US2269055A - Split heating system - Google Patents

Split heating system Download PDF

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US2269055A
US2269055A US291968A US29196839A US2269055A US 2269055 A US2269055 A US 2269055A US 291968 A US291968 A US 291968A US 29196839 A US29196839 A US 29196839A US 2269055 A US2269055 A US 2269055A
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air
furnace
water
casing
radiator
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US291968A
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Gower Thomas Charles
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Gower Thomas Charles
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D3/00Hot-water central heating systems

Description

Jan. 6, 1942. y T. c. GowER 2,269,055l

' SPLIT HEATING"SYSTEM` l v Filed Aug. 25,- 1959 s shgetsfsheet 2 normeoeuvemf BRANCH com. Am fuga-nunca PRIMA? .sraRA es TANK Jan. s, 1942. T, C, GowgR 2,269,05

. SPLIT HEATING' SYSTEM Filed Aug.- 25, 193s 5 sheets-sheet s' TIN@ GCU- Patented Jan. 6, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SPLIT HEATING sYs'rEM Thomas Charles Gower, Greenville, S. C. Application August 25, 1939, serial No. 291,969` 5 claims. -(c1.23'19) This invention relates to improvements in heating systemsespecially of the kind known as a ,split heating system. 'I'his system combines the .elements of direct and indirect transfer of Second, to provide a split heating system which is structurally arranged so as to be both efficient and fast in operation. v

Third, to provide a split system wherein one of the most important features resides in the heat control, the principle of which is the thermostatic regulation of hot water circulation for a preheater, the latter being situated in the path of the returning cool air so as to preheat it preliminarily toits contacting the hot furnace jacket.

Fourth, to providev a split system embodying both hot water (or steam) radiators and hot air registers in various portions of the house, the

.thermostatic control being such that the heating effect at both of these devices is kept substantially uniform so as to avoid undue variation in the room'temperatures, as produced by a radiator and by a register.

Fifth,- to provide an improvement in the Figure-6 isa section taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 1 illustrating an improved humidifier.'

Figure '7 is a detail sectional view of one of the stay-bolts.

Figure 8 is a detail sectional view of a portion a radiator system. The latter arrangement is depicted in the drawings, thus representing a true split system, but it is readily understood that the apparatus can delivery of warm air, in vention embodies a feature which respect the invof particular importance.

humidifier which is more efllcient than current devices of this kind inasmuch as it is embodied in the iiredoor frame, hence is located fairly high in the air stream.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the yfollowing specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a central vertical section of the furnace and some of its immediately associated auxiliaries. l

Figure 2 is a central vertical section taken on the line 2-,2 of Fig. l.

Figure 3 is a horizontal section taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2, the view being turned 90 as to position so as to match Fig. 1.

Figure 4 is a diagram of the electrical controls. Figure 5 is a detail vertical section taken substantially on the line 5 5 of Fig. 2, and illustrating a built-in heater.

' at I6'. The stay-bolt is -ho1es in the furnace and water Jacket walls..

Reference is made to the drawings. The socalled closed-air circuit comprises the heating apparatus itself (Figs. 1, 2 and 3), the branches of which lead to and from the rooms above and finally the rooms themselves. The heating apf paratus is generally designated I. The hot air delivery branch is designated 2 (Fig. 2)y and the cool air return branch is designated 3. The branch 2 is attached at 4 in any suitable way over and around a large opening 5 in the roof 6 of a casing 1. This casing comprises the complete enclosureof a furnace, the details of which are now described.

' Said furnace is designated 8. vIt comprises a ilueless compartment which in the instance of the use vof the oil burner 9 (Fig. 1) has the customary ash-pit lined with ilrebrick as at III.

The furnace has a fire door frame II and a gas outlet I2.

