held trom displacement by the free end: of the transverse. section I1 extending to the opposite side wall of.the container I. j
Although one skilled'dntheart could; by a more or less simple cut and try: method, determine thedesirable width of the spacing members II and I6, and alsothe-optimuminclination of. the diagonal member. I22, theoretically, these factors may be determined roughly by a simple mathematical calculation oranalysis. In other words, it is desirable to know approximately the correct location of the elliptical aperture relative to the tube I4, and also relative to the container I, and the best angle under which this support should be set.
v between its points, of support.
its weight equally distributed. The two points of suspension of the tube is the circular aperture 9 and the elliptical or oblong aperture I3. The bending moment of the center portion of the tube I4, 1. e., the portion between these two support-' ing points, reaches a maximum at the center. This maximum should be kept as low as possible. Fig. 6 shows diagrammatically the bending moment as a. function of its-location. The central portion of this diagram has the shape of a parabola I8 reaching its maximum value at the center of the tube. This maximum bending moment is equal to EEG): 4. 2 l
W is the weight of the supported tube, 1 is the length of. the tube and c is the distance of the support from each end of the tube.
It will be noted that the two outer sections, those extending. beyond the. supports have a bending. moment which-reaches its maximum at the point of support. The diagram of the bending moment. of. this. section. is also shapedlikea. parabola. I. 9. Increasing the bending. momentat the point of. support. decreasing. the bending mo.- ment. at the centrand vice versa. .Bothbending moments. willbethe smallest. if they are equal to eachother.- Setting thesetwo bendin moments equal, we can find. the ratio betweenv 0 audi We now have some points in order todiscuss the. bending. problem generally involved. Of course a cathode. ray tube is never. entirely cylindrical and obviously itsJweight. distribution is not the one of our theoretical. assumption, but
one can readily see that the supports have to be. located ratherclose. to the ends of. the tube. Asthe base SectiOn. isdefinitely heavier than. the upper tubular section of a. cathode. ray tube, it
willbe necessary to. makev 0. even. smaller than one-fifthof thetotal length.-
Thewide differences between. the shape of various. types of cathode ray tubes. makes itv impossible to calculate, generally,.more accurately how. and where the supporting pointsfor thetube should bev placed,,but it.is.obvious.1that in those tubes in. which they portion supported near the screen is ,cylindricaL. the. lower. down. the transverse supporting sectionlshouldv be. located from the screen, because. otherwise up tothe. point where the. tube becomes conical. inshape; there I is. little if any weight carried. by the transverse supporting: platform. It isalso obvious that'the diagonal section II should be spaced .low enough that the oblong. or. elliptical aperture I3. therein engages the straight. portionof theneck of the tube, i. e., below the conical section.
Fig. 7 illustrates. somewhat graphically, the theoretical positioning of the tube as explained above. Variations thereof will be produced. by variations in the contour of. the tube suspended A simplified modification of the supporting filler. member. 4,.isshownin Fig.4.. In thisfigure,
choice or selection of the kind timeQadmit air which causes early failure of the tube. To protect the top or-screen portion of the tube M, as well as assist in holding it firmly in place, a suitable packing serted, preferably in the form of a layer and characterized by its resiliency. An example of such a material is sold under the trade name of Kimpack.
adhesive material, as is customarily the practice. In the foregoing description, and inthe claims, I have referred to the material from which the carton is made as paperboard and by this term, I mean to include, as generallyunderstood in the trade, all forms of board, such as chip, corrugated, and substitutes therefor, such as fibre. A
of paperboard employed will vary with the typeof electrical device packaged as well as the size and weight thereof. For example, in the case of incandescent electric lamps, a much lighter material may be employed than is required in the packing of large size cathode ray tubes, and although I do not claim specifically any particularmaterial, I wish it understood that my invention in its broadest aspects contemplates the use of a variety of suitable material for the container and filler members.
Modifications in the construction of my carton will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art,
a but it is my intention to cover all such modifications as come Within th claims.
What is claimed is:
l. A carton for tubes and the like comprising an outer tubular member having side walls and cut-out closing end flaps, an inner member telescoping within the outer member and consisting of a scored blank adapted to form a series of sections when folded along the score lines, certain of said sections forming side walls and other sections forming supporting means for the contained device, one of said supporting sections being transscope of the appended material may be inmember contiguous with the "lower end of the diagonal section and extending to the bottomof theputer container, and a folded end section for retaining the adjacentspacing section in engagement with the supporting side wall portion, said supporting transverse and diagonal sections be-- ing provided with apertures, said apertures being in axial alignment with the axis of the outer memberand having different geometrical shapes to providethe proper supporting contacts with the contour of the envelope of the device at its To seal the carton, the closing end flaps 3 are folded over and held in place by a strip of versely arranged and another diagonally arranged when the inner member is telescoped within the outer member, said supporting sections extending substantially the inner width of the outer container, apertures provided in said supporting transverse and diagonal sections respectively, said apertures being in axial alignment with the axis of the outer member and having different geometrical shapes to provide the proper supporting contacts with the contour ofthe envelope of the device at its points of support, whereby a multipoint suspension is provided for the device.
