US2242783A - Elevator link and handle - Google Patents

Elevator link and handle Download PDF

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Publication number
US2242783A
US2242783A US296429A US29642939A US2242783A US 2242783 A US2242783 A US 2242783A US 296429 A US296429 A US 296429A US 29642939 A US29642939 A US 29642939A US 2242783 A US2242783 A US 2242783A
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United States
Prior art keywords
handle
link
bore
socket
elevator
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Expired - Lifetime
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US296429A
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Herbert E Grau
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BYRON JACKSON Co
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BYRON JACKSON CO
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Priority to US296429A priority Critical patent/US2242783A/en
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Publication of US2242783A publication Critical patent/US2242783A/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B19/00Handling rods, casings, tubes or the like outside the borehole, e.g. in the derrick; Apparatus for feeding the rods or cables
    • E21B19/02Rod or cable suspensions
    • E21B19/06Elevators, i.e. rod- or tube-gripping devices
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T16/00Miscellaneous hardware [e.g., bushing, carpet fastener, caster, door closer, panel hanger, attachable or adjunct handle, hinge, window sash balance, etc.]
    • Y10T16/48Insulated handle
    • Y10T16/498Bar-type handle
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T403/00Joints and connections
    • Y10T403/70Interfitted members
    • Y10T403/7037Externally shouldered or headed rod

