US2268645A - Phonograph - Google Patents

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US2268645A
US2268645A US215754A US21575438A US2268645A US 2268645 A US2268645 A US 2268645A US 215754 A US215754 A US 215754A US 21575438 A US21575438 A US 21575438A US 2268645 A US2268645 A US 2268645A
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arm
carriage
phonograph
plate
extremity
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Charles W Dann
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Thomas A Edison Inc
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Thomas A Edison Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B25/00Apparatus characterised by the shape of record carrier employed but not specific to the method of recording or reproducing, e.g. dictating apparatus; Combinations of such apparatus
    • G11B25/02Apparatus characterised by the shape of record carrier employed but not specific to the method of recording or reproducing, e.g. dictating apparatus; Combinations of such apparatus using cylindrical record carriers

Description

Jan. 6, 1942.
c. w. DANN PHONOGRAPH Filed June 25, 1938 11 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR Charles ZU'. Dan 72 A TORNEY C. W. DANN Jan. 6, 1942.
PHONOGRAPH 11 Sheets-Shet 2 Filed June 25, 1958 ILIU Zm INVENTOR Charles ZUZDamz BY A ORNEY c. w'. DANN Jan. 6, 1942.
PHONOGRAPH Filed June 25 ll Sheets-Sheet 3 C. W. DANN Jan. 6, 1942.
PHONOG-RAPH Filed June 25, 1958 ll Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR Charles ZIZDamn BY a y TTORNEY' Jan. 5, 1942. C. w. DANN 2,268,645
PHONOGRAPH Filed June l938 11 Sheets-Sheet 5 Md-W. A ORN EY I C. W. DAN N PHONOGRAPH Jan. 6, 1942.
TORNF Jan. 6,1942. c. w. DAM 2,268,645
I PHONOGRAPH Fi-led June 25, 1938 11. Sheets-Sheet 7 2374, 25 v gg INVENTOR Charles. M'Damz ZZY of I M 205 TORNEY Jan. 6, w DANN v PHONOGRAPH Filed June 25, 1938 11 Shets-Sheet 1o 500 INVENTOR Charles Zl/I Damz A ORNEY Jan. 6, 1942. c. w. DANN 2,268,645
PHONOGRAPH Filed June 25, 1958 11 Sheets-Sheet 11 INVENTOR Ch :1 rles WIDanm b BY J? Ma-A-a TORNEY Patented Jan. 6, 1942 PHONOGRAP-H Charles W. Dann, East Orange, N. J., assignor to Thomas A. Edison, Incorporated, West Orange, a N. J a corporation of New Jersey Application June 25, 1938, Serial No. 215,754
32 Claims.
This invention relates to phonographs, and especially to those of the type intended for the recordation, or recordation and reproduction, of dictation, speeches, conferences and the like.
It is an object of the invention to provide a phonograph of the type described which is small, light and compact.
It is an object to provide a phonograph of the type described which is highly flexible in arrangement, to permit its use as a single unit in an exposed place or in a moderate-sized enclosure, and as a plurality of yet smaller units in small-sized enclosures such as shallow desk drawers and the like.
It is an object to provide a phonograph of the type described employing and characterized by the advantages of electrical recordation and reproduction.
It is an object to provide a phonograph of the type described, the use of which will require a very small number of operations by the operator. It is an allied object to provide such a phonograph wherein the operation of change .of records will occasion the automatic performance of many other operations.
It is an object to provide a phonograph of the type described, the advantages-of which are attained economically. It is an allied object to form and arrange the components so that they may be constructed of cheap materials and otherwise at low cost. It is an allied object to avoid the necessity for attractively finishing many individual components, as well as to provide a maximum protection of the components from injury and dirt.
It is an object to provide a substantially fully enclosed phonograph without impairing its ready manipulab-ility or the positive awareness of the operator of the condition of the machine at any for recordation, is readily and positively con-1 verted forsimple reproducing use.
It is an object to provide improvements in the electrical and mechanical association of an electronic amplifier with the rest of the phonographic apparatus.
It is an object to provide improved means forv detachably coupling separate parts of the apparatus.
It is a general object to provide a generally improved phonograph of the type described.
Other and allied objects will more fully appear from the following description and the appended claims.
In the detailed description of my invention,
' hereinafter set forth, reference is had tov the ,ac-.
It is an object to provide improvements in and 55 companying drawings, of which:
Figure 1 is a perspective View of a complete phonograph equipment according to my inven- Figure2 is a top planview of the phonograph proper without its cover, for example in an adjustment for recordation, a few of the bottom parts being omitted for the sake of clearillustration;
Figure 2a. is a fragmentary horizontal crosssectional view taken centrally through the large diameter. cylinder 95 appearing in. plan in the upper lefthand corner of Figure 2;
Figure 3 is a front elevational view of the phonograph, adjusted for reproduction of matter already recorded, some of the more rearward parts being omitted;
Figure'3a is afragmentary horizontal crosssectional view taken on the line 3a-3a of Figure 3; Figure 4 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the phonograph taken substantially along the line 4-4 of' Figure 2, but with the phonograph in a neutral adjustment, a few of the most rearward parts being omitted; Figure 5 is a bottom plan View of the phono+ graph, for example at the termination of recordation upon a record, some of the upper carriage components being omitted;
Figure 6 is a rear elevational view of the phonograph, supported on the amplifier 2, with the phonograph in a stopped condition;
Figure 7 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the phonograph, again supported on the amplifier, taken substantially along the line 'I'I of Figure 2 to show the carriage but not the advance slide, and illustrating the phonograph during the process of the return of the carriage to its initial position;
Figure 8 is a fragmentary rear elevational view of the phonograph and amplifier covers, the pho- Figure l isa vertical cross-sectional view,
taken substantially along the line Ill-I0 of Figure 2 to show the advance slide but not the carriage, and illustrating the phonograph during the process of the return of the carriage toits initial position; 7
Figure a is a fragmentary horizontal crosss'ectional view, taken very, approximately along the line I U a-Illa of Figure 10, and illustrating the lower rear lefthand corner portion of the phonograph just as the process .of carriage return'is being completed;
Figure 11 is a fragmentary view similar to Figure 9a or to a portion of Figure 10, but illustrating, its components after the completion of the process of carriage return .but before the phonograph has again been started;
Figure 12 is a righthand end view of the carriage, with portions of the righthand end member II removed; illustrating a recordation'adjustment;
Figure 13 is a staggered vertical view taken through the carriage looking from the right, illustrating a reproduction adjustment, the translating device being shown in simplified elevation; Figure 14 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the carriage, taken principally along the line I 4I4 of Figure 12, and illustrating a neutral adjustment;
Figure 15 is a partial vertical cross-sectional view of the central carriage components, taken principally along the line ,I5I5 of Figure 12;
