US2276953A - Knitted fabric and method - Google Patents

Knitted fabric and method Download PDF

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US2276953A
US2276953A US353548A US35354840A US2276953A US 2276953 A US2276953 A US 2276953A US 353548 A US353548 A US 353548A US 35354840 A US35354840 A US 35354840A US 2276953 A US2276953 A US 2276953A
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wales
elastic
yarn
knitted
fabric
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US353548A
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Fregeolle Oscar
Isaac H C Green
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Hemphill Co
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Hemphill Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/42Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration
    • D04B9/46Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof
    • D04B9/54Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof welts, e.g. double or turned welts

Description

March17, 1942. o, FREGEOLLE ETAL 2,276,953
1940 2 sheets-sheet 2 w Ii ll/i Patented Mar. l?, 1942.
UNITE-D STATES .PATENT AOFFICE KNITTED FABRIC AND METHOD Oscar Fregeolle and Isaac H. C. Green, Central Falls, R. I., asslgnors to -Hemphill Company, Central Falls, R. I., a corporation of Massachusetts Application August 21, 1940, seri-a1 No.' 353,548
12 claims. (c1. ses-172) This case involves an invention in elastic knitted fabrics such as are employed for garter l tops of stockingsv or other hosiery. More speciflcally, the invention deals with certain imknitting machine, anda fabric pleasing in ap- In the figures of drawings:
Fig. 1 is a conventional illustration of a section of fabric knitted according to one form of the invention, the same' being shown greatly enlarged: Fig. 2 is a similar showing of the fabriccf Fig. 1, but illustrating to some extent the manner in which the fabric appears after the elastic yarn has contracted:
Figs.- 3 and 4 show modifications wherein the method employed is slightly different, although the same general principles apply;
Fig. 5 is a conventional showing of a half hose towhich the'invention has been applied, the top being illustrative of the form of the invention of Figs. 1 and 2;
Fig. 6 is a similar` view showing a stocking top and a portion of the leg of the stocking, the edge being knitted as in Fig. 3; and
Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6 but showing an edge knitted in accordance with the method shown in Fig. 4,
The .different edges herein illustrated and described have elastic yarn incorporated in spaced wales in such a manner as to draw said wales together to simulate a rib appearance and also to impart elasticity to the fabric so that the same may serve for self-supporting purposes, one such example being that of a garter top for hosiery. Normally selvages are started with elastic being introduced at every other wale, but herein the l elastic is preferably fed at every fourth wale at the very edge of the fabric and throughout the selvage portion. After that the elastic may .con-
tinue to be fed at the same interval or may be introduced according to some other scheme. To obtain a selvage resistant against ravelling, nonelastic yarn is knitted in the same walesin which the elastic is introduced, and in addition, at intermediate wales. This knitting in the intermediate wales maybe accompanied by tucking, or may be delayed until the entire selvage portion has been completed. yIn another form the intermediate vwales may be so knitted as to have the "elastic .incorporated therein after the initial course of non-elastic yarn.
'I'he invention herein described results in a fabric wherein the edge portion lis less bulky, although that characteristic is not displayed except by a drawing in at the edge of the fabric, 1
this being in contrast to a flaring outwardly especially in the event the vstocking or other article might be'knitted in a rather coarse gage. The same applies if heavier lyarns than usual are used for any particular gage. ,',1
Referring to Fig. 1, an elastic yarn jl, either covered oruncovered, is first fed to the hooks of needles at every fourth Wale such as the wales 2, 3 and l. Thiselastic yarn may be fed at one revolution and at one feed only of a circular type, independent needle knitting machine. or may be fed two or more times. Sucliyarn is shownas having` been introduced to the hooks of these needles twice thereby loading up what is generally Yknown as two courses of elastic. Thereafter a non-elastic yarn 5 is fed to the hooks of needlesknittingin every fourth wale and the previouslyheld elastic yarn is cast olf. According to the form of the invention being described with respect to Figs. 1 and 2, this yarn 5 is also knitted in the wales 6, l, etc. `These we shall refer to as the intermediate wales. The elastic, however, is not taken by other than needles knitting the wales 2, 3, 4, etc.
