US2281569A - Flat knitting hosiery machine - Google Patents

Flat knitting hosiery machine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2281569A
US2281569A US397707A US39770741A US2281569A US 2281569 A US2281569 A US 2281569A US 397707 A US397707 A US 397707A US 39770741 A US39770741 A US 39770741A US 2281569 A US2281569 A US 2281569A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
knitting
motor
shaft
drive
turning
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US397707A
Inventor
Fritsche Otto Ernst
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
ALFRED HOFMANN Inc
Original Assignee
ALFRED HOFMANN Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by ALFRED HOFMANN Inc filed Critical ALFRED HOFMANN Inc
Priority to US397707A priority Critical patent/US2281569A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2281569A publication Critical patent/US2281569A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B11/00Straight-bar knitting machines with fixed needles
    • D04B11/26Straight-bar knitting machines with fixed needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration
    • D04B11/28Straight-bar knitting machines with fixed needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof
    • D04B11/32Straight-bar knitting machines with fixed needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof welts, e.g. double or turned welts
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/19Gearing
    • Y10T74/19023Plural power paths to and/or from gearing
    • Y10T74/1914Alternate drivers and driven

Description

- May 5, 1942. o. E. FRITSCHE FLAT KNITTING HOSIERY MACHINE Filed June 12, 1941 INV ENTOR o 7. 0 III i d 1 W 7 IIIILEFEF Z 7.

104W K' *Gq, l

%TTORNEY I i Patented May 5, 1942 Friar rmc nosny MAC om Ernst Fritsche, Hasbrouok Heights, N.

signor to Alfred Hofmann, Inca, West New York, N. 5., a corporation of New Jersey Application June 12, 1941-, Serial No. 397,707 oi. se s2) This invention is a novel flat knitting hosiery machine, more especially of the modern type wherein from the operating shafts are caused not merely the actuation of the knitting mechanism, in each of the many sections of the ma,-' chine, but in alternation therewith the actuation of mechanism for forming the welt of each of the successivelyknit stockings, commonly called a welt-turning mechanism. The invention relates more particularly to the means for driving the as is known, to afiord the desired speed differfor the two purposes has been devised, so far the main.'shaft the necessary high speed forknitting, and a fraction of such speed for welt turning purposes; the present invention avoiding the dimculties of two-speed electric motors and permitting the operation of the shafts and mechanisms by fixed speed motors.

Other and further objects and advantages of the invention will appear during the hereinafter description of an illustrative embodiment thereof orwill be understood to those conversant with the subject. To the attainment of such objects and advantages the invention consists in the novel flat knitting hosiery machine, and the novel features of arrangement, combination and construction, herein'illustrated and described.

In the accompanying drawing Fig. 1 is a top plan view of suificient of the driving and operating parts of a flat knitting hosiery' machine to illustrate the principles of the present invention.

Fig. 2 is an interior end view of a one-way drive device or clutch shown in' Fig. 1, as will be further described.

ential during the knitting periods and welt turning periods respectively; and this deficiency has retarded the development of automaticity in re spect to the interruption of knitting for welt turning followed by the resumption of knitting. It is customary to drive a modern knitting machine by an electric motor, herein called the main or drive motor, and this motor is selected with characteristics rendering it adaptable to efiecting the high or knitting speed of the machine, such as '70 revolutions, or say between 60 and 100 revolutions, per minute of the main or cam shaft. Such being the case, it is well known that such a motor can not, by mere cont ol of motor action or current, be operated efliciently at a substantially lower speed, such as is desirable for welt turning, for example 10 turns per minute, or say between 5 and 20 turns, of the cam shaft. Neither has it been found practicable to construct a special motor which can be operated efflciently at will at two v speeds diil'ering to the extent mentioned. 'for example with a ratio of! to l as between its high and low speeds.