Figure 16 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the translating device only, taken principally along the line Iii-I6 of Figure 15, thevibration damper 305 being omitted;
Figure 17 is a horizontal cross-sectional view of the carriage, taken principally along the line I'I--I I of Figure 12', and illustrating a neutral adjustment;
Figure 18 is a vertical front view of the second cam plate 31 I in neutral position;
I Figure 19 is a vertical front view of the auxil iary cam plate 4M, in inactive position;
Figure 20 is a vertical cross-sectional view of translating device omitted, taken substantially along the line 2I-2I of Figure 20, and illustrating the components during operation of the phonograph but with a neutral adjustment;
Figure 22 is a partial vertical cross-sectional View taken principally along the line 22 22 of Figure 21, showing the relationship of the auxiliary cam plate to certain of the rear carriage components;
Figure 23 is a partial vertical cross-sectional view taken principally along the line 2323 of Figure 21;
Figure 24 is an enlarged, partial horizontal cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 24-24 of Figure 22;
Figure 25 is a partial vertical cross-sectional view taken principally along the line 25--25 of Figure 24, and indicating various positions occupied by certain of the components under different conditions of adjustment;
Figure 26 is a lefthand elevational view, with a small portion in section, of the latch lever 435 and associated components, illustrating two positions which may beassumed by that latch lever;
Figure 27 is a partial vertical cross-sectional view taken principally along the line 2I2'I of Figure 24;
Figure 28 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the central and top righthand portions of the carriage and advance slide system, taken vertically through the carriage rod I0;
Figure 29 is a righthand elevational View of the phonograph, illustrating the phonograph after a record has been mounted on the mandrel but before the next ensuing starting of operation of the phonograph;
' Figure 30 is a simplified schematic wiring diagram of the electrical connections of thephonoph;
Figure 31 is a righthand inside elevational view of the bottom part of the lefthand end of the cover 6 in position on the phonograph;
Figures 32a and 3217 are fractional perspective views respectively of the lower lefthand front corner of the cover 6 and of the forward end of the associated coupling slide, separated from their normal relationship;
Figures 33a. and 33b are fractional perspective views respectively of the lower lefthand rear corner of the cover 6 and of the rear end of the associated coupling slide, separated from their normal relationship; and
Figure 34 is a lefthand end View of the lower rear portion of the phonograph, with the end plate 2| shown only in dash-dot lines to expose a dashpot device 590 which I prefer to employ but which has been omitted from other figures in the interest of simplicity of illustration.
Figure 1 illustrates in perspective a complete electrical recording and reproducing phonograph equipment according to my invention, with all the necessary controls therefor; from this figure may be seen the extreme compactness, full encasement and protection of components, and simplicity of control and of appearance, which characterize the equipment. Four units are shown: the-phonograph proper as I, an amplifier as 2, a handpiece (for sound collection and dispersal) as 3, and a stand for the handpiece as 4, the several units being electrically interconnected by appropriate thin cabling such as 5. Both phonograph I and amplifier 2 are of very small height; as shown in Figure 1 (and in later Figures 6, 7 and 8) the amplifier 2 is in inverted position, forming a base for the, phonograph I. It will be understood, however, that the phonograph and amplifier may when desired be otherwise disposed-the amplifier for example upright in the drawer of a desk, the phonograph being disposed in that or another drawer or on top of the desk, or the like, the small, size of these units permitting a wide choice of their dispositions and affording a high degree of portability of the complete equipment.
Attention being directed particularly to the phonograph I, it will be seen from Figure 1 that a unitary cover 6 substantially completely encloses it. The cover 6 is formed with a large, approximately circular hole 1 in its right-hand end, exposing the end of the mandrel (hereinafter more fully mentioned) and permitting the mounting of a cylindrical record on the mandrel and its removal therefrom. The hole 1 also exposes a lever 8 hereinafter more fully described; this lever is provided with a hinged fingerpiece 9 which normally extends outwardly through the cover hole I, but which may be folded up to a vertical position to permit the lowering and raising of the cover. The cover 6 is formed with a slot it! along the bottom of its front, through which slot a carriage H extends to terminate in a vertical control plate 12 very slightly spaced forwardly of the front cover surface, the carriage (hereinafter detailedly described) and control plate being arranged for side-to-side travel. Above the slot l0, and on to the righthand end of the cover, the upper front edge of the cover is cut away to expose an elongated annotation-slip holder i3 which extends horizontally from side to side, and inclinedly upwardly from front to back. The top of the cover 6 is provided with a flange portion I 4 downhanging toward the holder [3 near the rear of the latter; a small space between the bottom of the flange portion M and the holder l3 permits the forward extension over the holder of two pointers-'a carriage pointer 15 and an advance pointer l1, hereinafter more fully referred to. The lefthand end of the flange portion 14 may be joined to the front of the cover by a further small flange portion I5 downhanging from the cover top to below the top of the lefthand extremity of the holder l3. The so-described interruptions in the continuity of the cover 6 are the only ones necessary for manipulation or observation of the phonograph.
Frame and mandrel The components of the phonograph I are assembled to a frame which basically comprises two vertical front-and-back extending plates 2| and 22, held to a circumferentially incomplete cylinder 29 at the extremities of the latter. In Figures 2 through 5 plate 2| appears as the righthand end member and plate 22 as an intermediate member relatively near the lefthand end of the machine, the cylinder 20 passing therebetween approximately at mid-position from front back. The circumferential discontinuity of the cylinder 20 is a longitudinal opening IS in the cylinder wall, of very approximately 90 degrees extent, and disposed toward the front of the machine; its upper edge appears as l9a in Figures 2 and 3 and its lower edge as I9b in Figure 5, but it is best seen in the central frontand-back vertical section of Figure 7. The plate 2| does not cover or close its end of the cylinder 23; the cylinder terminates in a full circular aperture in this plate, as best seen in the righthand end view of Figure 29, and with this aperture the cover hole 1 is aligned when the cover is in place. The plate 22, however,'covers its end of the cylinder (except for a small segment at the discontinuity l9) and, as may be seen best in Figures 2, 4 and 5, is provided with a leftwardly extending boss 23 central of the cylinder. In this boss there is secured, as by set screw 25, the lefthand end portion of a tube 24 extending axially of cylinder 20; and through this tube is rotatably passed a mandrel shaft 26. A mandrel 21 is secured on the mandrel shaft, within the cylinder 20, the latter thus forming an enclosure or shield for the mandrel and for the cylindrical record removably mounted on the mandrel.