A water jacket I3 surrounds most of the furnace 8. The walls of the furnace and water jacket are offset relatively to each other, bothinwardly and outwardly as seen in Figs. 1 and 2, in approximate line with the top of the firebrick lining I0. The jacket I3 contains a volume oi' water I4, and obviously so, this being supplied and kept at the desired level by any of the means currently known for the purpose. i

The furnace and water jacket I3 are held in spaced relationship by a bolts I5. the showing in Fig. '1. Here the' stay-bolt I5 is indicated as being threaded its full length as The threads alone tend to prevent separation of said walls under internal pressure, but in order be devoted solely to thev suitable number of stay- These are made in accordance with screwed into matching.

to insure that purpose the ends of the stay-bolt are riveted over at I1. The riveting also is a contribution toward a watertight joint.

A radiator chamber I8 (Figs. 1 and 3) has direct communication with the interior of the furnace 8 by means of the gas outlet I2. The outlet extends through and beyond the water jacket I3 and holds the radiator chamber I8 in spaced relationship at I9 ,to the rear wall of the jacket I3. The radiator 4chamber I8 preferably comprises two compartments I8s which are coupled near the bottom by a duct I8b and at a point substantially in line with the gas outlet I2 by a passageway I8. This passageway contains the pivoted damper I8d which is adapted to be turned in any desired way, for example, by handle I8e (Fig. 3), proper attention being paid to making gas-tight joints at the points of mounting of the chamber pivot in the walls of the passageway I8". The radiator chamber I8 receives all of the products of combustion from the furnace. The air surrounding both the jacket I3 and each of the compartments I8l is thus heated from two heat sources, first indirectly from the furnace 8 by way of the water volume I4, second directly by virtue of contact with the extremely hot chamber I 8.

In order to make the radiator compartments more effective for the purpose, its walls are slightly tapered at 20 (Fig. 3) in the lateral directions. The spaces I9 thus become progressively wider towardthe lateral margins of the radiator chamber, providing for the ample access of the circulating air to the radiator chamber. This formation comprises a circuitous course for the products of combustion in their flow toward the chimney flue 2|.

Another particular purpose of the invention is to make sure that all of the cool air entering the casing 1 by way of the return branch 3 is brought into direct contact with the `jacket I 3' and the radiator chamber I8. A strong-updraft is secured in these confined quarters by a horizontal baille 23 (Fig. 3) which follows the inside contour of the casing 1 and is cut out at 24 closely to the jacket and radiator so as to de- `flne a restricted passage. This horizontal baille is generally in the nature of a shelf, and it is approximately on a level with the furnace and water jacket offsetsand the top of the flrebrick lining I0. The latter also becomes very hot because of the discharge of the flame from the oil burner 9 into the chamber on the inside, consequently the returning cool air which, incidentally by this time has become preheated, starts at once to derive the heating benefit of the furnace.

In other words, the returning air is so controlled that the highest possible amount of heat is imparted to it by virtue of compelling the air stream to strike the hottest parts of the heating apparatus and to remain in contact therewith until the moment of discharge from the casing 1 into the branch 2. In furtherance of the last named purpose, the branch 3 is attached at 25 to a receiver 26. 'I'his receiver comprises a compartment at one'side of the casing 1, there being communication between the two by way of an lopening 21 (Fig. 2).

This opening constitutes the outlet of a `blower casing 28 within the receiver 28. A fan 29 is revoluble in the casing, being driven by an electric motor 30, and air is drawn into the casing 28 by the operation of the fan 29 through an opening 3|. The blower casing 28 actually provides thechannel of communication between the receiver 28 and the furnace casing 1.

The receiver 25 is partitionedat 32 (Fig. 2). Said partition underlies the branch 3, and it is desirably dished althoughthe dishing is not imperative. air opening 33. This opening has a preheating coil 34 tted in it like agrille (Fig. 3). Said coil intercepts all of the air returning in the branch 3 and its purpose is to preheat said air and thus warm the latter preliminarily to its being introduced into the casing 1.

Said preheating coil' 34 is piped at 35,y 36, to

the water jacket I3. It comprises an extension of the water jacket which reaches out in amanner of speaking, to a place where contact of the lReverting to the preheating coil 34, brief men-- tion is desired to be made 0f its structural details. A pair of heaters 39 (Fig. 3) is connected by a plurality of tubes A4I) (Fig. 8). 'I'hese tubes are spaced apart to providep'air passages, and they are equipped with fins 4I which augment the radiation of the heat from the water contained by the tubes.