Description

May 20, 1941. H. E. GRAU ELEVATOR LINK AND HANDLE Filed Sept. 25, 1939 ilk I 7 HerberZ'E, Gmu.
INVENTOR 13%; /9.
ATTORN EY Patented May 20, 1941 UNITED STATS P ELEVATOR LINK AND HANDLE Herbert E. Gran, Vernon, Calif., assignor to Byron Jackson 00., Vernon, alif., a corporation of Delaware 6 Claims.
This invention relates generally to elevator links of the type adapted for use in supporting well pipe elevators, and is directed particularly to an improved handle for such links.
Elevator links of the above type usually comprise a relatively large upper eye adapted to engage a drilling hook, a smaller lower eye adapted to engage the trunnion of the elevator, and an intermediate shank interconnecting the eyes. In the smaller sizes of links which are used in handling relatively light strings of pipe, the shank is of a size which can be readily grasped by the operator when manipulating the links or the elevator supported therein. In heavy duty links, however, the shank is too large in diameter to afford a convenient grip. For example, a link of 50-ton rated capacity has a shank approximately two and one-half inches in diameter, where as a 250-ton link has a shank four and one-half inches in diameter and weighs up to 600 pounds, depending on its length.
Various attempts have heretofore been made to provide handles for these larger sizes of links, none of which have been entirely successful. Rigid handles often become bent due to rough handling of the links, and for this reason are less satisfactory than flexible handles. It has been found from experience that a short length of one-inch or one and one-quarter inch steel cable, when attached to the link in parallel, spaced relation to the shank, provides a highly satisfactory handle. Diificulty has been experienced, however, in properly attaching the cable and in subjecting it to the necessary tension to prevent undue flexing cf the cable when a lateral pull is exerted on it.
A principal object of this invention is to provide an elevator link having a flexible handle which is capable of being readily attached to the link and when so attached may be subjected to the proper tension.
A further object is to provide an elevator link having a detachable flexible handle, and incorporating means for permanently tensioning the handle after it is attached to the link.
When elevator links are heavily loaded they necessarily stretch a certain amount, thereby subjecting the flexible handles to greater tensile stress than that initially imposed, and also imposing greater stress on the brackets or other means by which the handles are attached to the links. Prior attempts to attach flexible handles to elevator links have created a safety hazard, in that no provision has been made for preventing loose pieces from dropping to the derrick floor and possibly striking members of the drilling crew, in the event the attaching means at either end of the handle should break or become detached from the link, or in the event the handle should part intermediate its length.
A still further object of the present invention is to provide an elevator link having a detachable flexible handle which is secured to the link in such a manner that, in the event it should part under strain or should one of the attaching means break or become detached from the link, no loose parts can become wholly detached from the link and drop to the derrick floor.
The above and other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment of the invention, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing wherein:
Fig. 1 is a View in side elevation of an elevator link embodying the invention;
Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the link of Fig. 1, as viewed from the right of that figure;
Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary View in side elevation, with parts broken away substantially on the section line 33 of Fig. 2; and
Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line 44 of Fig. 2.
The invention has been shown in the accompanying drawing as applied to a Weldless elevator link comprising generally an upper eye [9, a lower eye II, and a connecting shank I 2. An upper handle bracket 13 is secured to the link, as by welding, and is preferably located approximately at the same elevation as the juncture of the upper eye ID with the shank l2. A lower handle bracket I4 is secured in a samilar manner to the link adjacent the upper end of the lower eye II. The brackets are mounted in vertical alignment, and are preferably, although not necessarily, disposed with their sockets lying in the central transverse plane of the link. It will be observed from Fig. 1 that by mounting the brackets on the converging portions of the eyes It] and II and adjacent the ends of the shank I2, the brackets are substantially completely housed in protected positions within the lateral confines of the link and are thus less subject to being damaged than if they were in more exposed locations.
A bore it extends vertically through the upper bracket l3 and is threaded to receive an externally threaded adjusting sleeve I! having a frustroconical nut 18 integrally formed on its lower extremity The sleeve is annular in cross-section, having an axial bore therethrough of a size to fit loosely over a short section of steel cable 20. As shown most clearly in Fig. 3, the ends of the cable are frayed and are brazed at 2| and 22 to upper and lower end rings 23 and 24, respectively, the adjusting sleeve I! having first been slipped over the cable. It will be observed that the upper end of the adjusting sleeve I1 is adapted to engage the under side of the ring 23 and thus force the ring and hence the upper end of the cable upwardly within the bore l6 as the sleeve is threaded thereinto.
The lower bracket I4 is bored at 26 to loosely receive the cable 20, and also has a counterbore 21 of slightly greater diameter than the ring 24 and extending partially through the bracket from the lower side thereof. The counterbore 21 terminates in a downwardly facing shoulder 28 against which the ring 24 is adapted to abut. As shown most clearly in Fig. 4, the outer side wall of the bracket is slotted vertically at 30, the width of the slot being equal to the diameter of the bore 26 to permit insertion or the cable laterally into the bore 26. The side walls of the slot 30 extend a substantial distance below the shoulder 28 (Fig. 2) in order to retain the ring 34 against lateral displacement from the counterbore 2'! so long as it is in abutting relation to the shoulder 28. A retaining pin 3| extends laterally across the counterbore immediately beneath the lower end of the cable to prevent the latter from moving downwardly to an extent that the ring 24 clears the lower end of the slot 30.
Assuming that a handle has been constructed from a length of cable 20 by mounting an adjusting sleeve i! thereon and thereafter brazing the end rings 23 and 24 to the ends of the cable, and assuming also that the brackets i3 and 14 have been welded to the link, the mode of assembly of the handle in the brackets is as follows:
The lower portion of the handle is inserted laterally through the slot 30 into the bore 26 in the lower bracket, and the upper end of the handle is then inserted upwardly into the threaded bore 16 in the upper bracket, the diameter of the upper ring 23 being slightly less than that of the bore 15. The handle is then moved upwardly to cause the lower ring 24 to enter the counterbore 21 and move upwardly therein into engagement with the shoulder 28. The adjusting sleeve I 1 is then threaded into the bore [6 until the upper end of the sleeve engages the under side of the ring 23. Thereafter, continued turning of the sleeve applies tension to the cable 20 inasmuch as the lower end of the cable is held stationary by engagement of the lower ring 24 with the shoulder 23. A look nut 33 may be provided, if desired, to lock the adjusting sleeve against inadvertent rotation in the bracket 63. The retaining pin 3| may be inserted in place at any time after the ring 24 has been brought into engagement with the shoulder 28.
From the foregoing detailed description of one embodiment of the invention, it will be apparent that a novel handle assembly for elevator links has been provided which possesses many distinct advantages over prior devices of this type. Any desired tension may be initially imposed on the flexible handle to provide the proper degree of rigidity thereto, and, in the event the cable becomes permanently stretched, it may be tensioned from time to time within the range of adjustment of the adjusting sleeve. The brazing of the end rings on the handle is a simple and inexpensive operation and yet produces abutments of adequate strength.
By reason of the slotted and counterbored lower bracket, the attachment and removal of the handle is an exceedingly simple operation. The provision of retaining means such as the pin 3| immediately below the lower end of the handle effectively locks the handle in place. Even if the cable should part (which is very unlikely) or should the end rings be pulled off the cable, neither the cable nor the end rings could drop off the link while the latter is suspended in the derrick. If either bracket should become detached from the link, it would remain attached to the handle rather than drop off.
Despite the above-mentioned operating advantages and safety features, the handle assembly is of simple and rugged construction capable of withstanding the rough usage and handling to which elevator links are subjected in the field.
While I have shown and described in detail what I now consider to be a preferred embodiment of the invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made therein while retaining the novel and advantageous features set forth above.
I claim:
1. A well pipe elevator link comprising a link body having a pair of longitudinally spaced handle sockets; a flexible handle extending between said sockets and having an enlargement at each end thereof; one of said sockets having a bore of a size to snugly receive said handle and a counterbore of a size to snugly receive the enlargement on the adjacent end of said handle, said counterbore terminating in an annular shoulder adapted to be engaged by the enlargement to limit movement of the handle in the direction of the other socket; said one socket having a lateral opening therein communicating with said bores and being of a size to receive said handle but being of less width than the handle enlargement; releasable retaining means on said one socket limiting movement of said handle enlargement away from said annular shoulder and thereby retaining the handle in said socket; and means adjustably connecting the other end of said handle to said other socket.
2. A well pipe elevator link comprising a link body having a pair of longitudinally spaced handle sockets; a flexible handle extending between said sockets; means adjustably connecting one end of said handle to the adjacent socket; means on the other socket limiting movement of said handle in the direction of said first socket; and separate means on said other socket limiting movement of said handle in a direction away from said first-named socket.
3. A well pipe elevator link comprising a link body having a pair of longitudinally spaced handle sockets; a flexible handle extending between said sockets; means adjustably connecting one end of said handle to the adjacent socket; the other socket having a longitudinal bore and a lateral opening communicating with said bore to permit lateral insertion of said handle into said bore; and means on said other socket releasably retaining said handle therein.
4. A well pipe elevator link comprising a link body having a pair of longitudinally spaced handle sockets; one of said sockets having a threaded bore, and the other socket having a stepped bore providing an annular shoulder; a flexible handle extending between said sockets and having an enlargement at one end engaging said shoulder and a second enlargement at the other end of a size to fit loosely in said threaded bore; an adjusting member threadedly engaging said threaded bore and adapted to engage said second handle enlargement; and retaining means on said first-named socket for retaining said first-named handle enlargement in said stepped bore.
5. A well pipe elevator link comprising a link body having a pair of longitudinally spaced handle sockets; one of said sockets having an opening extending longitudinally therethrough and the wall of said opening being stepped to provide an annular shoulder, the other socket having a longitudinally extending threaded bore; an adjusting member adapted to threadedly engage said threaded bore; and a flexible handle extending between said sockets and having an outwardly extending shoulder at one end engaging said socket shoulder and a second shoulder at the other end adapted to be engaged by said adjusting member.
6. A well pipe elevator link comprising a link body; a pair of longitudinally spaced handle sockets on said body, one of said sockets having a longitudinal bore and the other socket having an annular shoulder; a flexible handle having an abutment at each end thereof, one of said abutments being adapted tosengage said shoulder; and an adjusting member rotatably mounted on said handle and having a shoulder thereon engageable with the other of said handle abutments, said adjusting member being adapted to be adjustably mounted in the bore of said firstnamed socket.
HERBERT E. GRAU.
US296429A 1939-09-25 1939-09-25 Elevator link and handle Expired - Lifetime US2242783A (en)