Such a record, by way of example a wax record, has been indicated in various figures (Figure 4 for example) as R.
The mandrel 21, which may be of a well-known form such as that disclosed in U. S. Letters PatentNo. 2,010,717, issued August 6, 1935, on application of Heinrich F. Max Gramann, is not illuscause the collapse of the chuck members and the ejection of the record.
The plate 22 does not itself extend forwardly of the cylinder 20; but from the lefthand extremity' of the boss 23 above mentioned there extends forwardly an extension plate 3| having upper and lower arms 3| a and 3), respectively, as best seen in Figure 9. It will be understood that the assembly of plates 21 and 22, cylinder 2e, boss 23, and extension plate 3|, may be made of die castings.
The frame of the machine may include, in addition to the components just mentioned, another front-and-ba/ck extending, vertical plate 32; this may form the lefthand end member of the machine, and may be held spaced away from plate 22 by horizontal spacing means such as top post (33 fractionally shown in Figures 2 through 4) and bottom post 34 (shown in Figures 3 through 5). It may further betied. to thelower plate arm 3H) near the front of the machine through a block 35 and post 36, these being integrally formed and secured respectively to 32 and 3| b.
The annotation slip holder l3, into which a slip S may be leftwardly inserted, comprises a trough member l3a terminally secured on the I front portions of the tops of plate 2| and upper plate arm Ma; and a platform member l3b secured within, and raised above. the bottom of, the trough member 13a. Slip-holding flanges i3c are formed rearwardly from the upturned front of the trough member and forwardly from the rear of the platform member, that trough member front and the platform member extendingleftwardly only asfar as the cover flange [5.
Motor, etc.
A motor supplying driving power for various functions hereinafter mentioned is shown as 40;
-, this is disposed behind the cylinder 20, to the right of the plate-22. The internal construction of the motor is-not shown in detail; but in Figures 5 and 6 there willbe seen, largely in dotted lines, lefthand and righthand end members, 4| and 42 forthe motor assembly. Top and bottom senii-cylindrical shields 43 and 44 extend from one end member to the other, enclosing and shielding the motor. The lefthand motor end member 4| is secured to the plate 22 through a plurality of short mounting pillars 45; To the righthand motor end member 42 is secured the lefthand end wall of a die-cast housing 50; and from the top of the front surface of this housing there extends upwardly and forwardly an L-shaped lug 46, best seen in Figure '1. This lug overlaps a flat projection 41 formed from the upper rear surface of the cylinder and it is secured thereto by a screw 48, to complete the mounting of the motor. It has been found desirable to keep the entire motor frame and shielding free of electrical connection with the frame of the phonograph; accordingly the lug 46' may be insulated from the projection 41 as by insulation 49 disposed therebetween and around the screw 48, and insulating means may be employed in connection with the securing of the motor end member 4Isuch as the formation of the pillars 45 as insulating inserts in that end member. At the left of the motor its shaft 39 extends through the end member 4|, and through an oversize hole 38 in plate 22 into the space between plates 22 and 32, as seen for example in Figure 2. At the right of the motor the shaft 39 extends, through bearing 52 secured to the end member 42, into the housing 50.
On shaft 39 within the housing 50 is secured a centrifugal fan 53, comprising hub 54, disc 55, and vanes 56, all integrally cast for example. Opposite the fan 53 the rear wall of the housing is provided with a rectangular air duct 58 leading and opening rearwardly, while the bottom wall of. the housing is provided with a rectangular air duct 51 leading and opening downwardly. An air path 59 is provided from the interior of the motor into the housing 50 through the housing end wall 5|; and at the lefthand extremity of the motor its shields 43 and 44 are provided with air-admitting holes 60. The action of the fan 53 is to suck air through the holes 60, past the motor and through the air path 59, and to expel it through the air ducts 51 and 58, thereby cooling the motor.
In the space 6| within the housing 50 beyond the fan. 53 there may be located an electricalcontact type of governor for the motor; this governor, of which the details form no part of the instant invention, appears in purely schematic mechanical illustration in Figure 6, and in diagrammatic electrical illustration in Figure 30. At the bottom of the housing 50 there may be provided a shelf 62 extending a short distance rightwardly (appearing of course as leftwardly in the rear view of Figure 6) In the space 63 above this shelf and on top of the housing 50 may be disposed the components of an electrical filter system, as schematically indicated at F in Figure 6, interposed, as diagrammatically indicated at F in Figure 30, in the electrical connections to the motor for the suppression of highfrequency electrical disturbances which may tend to be set up by the motor. The space 63 may be covered and shielded by a generally L-shaped hollow cover 64, this cover being electrically at the potential of the housing 50 and motor 40.
"Carriage, advance slide and feed screw proximately mid-elevation,. and terminally secured in plates 32 and 2|. Along this rod there is adapted to move the carriage I I, already mentioned. While the carriage is illustrated and described in detail in and in connection with laterfigures, its general form will be apparent from Figures 2, 3, 5 and '7. It may include a righthand end member 1| and a lefthand end member 12, each in general vertically disposed in front of the cylinder 20 but extending, in its bottom portion, forwardly through the cover slot I0 and rearwardly to underneath the cylinder 20. The carriage may further include, between members 1| and 12, a top cross portion 13, a rearcross portion 14, and a central cross-portion 15, the latter surrounding and bearing on the rod 10 and having the leftward extension 16 beyond end member 12 (seen in Figure 3) also surrounding and bearing on rod 10. Adjacent the top of the end member 1| the cross portion 13 is thickened and provided with a bevel surface 11 in a. plane approximately directed toward the cylinder 2!] axis; and in this surface is secured a stud 18 carrying a roller 19 free to rotate on the stud. The periphery of this roller rests against a ridge formed on the outer surface of cylinder 20 adjacent the top of the cylinder opening I9, and rides along this ridge as the carriage is moved along rod 10. The weight of the carriage develops a force tending to rotate it about rod 10, rearwardly above that rod, and the roller 19 and ridge 80 form a bearing which resists that force. To render the carriage secure against rotation in the opposite direction a screw 8| may be passed upwardly through the rear cross portion 14, substantially into contact with a ridge 82 formed on the outer surface of cylinder 20 underneath the cylinder axis.
