US2266510A - Method of making building panels - Google Patents

Method of making building panels Download PDF

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US2266510A
US2266510A US206055A US20605538A US2266510A US 2266510 A US2266510 A US 2266510A US 206055 A US206055 A US 206055A US 20605538 A US20605538 A US 20605538A US 2266510 A US2266510 A US 2266510A
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members
cementitious
facing members
facing
cushioning
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US206055A
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Robert A Pottinger
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MABEL I POTTINGER
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MABEL I POTTINGER
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F13/00Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings
    • E04F13/07Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor
    • E04F13/08Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements
    • E04F13/14Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements stone or stone-like materials, e.g. ceramics concrete; of glass or with an outer layer of stone or stone-like materials or glass
    • E04F13/147Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements stone or stone-like materials, e.g. ceramics concrete; of glass or with an outer layer of stone or stone-like materials or glass with an outer layer imitating natural stone, brick work or the like
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B28WORKING CEMENT, CLAY, OR STONE
    • B28BSHAPING CLAY OR OTHER CERAMIC COMPOSITIONS; SHAPING SLAG; SHAPING MIXTURES CONTAINING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIAL, e.g. PLASTER
    • B28B19/00Machines or methods for applying the material to surfaces to form a permanent layer thereon
    • B28B19/0053Machines or methods for applying the material to surfaces to form a permanent layer thereon to tiles, bricks or the like

Description

16, 1941. R. AQPOTTINGER v v2,266,510
' METHOD oF MAKING BUILDING PANELS Filed May, 4, 19.58V
.I j@ v Patented Dec. 16, 1941 `-LUNVT-D STATES PATENT OFFICE '2,266,510 Y I' i METHOD or` MAKING BUILDING PANELs Robert Ai Pottinger, Chicago, 111., assignorto Y v Mabelvl. Pottinger f n .Application May 4.1938, seria1N0.206,055`
7 claims; (ci. 418-5'0) My invention relates to building panels having veneer-like facing members of such materials asv stone, brick and the likepthe joints between which comprise a suitable cementitious'material,
and more particularly to 'the method offmaking Buildingshaving an exterior finish,l of brick or stone have long beenconsidered-more pleasing in appearance andV more durable' and satisfactory in use than buildings having other types of exterior construction. However, the brick and stone have been laid individually by -hand and the building of a wall having a veneer of such materials necessarily fproceeds slowlyjv and is costly. The insulating values of 'brick and stone are negligible- 'Moreoventhe thicknessof such a veneer, usually fourffinches or more, adds greatly` tothe'weight of the building and requires correspondingly heavy foundations to carry the' increase inload. i Some attempts have been made toprovide building panels having thin brick-like facingmembersset in mortar, but such substitutes. have' Ibee'n unsatisfactory for various reasons.A It has 'been diicult to' transport or ship the panels withoutk breakage. The panels have been hard Ato Ahandle orfinstall'- on the' job. The appearance of the nished wall comprising the panels has not been uniform- Vor satisfactory.. The insulating valueof the panels has been quitelow. i i
It is an vobject f 'my'invention to Yprovidean improvedk and practical" building panel of the "type mentionedwhichiwill be'inexpensive 'to produce, light in'v weight, `easily transported: with- 'out likelihood'ofibeing' broken or damaged in transit, easy and quick .to install on thefjob,
'have Well denedmortar .jointsbetween the facing members and therefore presenta highly Ypleasing appearancev in the finished wall, and
which-will offer substantial whindrance the passage of heat and cold..
" My-inventio'n contemplates the use offrgfacin'g Vmembers of brick; stone, tile" andthe like.:v only about one-half V'inch or less .in thickness, andy it jis an object of my'invention to bond byftlie' use of a suitable cementitious material such facing members to eachother and to` a b'odyof lightweight insulating material, preferably;A of 'a'- brouscharacter. A I
v'Inthe'manufacture.of panels of this'type, no satisfactory' method has' been found` heretofore which will permit' the use of a cementitious ma'- terial in the joints between the facing members. It has Anot been Vpossible to. confine the slurry 'of cementitious material to the joint spaces. 'lnvariably someof the wet mortar .has always escaped and become smeared over the exterior surfaces ofthe Vfacingmembers thus presenting an unsightly appearance. This condition is very pron unced `when the eXter-iorlsurfaces of` the facing members are rough as is the case when chips of stone or brick material of a rough texture are used. lA furtherobject of my invention is-to provideA an improved and easily practiced method -of making my novel and improved panels by which the oW of wet cementitious joint filling material will be controlled4 and will be confined vclo-sely to the boundaries of the spaces between theedgesof the facing-members.