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2738998A (en) * 1952-11-13 1956-03-20 Keleket X Ray Corp Cable attaching device
US3461666A (en) * 1967-10-17 1969-08-19 Byron Jackson Inc Elevator link and process of making the same
US6170248B1 (en) 1999-01-13 2001-01-09 Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc. Dog bone chain link
US20040083708A1 (en) * 2002-11-05 2004-05-06 Vito Robert A. Security chain
US20070062688A1 (en) * 2005-09-20 2007-03-22 Mike Schats Support link for wellbore apparatus
US20070062705A1 (en) * 2005-09-20 2007-03-22 Mike Schats Wellbore rig elevator systems
US20080135230A1 (en) * 2006-12-06 2008-06-12 Wells Lawrence E Dual-saddle ear support apparatus
US20090000780A1 (en) * 2007-06-27 2009-01-01 Wells Lawrence E Top drive systems with reverse bend bails
CN102305036A (en) * 2011-08-12 2012-01-04 中国石油化工股份有限公司 Safety protection handle of hoisting ring
USD768471S1 (en) 2015-05-13 2016-10-11 Alpha Dog Oilfield Tools Bail extender
US9556690B1 (en) 2015-05-13 2017-01-31 Alpha Dog Oilfield Tools Elevator link extension systems
US10479644B2 (en) * 2017-08-03 2019-11-19 Forum Us, Inc. Elevator system and method with elevator link having integrated control lines