At the wales 8, 9, l0 and Il, yarn 5 is'also taken in the hooks of needles knitting thereat, but throughout the so-called selvage or edge portion of the fabric these needles are to tuck so that an accumulation of loops is to be knitted in the wales 8-l I. After the initial course, the elastic yarn I is to be cleared below needle latches so that it will be incorporatedA by what is generally termed inlaying in ycontrast'to knitting. The yarn l is taken by needles knitting at every 4th wale and must be either taken below needle latches initially or placed below those latches before the non-elastic yarn 5 is takenwhereupon as the latter yarn is drawn, the elastic will be cast off in to the fabric to be heldv although the same does not assume the characteristicsof a knitted stitch. This inlaying is generally known at this time and need not be described furthcr at this point.
Continuing, the yarn 5 is knitted at each course for several courses at every fourth walewhile the elastic is inlaid atthose wales. At the intermediate wales such as 6 and l, the non-elastic y'arn is also knitted, however, the elastic merely floats behind all needles intermediate those knitting in `points in Fig. 2.
'wales 2, 3, 4, etc.` TuckingY is simultaneously done by accumulating loops inthe hooks f needles knitting in wales 8, 9, I0, II, etc. Obviously, as much of this type of elastic yarn will be taken as will serve most effectively in the production of a substantially curl resistant edge. Four courses are shown herein although fewer or more might serve better under other circumstances.
Eventually when enough of this type of fabric has been knitted, a course such as the course designated at I2 is to be knitted from the yarn 5, this yarn knitting on all needles so that all previously held loops are cast off. Of course, the wales 2, 3, 4 appear as continuous wales having elastic yarn held therein, Wales such as 6 and 1 really are unsupported and may have their yarn robbed to a certain extent and will tend more or less to roll up or knot. An attempthas been made to illustrate this at the appropriate This Fig. 2 shows the fabric somewhat as it appears when the elastic yarn has contracted as it will when released from thev ,needles since it is originally fed under a certain amount of tension. This tension is preferably rather light, although tension may be applied other details all of which contribute to the appearance and characteristics of the finished article. However, for purposes of illustration, this Fig. 2 is shown still much moreopen than it would .be if the same were to show the fabric as it actually appears under these conditions.
After the course I2 the fabric might be knitted in one of several different ways. For example, the elastic may be knitted or otherwise incorporated in consecutive courses or spaced courses. Again, it may be held at every fourth wale as in the initial portion or may be held at every second or wales spaced at other intervals. The inlayi'ng may continue or the elastic yarn may be knitted in conjunction with the non-elastic yarn or alone, that is, more or less as in St. Pierre Patent #2,131,720.
As herein illustrated the elastic continues to be inlaid at every fourth Wale, but at every other course. This is a preferred form and is shown merely by way of illustration.
Referring to Fig. 3, a modifiedform of the invention is shown wherein the intermediate needles, so called, do not knit. Elastic yarn is fed at every fourthwale 'throughout the initial or selvage .portion of the fabric and the intermediate needles, three in number, tuck. First an elastic yarn I3 is -fed just as the yarn I was introduced in the form of the fabric of Figs..1 and 2. This yarn is taken in the hooks of every fourth needle for two courses, more or less, and thereafter a non-elastic yarn |14 i's fed to knit at the same needles. Thus the wales I5 and I6 are knitted as the wales 2, 3 and 4 were according to the preceding description. The elastic yarn.
is also introduced at each course fora plurality of courses and is inlaid by feeding to the hooks of these needles knitting wales I5, I6, etc., and thereafter passing said yarn below needle latches before the yarn I4 is taken. In the wales I1, I3 and I9 knitted on the three needles intermediate those in wales I5 and I6the yarn I4 is ,tucked by feeding to the hooks of all three needles but not clearing latches on each of the i courses constituting the selvage portion of the fabric. Throughout the courses 20, 2I, 22 and and cast oi until the course 24 is knitted, this being a course of non-elastic yarn knitted on all needles and corresponding to the course I2, Figs. 1 and 2.