To the top of the top carriage cross portion 13 in its lefthand half there is secured a plate 69, and from the righthand extremity of this plate there is formed the narrow, flat carriage pointer I6 above stated to extend forwardly over the annotation-slip holder I3.
Surrounding the carriage rod 10 at the right of the carriage II is a generally cylindrical advance slide I20. In its normal position relative to the carriage, the slide I20 extends leftwardly into a partial annular recess 15a formed in the righthand carriage end member 1| and the central carriage cross portion 15 immediately adjacent the rod 10, this recess extending leftwardly for a minor part of the width of the carriage and being indicated for example in Figure '7. In its normal position, the slide I20 extends rightwardly to bring its righthand extremity only very slightly to the right of the carriage end member 1|. The advance slide I20 is normally pushed rightwardly by the carriage II as the carriage moves in that direction. Ordinarily the carriage portion immediately in contact with the advance slide I20 is a thin finger I25 carried by the carriage and normally extending downwardly into the carriage recess 15a at the lefthand extremity of that recess; this finger is hereinafter more particularly referred to, but its extremity may be seen in Figure '7 in the recess 15a above the rod 10. 7
To the righthand extremity of slide I20 is secured an arm I2I, seen in Figure 10, extending upwardly and rearwardly from the slide in a vertical plane to terminate in gravity-maintained contact with the upper ridge 80 on cylinder 20.
On the lefthand surface of the arm I2I at its upper extremity is formed a thin boss or button I22; when the finger I25 is in contact with the lefthand slide extremity this button is slightly spaced from the surface of the righthand carriage end member II, as may be seen in Figure 2. From this figure and Figure 10 it may also be seen that a bracket I23 is secured to the arm I2I near the arm extremity,-extending first vertically upwardly and then horizontally leftwardly just above the top carriage cross portion I3. On top of the horizontal portion of this bracket there is secured a plate I24 in position such that its lefthand extremity is always spaced from the righthand extremity of plate 69 by a shade more than the spacing of button I22 from carriage end member II. From the lefthand extremity of the plate I24 there is formed the narrow, flat advance pointer I'l above stated to extend forwardly to over the annotation-slip holder it.
A feed screw 83 is disposed below and parallel with the rod Ill, and against this screw is biased a feed nut 84 carried in the carriage II, shown in Figure '7, and hereinafter more particularly referred to. At its lefthand end the feed screw 83 passes through and is journalled in the lower plate arm 3Ib. At its righthand end the feed screw is journalled in the cross portion or base 86 of a Ushaped hanger 85, whose extremities 85a are secured to the plate 2| so that hanger 85 extends leftwardly from that plate; a top view of the hanger 85 appears as Figure 3a. The feed screw 83 is rotated whenever the mandrel 21 is rotated; accordingly, assuming the feed nut 84 in engagement with the feed screw in response to its bias, the carriage I I is driven slowly rightwardly so that stylus means carried by the carriage and engageable with a record R .on the mandrel will traverse a spiral path on the rec- 0rd.
The stylus means and the control system therefor are hereinafter particularly described. It may here be mentioned, however, that those means may comprise a recording stylus and a reproducing stylus; and that that system may comprise a substantially inverted triangular, frontand-back extending fingerpiece or lever 88 in front of the vertical control plate I2 in which the carriage II was above stated to terminate at the front of the machine. This fingerpiece or control lever 88 is secured at its bottom to the top of an inverted triangular, side-to-side extending plate 89 spaced slightly in front of the control plate I2--the plate 89 being mounted to be swung in its own plane,and the control lever 88 accordingly being inclinable, to the right and left of the mean position illustrated in Figure 1. When the plate 89 is in its mean position, with the control lever 88 vertical, both styli are disengaged from the record and the feed nut 84 is held, against its bias, away from .the feed screw 83-i. e., a neutral adjustment is established. When the control lever 88 and plate 89 are moved to the right (e. g., as in Figure 2) and to the left (e. g., as in Figure 3), recordation and reproduction adjustments are respectively established; in each of these adjustments, excepting as prevented by other means hereinafter described, the respective stylus is engaged with the record and the feed nut 8 is engaged with the feed screw In Figure 2 the control lever 88 is shown in its recordation position, and the carriage Ii and the advance slide I20 in their normal relationship to each other. If the mandrel 21 and feed screw 83 be rotated, the carriage and advance slide will be driven slowly rightwardly and the recordq: no
ing stylus will traverse the rotating record; that stylus, being vibrated in accordance with sound should be desired to condition the phonograph for the reproductionof matter already recorded on the record, the mandrel and feed screw rotation is first preferablystopped'the controllever 88 is moved into its central or neutral position (disengaging the stylus from the record and the feed nut from the feed screw), the carriage. is manually moved leftwardly the desired distance, and the control lever 88 is then moved into its lefthandor reproduction position (engaging the reproducing stylus with the record and the feed nut with the feed-screw) the advance slide I20, however, is left at the position which it occupied at the beginning of the manipulations just-mene tioned. Now when the mandrel and feed screw are again rotated, the carriage will be driven slowly toward the advance slide and the reproducing stylus will traversethe rotating rec-. ord; the vibrations of that stylus caused by the record groove modulations are translated into sound as hereinafter described; Figure 3 illustrates the phonograph at the beginning of or during its operation forsueh reproduction, the carriage being assumed to have been moved left-.