Before describing the control diagram in-Fig. 4, reference is desired to be made to collateral features of the invention. One of these has to do with the fire door-frame, II (Fig. 1). This frame is utilized as the basis of an improved humidifier 42. The latter comprises one long pan 43 which is adapted to hold a quantity of water 44 that is supplied by way of a valve 45 (Fig. 3) from a pipe 48. A valve 45 is controlled by the float 41 and when the level of the water drops to a predetermined extent the Valve 45 -opens automatically to replenish the supply.

The advantage of this arrangement in the humidifier` 42 is that a positive evaporation of the water is insured. The pan 43' and its contained volume of water represents a fair amount of weight. Since the frame II is made of cast iron it is adequately strong to support the humidifier. The pan is firmly held in place by flanges 48 which stand up from the frame II. These flanges, and others like them at the bottom of the frame,=" are intended to enable the aflixation ofthe frame to the jacket and casing walls. They also serve the purpose of retaining the wate'r pan.

A secondary purpose of the heating apparatus is to furnish a supply of hot water in the summe'rtime. To that end a.l heater 49 (Figs. 2 and 5) is built into the jacket I3 as shown. It comprises headers 58 which are emplaced upon the outside of the water jacket. The distance between these headers is spanned by a -plurality of water 4tubes which are immersed in the water I4 inside of the jacket. The headers 50 are piped at 5I to a storage tank 52. The latter receives its supply from the service pipe 53 and when one of the fixtures in the house is opened, the pressure of water from the cold side drives the previously heated water up a. pipe 54 which leads to the xtur'e.

Inasmuch as thebuilt-in heater,49 is intended to supply hot water in the summer as well as winter, provision is made for diverting the heated air from the delivery branch 2. This prvision Said partition denes a constrictedcomprises twin dampers 49a, 50a, which are connected by a link Ia of a suitable type. They are hinged contiguously to the opening 5, and a lateral opening 52a in the casing 'I (Fig. 2) and when one of the dampers, for example the damper 49a, is moved to the closed position by the lever 53a, the `ldamper 50a is moved correspondingly to uncover the lateral opening 52a and let the heat out into the basement.

Reference is now made to the diagram in Fig. 4

which illustrates the electrical control of the sysl tem. The wires 55, 56, which lead to and from a source of current, have branches 51, 58, 59, 66 and 6I which embrace in the order stated a warm air thermostat 62, the blower and hot water circulator motors 38 and 38 as well as a stoker or oil burner motor 63 a thermal control 64, an immersion control 65 connected in parallel with the room thermostat 66, and a limit control 61 which is a pressure control connected in series with the firing device. i

These control devices are all of a known character and for that reason their details are omitted from the diagram. The thermostat 62 is emplaced in the midst of the house space adapted to be heated by the warm air. is adapted to be ,emplaced in that part of the house which is'intended to be heated by radiators. It maintains the necessary temperature in the water I4 to operate the indirect'hot water heater Ifor the domestic hot water supply. Reference is made to Fig. 1 wherein a radiator 68 is shown piped at 69, 10, to the top and bottom of the jacket I3. The steam is adapted to circulate through the radiator 68 so that the room heating effect can be produced indirectly through the radiator and directly through the expelled warmed air. A

The operation The operation is readily understood. It is assumed first that the rooms of the house which are a part of the closed air circuit, are intended to be heated only by warm air. The thermostat 62 is usually set for' a room temperature of 72.- l When the temperature drops below that amount the thermostat switch closes an electrical circuit through the motor 38 which starts the circulation of hot Water I4 from the jacket I3 through The thermostat 66 degrees it will maintain the water at this temperature, which, obviously is below the 212 degree y boiling or steam point. When the area controlled by the thermostat 66 calls for heat the firing device `63 will be operated until the circuit is opened at the thermostat 66, or until the pressure control 65 opens the circuit. No heat will be conveyed to the warm air area controlled by the thermostat 62, unless said thermostat closes. l

In thewinter operation of the heating system the damper I8d (Fig. 1) is intended to be closed. This prevents the products of combustion from flowing through the passageway I8 directly to the chimney nue 2 I. The hot gases are diverted downwardly, passing' from one compartment I8* `to the other by way of the duct I8b. A lhigh per- .centage of the heat value of the gases is thus utilized, theresult being an extremely hot radiator I8 which, in turn is certain to heat the circulating air to a high degree.

