US2308119A - Radiator construction - Google Patents

Radiator construction Download PDF

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Publication number
US2308119A
US2308119A US320401A US32040140A US2308119A US 2308119 A US2308119 A US 2308119A US 320401 A US320401 A US 320401A US 32040140 A US32040140 A US 32040140A US 2308119 A US2308119 A US 2308119A
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United States
Prior art keywords
radiator
expansion
headers
core sections
portions
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Expired - Lifetime
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US320401A
Inventor
Spieth Benjamin
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Modine Manufacturing Co
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Modine Manufacturing Co
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Publication date
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Priority to US320401A priority Critical patent/US2308119A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F9/00Casings; Header boxes; Auxiliary supports for elements; Auxiliary members within casings
    • F28F9/26Arrangements for connecting different sections of heat-exchange elements, e.g. of radiators
    • F28F9/262Arrangements for connecting different sections of heat-exchange elements, e.g. of radiators for radiators
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D1/00Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators
    • F28D1/02Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid
    • F28D1/04Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits
    • F28D1/053Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits the conduits being straight
    • F28D1/0535Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits the conduits being straight the conduits having a non-circular cross-section
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S165/00Heat exchange
    • Y10S165/051Heat exchange having expansion and contraction relieving or absorbing means
    • Y10S165/052Heat exchange having expansion and contraction relieving or absorbing means for cylindrical heat exchanger
    • Y10S165/053Flexible or movable header or header element

Description

Jan. 12, 1943. B. SPIETH RADIATOR CONSTRUCTION 2 shets-sheet 1 led Feb. 23, 1940 "fizz @7202 529259295,

Filed Feb. 23, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet'Z Patented Jan. 12, 1943 RADIATOR CONSTRUCTION Benjamin Spieth, Racine, Wis.,

assignor to Modine Manufacturing Company, Racine, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Application February 23, 1940, Serial N0. 320,401

6 Claims.

This invention relates to radiator construction, and particularly to the construction of radiator units and the use of expansion headers adapted to compensate for the expansion and construction of radiator cores forming a part of said units and employed in a fluid cooling system commonly associated with water jacketed engines such, for example, as internal combustion engines.

In some types of radiators, the top and bottom tanks are rigidly secured in relatively fixed position with respect to each other, and the connecting core sections, in some radiators are of considerabie length, sometimes as much as five feet or more.

The fluid conducting tubes of these cores or radiating sections are ordinarily made of copper, which has a relatively high degree of thermal expansion, and since the fluid passing through the radiator is hot, the tubes, particularly in the long cores, expand longitudinally to a considerable extent, while the distance between the top and bottom tanks to which the cores are connected remains the same, or fixed.

Heretofore, it has been the custom and practice to rely upon the flexibility of the tube plates of a header to compensate for longitudinal expansion of the tubes employed in systems of the character described. In the use of such an arrangement on radiator sections of considerable length, the distortion of the tube plates caused by the longitudinal expansion of the radiator tubes would be so great that the tube plates, and joints of the tubes and plates wouid be ruptured and cause leakage in the system.

One object, therefore, of the present invention is to provide efficient means to compensate for this expansion, in a manner to relieve the radiator structure of undue strains and stresses, and to avoid the possible rupture of joints and parts thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide an expansion header construction suitably positioned with reference to the core for relieving the core structure from excessive strains due to the expansion of parts thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel elongated tubular radiator unit of efiicient heat radiating capacity, and having novel means associated therewith to compensate for the expansion of the tubes of the radiator structure.

Another object of the invention is to provide an elongated radiator unit comprising a plurality of aligned connected core sections having expansion headers associated therewith, and having means for retaining the core sections in substantial alignment.

A further object of the invention is to provide a radiator construction wherein fluid conducting radiator core units are employed, and wherein novel means are provided for retaining the units in proper position, and for securing an intermediate portion thereof to the radiator frame.

A still further object of the invention is to improve devices of the character described in sundry details hereinafter referred to and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

One embodiment of the present invention is shown for illustrative purposes in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a radiator structure embodying features of the present invention and illustrating the application of my improved radiator unit thereto;

Fig. 2 is a sectional elevational view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 1, and taken substantially as indicated by the line 2-2 thereof;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged front elevational view partly in section of my improved radiator unit, portions of the figure being broken away to facilitate the showing of the structure on a larger scale;

Fig. 4 is a side elevational View partly in section of the structure illustrated in Fig. 3, and taken substantially as indicated by the line 44 thereof Fig. 5 is a further enlarged fragmentary sectional elevational View, taken substantially as indicated by the lines 55 of Figs. 4 and 6, respectively; and

Fig. 6 is a plan sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 5, and taken substantially as indicated by the line 6-6 thereof.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the type of radiator illustrated in the accompanying drawings comprises top and bottom tanks II and I2 respectively, adapted to be connected through conduits i3 and M of the respective tanks to the water jacket of an internal combustion engine or the like, (not shown), the tanks II and I2 being connected together in relatively fixed position by means of vertically disposed rigid side frame members l5 and it connected together adjacent their central portion by a transversely disposed frame member l1 shown, in the present instance, as of angular cross section, as clearly illustrated in Figs. 2 and 4.

