US2285905A - Apparatus for forming fuel charges for internal combustion engines - Google Patents

Apparatus for forming fuel charges for internal combustion engines Download PDF

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US2285905A
US2285905A US328760A US32876040A US2285905A US 2285905 A US2285905 A US 2285905A US 328760 A US328760 A US 328760A US 32876040 A US32876040 A US 32876040A US 2285905 A US2285905 A US 2285905A
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fuel
chamber
pipe
intake pipe
pressure
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US328760A
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Kenneth M Cunningham
Santomartino Antonio
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FUELMASTER Inc
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FUELMASTER Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M7/00Carburettors with means for influencing, e.g. enriching or keeping constant, fuel/air ratio of charge under varying conditions
    • F02M7/06Means for enriching charge on sudden air throttle opening, i.e. at acceleration, e.g. storage means in passage way system
    • F02M7/08Means for enriching charge on sudden air throttle opening, i.e. at acceleration, e.g. storage means in passage way system using pumps

Description

June 9, 1942. K. M. CUNNINGHAM ETAL APPARATUS FOR FORMING FUEL CHARGES FOR INTERNAL lCOMBUSTIONENGINES Filed April 9, 1940 .3 Sheets-Sheet 1 74 65 l 46 e5 v /Z 0 J @a 4Z 47 72 86 W7/ a9 l 45 4 6062 45 JO /9 6l g4 y 495@ 69 i 20 1L 5 5/ .95 Z/ 56,4 25

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June 9, 1942. K. M. CUNNINGHAM x-:TAL 2,285,905

APARATUS FOR FORMING FUEL CHARGES FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES v Filed April 9, 1940 3 Sheets-Shea?l 2 June 9, 1942. K, M. CUNNINGHAM ETAL 2,285,905

APPARATUS FOR FORMING FUEL ICHARGES FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 3.8. U5 /ZJ Patented June 9, 1942 APPARATUS FOR FORMING FUEL CHARGES FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES Kenneth M. Cunningham, Decatur, and Antonio Santomartino, Chicago, Ill., assignors to Fuelmaster, Inc., a corporation of Illinois Application April 9, 1940, Serial No. 328,760

21 claims.

This invention relates to apparatus for form-f ing fuel charges for internal combustion engines.

A further object is to provide an apparatus for forming fuel charges for internal combustion engines having means for gasifying volatile liquid fuel such as gasoline and to supply the gasiiied fuel to a stream of air moving into the engine whereby greatly increased power and a substantial reduction in fuel consumption is effected.

A further object is to provide an apparatus of this character wherein the flow of the gasified fuel is readily and accurately controlled to provide the necessary engine speed and power.

A further object is to provide a novel apparatusrof the character referred to wherein the flow of gasifled fuel into the intake manifold is controlled by the throttle through a suitable control valve mechanism, and wherein the sup` plyi-ng of the fuel to such valve mechanism is controlled automatically by a pressure' control valve so as to render a supply of gasified fuel constantly available under uniform pressure conditions to the control valve mechanism.

VOther objects and advantages of' the invention will become apparent during the course of the following description. f

In the drawings we have shown two embodiments of the invention. In this showing:

Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view through the apparatus showing its connection with the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, parts being broken away and parts being shown in elevation,

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view showing the fuel supply control valve system,

Figure 3 is an enlarged detail sectional view of the pressure control valve taken on line 3 3 of Figure l,

Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view through a portion of a modified form of the device showing the fuel gasifying means, parts being shown in elevation,

Figure 5 is a side elevation of the same,

Figure 6 is a vertical sectional view on line 6 6 of Figure 4,

Figure 7 is an enlarged vertical sectional view on line I-l of Figure 4, and,

Figure 8 is a detail sectional view on line 3-8 of Figure '7.

Referring to Figure 1, the numeral I designates a conventional carburetor, the air inlet of which is provided with an air cleaner I I. The

Acarburetor has beenvonly generally indicated in or the like I1.

Figure 1 since it forms no part per se of the ed to be connected by a three-way valve I4 to a main supply pipe I5 leading from the fuel pump of the motor vehicle or any other source of fuel supply. 'I'he valve I4 may be operated in any suitable manner and in Figure 1 it has been shown as being provided with a manually operable arm I6 movable by a rod, Bowden wire The third connection of the valve I4 leads to a pipe I8 for a purpose to be described. The air inlet of the carburetor is flanged as at I9 and such flange is usually connected to a flange 2li carried by the upper end of a pipe 2| secured to the intake manifold 22, it being apparent that the device as shown in Figure 1 is thus connected to a down-draft fuel supply device. A portion of the present mechanism to be described is introduced between the flanges I9 and 20. The pipe 2I is provided with the usual throttle 23 suitably operated in any desired manner.

The apparatus forming the subject matter of the present invention comprises a fuel gasiiier indicated as a whole by the numeral 24. 'Ihe gasiiier comprises an outer shell 25 and an inner shell 26 spaced Yfrom the outer shell preferably at least at its bottom and around its sides. A pipe 21 is connectedV to the exhaust manifold (not shown) of the engine to supply hot exhaust gases to the heating space 29 between the inner and outer shells 25 and 26. Adjacent the upper end of the shell 25 a pipe 30 is connected into the shell 25 to communicate with the heating chamber 29, the pipe 30 leading to a muiiler 3| or to any other means for disposing of the exhaust gases.

The pipe I8 leads to a float chamber 32 having a float 33 therein controlling a conventional needle valve 34. The fioat chamber 32 communicates with the interior oi' the shell 26 through a pipe 35. It will be obvious that the float 33 operates to maintain liquid fuel at a constant level in the shell 26, for example, at the level shown in Figure 1 and indicated by the numeral 36. 'I'he float chamber is provided with a top 31 which must be sealed to the atmosphere inview of the generation of pressure in the shell 26 as will be described.

Referring to Figures 1, 2 and 3, it will be noted that the principal operating parts of the mechanism are associated with a cast body indicated as a whole by the numeral 38. One end of the body 38 is provided with a passage 39 extending through a downturned end 40 on the body 38 and communicating with the interior of the shell `26 to receive gasied fuel therefrom. A small by a diaphragm 44 secured in position by a hollow plug 45 having an upwardly extending internally` threaded collar 46. A compression spring 41 urges the'diaphragm 44 downwardly and has its upper end seated within a hollow cap 48 threaded in the collar 46.