Obviously, what has been said with respect to the first form of the invention applies here with regard to the number of courses which may constitute the anti-curl or selvage part 'of the fabric. Four courses of non-elastic yarnwith the initial and following courses of elastic inlaid are shown for purposes of illustration and, generally speaking, a fabric knitted in that way would serve quite satisfactorily. More or fewer courses may be produced under certain circumstances. After the course 24 is knitted, the following elastic fabric may be knitted in the manner described with respect to the preceding form of the invention disclosed.
In Fig. 4 still another modification is shown wherein the elastic is fed at each course and inlaid at every fourth needle along with a nonelastic yarn all as in the preceding forms, but in addition, Athe intermediate needles corresponding to those needles knitting in wales 6 and 1, Fig. 1, knit the non-elastic yarn and in addition, inlay the elastic yarn. The remaining needles tuck.
Elastic yarn 25 is introduced in the initial course as previously described-and non-elastic.
- It will be noted that this form of the invention is very much like that of Figs. 1 and 2 except for the following feature. After the initial course of elastic is cast off, the 'yarn 25 is fed to .be inlaid at every other needle. Thus, in courses 32, 33, 34 and 35, the elastic yarn is inlaid in the wales 21, 26 and 29. After a requisite number ofcourses have been knitted to build up a desirable length of` selvage, a course -36 knitted on all needles and from non-elastic yarn, terminates the selvage as the held loops are cleared and cast oif as elongated tuck stitches.
Similarly, this type of fabric may be varied as to length of selvage and as to type and details of fabric knitted in continuation of the selvage.
at which non-elastic yarns are fed and a preced-` ing feed at which an elastic yarn is to be introduced. Needles are to be selectively controlled and yarns so manipulated that'spaced needles may take the elastic, and by varying the feed of the same, it may be introduced at every course or at spaced courses. Likewise, at the non-elastic.yarn feeding station certain selectivity is provided so as either to knit or tuck on such needles as are required to produce the fabric above described, these machine details and the operation of the machine in acocrdance therewith being understandable and capable of being carried out by those skilled in the art. While the fabric may be produced on what is generally termed a single feed machine, multifeed types may be employed if desired.
Referring to Fig. 5 a stocking is shown having a leg 31, foot 38, toe 39 and heel 40. A top 4I knitted in accordance with the` method of Figs. l and 2 has a selvage portion 42 which appears somewhat as shown. Normally the selvage portion may be of slightly less diameter than the top portion 4l in which event the edge is drawn in to a certain extent. Due to the fact that elastic is widely spaced at the points at which it is held in the selvage and the non-elastic yarn is tucked at every other wale and either very loosely connected to the elastic or not vconnected to the elastic at all at intermediate Wales, this part of the fabric is allowed to contract to a greater extent or will have less bulk than following portions. This is especially true wherein the elastic is introduced at every course for several courses at the edge.
In Fig. 6 a top 43 has an edge M knitted in accordance with the modification of Fig. 3. This is probably the simplest form of all; l
In Fig. 7 a top 45 has an edge 46 which is like that modification described with respect to Fig. 4.
Certain variations may be apparent to those skilled in the art and are intended to be included within the present disclosure and covered in the following claims. The invention as specifically described herein is merely illustrative and is'not held at some only of said non-adjacent wales in which the non-elastic yarn is knitted.
2. A selvage for a knitted fabric having an elastic yarn incorporated to be held at spaced Wales in which non-elastic yarn is knitted, said elastic yarn being inlaid at every fourth Wale while the non-elastic yarn is knitted at alternate wales, the said non-elastic yarn also being tucked at wales intermediate those in which it is knitted.
3. A selvage for a knitted fabric having in combination elastic and non-elastic yarns, the non-elastic yarnbeing knitted at every fourth wale and being tucked at at least some of the wales intermediate said fourth wales, the elastic yarn being inlaid to be held at the said fourth wales only in the initial course and constituting the only yarn preventing raveling of the fabric.
4. In a knitted fabric selvage the combination of elastic and non-elastic yarns, the non-elastic yarn being knitted at non-adjacent wales and tucked at intermediate wales while the elastic yarn is inlaid at some only of the wales in which the non-elastic yarn is knitted.