For connecting the tanks H and I2, and for passing the fluid from one to the other thereof, a plurality of elongated, relatively slender radiator units of improved construction, indicated as a whole and respectively by the numeral l8, are operatively connected to the respective tanks of the radiator structure, as clearly illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, 3. and 4.

As shown in Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive, of the drawings, my improved radiator unit comprises upper and lower hollow header castings l9 and 2|, respectively, adapted to be rigidly secured to the respective top and bottom tanks H and I2 by means of bolts 22 extending through the header castings and tanks, and having gaskets 23 associated therewith to provide a water-tight connection therebetween.

Positioned between the upper and lower header castings l9 and 2| are a plurality or pair of elongated, vertically disposed, longitudinally spaced, upper and lower core sections indicated, as a whole and respectively, by the numerals 24 and 25 and comprising header plates 26 adjacent their outer end portions operatively connected, by soldering or other suitable means, to the respective upper and lower header castings l9 and 2|, respectively, the opposite or inner end portions of the respective core sections being provided with expansion headers indicated, as a whole, by the numeral 21 and including header or tube plates 28 operatively connected to the header plates 25 by a plurality of tubes 29 having cooling fins 3| mounted thereon.

Each of the expansion headers 21 includes a flexible diaphragm portion or member 32 formed, preferably, of copper-nickel or other suitable flexible material, and operatively connected by soldering or other suitable means to the adjacent header or tube plates 28.

Positioned between the expansion headers 21 of the respective core sections 24 and 25 is a supporting bracket indicated, as a whole, by the numeral 33 having an opening 34 formed therein adjacent the central portion thereof, for receiving a sleeve or connecting member 35 adapted to be secured therein by brazing, or other suitable means, and connected adjacent its respective end portions to the diaphragm members 32 of the expansion headers 21 operatively related to the inner end portions of the core sections 24 and 25, respectively.

For retaining the core sections 24 and 25 and the supporting bracket 33 in substantial alignment, a plurality of elongated, relatively broad, shallow channel members 36 are positioned adjacent the respective sides of the core sections 24 and 25 and secured adjacent their respective outer and inner end portions, by spot-welding or the like, to the header plates 26 and the supporting bracket 33, as indicated at 31 in Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6, thereby providing also, suitable guides for the headers 21 in their movement vertically due to the expansion and contraction of the tubes 29.

For securing the respective radiator units and the respective supporting brackets 33, operatively related thereto, in proper relative position with respect to each other and with respect to the radiator frame, each of the supporting brackets 33 is provided on its respective outer sides with elongated, horizontally disposed recesses or grooves 38, as clearly illustrated in Figs. 3 and 5, the grooves of the respective brackets being positioned adjacent the grooves of an adjacent bracket and adapted to receive bolts 39 extending through a portion of the transversely disposed frame member l1 in a manner to secure the brackets 33 rigidly to the radiator frame,

as clearly illustrated in Figs. 2, 3, and 4 of the drawings.

As previously stated, the upper and lower tanks II and I2 and the header castings l9 and 2| connected thereto are secured in relatively fixed position with respect to each other by the side frame members 15 and iii of the radiator structure, and that the tubular members 29 of the core sections 24 and 25 are ordinarily made of copper or other suitable heat conducting material, which has a relatively high degree of thermal expansion, and since the fluid passing through the radiator and cores thereof is hot, the tubes 29, particularly in long cores, will expand to a considerable extent, which, without providing means to compensate for this expansion, would place the cores under extreme strains and stresses, possibly to the extent of breaking or rupturing joints or parts of the core structure sufficient to produce leaks therein.

It will be noted, however, by reference particularly to Fig. 5, that by reason of the flexible diaphragms 32 of the respective expansion headers 21, the expansion of the tubes 29 when sufliciently heated will cause a bodily movement of the tube plates 28, and cause the diaphragms 32 to flex in the manner shown, and to occupy a position substantially as indicated by dotted lines 32a in Fig. 5, and thereby relieve the core structure from the stresses and strains due to such expansion, and that upon cooling of the fluid in the radiator units, the material of the tubes 23 may contract and, owing to the flexibility of the diaphragms 32, the expansion headers 21 may assume their normal position, such expansion and contraction of the tubes 29 being accomplished without damage to the core structure.