In axial alignment with the chamber 43 the with and projecting upwardly from the wall 63.

The arm 16 carries a depending stem 18 the l of a port 8| which is adapted to establish com-vv munication between the chambers 62 and 12.v

.municates with a chamber 43 -closed at its top body 38 is provided with a vertical passage 49 the end seated in a cap 53. The valve 5| is provided with a depending stem 54 slidable in a guide 55 formed in the cap 53. Gas flows downwardly from the chamber 43 through passages 56 on opposite sides of the portion of the body 38 in which the passages 49 and 50 are arranged, as shown in Figure 3, the gas flowing from the spaces 56 into the passage 49 under the control of the-valve 5|, A disk 51 is connected to the diaphragm 44 and is provided with depending arms 58 extending downwardly through the spaces or passages 56 to engage the valve 5|. 'I'he springs 41 and 52 oppose each other and the spring 51 normally retains the valve 5| in slightly open position, the position of the valve depending upon the pressure in the chamber 43, as will become apparent.

'I'he passage 50 supplies gas from the pressure regulator valve to a fuel regulator carried by the body 38 and indicated as a whole by the numeral 59. The fuel regulator is shown in detail in Figure 2 and reference is made to such figure. The passage 50 leads to a relatively large chamber 60 closed at its top by a diaphragm 6| above which is a chamber 62 formed by the diaphragm 6| and by a wall 63 integral with a preferably cast body 64. The diaphragm 6| carries a valve stem 65 having a valve 66 at its lower end engageable with a valve seat 61 formed at the upper end of a fuel passage 68. The passage 68 communicates with a fuel outlet chamber 69 formed in the body 38.

Pressure in the chamber 60 influences the position of the diaphragm 6| and hence the valve 66, and this pressure is communicated to the chamber 62 through a bleed orifice 10 formed in the stem 65. A leaf spring 1| is carriedl by the stem and engages the wall 63 to tend to urge the valve 66 toward closed position.

Above the Wall 63 a chamber 12 is formed in the body 64 and is closed at its top by a diaphragm 13 secured in position by a cap 14.

`'Ihe diaphragm 13 is provided with a stern 15 to which is rigidly connected a resilient arm 16 adapted to fulcrum on a knife edge 11 :integral The cap 14 is provided with a chamber 82 therebeneath and the pressures in this chamber and the chamber 12 control the position of the diaphragm 13. The cap 14 is provided with a port 83 from which a pipe 84 (Figure 1) leads to the intake pipe of the carburetor. Pressure variations in the latter pipe incident to resistance to air passing through the air cleaner Il will be duplicated in the chamber 82, as will be apparent.

The main body 38 and body 64, and cap 14 are provided with a passage 85 the lower end of which communicates wlthvthe chamber 69. A port 86 in the body 64 communicates between the chamber 12 and the' passage 85. The upper end of the passage is adapted to communicate with a port 81 under the control of a manually adjustable valve 88. The port 81 is connected to one end of an idler tube 89, the other end of which communicates as at 90 (Figure l) with the pipe 2| adjacent the throttle 23 to be influenced by vacuum in the intake manifold when the throttle is in idling position.

As previously stated, the flanges I9 and 20 (Figure 1) are conventionally secured together. With the use of the present construction, however, these flanges are separated and one end of the body 38 is inserted between and secured to these flanges, Such end of the body 38 is provided with a passage 9| therethrough forming a direct connection between the pipe 2| and the intake pipe of the carburetor. This passage communicates with a chamber 92 adjacent the chamber 69 and separated therefrom by a wall 93. This wall is provided with an opening 94 controlled by a manually adjustable fuel load control valve 95.

A somewhat different form of the invention is shown in Figures 4 to 8 inclusive, the difference lying particularly in the gas generating apparatus. In the form of the invention previously described, the mechanism is provided with a gas generator adapted to be connected to a conventional exhaust manifold. In the form of the invention shown in Figures 4 to 8 inclusive, a special exhaust manifold is employed with the gas generator built thereinto as an integral part thereof. Referring to Figures 4 to '1 inclusive the numeral 96 designates a preferably cast body as a whole, the lower portion of which is elongated horizontally as at 91 to form a heating chamber 98 which forms the exhaust manifold for the internal combustion engine, this chamber being adapted for connection through openings 99 with the exhaust ports of the engine. One end of the chamber 98 communicates with a preferably integral outlet pipe |00 which is adapted for connection with the usual muler (not shown).

A chamber |0I is arranged within and spaced from all sides of the casing 91. The chamber |0| is preferably formed integral with the casing 91 being spaced from and supported with respect to the casing 91 by integrally cast connecting bars |02. The chamber |0| generally follows the shape of the casing 91 except that the chamber |0| is provided with downward extensions |03 between adjacent pairs of inlet openings 99, and a similar downward extension cent and parallel to the cover plate |06. This pipe turns inwardly at its ends as at |08 for connection with nozzles extending into the interior of the chamber adjacent the ends thereof, the approximate positions of these nozzles being" indicated by the dotted lines in Figure 4. The nozzles |09 are adapted to inject liquid fuel in spray form into the 4interior of the chamber |0| to be converted into gas therein by the heat of the exhaust gases in the chamber 98. Fuel is supplied to the pipe |01 by a pipe I0 connected thereinto by a T (Figure 5).

The form of the invention shown in Figures 4 to 8 inclusive also contemplates the use of a conventional carburetor, to be referred to later, for supplying explosive mixture to the engine until sufficient heat has been generated in the exhaust manifold to gasify fuel within the chamber |0|. A pressure or thermostatically controlled valve mechanism has been illustrated diagrammatically in Figures 5 and 7 and indicated by the numeral ||2. This valve is controlled by an element ||3 extending through the adjacent portion of the exhaust chamber 98 and terminating in a pressure or thermostatically responsive member ||4 arranged Within the chamber |0|. Fuel is supplied to the valve mechanism ||2 through a pipe ||5 leading from the fuel pump to the valve mechanism, adapted to connect the pipes 0 and ||5 when the gas generator is operating after the motor has been running a suflicient length of time. The pipe 5 is preferably provided with a check valve ||5 for a purpose to be described. During initial operation of the engine, the valve mechanism ||2 connects the pipe 5 to a fuel pipe I I6 leading to the conventional carburetor to be referred to.