The invention consists. inthe novel constructions and'arrangements to be hereinafter described and claimed Afor carrying out the above stated objectsl andsuch other objects as will appear. fromthe following specification, and it consistsjvfurther in -the improved method of making` building panels to be hereinafter described land claimed. Y
The invention `is illustrated in certain preferred embodiments in the accompanying drawing, wherein: y v Y Fig. lis a perspective View of a building panel embodying the principles ofmy invention;
Fig-2 is a transversek sectional viewon an enlarged scale taken on the-line 2-2 of Fig. rl;-. Fig. 3 is fa sectionaly View of suitable Amold apparatus in -panelforming rposition bywhich my improved method of making my improved panel rmay bevpracticed Y, -1 Fig.4 is a sectional view of the mold apparatus in inverted positionwith certain vof the parts separated from the remaining parts; and
Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a panel embodying the principles of my invention suitable for use at the corners of a building.
Like characters of reference parts in the several views.
designate like i The panelsA illustrated in the drawing comprise a plurality of' facing members l0 which may -be of any suitable material such as stone, -brick, tile and the like. The facing members may be of any desired thickness, those illustrated in thedrawing being approximately onehalf inch. "The-facing members are uniformhr spaced edgewise with respectrto each other at I I to provide spaces for the joint-lling material which'is shownv in said spaces at l2. The joint lling material also surrounds the outer edges of the facing members a distance of about onefourth inch as shown in the drawing Aat I3. Preferably the cementitious material isspread in a continuous layer I4 over the rear surfaces of the facing members. The mortar or cementitious material may be of any suitable composition. I have had satisfactory results by the use of ingredients in kind and quantity as follows: quick-setting Portland cement, 1 part,-a finely granulated light-weight aggregate such as furnace slag, 3 parts-powdered glue, waterproof after setting, one-eighth part,-and sul'cient Water to make a slurry of a thick, creamy consistency. Coloring matter of any desired shade may be added to the mix. VSuch a mortar ows readily into the spaces between and around the facing members, is easily spread over the backs of the facing members, sets quickly and provides weather-tight joints between the edges Q,f the facing members. A body of insulating material I5 is preferably applied over the layer I4 of cementitious material while the latter is in a wet or plastic state, the cementitious material serving effectively to bond the facing members to each other and to the backing member -I5. The member I5 may be of any desired thickness and of any suitable Vmaterial such as a precast body of cellular gypsum or cellular cement, but AI prefer 4to use a material of a fibrous nature such as Celotex, pressed wood pulp or the like.
I have found that my improved panels may be manufactured economically by the Vvuse of a mold apparatus such as that illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4. I n preparing vto make the panels, I use a fiat supporting surface which may be in the Vform cfa sheet of metal I6 Welded to and supported by a plurality of T-irons I 'I. lThe member I6 is positioned as shown in Fig. 3 with the T-irons resting on a table, bench or other suitable support. A cushioning member I8 is spread over the sheet I6. A rectangular frame ,comprising mold members I9 are placed on edge on the marginal portions of the cushioning memb-er I8 as shown in Fig. 3, the mold members I9 preferably being locked to the support I6 by spring-pressed fastening members 29 pivotally carried by the plate I6. Within the area defined by the mold members I9 the facing members I are positioned with their exterior or front surfaces in contact with the cushioning mea-ns4 I 8, The facing `members I0 are preferably spaced edgewise uniformly apart about onehalf inch and have their outer edges spaced about one-fourth inch from Ythe inner faces of the mold members I9. The wet cementitious material is then poured in place into the spaces between the adjacent edges of the facingmembers and in the spaces between the outer edges of the facing members and the `mold members onto the cushioning means I8 which forms the vbottoms of said spaces. The cementitious material is spread by screeding or -trowelling it into `a layer I4 over the rear surfaces of the facing members I0. The body of insulating lmaterial I is then applied and pressed down into firm contact with the layer I4 o f the wet cementitious material. A pallet Y2| of plywood or the `like is preferably placed over the insulating material as shown in Fig. 3. The Amold apparatus'and the panel formed as Idescribed within i-t vare then turned upsidedown -into the position shown in 4, the pallet v2| being Vplaced on any suitable elevated support (not shown). As soon as the joint material has set sufiiciently to hold its shape the fastening members 20 are operated to release the mold members from the plate I6.