For summer operation it is undesirable to have this effect, and for that reason the damper I8d is opened so as to by-pass the hot gases directly to the chimney flue. The primary purpose of summer operation of the heating systemis to heat the water in the'heater 49 (Fig. 2) for domestic uses.

I claim:

l. A split heating system comprising a closed air circuit including air delivery and return branches, a power fan to induce a unl-directional air flow in said circuit, a furnace having a water the preheating coil 34. The immersion control which comprises an immersion acquastat operates the burner motor 3 to maintain the water at a predetermined temperature. When the thermostat 62 is closed the result is the starting of the hotwater circulator 38 whereupon water is pumped through the preheating coil 34. This reduces the temperature of the Waterand causes the ring device (motor 63) to operate.

This coil is intended to be kept quite hot usually from te 180. When the temperature rises in the coil 34 into the foregoing range, the blower motor 30 is started by means of the thermal control 64. Said control is in contact with the coil 34. The room thermostat 66 operates the firing device to produce the necessary steam pressure to heat the radiator 68. Either thermostat 62 or 66 can start the flow. of heat independently -for the areas which they control.

With respect to the immersion control 65 and limit control 61 it will be noted that the latter is in series with the line in .which the oil burner motor 63 is connected. Its purpose is to limit and control the steam pressure. The immersion acquastat 65 'is connected in parallel with the thermostat '66.

Assuming that the acquastat 65 is set at 190 jacket, a space-heating radiator piped to the water jacket and adapted to warm the air of a room in which it is-located, a radiator chamber connected to the furnace for receiving the escaping products of combustion, a casing enclosing the furnace with its jacket and radiator chamber to conne the heat radiating therefrom and beingv coupled in said system to pre-heat the air entering the delivery branch thus to augment the heating function of said space-heating radiator, and a preheating coil situated in the return branch to intercept and preheat the spent and confluent air prior to its reentrance into the casing, said coil being piped to the jacket to utilize some of the hot water for the preheating. 2..A split heating system comprising a closed air circuit including air delivery and return branches, the return branch having an opening, a furnace having a Water jacket, al radiator chamber connected to the furnace .for receiving the escaping products of combustion,'a casing i enclosing the furnace with its jacket and radiator chamber to confine the radiant heat and being coupled in said system to supply the heat for the air passing into the delivery branch, a

preheating coil occupying said opening like a grille, intercepting the air in the returnl branch and preheating it prior to its reentrance into the casing, said coil being piped to the jacket. a cirg culating pump coupled in said piping, and a motor to drive the pump, having a thermal control in substantial contact with the preheating coil.

3. In a heating system, a casing for the supply and return of hot and cool air, a furnace located in the casing, spaced in from the walls thereof to denne a surrounding air space, a iiredoor -f frame .extending from the furnace across the space to the outside of the casing, and a humidilier supported upon and thereby utilizing said frame as a mount for the humidifier in said space.

4. In a heating system, a casing for the supply and return o! hot 'and cool air, a furnace located in the casing, spaced in from the walls thereof to dene a surrounding air space and'having a hot gas out1et, a radiator located in said air space, consisting of compartments coupled at one end, one of the compartments being connected to said gas outlet adjacent to the other end of the radiator, said compartments having a communieating passageway. and-a chimney ueconnection 'substantially in line with said outlet, and a damper situated in said passageway, being adjustable to either of two positions respectively to close said passageway and by-pass the gases into the compartments and through the coupling or to open said passageway for the escapeof the gases directly to the chimney ilue.

5. In a heating system. a casing having a hot air delivery branch leading to a room from an opening in the top, a furnace located in the cas- THOMAS CHARLES GOWER.