'- wardly a considerable distance in the condition-i ing of the phonograph for the reproduction. When the carriage has been driven rightwardly sufficiently to re-establish the normal relationship between it and the advance slide (1. e., when the finger I25 has again come, into contact with the lefthand end of the advance slide) the reproe ducing stylus will have traversed all thematter recorded before the conditioning of the phonograph for reproduction; the phonograph may then be re-conditioned for recordation by the movement of the control lever 88 from its reproduction position back into its recordationposition. I r
M andrel and feed screw rotation The power of the motors!) is made available for various functions in the phonograph through the medium of a rotatable pulley or-hub 9| driven by the motor, best seen in Figures 2, 2a and 9,. Thus between the plates 22 and 32, a little above and forward of the motor shaft 39, is journalled a horizontal rod 96, and on this rod is secured the hub SI abovementioned; this hub may be of length about half the distance between plates 22 and 32, and may beheld relatively near the plate 32. At the righthand end of hub 9|. is formed a disc 94 of relatively large diameter; and at the periphery of this disc is formed a rightwardly extending annular flange or cylinder 95. The motor shaft 39 extends to within this cylinder, and on its extremity is secured the small pulley 96. Within the cylinder is located a mechanism constantly coupling the pulley 98 to the inside surface of the cylinder. The fundamental element of this mechanism is a coupling roller 9'! of rubber or other insulating and resilient composition, disposed diagonally forward of and below the pulley 96 and carried by the forward bifurcated extremity of a curved arm 98. The rear bifurcated extremity of this arm is pivotally secured to the lower extremity of a lever 99 which is pivotally mounted on a stud I0 extending leftwardly from plate 22, these elements being best seen in Figures 2a and 10. The upper extremity of the lever 99 is constantly biased forwardlyby a spring I93 tensioned between a pin MI. in that lever extremity and a pin I92 secured in the plate 22; this maintains a bias of the coupling roller 91 against both the pulley 96 and the inside surface of cylinder 95, in spite of any possible wear of the roller. It will accordingly be understood that the cylinder 95 and hub 9| will be rotated whenever the motor 49 is operated, though at reduced angular velocity in view of the relative diameters of pulley 96 and cylinder 95. Amon other things, the mandrel 21 and feed screw 83 are driven by the hub 9 I, being clutchable thereto and de-clutchable therefrom to control their rotation, as may now be described.
The mandrel shaft 26 is extended, to the left of the extremity of tube 24, to a bearing I94 in plate 32, as best seen in Figure 4. Adjacent the bearing I 94 there is secured on the shaft 26 a hub I96 extending rightwardly substantially to the extremity of tube 24. At about the center of the hub I96 there is formed a disc I91 of relatively large diameter; and at the periphery of this disc is formed a rightwardly and leftwardly extending annular flange or short cylinder I98. This cylinder is in front-and-back alignment with a major portion of the hub 9| abovementioned, and is spaced slightly forwardly of the latter, as seen best in Figure 9. The cylinder I98 is driven from the hub 9| through the intermediary of a clutch roller 9 of rubber or other resilient composition, which may be selectively moved into joint engagement with cylinder I98 and. hub 9| or out of such engagement, as hereinafter more particularly described. It will be understood that during such engagement the mandrel 21 will be rotated by the hub 9 I, though at a reduced angular velocity in view of the relative diameters of hub 9| and cylinder I98. In Figures 9 and there have been indicated by arrows the typical directions of rotation of the several rotary members described in this and the preceding paragraph.
The feed screw 83 is slowly rotated simultaneously with mandrel rotation through the intermediary of a train of gears best seen in Figures 2 and 9. This train comprises a gear I I I secured on hub I96 near the righthand extremity of the latter; a larger gear II2, engaging gear III, and carried on a stud II6 secured in lower plate arm 3Ib in front of and a little below shaft 26; a small gear II3 also carried on stud H6 and securely connected with gear H2, to rotate therewith, through a collar II'I therebetween; a coupling gear I I4, engaging gear I I3, and carried on a stud II8 secured in lower plate arm 3Ib in front of and a little below stud H6; and a gear II5, engaging the coupling gear II4, and secured on the lefthand extremity of the feed screw 83 just to the left of the lower plate arm 3 lb.
Control of mandrel and feed screw rotation As seen in Figures 9 and 2, the clutch roller II9, which controls the mandrel and feed screw rotation, is carried by a vertical fork member I39 hanging down between the hub 9| and cylinder I08; near the bottom of this fork member, and below the center line between that hub and that cylinder, is a horizontal cross pin I3I on which the clutch roller I I9 is rotatably mounted. Near its top extremity the fork member I39 is curved slightly rearwardly, and at that extremity it is pivotally held on a horizontal cross pin I36 in the bifurcated forward extremity of a horizontal lever I31; this lever is intermediately pivoted on a horizontal stud I39 extending rightwardly from the plate 32.' The fork member I39 has a cross member I32 a little above the roller H9; and a spring I33, tensioned between the cross member I32 and a horizontal pin I34 secured in plate 32 thereabove, biases the fork member upwardly and the clutch roller 9 into its effective position of joint engagement with hub 9| and cylinder I98. The roller II9 may be moved out of such engagement (though remaining engaged with the cylinder I98) by upward movement of the rear extremity of lever I3'I. So to move the lever there is pivotally mounted on the stud I39, in straddling relationship to the lever, the bifurcated forward extremity of a horizontal arm I49; between the side portions of this arm underneath the rear extremity of lever I3'I is a cross member or web I4I against which there is adapted to impinge the lower end of a vertical screw I38 carried in that lever extremity. When the rear extremity of arm I49 is sufficiently low the web MI is out of contact with screw I38, clutch roller II9 obeys its bias and engages hub 9| and cylinder I98, and the mandrel and feed screw are rotated. When the rear extremity of arm I49 is sufiiciently raised the web I4I impinges against screw I38, raising the rear lever extremity, forcing fork member I39 downwardly, disengaging the clutch roller, and stopping the rotation of the mandrel and feed screw. The bottom surface of the upper extremity of the fork member I39 may be formed with a concave heel I35, which when the member I39 is lowered is pressed downwardly into contact with a resilient stop, comprising a resilient cylindrical pad I42 extending rightwardly from the plate 32 in an appropriate position.
The position of the rear extremity of arm I49 may be controlled by a solenoid assembly positioned therebeneath, best seen in Figures 6, 2 and 9; this assembly may be supported by a vertical plate I45 secured to and forming a rearward extension of plate 32. To this plate I45 may be secured a lower rectangular iron frame I46 and an upper like frame M1, in vertical alignment with each other; and within these frames respectively may be held the vertical solenoids I48 and I49. From the bottom horizontal member of the lower frame I46 a core member I59 extends upwardly a short distance axially within solenoid I48; and from the top horizontal member of the upper frame I4'I a core member I5I extends downwardly a short distance axially within solenoid I49. The top horizontal member of the lower frame I46 and the bottom horizontal member of the upper frame I41 are suitably apertured to permit a common vertical iron plunger I52 to extend axially between and partially into the two solenoids, the plunger I52 having a considerable range of vertical movement between the two core members I59 and I5I. The top core member I5I is centrally apertured to pass a thin coupling rod I53, whose lower extremity is secured in the upper end of the plunger I52 and Whose upper extremity carries a horizontal pin I54 extending both rightwardly and leftwardly. The rear extremity of arm I49 is bifurcated horizontally to embrace the vertical coupling rod I53; and on each side of that rod the arm extremity is bifurcated vertically to embrace the horizontal pin I54. It will be understood that when the lower solenoid I48 is actuated the plunger I52 will be attracted into a downward position, causing rod I53 and the rear extremity of arm I49 to assume downward positions and the clutch roller II9 to be engaged as abovementioned; and that when the upper solenoid I49 is actuated the plunger I52 will be attracted into an upward position (as illustrated in Figures 6 and 9), causing the assumption of upward positions by rod I53 and by the rear extremity of arm I and the disengagement of the clutch roller IIO. In order that each of the two positions of plunger I52, arm I40 etc. may be positively maintained after having been established, a sufficiently strong toggle spring device I55 may be connected between a pin I56 extending rightwardly from plate I (near its rear top corner) and a pin I51 extending leftwardly from arm I40 somewhat forwardly of pin I56.