A'lhe inner sides of the mold members `I9 are preferably inclined slightly as shown in the drawing so that they will separate freely from the outer edges of the panel when the fastening members 20 are released. The plate I6 is lifted clear of the panel underneath and the cushioning member I8 is stripped from the facing members I0 and the joint material between and around the members. By means of a suitable punch 22 shown in dotted lines in Fig. 4, openings 23 for the reception of fastening members such as screws 24 may be easily formed in the self-sustaining but plastic joint material and the fibrous insulating material therebelow. The panel is permitted to harden and dry on the pallet 2l after which it is ready for use.
When lthe parts are arranged as shown in Fig. 3, thelower edges of the mold members I9 and the lower or exterior surfaces of the facing members III seat themselves well within the cushioning member I8. I have had highly satisfactory results by the use of cushioning means inv sheetlike form of fabrics such as Turkish towels, linen towels and pieces of cotton flannel. Such fabrios are substantially impervious to cementitious material when 'in an unset or pourable condition. When the cushioning means comprises terry cloth of which Turkish towels are commonly made, the mold members and the facing members bear down into the nap to such' an extent that the spaces between adjacent edges of the facing members and between the outer edges of the facing members and the mold members are well defined, with the result that the -Wet cementitious material is not permitted to escape from said spaces .but is controlled 'in and confined to the boundaries of such spaces even when the exterior surfaces of the facing members are quite rough or uneven. Fabrics of the type mentioned are moisture-absorbent with the result that those portions of the Wet cementitious material which make contact with the cushionling means set very rapidly which further aids in conning the joint material to the spaces provided therefor. By the practice of my improved method, the joint material does not get out of control and it does not get onto the exterior surfaces of the facing members III to smear or otherwise detract from the appearance of the panels.
The corner panel shown in Fig. 5 is formed substantially in the same manneras the straight panels heretofore described by the -use of facing members Illa of angle shape. The long web of the corner panel is first made in a mold of appropriate size and then `the short web of the Apanel is placed in a. mold of a size to t it and that -web is completed.
Panels made in accordance with my invention are light in weight, a panel 8" Wide, 16" long and V11A thick weighing but little more than a single brick of the usual dimensions. :The panels, therefore, are easy to handle. When the backing of insulation material is of afbrous nature the panels may be stacked on top of each other, the insulating material .serving to cushion the Vhard facing members of one panel from those on another. The panels may be easily installed against the sheathing of a wall by inserting the screws `24 into .the ODSDJDSS therefor and driving them into the sheathing. The work of installation proceeds rapidly as a panel of the size mentioned covers approximately the same area as would be covered by the use of six or seven 'bricks of ordinary Size. Breferably a patch 25 of material in the form ,of a suitable mastic is applied to the back o .f the n- 'sulating body I5 around the screw Yplate I5.'
that modifications may ring from the principles of the invention.
openings to provide a seal against moisture. The mastic may also be applied to the edges of the panels to provide a weatherproof seal between adjacent panels. The panels may be made inonehalf, one-fourth or other smaller sizes to permit rthem to be fitted around door and window openings, or 'they may be cut or sawed to size on the job to fit around such openings. A wall of panels made in accordance with my inventionpresents a pleasing effect. The width of the Vjoints between the outer edges of the facing members of one panel and the outer edges of the adjacentfacing members of the adjacent panels are approximately equal one panel, thereby enhancing the uniform appearance of the finished Wall. The heads vof the screws 24 are preferably covered by a Vpatch.4 of the'` joint material so that in the finished wall the' fastening screws do not appear.
If desired, the joint of my improved panels may be of the raked, curved or V-type. `If a joint of that type is desired, I attach strips 26 of the desired cross section to the supporting The strips 26 are preferably made of metal and may be secured to the supporting plate I6 by spot-welding or the use of rivets. In Fig. 3 I have shown strips 26 of a cross section suitable for making joints having their outer vsurfaces curved. The cushioning means -l8 in such case is positioned over the :strips 26 with the result that the raised portions of the cushioning means forms the bottoms `of therespective spaces in which the joint material isv poured.