It has been found that improved results may be obtained by supplying water in atomized form to the heating chamber |0|. To this end, water is supplied through a pipe ||1 by any suitable form of pump indicated diagrammatically by the numeral H8. From the `outlet side of the pump a pipe 9 extends to the cover |06 (Figure 7) for connection with a spray nozzle extending into the heating chamber |0|. This nozzle is preferably connected into the heating chamber |0| centrally of the length thereof and preferably near the bottom of the depending portion |04 of the heating chamber as shown in dotted lines in Figure 4.

The heating chamber |0| is provided in its top and substantially centrally of the length thereof with an outlet duct |2| (Figures 4 and 7) from which gas generated in the chamber |0| is sup- Y plied to a pressure regulatingY valve mechanism indicated as a whole by the numeral |22 and similar to the valve mechanism 42 previously described. The duct 2| communicates with a chamber |23 formed in the body 96 and closed by a diaphragm |24 held in position by a hollow plug |25 threaded into the body 86. A compressing spring |26 urges the diaphragm |24 to the left as viewed in Figure 7, and the outer end of this spring seats in the end of a threaded plu |21, this plug obviously being adjustable Vto adjust the `tension of the spring |26.

In axial alignment with the chamber, |23, the body 96 is provided withra passage |28 communicating with a vertical passage |29. The end of the passage |28 forms a valve seat controllable by a valve |30 urged toward closed position by a spring |3| seating in, a threaded cap |32. The portion of the body 96 in which the passage |28 is formed is provided on opposite sides with spaces |33 (Figure 8) in direct communication with the chamber |23 and communicati-ng through the inner end of the plug |32 with the space to the left of the end of the passage |28 as'viewed in Figures 7 and 8. Thus when the valve |30 is open. gas flows from the chamber |23 through the spaces |33and thence into the passages |28 and |29. The diaphragm |24 is provided with a central disk |35 having parallel arms |36 extending through the spaces |33 to engage the valve |30 to exert the force of the spring |26 thereagainst. The pressure of the spring |26 normally slightly overbalances the pressure of the spring |3|, and upon an increase in pressure in the chamber` |23, the pressure moves the diaphragm |24 toward the right as viewed in Figures 7 and 8 to permit the spring |3| to move the valve |30 toward its closed position. Conversely, a drop in pressure in the chamber |23 permits the spring |26 to move the valve 30 away from closed position, thus controlling the supply of gas to the passage |28.

The passage |29 communicates with a chamber |31 formed in the body 96 and closed at one side by a diaphragm |38. This diaphragm carries a stem |39 to which is connected a valve |40 engageable with a port |4| to control the passage of gas therethrough. The body 96 is provided with a horizontally projecting hollow portion |42 divided by a wall |43 to form chambers |44 and |45, the-valve |40 controlling the passage of gas from the chamber |31 to the chamber |44. 'I'he projection |42 has the chamber |45 thereof communicating with a passage |46 extending through the projection |42. It will be noted that the projection |42 is arranged between and secured to upper and lower sections |41 and |48 of a conventional carburetor, the device being mounted in the same manner as in the form of the invention shown in Figure 1. The upper end |41 of the carburetor is provided with the usual air cleaner |48', while the conventional choke valve |49 and throttle valve |50 are arranged in the respective carburetor sections |41. and |48. The flow of gas from the chamberv 44 into the carburetor and thus into the intake manifold is controlled by a fuel adjusting valve |5| adjustable with respect to an opening |52 formed in the Wall |43.

A preferably4 cast body |53 is secured against the diaphragm |38 and has a chamber |54 formed therein facing toward the diaphragm. The body |53 has the chamber thereof formed by a wall |55 and a leaf spring |56 seats `against this wall and urges the diaphragm |38 and valve 40 toward the left as viewed in Figure 7. The stem |39 of the valve |40 is provided with a bleed passage |51 affording restricted communication between the chambers |31 and |54, this passage corrgsponding to the passage 10 shown in Figure The wall |55 divides the chamber |54 from another chamber |58 formed in the body |53 and the wall |55 ls provided with a restricted passage |59 adapted to afford communication-'between :the chambers |54 and |58. The chamber |58 is covered by a diaphragm |59 carrying a stem |60 to one end of which is connected a spring arm |6|. This arm fulcrums on a projection |62 formed integral with the wall |55 and the other end of the arm |6| carries a small tapered valve |63 controlling the passage |59.

At their upper ends, the bodies 96 and |53 are provided with a passage |10 one end of which communicates with the chamber |58 and the other end of which communicates with the chamber |44. A passage |1| communicates between the passage |10`and a. pipe |12, the other end of which leads to the carburetor intake pipe |48 adjacent the throttle valve |50. Communication between the 'passage |1| and pipe |12 is controlled by an idling adjustment valve |13'.

A cap |13 is secured to the diaphragm |59 and is recessed to form a chamber |14 from which a pipe |15 extends to the carburetor pipe |41 (Figures iA and 5) adjacent the air cleaner |48'. As is true of the chamber 82 (Figure 2) therefore the chamber |14 is subjected to atmospheric pressure except for variations occurring in the carburetor pipe |41 incident to resistance to the flow of air into the carburetor through the i air cleaner.

'Ihe operation of the form of the invention shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3 is as follows:

The'present apparatus, as distinguished from a conventional carburetor does not atomize the fuel to be evaporated by the air passing through the carburetor into the intake manifold, but on the contrary, converts the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the mixing of the fuel with the air, Of course, the apparatus is particularly intended for use with internal combustion engines employing lighter fuels such as gasoline.

Gasication of the liquid fuel takes place in the heating chamber 26 due to the high temperature provided in such chamber by the exhaust gases passing .through the space 29. It will be apparent therefore, that the proper operation of the apparatus depends upon the heating of the chamber 26, and for this reason a conventional carburetor is employed for the starting of the engine and for the running of the engine until the chamber 26 is heated to the point necessary for the gasification of the fuel.