The general object of the present invention is to ailorda hosiery machine having knitting and welt turning operating means of superior efliclency and convenience and adapted to confer autom'aticity in respect to the changes necessary between knitting periods and welt turning periods. A particular object is to afford a novel drive means practically adapted to delivering to Fig. 3 is a wiring diagram of the machine. showing also the essential construction of an illustrative automatic switch used for shifting between knitting and welt turning periods.

Fig. 4 is a diagram of the switch interior showing the principles of one or many possible arrangements. A I v As a basis for cross reference to the prior machines containing welt turning mechanisms.

I thus to avoid undue-need of disclosure herein,

reference is hereby made to the following typical instances. In the copending application of A. Hofman and F. M. Wachtler, Serial No.

257,772, filed February 23, 1939, and assigned to the same assignee as the present application. is disclosed the forming of welts in a straight knitting machine by means of a welt turning mechanism supplementing the regular knitting mechanism of the machine. In said application is shown, near the upper front, a handwheei shaft 58 constituting the source of power for the remainder of the machine, and well below y it and substantially central a main or cam shaft 53 driven with speed reduction from the power shaft, this cam shaft carrying various cams for working the mechanical elements of the knitting 'mechanism and other cams, such as marked El and 55," for causing the actuation of the welt turning mechanism, delivering rising and falling and frontward and rearward movements from which detail actions are derived. While said ap-' plication does not show the drive means, the

prevailing motor drive of the power shaft is to be assumed. As a much earlier instance reference is made to the expired patent of W. Richter No. 1,127,283 patented February 2, 1915. In this patent is shown the upper or handwheel shaft with indication of gearing for reduced speed of'the main cam shaft 5 at the lower central part of the machine, the latter shaft having various connections, unnecessary to describe, for operating alternately the knitting and welt turning mechanisms. The principles of the present inventionmay be embodied in the knitting machine shown in said prior application or that in said patent, or in any other types involving the alternate knitting and welt turning operations already outlined.

Referring next to the machine illustrated in the drawing hereof, the conventional framework of the machine is to be understood, and this gives support to the upper or power shaft (0 which carries handwheels II for manual turning over of the machine when idle. From the power shaft extend a reduction gearing, such as the small and large gears l2 and I3, to the main cam shaft M at a lower point upon which is shown a cam l5, representative of various cams adapted to actuate through conventional connections the knitting mechanism, and a cam l6, representative of other cams, with connections actuated thereby, such as cam follower I1 and lever l8 pivoted at l9 and carrying the follower, all similar to saidprior application and being representative of means to actuate and control the welt turning mechanism; other cams and connections, not shown, being understood for effecting various other operations of the knitting, welt turning and other mechanisms of the machine.

For the driving of the power shaft l0 and parts therebeyond there is provided an electric drive motor 20, to be referred to as the main motor of the machine. characteristics as to deliver through the power shaft to the main shaft a suitable knitting speed, such as 10 turns or courses per minute, and for this purpose a reduction gearing is shown between the shaft 2| of the drive motor and the handwheel shaft l0, consisting of gearing, illustratively shown as a sprocket gear 22 on the motor shaft 2|, this being relatively small and connected by a sprocket chain 23 with a larger sprocket wheel or gear 24 on the power shaft. When the drive motor is energized this furnishes the actuation for the main cam shaft and mechanisms beyond it for the regular or special knitting purposes of the machine.

In combination with the described parts there is herein provided a separate auxiliary electric motor 25. adapted to be energized or deenergized as will be described. Between the auxiliary motor shaft 26 and the power shaft I0 is reduction gearing which may be generally described as comprising a gear or sprocket wheel 21 surrounding the shaft 26, and a sprocket chain 28 extending therefrom. Instead of extending said chain directly to the power shaft, an advantageous arrangement is to provide on the shaft 2| of the drive motor a sprocket wheel 29, larger than the wheel 21, so that when the auxiliary motor is in operation and the drive motor is out -of operation, the former communicates to the shaft of the latter and therefrom through the gearing 22-24 to the power shaft Ill. The auxiliary motor 25 is of such characteristics that while it is in operation it delivers drive at such speed as to cause the main cam shaft to turn at a welt This motor is to be of such turning speed of for example 10 turns per minute as compared with I0 turns per minute of knitting means to obviate the objection that, during knitting periods when the drive motor is operating but the auxiliary motor is idle, the gearing 29, 28 and 21 from the drive motor shaft to the shaft of the auxiliary motor would cause a very high passive rotation of the motor shaft and armature, many times its normal rotary speed when in operation, thus tending to impair the auxiliary drive means by undue wear and otherwise.