While I have illustrated in detail and have specifically described certain preferred constructions, it is to be understood that such has been done merely for the purpose of illustrating the principles of the invention. I do not intend, therefore, to limit my invention to the details of construction shown and described, except only in so far as certain of the appended claims are specifically so limited, as it will be obvious be made without depart- I claim: l 1. In the herein described method of making a building. panel having veneer-like facing members separated edgewise by joint material confined closely to the adjacent edges of the members, those steps which comprise placing on a flat support a sheet of cushioning means substantially yieldable under the facing members and substantially impervious to a pourable cementitious material, positioning the facing members with their exterior or front faces downward on said cushioning means and spaced edgewise from each other, pouring a cementitious material into the edge spaces between said facing members and onto those portions of the cushioning means forming the bottoms of said spaces, and after the cementitious material has hardened suiciently to retain its shape and while the facing members are in a common plane stripping said sheet from the panel thus formed, whereby the pourable cementitious material is prevented from getting onto the front faces of the veneer-like members of the panel.
2. In the herein described method of making a building panel having veneer-like facing members separated edgewise by joint material conned closely to the adjacent edges of the members, those steps which comprise placing on a 75 material while to the width of the` joints between adjacent facing members of any flat support a sheetV of cushioning means substantially yieldable under the facing members and substantially impervious to a pourable cementitious material, positioning the facing members withr their exterior or front faces downward on said cushioning means and spaced edge- .wise from each other, pouring and spreading a cementitious material into the edge spaces between said facing members and onto those por- -tions of the cushioning means forming the bottoms ofisaid spaces and over the rear surfaces of the facing members, applying a body of backing material to said cementitious maerial while the latter is in a bondable condition, and after the cementitious material has hardened suiiicierrtly tof retain its shape -a-nd while the facing members are in a common plane stripping said sheet from the panel thus pourable cementitious material is prevented from getting onto the front faces of the veneer-like members of the panel. f
3. In therherein described method of making a building panel'having veneer-like facing members separated edgewise by joint material confined closely to the adjacent edges of the members, those.steps which comprise placing ona -flat support av sheet `of cushioning means substantially yieldable under the facing members and substantially impervious to a Ypourable cementitious material, positioning the facing.. memberslwith their exterior or .front faces downward on said cushioning means and spaced edgewise substantially uniformlyy fromf each other, surrounding the facingmembers with mold members spaced from the respective adjacent edges of-the facing members a distance approximately one-half the width of the vspaces between the facing members, pouring a cementitious material into the edge spaces between said facing members 'and the edge spaces between said mold members and said facing members and onto those portions of .the cushioning means forming thebottoms of said spaces, and after the cementitious material has hardened sufficiently to retain its shape and while the facing members are in a common plane stripping said sheet from the panel thus formed whereby the pourable cementitious material is prevented` from getting onto kthe: front faces of the veneer-like members 4of the panel. i 'f V 4. In the herein described method 0f making a building panel having veneer-like facing members separated edgewise by joint material confined closely to the adjacent edges of the members, those steps which comprise placing on a flat support a sheet of cushioning means substantially yieldable under the facing members and substantially impervious to a pourable cementitious material, positioning the facing members with their exterior or front faces downward on said cushioning means and spaced edgewise substantially uniformly from each other, surrounding the facing members with mold members spaced from the respective adjacent edges of the facing members a distance approximately one-half the width of the spaces between the facing members, pouring and spreading a cementitious material into the edge spaces between said facing members and the edge spaces between said mold members and said facing members and onto those portions of the cushioning means forming the bottoms of said spaces and over the rear surfaces of the facing members, applying a backing sheet to said cementitious the latter is in a bondable condiformed whereby the v tion, and after the cementitious material has hardened sufficiently to retain its shape and while the facing members are in a `common plane stripping said cushioning sheet from the panel thus formed whereby the pourable cementitous material is prevented from getting onto the front faces of the veneer-like members of the ipanel.
5. In the herein described method of making a building panel having veneer-like facing -members separated edgewise by joint material 'conlined closely tothe adjacent edges of the members, those -steps which comprise placing on a hat support a sheet of cushioning means substantially yieldable under the facing members and substantially impervious to a pourable cementitious material, placing on said cushioning means side and end mold members on edge to provide a confined area, positioning the facing members in said conned area with their eX- terior or front faces downward on said cushioning means and spaced edgewise from each other 'and from said mold members, pouring and spreading a cementitious material into the edge spaces between said facing members and the edge spaces `between said mold members and said facing members and onto those portions of the cushioning means forming the bottoms of said spaces and over the rear surfaces of the facing members, applying a backing lsheet to -said cementitious material While the latter is in a bondable condition, turning upsidedown the panel thus formed 'and its supporting parts, removing the mold members and the support, and then stripping the cushioning means from said facing members and the rcementitious material therearound while the facing members are in a common plane, whereby the pourable cementitious material is prevented from getting onto the front faces of the veneer-like members of the panel.