In starting the engine, the valve handle I6 (Figure 1) is swung to the position wherein the pipe |5 will communicate with the pipe |3 to supply fuel to the carburetor I0. The engine is started in the usual manner and carbureted air will pass to the intake manifold of the engine in the usual manner. The level of the fuel in the float chamber (not shown) of the carburetor will practice.

After the engine has been running a suficient buretor float chamber will be substantially more than .is necessary to continue the operation of the engine until gas is supplied to the engine from the chamber 26.

Theiioat 32 controls the height of the liquid approximately at the level indicated by the numeral 36, and the chamber 26 and other elements which are subjected to the maximum gas pressure are constructed to withstand the greatest pressures to which the apparatus will be subjected. The conversion of the liquid fuel into gas will, of course, depend not only on the heat generated in the chamber 26 but also on the pressure present therein. For the heat generated, the pressure within the chamber 26 will rise to the point where there will be no further gasification of fuel except as the fuel is consumed by the engine and when such point is reached,

the rate of gasification will exactly correspond tothe rate of fuel consumption by the engine.

The gas will flow from the chamber 26 through the passage 39 and thence into the chamber 43 of the pressure control valve. Referring to Figure 3, it will be noted that the gas will flow from the chamber 43 downwardly through the spaces 56, thence into the upper end of the cap 53 and 41 will urge the valve 5| downwardly to open it length of time to heat the chamber 26V to the proper point, the valve handle I6 will be manually operated to disconnect the pipe |5 from the pipe I3 and connect the pipe I5' to the pipe |8. Fuel thus will flow into the float chamber 32, and thence through the pipe 35 into the heating chamber 26 where it will be immediately gasii'led to be supplied to the engine. In this connection it will be noted that while the three-way valve disconnects the conventional carburetor from the source of fuel supply prior to the running of the engine on gas from the chamber 26, the quantity of fuel maintained in the conventional carto a degree proportional to the pressure present in the chamber 43. As the pressure builds up in the chamber 43, th'e diaphragm 44 will be forced upwardly againstthe tension of the spring 41-to move the valve 5| closer to the end of the passage 49, thus retarding the ow of gas into such passage as the pressure of the gas increases in the chamber 43.

Thus gas will be supplied at a constant pressure to the control chamber 60 (Figure 2). When the engine is not running, the bleed passage 10 equalizes pressure in the chambers 60 and 62 and the spring 1| holds the valve 66 in closed position. During the running of the engine, partial vacuum' in the intake manifold will be communicated to the chamber 69 (Figure 2) thence through passage and port 86 to the chamber 12. Pressure above the diaphragm 13 will then hold this diaphragm in a depressed or lowered position, thus opening the valve 18 to an extent commensurate with the partial vacuum present in the chamber 12. As the pressure drops in the chamber 12, the valve 19 will be opened to provide a greater degree of communication between the chambers 62 and 12 than is provided between the chambers 60 and 62 through the bleed passage 10, and under such conditions the diaphragm 6| will be moved upwardly to open the valve 66 and admit uid from the chamber 60 to the chamber 69 and thence through the opening 94 (Figure 1) into the intake manifold. It will be obvious that the extent to which the valve 66 opens will depend upon the degree to which pressure drops in the chamber 12 to move the diaphragm 13 downwardly and thus open the valve 19. Some fuel, of course, will flow through the passages 10 and 8| (Figure 2) ini-,0 the chamber 12 and thence through passages 86 and 85 and chamber 69 and opening 94 to be supplied to the intake manifold.

The degree of vacuum in the intake manifold is dependent not only on the rate of piston displacement but also upon resistance offered by the air cleaner to the entrance of air inw the carburetor. Since this is true, it is desirable that the chamber 82 (Figure 2) be not connected directly to the atmosphere. 0n the contrary,

the proper functioning of the diaphragm 13 is better secured by also rendering the pressure in the chamber 82 subject to the resistance ofthe air cleaner For this reason the pipe 84 is connected between the chamber 82 and the carburetor intake adjacent the air cleaner I l.

The pressure above the throttle valve 23 is relatively high when the throttle is in the idling position due to the resistance offeredby such valve to the entrance of air into the intake manifold. Under such conditions the degree of vacuum affecting the diaphragm 13 through the chamber 88, passage 85 and port 88 would be too low to hold the valve 88 in more than a very slightly open position. For this reason the idler pipe 88 is employed. This pipe has one'end connected to the intake pipe adjacent the throttle 28 and accordingly is subjected to a relatively great degree of partial vacuum when the throttle is in idling position.

Under such conditions, apartial vacuum will be established beneath the diaphragm 13 through the pipe 88, passages 81 arid- 85 and port 88, the degree of communication between the passages 85 and 81 being controlled by the manually adjustable valve 88. -As previously stated, there will not be a great drop in pressure in the chamber 88 when the throttle is in idling position, the degree of vacuum not being nearly as great as it is in the pipe 88. Hence the valve 88 is adjusted to control the rate of exhaustion of air from the passage 85 into the pipe 88 to provide the desired degree of partial vacuum in the chamber 12 to open the valve 18 sufficiently to draw gaseous fuel through the passage 10 (Figure 2), chamber 82, passage 8| and into the chamber 12, from which the gas flows through port 86, passages 85 and 81 and idler pipe 88 into the intake manifold. The partial vacuum thus created in the chamber 12 also results in lowering the pressure in'the chamber 82 whereby pressure in the charnber 88 will move the diaphragm 6| upwardly and thus open the valve 86 to a greater extent than would occur if the idling pipe 88 were not used. Accordingly some of the idling fuel is supplied through the port 68.

It will be apparent that the ypresent device need not and preferably does not employ any means for heating the air passing into the intake pipe of the carburetor. In a conventional carburetor gasification of the-fuel is dependent upon evaporation of the atomized fuel in the short space of time required for the fuel and air to pass from the carburetor through the intake manifold and into the engine cylinders. In the present device, the fuel is converted into gaseous form prior to its mixture with the air which supports combustion of the fuel, and accordingly evaporation of the fuel is not depended upon for gasification of the fuel.