It will be apparent also, that by reason of the arrangement of the guide members 36 adjacent the expansion headers 21, the tube plate portions 28 of the headers, in the present instance, may slide between the members 33 when the headers are moved vertically, as the tub-es 29 expand and contract under the influence of the heat of the water passing through the tubes.

It will be observed from the foregoing description that the present invention provides a radiator of efficient heat radiating capacity having novel means associated therewith to compensate for the expansion of tubes forming a part of the radiator structure, and wherein novel means are provided for retaining the core sections of the radiators units in substantial alignment, and for retaining the units in proper position with respect to each other and to the radiator frame.

Obviously, the present invention is not limited to the precise construction and arrangement shown and described as the same may be variously modified. Moreover, all the features of the invention need not be used conjointly as the same may be used to advantage in variously differerit combinations and sub-combinations.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a radiator unit and in combination, a pair of hollow header castings, a pair of elongated longitudinally spaced core sections positioned between and operatively connected adjacent their respective outer end portions to said header castings, expansion headers operatively connected to the respective inner end portions of said core sections, a supporting bracket having an opening therein positioned between said expansion headers, and a sleeve secured in said opening and communicating at its respective ends with said headers.

2. In a radiator unit and in combination, a pair of hollow header castings, a pair of aligned elongated longitudinally spaced core sections positioned between and operatively connected adjacent their respective outer end portions to said header castings, expansion headers operatively connected to the respsective adjacent inner end portions of said core sections, a supporting bracket having an opening therein positioned between said expansion headers, a sleeve secured in said opening and communicating at its respective ends with said headers, and means connected to said header castings for maintaining said core sections in alignment.

3. In a radiator unit and in combination, a pair of upper and lower hollow header castings adapted to be connected to and to communicate with relatively fixed top and bottom tanks, respectively, of a fluid circulating system, a pair of aligned elongated longitudinally spaced core sections positioned between and communicating adjacent their respective outer end portions with said header castings, expansion headers operatively connected to the respective adjacent inner end portions of said core sections, a supporting bracket having an opening therein positioned between said expansion headers, a sleeve secured in said opening and communicating at its respective ends with said headers, and means connected to said header castings and said bracket for maintaining said core sections in alignment.

4. In a radiator of a fluid circulating system and in combination, a pair of upper and lower tanks, substantially rigid frame members connected thereto for securing said tanks in relatively fixed position, a pair of vertically aligned elongated longitudinally spaced core sections positioned between and communicating adjacent their respective outer end portions with said tanks, expansion headers operatively connected to the respective inner end portions of said core sections, a supporting bracket having an opening therein and positioned between said expansion headers, a sleeve secured in said opening and communicating at its respective ends with said headers, respectively, said bracket having horizontally disposed elongated recesses formed in opposite side portions thereof, and bolts positioned in said recesses and operatively related to said bracket and a portion of said frame for se curing the bracket thereto.

5. In a radiator of a fluid circulating system and in combination, a pair of upper and lower tanks, substantially rigid frame members for securing said tanks in relatively fixed position, a pair of hollow header castings rigidly secured to and communcating, respectively, with said tanks, a pair of vertically aligned elongated longitudinally spaced core sections positioned between and communicating adjacent their respective outer end portions with said header castings, expansion headers operatively connected to the respective inner end portions of said core sections, said headers having diaphragm portions forming a part thereof, a supporting bracket having an openng therein and positioned between said expansion headers, a sleeve secured in said opening and connected at its respective ends to the respective diaphragm portions of said headers, said bracket having horizontally disposed elongated recesses formed in opposite side positions thereof, and bolts positioned in said recesses and operatively related to said bracket and a portion of said frame for securing the bracket thereto.

6. In a radiator unit and in combination, a pair of hollow header castings, a pair of elongated longitudinally spaced core sections including fluid conducting tubes operatively connected adjacent their respective outer end portions to said header castings, a pair of expansion headers positioned between the adjacent inner ends of said core sections, said expansion headers having tube plates at one side of the respective headers, said plates being operatively connected, respectively, to the inner end portions of the tubes of the respective core sections, flexible diaphragms forming a part of the respective headers at the opposite sides thereof from said tube plates, and tubular means connecting said diaphragm to provide communication between said headers.

BENJANIIN SPIETH.