By way of avoiding this drawback there is introduced between the auxiliary motor shaft 26 and the shaft 2| of the main motor a one-way drive device or clutch, through which the auxiliary motor may drive the shafts 2|, l0 and H but precluding any drive of the auxiliary motor therefrom. This one-way clutch or coupling is arranged between one of the motor shafts and the sprocket gear thereon, preferably between the auxiliary motor shaft 26 and the sprocket gear 21 thereon. Such a clutchmay be of various types, as on the general rinciple of a pawl and ratchet, but preferably of a silent type, such as a centrifugal clutch or coupling by which the gear is normally loose upon the shaft and only becomes coupled thereto when the motor shaft, turning at speed, develops centrifugal force to engage the clutch elements. As an illustration the clutch is shown in Fig. 2 as comprising an inner or shaft element 33 and an outer or gear element 34, between which are arranged rolling or wedging pieces 35, adapted to cause clutching or unclutching as described. For example the clutching pieces are shown as rollers 35, kept in suitably spaced-apart positions, with play, by

spacers or blocks 36; and these cooperate with surface 38 of'the outer element 34.

Fig. 3 shows one manner of connecting up the motors for alternate action; the illustration be ing purely'diagrammatic to explain principles. The drive motor 20 is in a circuit 40 andthe auxiliary motor in a circuit 4|, both of thesederiving their power from main conductors 42, through a main or cut-ofi switch 43, and with an interposed or two-way switch 44 which may be reversed to throw into action in a conventional way one or another of the circuits 40 or 4|. The switch 44 may be such that one motor is always in connection with the current source, excepting of course as the power switch 43 may be thrown to break all circuits when the machine is to be stopped. I

In order to cause the reversing adjustment of the control switch 44 it is shown as provided effected manually when desired but preferably.

automatically in any conventional manner. For example a reverser member 46 is shown in the form of an actuator or lug mounted at a correctly timed point in the length of a long cyclic belt position for energizing the drive motor, as regular knitting is resumed.

, The mechanical connections by which members 4'? and 46 may throw the switch arm are illustrated as comprising a bellcrank lever 48 the horizontal arm of which has its contact end lying in the path of the reversing lug 46, while its upright arm carries a cam wedge or extension 49, so related to the switch arm that the swing of the bellcrank lifts the. switch arm from positions to position y. When shortly the lug releases thebellcrank this allows the control to return to normal, when knitting is resumed.

The diagram Fig. 4 shows how the switch interior may be constructed. In series with the common conductor of the circuits 40 and 4| is a switch member 45, moving .up and down with the exterior control arm 45. This is shown as constituting the movable member of a two-point switch 50 by which the reversals are effected. In its lowered position the switch member closes the line wires 42 with the circuit 40 of the main motor 20, as shown. When the member 45 is reversed this opens the circuit 40 and energizes the circuit 4|.