2. A carton for tubes and the like comprising an outer container having side walls and cut-out closing end flaps, an inner supporting filler consisting of a scored blank adapted to form sections when folded along the score lines, one of said sections constituting a supporting wall substantially the length of the container, the adjacent wall constituting an upper transverse supporting platform, another of said walls constituting a spacing means folded downwardly at right angle to the supportwall portion, whereby the -axis of a circular points of support. i i r 3. A carton for tubes and the like comprising an outer container member having side walls and cut-out closing end flaps, an inner supporting filler member of a telescopic form and consisting of a scored blank adapted to form a series of sections when folded along the score lines, one of said sections constituting a supporting Wall and extending substantially the full length of the outer member when the filler member is telescoped therein, a second section adjacent to said wall section constituting an upper transverse supporting platform, a third section constituting a spacing member folded downwardly at substantially right angle to the supporting platform, a fourth section formed by diagonally folding the blank portion constituting the same so that the lower end thereof abuts against the supporting wall section, a second spacing member contiguous with the lower end of the diagonal section and extending to the bottomof the outer container, a folded transverse section for retaining the adjacent spacing section in engagement with the opposing side contained article is firmly held within the outer container when inserted therein.
4. The construction claimed in claim 3, wherein the inner filler member has die-cut apertures formed therein, one of said aperturesbei'ng made in the transverse platform section of the filler, and another aperture being formed in the diagonal section, said apertures being in axial alignment and adapted to frictionally engage the contacting surfaces of the tube supported therebetween.
5. The construction claimed in claim 3, wherein the inner filler member has die-cut apertures, one of said apertures being circular and. formed in the upper transverse platform section of the filler, and another of said apertures being elliptical and formed in the diagonal section, said apertures being in axial alignment and adapted to frictioanlly engage the contacting surfaces of the tube supported therebetween.
6. The construction claimed in claim 3, wherein the section constituting the transverse supporting platform and the diagonally folded section are each provided with laterally extending reinforcing wing members.
7. The construction claimed in claim 3, wherein the relationship between the inclination of the diagonally folded'section and the Width of the spacing members is such that an elliptical aperture formed in the diagonal section is inclined-at an angle of approximately 45 degrees, and the axis of said aperture is in alignment with the aperture formed in the transverse supporting platform, the points of support afforded the contained article by said apertures being determined by substantially equalizing the bending moments at the points of suspension with the bending moment at the center of the supported article.
8. The construction claimed in claim 3, whereinst the supportingside wall, a second spacing irrthejnner. filler member has die-cut apertures, one of said apertures being circular andiormed in theupper-transverse platform section of the filler, the diameter of thecircular aperture corresponding to the diameter of an optimum conical section of the contained tube, and another of said apertures. being elliptical and formed in the diagonal section of the filler, the minor axis of the elliptical aperture corresponding to the diameter of the neck of the tube, said apertures having a common axis when the inner supporting filler is telescoped within the outer container.
9. The construction claimed in claim 3, Wherein thediagonally folded.v sectionis inclined at an angle of approximately 45 degrees to. the axis of the o'utercontainer member,. and the, points of suspension of the contained article are constituted by an elliptical aperture formed in thediagonal section and. a. circular aperture formed in the upper transverse platform section, the location of these points/0f support being determined by substantially equalizing the bending moments thereof with the bending moment at the center of the tube. 1 v t PERRY'BELDEN.-
US500467A 1943-08-30 1943-08-30 Carton Expired - Lifetime US2377602A (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2516124A (en) * 1946-02-27 1950-07-25 Charles O Kishibay Shipping carton for sensitive electrical instruments
US2656090A (en) * 1947-09-10 1953-10-20 Marcia C Hamblet Nonspill powder container
US2691441A (en) * 1951-05-19 1954-10-12 Charles A Wilkinson Container for fragile cookies or the like
US2703973A (en) * 1950-02-07 1955-03-15 Henry J Fawcett Clothing impregnator apparatus having vaporizing means therein
US2739705A (en) * 1953-09-24 1956-03-27 Highland Container Company Inc Yarn packaging pad and shipping container using same
US3240417A (en) * 1963-11-18 1966-03-15 Robert F Andreini Carton for fragile articles
US3948388A (en) * 1971-01-25 1976-04-06 American Can Company Frame-like holder for articles
EP0716985A1 (en) * 1994-10-21 1996-06-19 Lg Electronics Inc. Packaging for microwave-oven parts
FR2737474A3 (en) * 1995-07-31 1997-02-07 Smurfit Socar Sa Packaging carton insert for bottle - has semi-rigid corrugated cardboard panels with connecting folds and apertures for bottle

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2516124A (en) * 1946-02-27 1950-07-25 Charles O Kishibay Shipping carton for sensitive electrical instruments
US2656090A (en) * 1947-09-10 1953-10-20 Marcia C Hamblet Nonspill powder container
US2703973A (en) * 1950-02-07 1955-03-15 Henry J Fawcett Clothing impregnator apparatus having vaporizing means therein
US2691441A (en) * 1951-05-19 1954-10-12 Charles A Wilkinson Container for fragile cookies or the like
US2739705A (en) * 1953-09-24 1956-03-27 Highland Container Company Inc Yarn packaging pad and shipping container using same
US3240417A (en) * 1963-11-18 1966-03-15 Robert F Andreini Carton for fragile articles
US3948388A (en) * 1971-01-25 1976-04-06 American Can Company Frame-like holder for articles
EP0716985A1 (en) * 1994-10-21 1996-06-19 Lg Electronics Inc. Packaging for microwave-oven parts
CN1059167C (en) * 1994-10-21 2000-12-06 Lg电子株式会社 Packing apparatus for contents of microwave
FR2737474A3 (en) * 1995-07-31 1997-02-07 Smurfit Socar Sa Packaging carton insert for bottle - has semi-rigid corrugated cardboard panels with connecting folds and apertures for bottle

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