In view of their respective influences on mandrel (and feed screw) rotation, the lower and upper solenoids I48 and I49 may respectively be termed starting and stopping solenoids. They are arranged for alternate, momentary actuations through the medium of a single-pole double-throw switch, which upon the actuation of either solenoid breaks the power circuit to it and closes that power circuit to theother. This switch, best seen in Figure 6, is assembled to the rear of a vertical, side-to-side extending plate I59, this plate being held at the right of frames I46 and I41 by brackets I60 and I6I. The two throw-contacts of the switch are shown at I62 and I63, respectively carried near the tops of vertical springs I64 and I65 secured to and extending upwardly from the lefthand and righthand sides respectively of an insulating block I66, this block being secured against the lower rear surface of plate I59. As will appear from the diagrammatic Figure 30, contact I62 is electrically connected in series with starting solenoid I48, and contact I63 in series with stopping solenoid I49. The pole of the switch is shown as a pair of contacts I61 on opposite sides of a vertical lug I68 folded rearwardly from the lower lefthand edge of a pivoted vertical arm I10 disposed parallel with and behind plate I59; the confacts I 61 are electrically connected together but are insulated from lug I68 as by insulation I69. The arm I10 is pivoted, at its top extremity, for movement in its own plane, as on a horizontal pin I1I extending rearwardly from the upper portion of plate I59 to a lug I12 folded rearwardly and leftwardly from the righthand edge of plate I59 near its top.
The arm I10 is moved, to throw the switch, by the plunger I52; this movement is effected through the medium of a lever I13 intermediately pivoted on a horizontal pin I11 extending rearwardly, from a leftward projection l59a of the central portion of plate I59,to a lug I19 folded rearwardly and upwardly from the bottom of that projection. A bushing I18 around the pin I11 in front of the lever I13 holds the latter rearwardly against lug H9. The lefthand extremity of the lever I13 is vertically bifurcated to embrace a lu I80 extending rearwardly from a horizontal disc I8I which is secured about the plunger I52 between the solenoids, so that the lever I13 is rocked in a vertical plane by the plunger movement. The lever I13 moves the arm I10 through the medium of an auxiliary lever arm I14 integral with and extending upwardly from the center of the lever I13, and a toggle spring I84; this toggle spring is terminally connected to a pin I85 extending forwardly from the upper extremity of lever arm I14 and to a pin I86 extending rearwardly from arm I10 above pin I85. The righthand extremity of lever I13 is folded forwardly to form a small lug I15, and from the arm I10 there extends rearwardly a' small lug I16, the vertical path of 111g I15 and the horizontal path of lug I16 crossing each other. Lug I15 therefore interferes with the movement of lug I16 in either direction, preventing any switch-throwing movement of arm I10, until the substantial completion of the movement of the plunger (either up or down); this prevents the premature opening of the power circuit to that solenoid which is causing the plunger movement. The plunger movement is conveniently limited and silenced by bumper discs I82 and I63 of soft material respectively above and below the disc I8I abovementioned. The arrangement of the switch is of course such that the actuation of the starting solenoid I48 will move the arm I 10 rightwardly to bring and leave the switch pole (one of the contacts I61) against contact I63, thus opencircuiting the starting solenoid I48 at contact I62 and preparing the stopping solenoid I49 for next actuation; and vice versa.
Return mechanism There has been described the manual leftward movement of the carriage, to such extent as desired, without the advance slide I20, when it is desired to reproduce matter already recorded on a record in the phonograph. It will be understood, however, that ther is necessary a leftward movement, or return, of both the carriage and the advance slide to their initial positions when a fresh record is mounted on the mandrel. In the phonograph according to the instant invention there is incorporated a power-driven means for effecting this return. This means may be driven from hub 9| through a second clutch roller engageable with that hub; there may first be described the structure of the return means and its operation when that roller is engaged, attention thereafter being given to the control of the engagement, of that roller. The return means is immediately associated with the advance slide I20, and operates directly upon that slide to cause its leftward movement; the slide in I that movement pushes the carriage leftwardly,
so that both are returned together. The return means is in the form of a chain-and-sprocket drive, and its major portions are best seen in Figure 3.
Two sprockets are provided near the respective ends of the phonograph; these are centered at the lever of the feed screw 83, and lie in a single vertical plane passing through the feed screw axis. The righthandsprocket I90 is contained within the hanger 85 abovementioned; it is rotatably mounted on a horizontal cross pin I89 extending in a front-a'nd-back direction be tween the sides of the hanger, and may project somewhat into a vertical slot I68 formed in the plate 2| centrally of the hanger. The lefthand sprocket I9I is rotatably mounted on a stud I94 extending forwardly from block 35 abcvementioned, the lower front portion of plate 32 being cut away (as indicated at 32a in Figure 3) to clear this sprocket. From the bottom of the advance slide I20 at its lefthand extremity there hangs down a pair of front-andeback aligned lugs I95 (as seen in Figure 10); a chain I96, secured to a horizontal cross pin I 95a between these lugs, passes leftwardly therefrom to sprocket I9I, downwardly around that sprocket, rightwardly underneath the feed screw 83 to the sprocket I90, upwardly around that sprocket, and leftwardly' back to cross pin I95a. A tensioned spring I91 may be interposed in the lower portion of the chain I96 to maintain the latter taut. Sprocket I90 is always free to rotate; and sprocket I9I; although coupled to other mechanism as will next appear, is ordinarily likewise free to rotate. Thus as the carriage and advance slide are driven rightwardly by the feed screw the chain I96 slowly idles over the two sprockets.