A modified arrangement and operation may be practiced by so arranging the control switch 44 that it merely throws the drive motor into and out of circuit. while leaving the auxiliary motor always energized. This may be brought about by providing asupplemental or shunt circuit 5| containing a manual switch 52, and extending from one of the line wires 42 to one of the conductors 4|, so that when the switch 52 is closed the auxiliary motor is continuously energized. This arrangement has certain advantages. The switch 50 may then be a simple on and off switch for the drive motor. During knitting periods this switch is closed energizing the drive motor and affording fast drive. However, the circuit 4| and the auxiliary motor remain energized, this motor running idly. The inner member 33 of the drive device 32 is thus turned by the motor 25, but is turned relatively slowly so that the drive device is inoperative. The relative velocity between the two parts of the clutch is thus greatly reduced, which minimizes wear on the partsof the clutch; and moreover the continued rotation of the inner part causes the wear to be distributed and there- "fore more uniform. There is substantially no power loss since it takes but little current to run the motor 25 idly, as it performs no work under these circumstances; and the wear of the motor 25 is negligible, the motor being designed for full-load operation. The auxiliary motor stands always ready to take up the drive for the welt turning period. It is only necessary to open the switch 50, by lifting the member 45 deenergiz- -ing the drive motor 20.,

invention, but as many matters of arrangement,

combination and construction may be variously modified it is not intended to limit the invention thereto except as set forth in the appended claims,

What is claimed is:

.1. In a flat-knitting hosiery machine having knitting and welt turning mechanisms and a power or handwheel shaft and a relatively slower main or cam shaft making one turn per cycle or course, with reduction gearing from the power shaft to the main shaft, and said shafts being adapted to actuate in automatic alternation for relatively long periods the knitting mechanism and for relatively short periods the welt turning mechanism; a drive means for such shafts and mechanisms comprising an' electric drive motor, with speed reduction gearing from the drive motor shaft to the. power shaft, adapted to deliver to themain shaft when the motor is tuming at normal speed a relatively high predeter- -mined main shaft rotary speed during knitting periods, as between 60 and 100 turns per minute;'in combination with an auxiliary motor with auxiliary gearing from its shaft to the drive motor shaft adapted to deliver therethrough to the main shaft when the auxiliary motor is turning at normalspeed a .relatively low predetermined main shaft speed during welt turning periods, as between 5 and 20 turns per minute; said auxiliary gearing comprising a gear wheel loose on one of said motor shafts and a one-way drive device orclutch between said gear wheel and motor drive through but may not be driven by the drive motor shaft; a reversible electric switch controlling the circuits of said drive motor and auxiliary motor respectively and adapted to deepergize each motor when energizing the other; and a cyclic or pattern means adapted to control said switch to close the auxiliary motor circuit for each short period of welt turning and to maintain open such circuit when the drive motor circuit is closed for knitting.

2; A machine as in claim 1 and wherein the loose gear wheel surrounds the auxiliary motor shaft, with the one-way clutch between them, and the' electric switch has a control arm or -member, the pattern means having a reverser member or lug adapted to cause the timed shifting of the switch controlmember to and from v welt-turning position.

3. In a fiat-knitting hosiery machine having knitting and welt turning mechanisms and a power shaft and a relatively. slower'main shaft with-reduction gearing from the power shaft to the mainshaft, and said shafts being adapted to actuate in automatic alternation for relatively long periods the knitting mechanism and for relatively short periods the welt turning mechanism; a drive means for such mechanisms-comprising an electric drive motor, with. speed reduction earing from the drive motor shaft to the'power shaft, adapted to deliver to the main shaft when the motor is turning at normal speed a relatively high predetermined main shaft rotary speed during knitting periods; in combination with an auxiliary motor with auxiliary gearing through whichbetween them a one-way drive device or freewheeling clutch so arranged that the auxiliary motor may drive but may not be driven by the drive motor or power shaft; and a reversible electric switch means controlling the circuits of said drive motor and auxiliary motorrespectively and adapted to deenergize each motor when energizing the other; whereby the auxiliary motor circuit may be closed for each short period of welt turning and maintained open while the drive motor circuit is closed for knitting.