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2738998A (en) * 1952-11-13 1956-03-20 Keleket X Ray Corp Cable attaching device
US3461666A (en) * 1967-10-17 1969-08-19 Byron Jackson Inc Elevator link and process of making the same
US6170248B1 (en) 1999-01-13 2001-01-09 Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc. Dog bone chain link
US20040083708A1 (en) * 2002-11-05 2004-05-06 Vito Robert A. Security chain
US6895738B2 (en) 2002-11-05 2005-05-24 Robert A. Vito Security chain
US7303021B2 (en) 2005-09-20 2007-12-04 Varco I/P, Inc. Wellbore rig elevator systems
US20070062688A1 (en) * 2005-09-20 2007-03-22 Mike Schats Support link for wellbore apparatus
US20070062705A1 (en) * 2005-09-20 2007-03-22 Mike Schats Wellbore rig elevator systems
WO2007034235A2 (en) * 2005-09-20 2007-03-29 Varco I/P, Inc. A link for supporting a wellbore apparatus and a method for handling pipe
WO2007034235A3 (en) * 2005-09-20 2007-05-18 Varco Int A link for supporting a wellbore apparatus and a method for handling pipe
US20080135230A1 (en) * 2006-12-06 2008-06-12 Wells Lawrence E Dual-saddle ear support apparatus
US20090000780A1 (en) * 2007-06-27 2009-01-01 Wells Lawrence E Top drive systems with reverse bend bails
US7784535B2 (en) 2007-06-27 2010-08-31 Varco I/P, Inc. Top drive systems with reverse bend bails
CN102305036A (en) * 2011-08-12 2012-01-04 中国石油化工股份有限公司 Safety protection handle of hoisting ring
USD768471S1 (en) 2015-05-13 2016-10-11 Alpha Dog Oilfield Tools Bail extender
US9556690B1 (en) 2015-05-13 2017-01-31 Alpha Dog Oilfield Tools Elevator link extension systems
US10479644B2 (en) * 2017-08-03 2019-11-19 Forum Us, Inc. Elevator system and method with elevator link having integrated control lines

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