5. A knitted fabric having in combination elastic and non-elastic yarns, the non-elastic yarn being knitted at every fourth Wale for a plurality of courses and being tucked over said plurality of courses in all wales intermediate said fourth wales, the elastic yarn being so incorporated as to be held at said fourth wales only.
6. A knitted fabric having a selvage with elastic and non-elastic yarns incorporated therein, said non-elastic yarn being knitted at every course at recurrent wales spaced apart by more than a single Wale, the said yarn being tucked at all wales intermediate the wales in which it is knitted and the elastic yarn being inlaid to be held at said knitted wales only.
'7. A knitted fabric having a selvage formed from non-elastic and elastic yarns, the said nonelastic yarn being knitted at alternate wales and tucked at intermediate wales, the elastic yarn passing through sinker loops at each initial stitch in every fourth wale and in following courses, said elastic yarn being inlaid to be held at stitches at alternate wales.
8. A method of knitting to form a selvage including the steps of feeding and knitting a nonelastic yarn throughout a plurality of courses and at each fourth wale in said courses, incorporating an elastic yarn in the initial stitches of said fourth wales to be held at each sinker loop therein, knitting said non-elastic yarn at wales inter-v mediate said fourth wales and tucking that yarn at the remaining Wales.
9. A method of knitting to form a selvage lncluding the steps of feeding and knitting a nonelastic yarn at every fourth Wale, ltucking said yarn at the t-hree intermediate wales and over a plurality of courses, and incorporating an elastic yarn to be held inthe initial stitches at said fourth wales and to be inlaid at each succeeding stitch in those wales throughout said plurality of courses.
1o. A method of knitting to form a selva'ge including the steps of feeding and knitting a non-elastic yarn throughout a plurality of courses and at each fourth Wale in said courses, incorporating an elastic yarn to be held at single wales of each initial stitch in said fourth Wales. knitting said non-elastic yarn at wales intermediate said fourth wales but'tucking at those wales between said fourth wales and intermediate wales and inlaying the elastic yarn to be held at said fourth wales and also at said intermediate wales in those courses following the said initial elastic yarn course.
11. A selvage for a knitted fabric having in combination elastic and non-elastic yarns, the
non-elastic yarns being drawn into knitted stitches at every fourth wale and being tucked in at least some of the wales intermediate those fourth wales, .the initial loops of the fabric at each fourth wale only having the elastic yarn threaded therethrough to prevent raveling, there being no other yarn in these initial loops so that the fabric is drawn together at the edge but is free to be extended to the limit of stretch in the elastic yarn itself, the said elastic yarn being further held at stitches in the said fourth wales and in following courses of the fabric.
12. A method of knitting to form a selvage including the steps of knitting non-elastic yarn at spaced wales, tucking that yarn at a plurality of wales intermediate those spaced wales and preventing raveling of the fabric by incorporating an elastic yarn to be threaded through the initial loops of each fourth Wale only and in such a manner that said elastic yarn constitutes the only connectingyarn between those said wales in the initial course and thereafter incorporating the said elastic yarn to be held at each fourth wale at least and in stitches therein throughout several courses following the initial course.
OSCAR FREGEOILE. ISAAC H. C,GREEN.
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2598144A (en) * 1950-06-13 1952-05-27 Hemphill Co Elastic top for hosiery
US3602012A (en) * 1968-07-02 1971-08-31 Burlington Industries Inc Detachable hose with knitted fabric loops
US4237707A (en) * 1978-09-07 1980-12-09 Kayser-Roth Hoisery, Inc. Dress weight tube sock with mock rib leg and method of knitting

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2598144A (en) * 1950-06-13 1952-05-27 Hemphill Co Elastic top for hosiery
US3602012A (en) * 1968-07-02 1971-08-31 Burlington Industries Inc Detachable hose with knitted fabric loops
US4237707A (en) * 1978-09-07 1980-12-09 Kayser-Roth Hoisery, Inc. Dress weight tube sock with mock rib leg and method of knitting

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