Reference now being had especially to Figures and 9, it will be seen that behind sprocket |9| on stud I94 there is provided a gear I92; this is secured to sprocket |9| through a collar I93 therebetween, the gear and sprocket and collar being rotatable as a unit on the stud. In the block 35 below the stud I94 there is journalled a horizontal, front-and-back extending shaft I98; and on the forward extremity of this shaft, just in front of the block 35, there is secured a gear I99 engaging the gear I92. The shaft I98 extends rearwardly below the cylinder I08, and is journalled in another block 200 secured to the righthand surface of plat 32 at the bottom and somewhat behind the horizontal center of that plate. On the rear extremity of the shaft I98, just behind the block 200, is secured a bevel gear 20I (best seen in Figure 5), which is engaged by a second bevel gear 202 having a horizontal, side-to-side extending axis. This bevel gear 202 is secured to a simple gear 203 of larger diameter immediately to its left, and to a small hub 204 immediately to its right, the assembly 202203204 being rotatably mounted closely adjacent plate 32 on a rod 205 which extends horizontally between plates 32 and 22 below the cylinder 95. Just to the right of the small hub 204, on the rod 205, there is rotatably positioned another hub 224 forming a portion of a casting which is hereinafter more particularly described, but which may here be mentioned to include an arm 225 extending upwardly and somewhat rearwardly from hub 224 to terminate beneath, and to the rear of the center of, hub 9| abovementioned. Near the top extremity of this arm 225 there is secured a leftwardly extending horizontal stud 208. On this stud there is rotatably mounted a gear 209 engaging gear 203, and a clutch roller 2I0 of rubber or other resilient composition; the clutch roller 2I0 is of larger diameter than the gear 209, is disposed between that gear and the arm 225, and is secured to that gear for rotation of the two as a unit.
The casting of which arm 225 and hub 224 form parts further includes a small hub 220 (best seen in Figure a) surrounding rod 205 adjacent the plate 22; small lug portions 224a and 226a extending downwardly from the respective hubs 224 and 226 (each of these portions being indicated in the front and bottom views of Figures 4 and 5, and portion 224a being also seen in side elevation in Figures 9a and 10); an arm 22'I extending forwardly in a vertical plane from the lower portion of hub 224; and a substantially horizontal web 229 joining the two hubs 224 and 226 and reinforcing thereto the rear portion of the top edge of arm 221. As will hereinafter appear, arm 221 is subjected to an upward biasing force; a limit for its upward movement is provided by a felt or like button 230 on top of the Web 229, which button normally rests in contact with the bottom of a stop plate 23| secured on top of and extending rightwardly from the block 200 abovementioned, as may be seen in Figures 5, 9 and 10.
It will be understood that the clutch roller 2I0 is constantly coupled to the sprocket I9| and chain I96 through the train of gears last described. The clutch roller 2I0 is in' a side-to side positiom permitting its engagement with the driving hub 9|; but when the mutually integral arms 225 and 221 occupy their normal angular positions about rod 205 (illustrated in Figure 9) the clutch roller 2| 0 is held out of such engagement (i. e., slightly spaced diagonally behind and below hub 9|) and is free to rotate as the chain I96 and'sprocket I9I may indicate. But as will hereinafter appear, at certain times when the feed nut 84 is disengaged from the feed screw 83, the arm 221 may be rocked slightly downwardly; then the, arm 225 will be rocked slightly forwardly,'the clutch roller 2I0 will be engaged with th hub 9 I, the gear 209 will planetate slightly about but will remain engaged with the gear 203, the gear train last described will rotate the sprocket I9I counterclockwise (viewed as in Figure 3), and the advance slide I20 will be driven leftwardly at a relatively rapid rate, pushing against the finger I25 abovementioned and moving leftwardly the carriage II.
Control of return mechanism Since in the usual operation of the phonograph the advance slide I20 and the carriage II are to be returned to their initial positions whenever a record is removed from the mandrel 21 and a fresh record mounted thereon, the phonograph is desirably arranged so that the operation of record manipulation or change will automatically bring into play the return mechanism. In the illustrated embodiment of this invention use is made of an interferenc piece or guard normally interfering with record manipulation, and requiring movement to a position of noninterference in order to permit that manipulation. The clutch roller 2I0 is engaged with the driving hub 9| in response to that movement,
that roller being automatically disengaged from that hub when the carriage and advance slide have been returned to their initial positions. Other operations are also automatically performed concomitantly with that movement, or with the engagement of the return clutch roller 2 I0. These principally affect components of the carriage, and will be described hereinafter-it being convenient at this juncture to note only that these operations include the positive removal of both styli out of engagement with a record on the mandrel 21, the positive disengagement of the feed nut 84 from the feed screw 83, and the positive placement of the finger I25 in its normal position of downward extension into the recess 15a as abovementioned.
The interference piece or guard is the lever 8,
with its fingerpieceflS, already mentioned. As
best seen in Figure 29, this'lever extends forwardly from a horizontal stud 2|3 extending rightwardly from the plate 2| quite near the bottom and, relatively near the rear of that plate. The righthand surface of the plate 2| may be provided with. a recess or sunken portion 2I4 about the stud 2|3 and forwardly therefrom to and underneath the end of the mandrel-shielding cylinder 20, so .that neither stud 2I3 nor lever B proper need project appreciably beyond that righthand plate. surface. In its position of non-interference with record manipulation, as solidly illustrated in Figure 29, the lever 8 may extend approximately horizontally forwardly from the stud. 2I3, wholly within the recess2l4. In its normal or interfering position, illustrated in Figures -1 and 4 and dottedly indicated in Figure29, the lever 8 may extend diagonally forwardly and upwardly from stud 213 to lie across the-open} end of cylinder 20, partially in front of the record-ejecting fingerpiece 29 of the mandrel 21. In this latter position the lever interferes with the free manipulation of the fingerpiece 29, and positively prevents the full removal of a record from, or the mounting of a record on, the mandrel 21. The forward portion of thetop edge of lever 8 may be thickened, as indicated at 8a, and to this portion may be hinged the fingerpiece 9 already mentioned.