The result is that the relatively cool fuel mixture satisfies the volumetric requirements of the engine cylinders which is not true when and if the mixture is heated and expanded, as is well known. Accordingly maximum poweris secured from each. power stroke of each piston of the motor. Moreover, complete gasication and complete mixture of the fuel and air occurs before the fuel reaches the cylinders of the engine 75 been projected from the exhaust outlets as coinpared with the flames projected from the exhaust openings when a conventional carburetor is employed. Actual tests with the apparatus in a testing laboratory have indicated not onlyvery greatly decreased fuel consumption but also an increase of approximately one-third in the power developed by the motor, the test being made in connection with a popular motor vehicle having an eight cylinder engine. It has been found that the mixture of the gaseous fuel wlththe incoming relatively cool air does not result in condensation of 'any of the fuel prior to its entrance into the engine, and accordingly the engine is supplied with a completely gaseous and homogeneous fuel mixture. The only condensation which was found to occur was in the body 38 and particularly in the passage 58. Such difliculty readily was overcome by the simple expedient of heat insulating the body 38.

In the normal operation of the apparatus most of the fuel for idling is supplied through the pipe 88 in the manner stated. When the engine is operating at increased speeds most of the fuel is supplied through the valve opening 88, a relatively small proportion being supplied through the pipe 88. When the engine has stopped, the valve obviously returns to its closed position and the temperature drop in the heating chamber 26 gradually causes the fuel to condense in such chamber. Accordingly some fuel will be in the chamber 26 ready for gasification upon the next starting of the engine, although no initial fuel is needed in view of the foregoing description wherein it was pointed out that initial operation is carried out by the carburetor which is functioning in its normal manner until the chamber 26 is heated. The operation of the valve arm I6 then starts the normal operation of the gas generating means, the fuel being immediately supplied in liquid form to the heating chamber 26 to be converted into gas and supplied to the engine before the fuel is exhausted from the float chamber of the carburetor.

The operation of the form of the invention shown in Figures 4 to 8 inclusive is substantially identical with the operation of the form of the invention described and need not be referred to in detail. Fuel is supplied from the fuel pump to the pipe l I6 and thence to the conventional carburetor during the starting and initial running of the engine. 'I'he element H4 may be either a thermostatically operated or pressure responsive member, as may be desired, and controls the automatic valve mechanism I2. Upon the increasing of the temperature or the pressure to a given point in the chamber |0|, the valve mechanism I|2 will disconnect the pipe ||5 from the pipe ||6 and connect it to the pipe ||8 to supply fuel through the jets |08 (Figures 4 and 6). The atomized fuel is thus supplied to the heating chamber IUI into which heat is radiated by the ns |05. 'I'he chamber is obviously heated by exhaust gases passing from the engine into the chamber 88 through openings 88. 'I'he fuel asit .is gasled is supplied to the chamber |23 (Figure 7) under the pressure generated incident to the gasification of the fuel and the pressure control valve |22 functions in exactly the same manner as the pressure control valve previously described to regulate the `flow of gas through the passage |29. The admission of fuel into the chamber need not be controlled by a float valve such as the float valve mechanism shown in Figure 1 but may be controlled in accordance with the pressure in the chamber |0|. This pressure, when it builds up to a predetermined point blocks the functioning of the conventional fuel pump and prevents such pumpfrom supplying additional fuel except as pressure dropsin the chamber |0|. The check valve ||5' prevents pressure inthe chamber |0| from forcing fuel back through the fuel line I l5.

The use of the nozzle |20 for spraying water into the heating chamber is a` desirable but not necessary adjunct to the apparatus. As is well known, the admission of some water vapor into the intake manifold of`an internal combustionl engine assists combustion in the engine and accordingly it is desirable that such means be employed.

The fuel control valve mechanism which controls the flow of fuel from the passage |29 into the engine functions in exactly the same manner as the corresponding elements in the form of the invention previously described and need not be repeated in detail. vThe position of the diaphragm |38 depends upon relative pressures in the chambers |31 and |54, which pressures, in turn, are dependent upon the area of the bleed passage |51 and the effective area of the passage |59 as determined by the position of the valve |63. With the engine operating at high speed, relatively low pressure will exist in the chamber |44 and consequently in the chamber |58 to open the valve |63 and thus reduce pressure in the chamber |54. Pressure in the chamber |31 will then move the diaphragm |38 to open the valve |40 to the proper extent to admit gas into the chamber |44.

,When the motor is idling, greater pressure will exist in the chambers |44 and|45 but a relatively high vacuum will be present in the intake manifold and consequently in the pipe |12. Air will be drawn from the passage to move the diaphragm |59' and open the valve |63 to admit gas through the bleed passagel |51, chamber |54, passages |59 and |10 and pipe |12 into the intake manifold. The decreased pressure in the chambers |54 and |58 also results in the opening of the valve |40 to a greater extent than otherwise would occur. Thus idling fuel is supplied through the pipe |12 and through the port |4|.

The main adjusting valves 95 (Figure l) and |5| (Figure 7) are adjustable to determine the rate of exhaustion of gas through the ports which they control and also to determine the rate of exhaustion of air through the passages 85 (Figure 2) and |10 (Figure 7) to determine the degree of vacuum in the chambers with which such passages are connected. Similarly, the idling valves 88 (Figure 2) and |13 (Figure 7) determine the rate of exhaustion of air through the ports which they control, thus .determining the rate of flow of fuel into the intake manifold when the engine is idling.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that the present invention contemplates a method of forming fuel charges from volatile liquid fuels of depending upon the flow of air into an intake fuels, such prior methods failing to provide anything approximating perfect combustion because wherein fuel is continuously converted into gas which is fed to a body of air moving into an internal combustion engine whereby a completely gaseous and homogeneous fuel charge is formed. The method therefore eliminates the necessity ofthe incomplete gasification of the fuel. Because of the extremely small time interval existing between the mixing of the gaseous fuel and the air and the entrance of the fuel mixture into the engine, and because of the normal turbulence occurring in the fuel mixture as it flows to theengine, no condensation of fuel occurs. As stated, therefore, the explosive charge reaches each cylinder in completely gaseous form to be perfectly burned. Such fact permits the supplying of relatively cool unheated air into the intake manifold, thus avoiding expansion of the fuel charge and satisfying the full volumetric requirements of the engine. In actual tests, therefore, the present method and apparatus have been found not only to greatly decrease the rate of fuel consumption of a .given engine but also to very materially increase the power developed by the engine.