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2482746A (en) * 1945-12-10 1949-09-27 Robert E Crozier Space heater
US2526464A (en) * 1947-03-14 1950-10-17 George W Folk Hot-air heater and boiler therefor
US2529977A (en) * 1949-03-29 1950-11-14 Gilbert & Barker Mfg Co Warm air and hot-water heating apparatus
US2533508A (en) * 1946-05-24 1950-12-12 Walter I Riu Furnace for hot-air and water space heating with domestic water heater
US2541337A (en) * 1946-03-23 1951-02-13 Gabriel A Cherem Heating and air conditioning system
US2556671A (en) * 1948-03-30 1951-06-12 Auslander George Combination wet and dry heat generator
US2561506A (en) * 1945-12-29 1951-07-24 Phillips Petroleum Co Liquefied gas evaporator
US2573364A (en) * 1949-02-04 1951-10-30 John E Scharff Air-heating furnace with liquid heat transfer means
US2638891A (en) * 1947-12-12 1953-05-19 Guyon L C Earle Combination space and water heater and incinerator unit
DE949258C (en) * 1951-12-21 1956-09-13 Thure Andersson Standing boiler for generating hot water and hot air
US2833268A (en) * 1954-09-16 1958-05-06 Albert E Warren Combined air and water heater
DE1111359B (en) * 1958-10-07 1961-07-20 Guenther Dammkoehler Hot water boilers with built-in heaters
US3563225A (en) * 1968-08-08 1971-02-16 Mario M Masrieh Warm air units
US4192457A (en) * 1978-08-30 1980-03-11 Easterly Herbert D Auxiliary truck heater
US4418866A (en) * 1980-06-11 1983-12-06 Workman Theodore W Heat recovery
US5796915A (en) * 1996-10-02 1998-08-18 Hsing-Lin; Hsieh Hot water heater with refuse incinerator
US20130206130A1 (en) * 2010-04-15 2013-08-15 King ching Ng Athermal radiation type oil burner and a method for reducing greenhouse gas emissions

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2482746A (en) * 1945-12-10 1949-09-27 Robert E Crozier Space heater
US2561506A (en) * 1945-12-29 1951-07-24 Phillips Petroleum Co Liquefied gas evaporator
US2541337A (en) * 1946-03-23 1951-02-13 Gabriel A Cherem Heating and air conditioning system
US2533508A (en) * 1946-05-24 1950-12-12 Walter I Riu Furnace for hot-air and water space heating with domestic water heater
US2526464A (en) * 1947-03-14 1950-10-17 George W Folk Hot-air heater and boiler therefor
US2638891A (en) * 1947-12-12 1953-05-19 Guyon L C Earle Combination space and water heater and incinerator unit
US2556671A (en) * 1948-03-30 1951-06-12 Auslander George Combination wet and dry heat generator
US2573364A (en) * 1949-02-04 1951-10-30 John E Scharff Air-heating furnace with liquid heat transfer means
US2529977A (en) * 1949-03-29 1950-11-14 Gilbert & Barker Mfg Co Warm air and hot-water heating apparatus
DE949258C (en) * 1951-12-21 1956-09-13 Thure Andersson Standing boiler for generating hot water and hot air
US2833268A (en) * 1954-09-16 1958-05-06 Albert E Warren Combined air and water heater
DE1111359B (en) * 1958-10-07 1961-07-20 Guenther Dammkoehler Hot water boilers with built-in heaters
US3563225A (en) * 1968-08-08 1971-02-16 Mario M Masrieh Warm air units
US4192457A (en) * 1978-08-30 1980-03-11 Easterly Herbert D Auxiliary truck heater
US4418866A (en) * 1980-06-11 1983-12-06 Workman Theodore W Heat recovery
US5796915A (en) * 1996-10-02 1998-08-18 Hsing-Lin; Hsieh Hot water heater with refuse incinerator
US20130206130A1 (en) * 2010-04-15 2013-08-15 King ching Ng Athermal radiation type oil burner and a method for reducing greenhouse gas emissions

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