4. In a flat-knitting hosiery machine having knitting and welt turning mechanisms and a power shaft and a relatively slower main shaft with reduction gearing from the power shaft to the main shaft, and said shafts being adapted to actuate in automatic alternation for relatively long periods the knitting mechanism and for relatively short periods the welt turning mechanism; a drive means for such mechanisms comprising an electric drive motor, with speed re-' duction gearing from the drive motor shaft to the power shaft, adapted to deliver to the main shaft when the motor is turning at normal speed a relatively high predetermined main .shaft rotary speed during knitting periods; in combination with an auxiliary motor with auxiliary gearing through which it may drive the power shaft and adapted to deliver therethrough to the main shaft when the auxiliary motor is turning at normal speed a relatively low predetermined main shaft speed during welt turning periods, said auxiliary gearing comprising a gear wheel loose on a shaftand between them a one-way drive device or free wheeling clutch so arranged that the auxiliary motor may drive but may not be driven by the power of the drive motor; a reversible electric switch means controlling the circuits of said drive motor and auxiliary motor respectively and adapted to deenergize each motor when energizing the other; and automatic means whereby the auxiliary motor circuit is maintained closed for each short period of welt turning and is maintained open while the drive motor circuit is closed for knitting.

5. In a stocking knitting machine having the regular knitting mechanism and a welt turning mechanism operable during periods when the knitting mechanism is idle and a main or cam shaft from which both knitting and welt turning operations are controlled or effected, the combinations of an electric drive motor connected to actuate the main shaft and knitting mechanism at a relatively high knitting speed of the order of 70 cycles or courses per minute during knitting periods, and an auxiliary motor connected to actuate the main shaft and welt turning mechanism at a relatively low welt turning speed of the order of cycles per minute during welt turning periods; with a free wheeling or one-way clutch device in the connections actuated by the auxiliary motor such that during knitting periods .binations of an electric drive motor connected to actuate the main shaft and knitting mechanism at a relatively high knitting speed during knitting periods, and an auxiliary ,motor connected to actuate the main shaft and welt turning mechanism at a relatively low welt turning speed during welt turning periods; with a freewheeling clutch or one-way drive device in the connections actuated by the auxiliary motor such that during knitting periods the high speed actuation by the drive motor can not be communicated back to the idle auxiliary motor; and an automatic switching means adapted to deenergize the auxiliary motor in periods when the drive' motor is energized.

7. A machine as in claim 6 and wherein is cyclic means'arranged tomaintain the drive motor in operation for each long knitting period and tosuspend its operation and operate the auxiliary motor for each short welt turning period.

8. In a stocking knitting machine having the regular knitting mechanism and a welt turning mechanism operable during periods when the knitting mechanism is idle and a main or cam shaft from which both knitting and welt turning operations are controlled or effected, the combination of an electric drive motor connected to actuate the main shaft and knitting mechanism at a relatively highor knitting speed during knitting periods, and an auxiliary motor connected to actuate the main shaft and welt turning mechanism at a relatively low or welt turning speed during welt turning periods; with a one-way clutch device in the connections actuated by the auxiliary motor such that during knitting periods the high speed actuation by the drive motor is not communicated back to the idle auxiliary motor.

9. A knitting machine as in claim 8 and where'- in. are electrical control means adapted to energize the respective motors during knitting and welt turning periods respectively and to deenergize each when the other isenergized.

10. A knitting machine as in claim 8 and wherein are electrical control means adapted to energize the drive motor during knitting and deenergize it during welt turning while maintaining the auxiliary motor energized during both peri-- ods, to drive during welt turning but to run idly during knitting.

OTTO ERNST 'FRITSCHE.