It is to be understood that the forms of the invention herewith shown and described are to be taken as preferred examples of the same and that various changes in the shape, size and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the subjoined claims. C

We claim:

,1. In combination with the intake pipe of a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus, in which pipe variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, a source of vola-` tile normally liquid fuel, and a carburetor having a feed pipe for connection to said source, and connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasifed fuel to said intake pipe, a chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to,said chamber, means for converting said fuel into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply gasied air-free fuel to said pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means conconnected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasifed fuel to said intake pipe, a chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber, means for converting said fuel into an air free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply air-free gasifed fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means constructed and arranged for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel through said duct into such intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, means constructed and arranged to control the flow of liquid fuel from the fuel source to said chamber at a rate liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe` or to said conduit means.

3. In combination with the intake pipe of a,

gaseous fuel consuming apparatus, in which pipe variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, a source 'of volatile normally liquid fuel, and a carburetor having a feed pipe for connection to said source, and connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, andsupply the gasifled fuel to said intake pipe, a closed chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel under pressure to said chamber, means for heating said chamber to convert fuel therein into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply air-free gasifled fuel toy such pipe to be admixed with air flowing therethrough, means constructed and arranged for controlling the iiow of gaseous fuel through said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in said intake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or tosaid conduit means.

4. In combination with the intake pipe of a gaseous fuel'consuming apparatus, in which pipe variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, a source of volatile normally liquid fuel, and a carburetor having a feed pipe for connection to said source, and connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air toA gasify it, and supply the gasifled fuel to said intake pipe, a closed chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel under pressure to said chamber, means for heating said chamber to convert fuel therein into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply air-free gasified fuel to such pipe to be admixedwith air flowing therethrough, means constructed and arranged for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel through said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in said intake pipe, means responsive to pressures in said chamber andconstructed and larranged to control the flow of liquid fuel from said fuel source to said chamber in accordance with pressures therein, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

5. In combination with the intake pipe of a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus, in which pipe variations in pressure Aoccur in' accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, a source of volatile normally liquid fuel, and a carburetor having a feed pipe for connection to said source, and connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasified fuel to said intake pipe, a chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber, means for heating said chamber to convert fuel therein into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply air-free gasified fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therthrough, a pressure control valve in said duct for controlling the pressure of gas flowing from said chamber, a fiow control mech- A 6. In combination with vthe intake pipe of a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus, in which pipe variations in pressure occur in accordance with yfuel demands ofthe apparatus, a source of volatile normally liquidfuel, and a carburetor having a feed pipe for connection to said source, and connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasified fuel to said intake pipe, a chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber, means for heatingsaid chamber to convert fuel therein into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to'supply air-free gasified fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, a pressure control valve in said duct for controlling the pressure of gas flowing from said chamber, a flow control mechanism in said duct between said pressure control valve and said intake pipe for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel from said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in said intake pipe, means constructed and arranged to control the supply of liquid fuel from thefuel source to said chamber at varying rates in, accordance with pressures in said chamber, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

7. In combination with the intake pipe of a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus, in which pipe variations in pressurel occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, a source of volatile normally liquid fuel. and a carburetor having a feed pipe for connection to said source, and

connectedv to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasifled fuel to said intake pipe, and an exhaust conduit for the passage of products of combustion from the apparatus, a chamber substantially surrounded by a portion of said conduit, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber to be converted into an air-free gas by the heatv of the products of combustion passing through said conduit, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply air-free gasifed fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means constructed and arranged for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel through said duct into said intake pipe at vary rates depending upon pressure conditions in said intake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

8. In combination with the intake pipe of a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus, in which pipe variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, a source of volatile normally liquid fuel, and a carburetor having a feed pipe for connection to said source, and connected to said intake pipe to atomized fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasiiied fuel to said intake pipe, and an exhaust conduit for the passage of products of combustion/from the apparatus at least partially surrounding said exhaust conduit, ,a chamber substantially surrounded by aI portion of said conduit, conduit means for spraying liquid fuel into said chamber to be converted into gas by the heat of the products of A combustion -in said conduit, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply airfree gasifled fuel to such pipe to be mixed with pipe or to said conduit means'.

the flow of gas through said duct into said intake `f pipe, said last named means comprising a flow control mechanism for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel from said duct into said intake pipe at varying rates, depending upon pressure conditions in said intake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

9. In combination with the intake pipe of a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus, in which pipe variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, a source of volatile normally liquid fuel, and a carburetor having a feed pipe for connection to said source, and connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel withair to gasify it, and supply the gasified fuel to said intake pipe, and an exhaust conduit for the passage of products of combustion from the apparatus at least partially surrounding said exhaust conduit, a chamber substantially surrounded by a portion of said conduit, conduit means for` spraying liquid fuel into said chamber to be converted into gas by the heat of the products of combustion in said conduit, a duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply airfree gasiled fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means for controlling the flow of gas through said duct into said intake pipe, said last named means comprising a flow control mechanism for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel from said duct into said intake pipe at varying rates, depending upon pressure conditions in said intake pipe, means for controlling the rate of supply of liquid fuel to said chamber in accordance with pressures generated therein, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

10. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a Y gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasied fuel to said intake pipe,-comprising a chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber, means for converting fuel in said chamber into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake -pipe to supply gasifed fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough,

`means constructed and arranged for controlling the iiow of gaseous fuel through said duct into the intake pipe at vary' rates depending upon pressure conditions in theintake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

11. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasified fuel to said intake pipe, comprising av chamber, conduit means for supplying liquidfuel to said chamber, means for converting fuel in said chamber into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe to supply gasied fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means constructed-and arranged for controlling the ow of gaseous fuel through said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, means constructed and arranged to control intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur' in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it,' and supply the gasiiied fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a closed chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel under pressure to said chamber, means for heating said chamber to convert fuel therein into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe to supply gasied fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air owing therethrough, means constructed d arrangcd'for controlling the flow of gaseo fuel through said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

13. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to vsaid source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasiied fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a closed chamber, conduit means for supplying a liquid fuel under pressure to said chamber, means for heating said chamber to convert fuel therein into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe to supply gasied fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means constructed-and arranged for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel through said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, means responsive to pressuresy in said chamber and constructed and arranged to control the flow of liquid fuel from the fuel source to said chamber in accordance with pressures therein, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

14. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasii'led fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber, means for heating said chamber to convert fuel therein intol an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe to supply gasiiied fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, a pressure control valve in said duct for controlling the pressure of gas flowing from said chamber, a ilow control mechanism in said duct between said pressure control valve and the intake pipe for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel from said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed plpeor to said conduit means.

15. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source. mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasied fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber, means for heating said chamber to convert fuel therein into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe to supply gasiiled fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air fiowing therethrough, a pressure control valve in said duct for controlling the pressure of gas flowing from said chamber, a flow control mechanism in said duct between said pressure control valve and the intake pipe for controlling the iiow of gaseous fuel from said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, means constructed and arranged to control the supply of liquid fuel from said source to said chamber at varying rates in accordance with pressures in said chamber, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

16. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasiiied fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a closed chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber, means for converting fuel in said chamber into an air-free gas, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe to supply gasified` fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means constructed and arranged for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel through said duct into the intake pipe, said last named means comprising a gas control valve for controlling the flow of gas from said duct into the intake pipe, a diaphragm connected to said valve, means for effecting pressure variations on opposite sides of said diaphragm to control the position of said gas control valve and accordingly the rate of ow of gas into the intake pipe in accordance with the demands of the apparatus, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

17. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus,

and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said.source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasifled fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a closed chamber, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel to said chamber, means forconverting fuel in said chamber into an air-free gas, a' duct connecting said chamber to said intake pipe to supply gasiiied fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air owing therethrough, means constructed and arranged for controlling the flow of gaseous fuel through said duct into the intake pipe, said last named means comprising a gas control valve for controlling the ow of gas from said duct into the intake pipe, a diaphragm connected to said valve, means for effecting pressure variations on opposite sides of said diaphragm to control the position of said gas control valve and accordingly the rate of flow of gas into the intake pipe in accordance with the demands of the apparatus, means for controlling the supply of liquid fuel to said chamber in accordance with pressures present therein, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

18. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an exhaust conduit and an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasifled fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a chamber substantially surrounded by a portion of said exhaust conduit, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel from said source to said chamber to be converted into an air-free gas by the heat of the products of combustion passing through said exhaust conduit, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe to supply gasied fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means constructed and arranged for controlling theV flow of gaseous fuel through said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

19. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an exhaust conduit and an intake pipe in which variations in pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasified fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a chamber at least partially surrounded by said exhaust conduit, conduit means for supplying liquid fuel from said source to said chamber to be converted into gas by the heat of the exhaust gases in said exhaust conduit, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe to supply gasifed fuel to such pipe to be mixed with air owing therethrough, a pressure control valve in said duct for controlling the pressure of gas flowing from said chamber, a flow control mechanism in said duct between said pressure control valve and the intake pipe for controlling the :iiow of gaseous fuel from said duct into the intake pipe at varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said conduit means.

20. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a gaseous fuel consuming apparatus having an exhaust conduit and an intake pipejin which variations inpressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix'the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasifled fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a chamber at least partially surrounded by said exhaust conduit, means for spraying liquid fuel into said chamber to be converted into gas by the heat of the products of combustion in said exhaust conduit, a duct congaseous fuel from said duct into the intake pipe aty varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, and means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said spraying means.

21. Apparatus for forming fuel charges for a g'aseous fuel consuming apparatus having an exI haust conduit and an intake pipe in which varia# tions inf pressure occur in accordance with fuel demands of the apparatus, and wherein a source of volatile normally liquid fuel is employed, and in which a carburetor has a feed pipe for connection to said source and is connected to said intake pipe to atomize fuel from said source, mix the atomized fuel with air to gasify it, and supply the gasied fuel to said intake pipe, comprising a chamber at least partially surrounded by said exhaust conduit, means for spraying liquid fuel into said chamber to be converted into gas by the heat of the products of combustion in said exhaust conduit, a duct connecting said chamber to the intake pipe .to supply gasiiied fuel, to such pipe to be mixed with air flowing therethrough, means for controlling the flow of gas through said duct into the intake pipe. said last named means comprising a flow control mechanism for, controlling the flow of gaseous fuel from said duct into the intake pipe at'varying rates depending upon pressure conditions in the intake pipe, means for controlling the rate of supply of liquid fuel to said chamber in 'accordance withpressures generated therein, and

means for directing liquid fuel from said source to said feed pipe or to said fuel spraying means.

KENNETH M. CUNNINGHAM. ANTONIO SANTOMARTINO.

US328760A 1940-04-09 1940-04-09 Apparatus for forming fuel charges for internal combustion engines Expired - Lifetime US2285905A (en)