The rear portion of the lever 8 is upwardly widened, forwardly to a point a little forward of the rear of cylinder 20, and here an approximately vertical lug H is folded leftwardly from the upper portion of the lever. This lug passes through a kidney-shaped aperture 2l2 in plate 2| to permit its movement with that of the lever 8; and at the left of the plate 2| the lug 2| 5 is folded rearwardly to form a further lug 2H5 (as seen in Figures 2 and 5 for example). A spring 2|! is tensioned between the lug H6 and a pin 2I8 extending leftwardly from the upper portion of plate 2! this spring serves to bias the lever upwardly to its normal or interfering position. Against the forward surface of lug 215 is secured the righthand extremity of a horizontal bail. 220; this bail serves to transmit'the effect of the movement of lever B to the lefthand portion of the phonograph, as well as to members of the carriage in manner hereinafter described. The bail. 220 passes leftwardly below the rear of the cylinder 20, as seen in Figure 5 for example, and through a suitable aperture 22l in plate 22, seen in Figures '7 and 10. This aperture 22! may be similar to aperture 2l2 abovementioned, excepting that its lower portion is forwardly extended to pass other components hereinafter mentioned. The bail 225 is supported near its lefthand extremityby an arm 222 (best seen in Figures'5 and 10a); the forward extremity of this arm is secured to the bail, while the rear extremity of the arm is pivoted to the righthand surface of plate 22for example on an extension of rod 205 therethrough', this rod being positioned in axial alignment with the stud 213 to which lever 8 is pivoted. The bail 220 will be understood to occupy a raised or upward position (well illustrated for example in Figures 4 and 9a) whenever lever B is in its normal or interfering position, and to be moved to a lowered or downward position (illustrated for example in Figures 7 and 10) as the lever 8 is moved to itsnon-interfering position.
Downward movement of the bail 22!? engages the return clutch roller 2:0 by rocking downwardly an arm 23?. next described, this arm causing the necessary downward rocking of arm 227 abovementioned. The arm 23'! extends forwardly in a vertical plane, underneath web 229 and to the right of arm 22?, from an elongated hub 236 which is rotatably mounted on a horizontal cross pin 234 extending slightly below rod 235 between the lugs 224a and 226a abovementioned. The arm 23'! may join the hub 235 relatively near the lefthand extremity of that hub, and the rear portion of its top edge may be reinforced to that hub through the substantially horizontal web 235. The arm 23?, at the forward extremity of web 235, is offset slightly to the left past the path of the lefthand end portion 225a of he bail 221]; the arm 237 is then very considerably widened upwardly by the upwardly extending portion 231a seen in Figures 9 through 11. After extending forwardly a short further distance, the so widened arm is folded right wardly to form an approximately vertical apron 238, the upper portion 238a of which is continued to the right further than the lower portion as seen in Figure 4. From the righthand edge of theupper apron portion 238a there is folded rearwardly a lug 240.; between this lug and the arm portion 231a there is secured a horizontal cross pin 2M, and on this cross pin there is rotatably mounted an'elongated collar 242. Downwardly from'the center of this collar there is formed, in a vertical front-and-back extending plane, agenerally L-shaped pawl 243 having a rearwardly directedfoot 244. The normal ang'ular position ofthe pawl about thecross pin 24! is such as to disposethe foot 244 in the path of downward movement of the bail end portion 220a; .this'positionfor the pawl is normally maintained by a spring 246,'tensioned between a forwardlycurved upward extension 245 of the pawl and a pin 24'! extending forwardly from the apron 238, andbiasing the extension 245 forwardlylinto contact with the top of that apron.
The entire arm 23! is biased upwardly by a spring 248 tensioned between a pin 249 extending rightwardly from the lug 243 and a pin 250 extending leftwardly' from plate 22 above pin 249,. as may be seen from Figures 10 and 10a. A limit forupward movement of the arm 23-! is established by 'a horizontal lug 239 folded forwardly from thelower lefthand corner of the apron 238i and surmounted by a felt or like button 25L this buttonimpinging against the bottom,of .a horizontal lug 228 folded rightwardly from the bottom of the forward portion of arm 227'; this structure communicates the upward bias of arm 23'! to arm221; besides making eifec tive on arm 23! theupwardmovement limit for arm 22]- already described. To render arm 22! responsive to a downward rocking of arm 231, a
spring- 252 is tensioned between a pin 253 extending rightwardly from an upward extension 22'la'formed from arm 22'! and a pin 254 extending 1eftwardly.from-arm 23'! below pin 253, as seenfor example in Figure 10a.
In thelast portion of downward movement of the bail 220' from its normal position illustrated in Figure 911., its lefthand end portion 220a will impinge upon the pawl foot 244, carrying the latter downwardly and rocking downwardly the entire arm 23'! to the position illustrated in Figure 10; by reason of spring 252, the arm 22'! will also be rocked downwardly and arm 225 forwardly, lug 228 remaining in contact with button 25!. When the clutch roller 2| 0' comes into engagement with the hub 9| and the return mechanism is thus started in action, the movement of arms 225 and 221 will be completed; but that "of arm 23'! may continue slightly, button 25! then leaving-intimate contact with lug 223, to insure positiveness of engagement of the clutch roller with the hub. To guard,'however, against possible jamming of the clutch :roller 210 between its support and the hub 9| under abnormal conditions interfering with the return ofthe carriage, it may be desirable to provide an adjustable stop for the downward rocking of arm 22?; this may be done by extending the lug 228-forwardly toover the bottom horizontal post34 abovementioned, and passing an adjustable screw 255 upwardly through that post to be impinged upon by the lug 228 under the mentioned conditions.
When the lever 8 and bail 220 have been moved
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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2538452A (en) * 1945-12-31 1951-01-16 Gerard A Harrington Sound recording and reproducing machine
US2567318A (en) * 1947-10-08 1951-09-11 Edison Inc Thomas A Phonograph on-off control
US2698183A (en) * 1948-05-03 1954-12-28 Int Electronics Co Drive control mechanism for magnetic recording apparatus
US2714010A (en) * 1948-07-07 1955-07-26 Presto Recording Corp Magnetic transducing unit
US2743317A (en) * 1952-07-05 1956-04-24 Int Electronics Co Magnetic recording machine
US3198527A (en) * 1954-06-08 1965-08-03 Dictaphone Corp Method for synchronizing transducer head scanning motion in sound recording and reproducing machines

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2538452A (en) * 1945-12-31 1951-01-16 Gerard A Harrington Sound recording and reproducing machine
US2567318A (en) * 1947-10-08 1951-09-11 Edison Inc Thomas A Phonograph on-off control
US2698183A (en) * 1948-05-03 1954-12-28 Int Electronics Co Drive control mechanism for magnetic recording apparatus
US2714010A (en) * 1948-07-07 1955-07-26 Presto Recording Corp Magnetic transducing unit
US2743317A (en) * 1952-07-05 1956-04-24 Int Electronics Co Magnetic recording machine
US3198527A (en) * 1954-06-08 1965-08-03 Dictaphone Corp Method for synchronizing transducer head scanning motion in sound recording and reproducing machines

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