US320401A 1940-02-23 1940-02-23 Radiator construction Expired - Lifetime US2308119A (en)

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2434988A (en) * 1943-09-25 1948-01-27 Young Radiator Co Heat exchange core and air duct
US2995342A (en) * 1956-10-18 1961-08-08 Frank J Quattrini Tank for sectional type radiators
US3246691A (en) * 1963-11-27 1966-04-19 Fedders Corp Radiators
US4005746A (en) * 1975-08-22 1977-02-01 Young Radiator Company Sectional heat exchanger
US4441547A (en) * 1981-01-05 1984-04-10 Borg-Warner Corporation Radiator mounting fittings
US4741392A (en) * 1988-02-05 1988-05-03 Modine Manufacturing Company Sectional core radiator
US5097891A (en) * 1990-10-05 1992-03-24 Paccar Inc. Parallel core charge air cooler
EP0519615A1 (en) * 1991-06-20 1992-12-23 Modine Manufacturing Company Modular heat exchanger
US20040250988A1 (en) * 2003-05-16 2004-12-16 Norbert Machanek Heat exchanger block
US20060137855A1 (en) * 2004-12-23 2006-06-29 Behr Gmbh & Co. Kg Brazed in place heat exchanger core window and method of making same
US20060151157A1 (en) * 2003-03-18 2006-07-13 Behr Gmbh & Co., Kg Collecting vat, heat exchanger and method for producing a collecting vat
US20080121387A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2008-05-29 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Heat Exchanger and Method of Producing the Same
US20110226222A1 (en) * 2010-03-18 2011-09-22 Raduenz Dan R Heat exchanger and method of manufacturing the same
US8631859B1 (en) * 2008-11-03 2014-01-21 Vista-Pro Automotive, Llc Modular heat exchanger
US9309839B2 (en) 2010-03-18 2016-04-12 Modine Manufacturing Company Heat exchanger and method of manufacturing the same
US20180038651A1 (en) * 2015-02-18 2018-02-08 Dana Canada Corporation Stacked plate heat exchanger with top and bottom manifolds
US20190277571A1 (en) * 2018-03-07 2019-09-12 United Technologies Corporation Ganged plate stack in cast plate fin heat exchanger

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2434988A (en) * 1943-09-25 1948-01-27 Young Radiator Co Heat exchange core and air duct
US2995342A (en) * 1956-10-18 1961-08-08 Frank J Quattrini Tank for sectional type radiators
US3246691A (en) * 1963-11-27 1966-04-19 Fedders Corp Radiators
US4005746A (en) * 1975-08-22 1977-02-01 Young Radiator Company Sectional heat exchanger
US4441547A (en) * 1981-01-05 1984-04-10 Borg-Warner Corporation Radiator mounting fittings
US4741392A (en) * 1988-02-05 1988-05-03 Modine Manufacturing Company Sectional core radiator
US5097891A (en) * 1990-10-05 1992-03-24 Paccar Inc. Parallel core charge air cooler
EP0519615A1 (en) * 1991-06-20 1992-12-23 Modine Manufacturing Company Modular heat exchanger
US20060151157A1 (en) * 2003-03-18 2006-07-13 Behr Gmbh & Co., Kg Collecting vat, heat exchanger and method for producing a collecting vat
US20040250988A1 (en) * 2003-05-16 2004-12-16 Norbert Machanek Heat exchanger block
US8061410B2 (en) * 2003-05-16 2011-11-22 Modine Manufacturing Company Heat exchanger block
US20080121387A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2008-05-29 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Heat Exchanger and Method of Producing the Same
US20060137855A1 (en) * 2004-12-23 2006-06-29 Behr Gmbh & Co. Kg Brazed in place heat exchanger core window and method of making same
US8631859B1 (en) * 2008-11-03 2014-01-21 Vista-Pro Automotive, Llc Modular heat exchanger
US20110226222A1 (en) * 2010-03-18 2011-09-22 Raduenz Dan R Heat exchanger and method of manufacturing the same
US8844504B2 (en) 2010-03-18 2014-09-30 Modine Manufacturing Company Heat exchanger and method of manufacturing the same
US9309839B2 (en) 2010-03-18 2016-04-12 Modine Manufacturing Company Heat exchanger and method of manufacturing the same
US20180038651A1 (en) * 2015-02-18 2018-02-08 Dana Canada Corporation Stacked plate heat exchanger with top and bottom manifolds
US10429132B2 (en) * 2015-02-18 2019-10-01 Dana Canada Corporation Stacked plate heat exchanger with top and bottom manifolds
US20190277571A1 (en) * 2018-03-07 2019-09-12 United Technologies Corporation Ganged plate stack in cast plate fin heat exchanger

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