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2444199A (en) * 1942-09-19 1948-06-29 Chester F Klaburner Charge forming device
US2627257A (en) * 1942-05-08 1953-02-03 Alward Kenneth Cutler Energizer for petroleum fuels
US2696714A (en) * 1950-09-25 1954-12-14 Laudrum L Hughes Carbureting apparatus
US2701133A (en) * 1950-06-29 1955-02-01 Mendez Alfredo Propane or like fuel supply system for internal-combustion engines
US2744387A (en) * 1952-08-04 1956-05-08 John M Stover Liquid fuel vaporizer
US2746440A (en) * 1953-12-16 1956-05-22 Eriksen Morten Carburetion apparatus
US2749223A (en) * 1952-06-18 1956-06-05 Frank J Schraeder Jr Apparatus for operating internal combustion engines
US2757516A (en) * 1951-12-26 1956-08-07 Phillips Petroleum Co Automatic vapor-liquid selector valve
US2778720A (en) * 1957-01-22 Gas carburetor system
US2855759A (en) * 1954-03-29 1958-10-14 Bastian Blessing Co Gas dispensing system
US2897073A (en) * 1956-09-28 1959-07-28 Easton H Shipp Gasifier for liquid fuels
US3306273A (en) * 1964-12-10 1967-02-28 Maynard W Dolphin Fuel vaporizer
US3800768A (en) * 1972-02-28 1974-04-02 Standard Oil Co Apparatus and method for fueling an internal combustion engine
US4023538A (en) * 1975-10-24 1977-05-17 Econo Fuel Systems, Inc. Hot fuel gas generator
US4050419A (en) * 1975-10-24 1977-09-27 Econo Fuel Systems, Inc. Hot fuel gas generator
US4174691A (en) * 1978-01-27 1979-11-20 Trexler Charles H Fuel-air supply system for internal combustion engines
US4249502A (en) * 1979-06-04 1981-02-10 Hover David J Method and apparatus for generating and delivering gaseous fuel vapor to an internal combustion engine
US4332228A (en) * 1977-11-02 1982-06-01 Lehar James J Fuel device for a gasoline engine
US4343282A (en) * 1979-07-16 1982-08-10 Glenn Joseph G Liquid tower carburetor
US4398523A (en) * 1980-11-18 1983-08-16 Henson Dennis R Fuel conservation device
US4458653A (en) * 1981-06-01 1984-07-10 Geddes Harold L Vapor fuel system for internal combustion engines
US4498447A (en) * 1983-10-06 1985-02-12 Richard Harvey Gasoline vaporizer for internal combustion engine
US4506647A (en) * 1981-06-01 1985-03-26 Geddes Harold L Vapor fuel system internal combustion engines
US4510912A (en) * 1983-02-18 1985-04-16 Gamble David E Fuel system
US4539966A (en) * 1984-06-06 1985-09-10 Tri-Saver Corporation Gas saving apparatus
US4550706A (en) * 1983-09-21 1985-11-05 Hoffman-Lewis, Ltd. Fuel vaporizer
US4599984A (en) * 1983-07-25 1986-07-15 Kleinholz Edward O Vapor fuel supply systems for internal combustion engines
US4705008A (en) * 1983-07-25 1987-11-10 Kleinholz Edward O Fuel vaporizer
US4708118A (en) * 1986-04-23 1987-11-24 Anti-P, Inc. Fuel injected internal combustion engine pollutant control system
US4711222A (en) * 1985-05-02 1987-12-08 Anti-P, Inc. Internal combustion engine pollutant control system
US4781165A (en) * 1986-04-23 1988-11-01 Anti-P, Inc. Internal combustion engine pollutant control system

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2778720A (en) * 1957-01-22 Gas carburetor system
US2627257A (en) * 1942-05-08 1953-02-03 Alward Kenneth Cutler Energizer for petroleum fuels
US2444199A (en) * 1942-09-19 1948-06-29 Chester F Klaburner Charge forming device
US2701133A (en) * 1950-06-29 1955-02-01 Mendez Alfredo Propane or like fuel supply system for internal-combustion engines
US2696714A (en) * 1950-09-25 1954-12-14 Laudrum L Hughes Carbureting apparatus
US2757516A (en) * 1951-12-26 1956-08-07 Phillips Petroleum Co Automatic vapor-liquid selector valve
US2749223A (en) * 1952-06-18 1956-06-05 Frank J Schraeder Jr Apparatus for operating internal combustion engines
US2744387A (en) * 1952-08-04 1956-05-08 John M Stover Liquid fuel vaporizer
US2746440A (en) * 1953-12-16 1956-05-22 Eriksen Morten Carburetion apparatus
US2855759A (en) * 1954-03-29 1958-10-14 Bastian Blessing Co Gas dispensing system
US2897073A (en) * 1956-09-28 1959-07-28 Easton H Shipp Gasifier for liquid fuels
US3306273A (en) * 1964-12-10 1967-02-28 Maynard W Dolphin Fuel vaporizer
US3800768A (en) * 1972-02-28 1974-04-02 Standard Oil Co Apparatus and method for fueling an internal combustion engine
US4023538A (en) * 1975-10-24 1977-05-17 Econo Fuel Systems, Inc. Hot fuel gas generator
US4050419A (en) * 1975-10-24 1977-09-27 Econo Fuel Systems, Inc. Hot fuel gas generator
US4332228A (en) * 1977-11-02 1982-06-01 Lehar James J Fuel device for a gasoline engine
US4174691A (en) * 1978-01-27 1979-11-20 Trexler Charles H Fuel-air supply system for internal combustion engines
US4249502A (en) * 1979-06-04 1981-02-10 Hover David J Method and apparatus for generating and delivering gaseous fuel vapor to an internal combustion engine
US4343282A (en) * 1979-07-16 1982-08-10 Glenn Joseph G Liquid tower carburetor
US4398523A (en) * 1980-11-18 1983-08-16 Henson Dennis R Fuel conservation device
US4458653A (en) * 1981-06-01 1984-07-10 Geddes Harold L Vapor fuel system for internal combustion engines
US4506647A (en) * 1981-06-01 1985-03-26 Geddes Harold L Vapor fuel system internal combustion engines
US4510912A (en) * 1983-02-18 1985-04-16 Gamble David E Fuel system
US4705008A (en) * 1983-07-25 1987-11-10 Kleinholz Edward O Fuel vaporizer
US4599984A (en) * 1983-07-25 1986-07-15 Kleinholz Edward O Vapor fuel supply systems for internal combustion engines
US4550706A (en) * 1983-09-21 1985-11-05 Hoffman-Lewis, Ltd. Fuel vaporizer
US4498447A (en) * 1983-10-06 1985-02-12 Richard Harvey Gasoline vaporizer for internal combustion engine
US4539966A (en) * 1984-06-06 1985-09-10 Tri-Saver Corporation Gas saving apparatus
US4711222A (en) * 1985-05-02 1987-12-08 Anti-P, Inc. Internal combustion engine pollutant control system
US4708118A (en) * 1986-04-23 1987-11-24 Anti-P, Inc. Fuel injected internal combustion engine pollutant control system
US4781165A (en) * 1986-04-23 1988-11-01 Anti-P, Inc. Internal combustion engine pollutant control system

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