US397707A 1941-06-12 1941-06-12 Flat knitting hosiery machine Expired - Lifetime US2281569A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US397707A US2281569A (en) 1941-06-12 1941-06-12 Flat knitting hosiery machine

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US397707A US2281569A (en) 1941-06-12 1941-06-12 Flat knitting hosiery machine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2281569A true US2281569A (en) 1942-05-05

Family

ID=23572312

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US397707A Expired - Lifetime US2281569A (en) 1941-06-12 1941-06-12 Flat knitting hosiery machine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2281569A (en)

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2540645A (en) * 1951-02-06 Drive mechanism
US2681578A (en) * 1950-05-20 1954-06-22 Carl S Shields Two-speed drive
US2790337A (en) * 1953-08-29 1957-04-30 Fischer Ag Georg Infinitely variable two-motor drive
US2836276A (en) * 1952-07-25 1958-05-27 Heimann Karl Willi Electric sewing machine drives
US2836992A (en) * 1954-05-24 1958-06-03 Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Mac Drive and emergency brake mechanism for nut formers, headers and the like
US2910286A (en) * 1955-10-27 1959-10-27 Marland One Way Clutch Co Rotary kiln drive mechanism
US2949817A (en) * 1957-05-25 1960-08-23 Leitz Ernst Gmbh Driving mechanism for microtome
US2970788A (en) * 1957-12-02 1961-02-07 Us Electrical Motors Inc Windup drive system utilizing induction motors
US3017784A (en) * 1960-04-01 1962-01-23 Litton Systems Inc Phased synchronous drive for recorders and the like
US3127790A (en) * 1960-04-20 1964-04-07 Hughes Aircraft Co Electric drive
US3245284A (en) * 1963-05-31 1966-04-12 Donald J Leslie Rotor drive for pulsato apparatus
US4083473A (en) * 1975-10-14 1978-04-11 Dresser Europe S. A. Liquid blending control system

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2540645A (en) * 1951-02-06 Drive mechanism
US2681578A (en) * 1950-05-20 1954-06-22 Carl S Shields Two-speed drive
US2836276A (en) * 1952-07-25 1958-05-27 Heimann Karl Willi Electric sewing machine drives
US2790337A (en) * 1953-08-29 1957-04-30 Fischer Ag Georg Infinitely variable two-motor drive
US2836992A (en) * 1954-05-24 1958-06-03 Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Mac Drive and emergency brake mechanism for nut formers, headers and the like
US2910286A (en) * 1955-10-27 1959-10-27 Marland One Way Clutch Co Rotary kiln drive mechanism
US2949817A (en) * 1957-05-25 1960-08-23 Leitz Ernst Gmbh Driving mechanism for microtome
US2970788A (en) * 1957-12-02 1961-02-07 Us Electrical Motors Inc Windup drive system utilizing induction motors
US3017784A (en) * 1960-04-01 1962-01-23 Litton Systems Inc Phased synchronous drive for recorders and the like
US3127790A (en) * 1960-04-20 1964-04-07 Hughes Aircraft Co Electric drive
US3245284A (en) * 1963-05-31 1966-04-12 Donald J Leslie Rotor drive for pulsato apparatus
US4083473A (en) * 1975-10-14 1978-04-11 Dresser Europe S. A. Liquid blending control system

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US630611A (en) Warping and beaming machine.
CN202016774U (en) Automatic fabric spreading device
GB575625A (en) Improvements in and relating to clothes washing machines
US2352183A (en) Control mechanism
US2412248A (en) Knitting method and machine
US2473944A (en) Selecting mechanism
US2235943A (en) Change gearing
US2671861A (en) Material-handling apparatus and control therefor
US2011488A (en) Mechanical movement for turret and like devices
US2970557A (en) Control device for the operation of sewing machines
US1882219A (en) Controller for motor driven machines
US2422568A (en) Electronically controlled knitting machine
US3052134A (en) Automatic gear change controls
US3008059A (en) Control for clothes washer or dryer or the like
US2656989A (en) Textile spinning and analogous machinery
US3011079A (en) Automatic control device
US2442822A (en) Knitting machine
CN206193503U (en) Double -deck control system around chartered plane
US2501738A (en) Machine structure
US2150638A (en) Washing machine
US1462354A (en) Speed control for machine tools and the like
US3700153A (en) Yarn feeder for a knitting machine
US3035835A (en) Pile feeder
US2334058A (en) Warp knitting machine
US2015106A (en) Safety stop mechanism for knitting machines