6. In the herein described method of mak-ing a building panel having veneer-like facing members separated edgewise by material providing joints of 'the rake, curved or V-type, those steps which comprise providing on a flat support strips which in cross section are like the recessed portion 'of the type 'of joint desired, placing over the support and said strips a sheet of cushioning means substantially yieldable under the facing members and substantially impervious to a pourable cementitious material, arranging facing members with their exterior or front faces -downward on said cushioning means of Vsizes corresponding to the respective areas between the f the veneer-like members of the panel.
7. In the herein described method of making a building panel having veneer-like facing members separated edgewise by material providing Vjoints of the rake, curved or V-type, those steps which comprise providing on a iiat support strips which in cross section are like the recessed portions of the type of joint desired, placing vover the support vand said strips 'a sheet of cushioning means lsubstantially yieldable under the facing members and substantially impervious to a pourable cementitious material, providing on 'said cushioning means side and end mold members on edge to provide a confined area, arranging facing members with their exterior 'or `front faces downward on said cushioning means of sizes corresponding to the respective areas between 'the raised portions formed by said strips, pouring and spreading a Ycementitious material into the 'edge spaces between said facing members and onto those portions of the cushioning means raised by said strips and forming the bottoms of said spaces and over the rear surfaces 'of the -fa'cing members, applying a backing material to 'said cementitious Vmaterial while the latter is in a bondable condition, turning upsidedown the panel thus formed and its supporting parts, removing the mold members and the support, and then stripping the cushioning means from said facing members and the cementitious material therebetween while the facing members are in a common plane, whereby the po'urable cementitious material is prevented from getting ont'o the front faces of the veneer-like members of the panel.
ROBERT A. POTTINGER.
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Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2431615A (en) * 1942-10-10 1947-11-25 Clarence W Kraus Method of manufacturing building elements
US2443640A (en) * 1943-12-21 1948-06-22 William S Potter Surface plate and method of making same
US2669860A (en) * 1945-01-31 1954-02-23 Norman Greenles Weir Loudon Hollow plaster building panels and method of making
US2700810A (en) * 1948-02-10 1955-02-01 Garni Bruce Apparatus for manufacturing faced concrete blocks
US2781554A (en) * 1956-03-02 1957-02-19 Tile Council Of America Method and apparatus for making tile panels
US2855653A (en) * 1955-10-07 1958-10-14 Tile Council Of America Apparatus for making tile panels
US2917801A (en) * 1954-11-29 1959-12-22 Tile Council Of America Apparatus for making tile panels
US3026575A (en) * 1957-11-27 1962-03-27 Owens Illinois Glass Co Skylight structure and method of fabrication
US3070866A (en) * 1955-10-07 1963-01-01 Tile Council Of America Apparatus and method for making tile panels
US3125831A (en) * 1964-03-24 Tile assembly
US3209058A (en) * 1960-08-04 1965-09-28 Air Preheater High temperature rotor
US3251165A (en) * 1962-12-24 1966-05-17 Bennie M Tyler Unitary brick and concrete tilt-up wall sections and molds for producing
US3327442A (en) * 1964-06-23 1967-06-27 Gail Internat Prefabricated synthetic resin bonded tile wall unit
US3335048A (en) * 1963-02-19 1967-08-08 Lieges Des Hamendas Et De La P Mosaic tile assembly
US3350827A (en) * 1964-01-02 1967-11-07 Ridge Rock Ind Inc Building panels and method of mounting the panels
US3381066A (en) * 1965-01-27 1968-04-30 Reyntiens Method of making a translucent panel
US3426122A (en) * 1968-01-18 1969-02-04 Edmond M Gaudelli Process for producing stone block structures
US3521418A (en) * 1967-09-25 1970-07-21 Ceramic Tile Walls Inc Pre-finished decorative rigid panel
US3607606A (en) * 1967-05-16 1971-09-21 Coors Porcelain Co Ceramic-rubber composites
US4422997A (en) * 1978-12-14 1983-12-27 Alfred Machnik Method for making an insulated panel
US5173337A (en) * 1991-02-25 1992-12-22 Nelson David S Construction process for simulating a desirable appearance
US6412244B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2002-07-02 Edward Nolan Modular wall element
FR2853344A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-10-08 Dorothee Betous Bay e.g. lintel, decorating device, has support that is plate made up of cement whose thickness varies based on constraints linked to finishing unit, and hole to connect device with masonry by screw
US20040261345A1 (en) * 2003-06-24 2004-12-30 Mcgrath John Rock facade panel and methods of manufacturing a rock facade panel
US20050247018A1 (en) * 2004-04-08 2005-11-10 Johnson Edward L Sr Device and method of installing ceramic tiles
US8962088B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-02-24 Lithocrete, Inc. Method and finish for concrete walls
US9487951B2 (en) 2013-03-01 2016-11-08 Shaw & Sons, Inc. Architectural concrete wall and method of forming the same
US9562360B2 (en) * 2011-11-11 2017-02-07 Lithocrete, Inc. Concrete mosaic
US10704272B1 (en) * 2018-08-14 2020-07-07 Leah Gaylord Tile backsplash manufacture method

Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3125831A (en) * 1964-03-24 Tile assembly
US2431615A (en) * 1942-10-10 1947-11-25 Clarence W Kraus Method of manufacturing building elements
US2443640A (en) * 1943-12-21 1948-06-22 William S Potter Surface plate and method of making same
US2669860A (en) * 1945-01-31 1954-02-23 Norman Greenles Weir Loudon Hollow plaster building panels and method of making
US2700810A (en) * 1948-02-10 1955-02-01 Garni Bruce Apparatus for manufacturing faced concrete blocks
US2917801A (en) * 1954-11-29 1959-12-22 Tile Council Of America Apparatus for making tile panels
US2855653A (en) * 1955-10-07 1958-10-14 Tile Council Of America Apparatus for making tile panels
US3070866A (en) * 1955-10-07 1963-01-01 Tile Council Of America Apparatus and method for making tile panels
US2781554A (en) * 1956-03-02 1957-02-19 Tile Council Of America Method and apparatus for making tile panels
US3026575A (en) * 1957-11-27 1962-03-27 Owens Illinois Glass Co Skylight structure and method of fabrication
US3209058A (en) * 1960-08-04 1965-09-28 Air Preheater High temperature rotor
US3251165A (en) * 1962-12-24 1966-05-17 Bennie M Tyler Unitary brick and concrete tilt-up wall sections and molds for producing
US3335048A (en) * 1963-02-19 1967-08-08 Lieges Des Hamendas Et De La P Mosaic tile assembly
US3350827A (en) * 1964-01-02 1967-11-07 Ridge Rock Ind Inc Building panels and method of mounting the panels
US3327442A (en) * 1964-06-23 1967-06-27 Gail Internat Prefabricated synthetic resin bonded tile wall unit
US3381066A (en) * 1965-01-27 1968-04-30 Reyntiens Method of making a translucent panel
US3607606A (en) * 1967-05-16 1971-09-21 Coors Porcelain Co Ceramic-rubber composites
US3521418A (en) * 1967-09-25 1970-07-21 Ceramic Tile Walls Inc Pre-finished decorative rigid panel
US3426122A (en) * 1968-01-18 1969-02-04 Edmond M Gaudelli Process for producing stone block structures
US4422997A (en) * 1978-12-14 1983-12-27 Alfred Machnik Method for making an insulated panel
US5173337A (en) * 1991-02-25 1992-12-22 Nelson David S Construction process for simulating a desirable appearance
US6412244B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2002-07-02 Edward Nolan Modular wall element
FR2853344A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-10-08 Dorothee Betous Bay e.g. lintel, decorating device, has support that is plate made up of cement whose thickness varies based on constraints linked to finishing unit, and hole to connect device with masonry by screw
US20050188643A1 (en) * 2003-06-24 2005-09-01 Mcgrath John Rock facade panel and methods of manufacturing a rock facade panel
US20040261345A1 (en) * 2003-06-24 2004-12-30 Mcgrath John Rock facade panel and methods of manufacturing a rock facade panel
US20050247018A1 (en) * 2004-04-08 2005-11-10 Johnson Edward L Sr Device and method of installing ceramic tiles
US9562360B2 (en) * 2011-11-11 2017-02-07 Lithocrete, Inc. Concrete mosaic
US9487951B2 (en) 2013-03-01 2016-11-08 Shaw & Sons, Inc. Architectural concrete wall and method of forming the same
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